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today's leftovers

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  • Gaming for Linux, Raspberry Pi, and open source: Top reads of the year

    It's been a good year for gaming and Linux. For one thing, it's become much easier to play proprietary games on Linux in recent years, but open source gaming has also seen many advances, thanks in part to a retro gaming renaissance. If you are a gamer and an open source advocate, Opensource.com's top 11 gaming articles of 2018 (listed below) will help you enjoy your games and support open source at the same time.

    If fun is your goal, you might want to start with our six-part series that looked at some of the best, most polished open source games in various genres. It covered 30 games, so there is plenty of variety. We also published two great articles about retro gaming on a Raspberry Pi. One explores five different ways to use a Raspberry Pi to play retro games, and the other explains how to set up RetroPie on Raspberry Pi for retro gaming.

  • Bluestar Linux 4.19.11 Run Through

    In this video, we look at Bluestar Linux 4.19.11. Enjoy!

  • Fedora Rawhide Users Can Now Test The Experimental Zchunk Metadata Support

    Zchunk is the file format announced earlier this year for delivering good compression while being delta-friendly and based upon Zsync and Casync while compression handling is done by Zstandard. 

    There was a plan to switch to Zchunk for repository metadata with Fedora 29, but that didn't pan out in time. Now the plan is to make the repo metadata switch for Fedora 30 and now it can be tested with Fedora Rawhide.

  • Best of 2018: 5 Open Source SIEM Tools Worth Checking Out

    Security information and event management (SIEM) is the cornerstone of IT security. All other network solutions are merely data flows that feed into an organization’s SIEM. Not all SIEMs are created equal, and their capabilities can vary wildly. Choosing the right one for your needs can mean the difference between detecting a security weakness and becoming just another statistic.
     
    A SIEM solution is a combination of a security event management (SEM) system and a security information management (SIM) system. SEMs monitor servers and networks in real time, while SIMs store the data.

  • Europe Speeds Ahead on Open Access: 2018 in Review

    Open access is the common-sense idea that scientific research (especially scientific research funded by the government or philanthropic foundations) should be available to the public—ideally with no legal or technical barriers to access and reuse. EFF is a longtime supporter of the open access movement: we think that promoting broad access to knowledge and information helps to ensure that everyone can speak out and participate in society.

    For over five years now, EFF and our allies in the open access world have been campaigning for the Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR, S. 1701, H.R. 3427). Despite broad support from both parties and barely any opposition from anyone besides major publishers, Congress continues to snooze on FASTR year after year.

    While Congress dragged its feet on important legislative fixes, the most exciting changes came in Europe and at the state level.

    This year, though, something changed. Europe soared ahead of the United States with the Plan S initiative, a plan to require government-funded research to be made available to the public on the date of publication by the year 2020. Thirteen government agencies that fund research have endorsed Plan S, as well as a few foundations.

BSD Now, GNU World Order and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • My System76 Galago Pro, Six Months Later
  • Linux Action News 85

    It’s been a huge year for Linux and FOSS news, and we take a look at some of the major stories that shaped the industry over the last 12 months.

    Acquisitions, solid releases, a revolution for gaming, politics in the kernel community, Chrome OS coming of age, and more.

  • Elive 3.0.3 Screenshot Tour
  • Hideki Yamane: debootstrap: speed up

    I've put new debootstrap version 1.0.112 into unstable today, it gets more speed than the previous one. Kudos to Thomas Lange for the hack.

  • Debug and run the python code online

    Hello and welcome to another python article, we are going to get some rest for a few days before starting a few examples again for another new python module. In these few days time, we will look at a few useful online programming websites that we can join to improve our python skill. In this article, we will visit OnlineGDB, an online python IDE which allows us to create a python project, saves our work and then embeds our programming code on our own website. Below is a new python generator demo project which I have created on the above-mentioned website, as you can see I have embedded the project on this article with the share feature of OnlineGDB! Click on the run button below this entire python script to see the outcome.

  • Only Idiots Start Their Day at 4 a.m. by Choice

    But you know who doesn't get up at 4 a.m.? Linus Torvalds, who (in addition to being a nite owl) created Linux, the operating system that runs most of the servers on the Internet and also has the same core (Unix) as MacOS.

  • Russian hacker who once tormented state officials says he's starting his own cybersecurity consultancy

    Vladimir Anikeev, the former leader of the hacktivist group “Anonymous International” (better known in Russia as “Shaltai Boltai” or “Humpty Dumpty”), has announced that he will form his own cybersecurity consultancy. He told the magazine RBC that he’s even considering keeping the “Shaltai Boltai / Anonymous International” brand name.

    Anikeev went free from prison in August 2018 after serving two years for the felony crime of unauthorized data access. He spent less than two years behind bars thanks to Russia's new incarceration rules that weigh days spent in pretrial detention as 1.5 days in a standard prison.

  • Create a Backdoor with Cryptcat
  • Max Planck Society Ends Elsevier Subscription

     

    This move by MPS follows the cancelation of Elsevier subscriptions by nearly 200 German universities and research institutions in the last two years, alongside similar cancellations in Sweden. And it’s in line with Plan S, a requirement by a coalition of research funders, now numbering 13 in Europe and in the US, requiring that starting in 2020, researchers receiving funds from the organizations make their publications open-access, as The Scientist reports. After losing access to journals this July, universities in Germany in Sweden have relied on other means for accessing articles, such as inter-library loan and emailing study authors directly.

today's leftovers

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  • Newaita Icon Theme – A Combination Of Old Style And Color Of Material Design Icon Theme

    Newaita icons is one of the latest icon theme that is very famous and talked about by so many users because it’s combination of old style and ultra modern look.

    It’s completely new and it’s not based on any other icon theme. This is material design icon theme category.

    It comes with two variants like light and dark.

    It looks good, flat, classic and ultra modern icon theme that makes your desktop more beautiful.

    Many users are raising a request to developer to add missing icons, he is immediately responding and adding those missing icons in high priority.

    This icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others.

  • December 2018 report: archiving Brazil, calendar and LTS

    Keen readers probably noticed that I didn't produce a report in November. I am not sure why, but I couldn't find the time to do so. When looking back at those past two months, I didn't find that many individual projects I worked on, but there were massive ones, of the scale of archiving the entire government of Brazil or learning the intricacies of print media, both of which were slightly or largely beyond my existing skill set.

  • Debian is back in the Mastodon/GNU Social fediverse, follow fosstodon.org/@debian

    The GNU Social instance where the @debian account was hosted (quitter.se) shut down last May. Thanks to the Quitter.se admins for all this time!

    Long overdue, I’ve setup the @debian account with the feed of micronews.debian.org in other place (I still cannot selfhost properly, due to time constraints mostly). This time I chose a Mastodon instance, fosstodon.org. Thanks to the Fosstodon admins for hosting, and Carl Chenet for feet2toot.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Tableview performance

    In my previous blog post, I wrote about the new TableView for Qt-5.12. What I didn’t mention was how the new TableView performs compared to the old TableView in QtQuick Controls 1. However, the old version had some serious performance issues, which is what led us to implement a new one from scratch. The reason for the bad performance comes from the fact that it’s written on top of ListView. But ListView is designed and optimized to show only one column, which of course is problematic when you try to use it to show a table with multiple columns.

    To work around this limitation, the old TableView implements a little hack: it takes each column delegate and puts them side-by-side to create one fat row delegate. From ListViews point of view, it looks like a normal list delegate. The result is that whenever a new row is flicked in, all the items inside that delegate (which is one item for each column) will be instantiated in one go. Although this is not a disaster for a table with only a handfull of columns, performance takes a major hit when a table is of a non-trivial size. And to be fair, the old TableView was never designed to handle anything else. But for tables where you have, lets say, hundred columns or more, you will create hundred new items for each row flicked in. And most of them ends up hidden outside the viewport. And that is actually the best case; a delegate is normally composed of many items, so the item count will be even higher. The video underneath shows how scrolling can grind to a halt when using a model with only thirty columns.

  • QmlBook gets CI/CD

    Christmas is coming and a long and exciting fall is coming to and end. One of my projects during this fall has been to update the QmlBook. This was made possible by The Qt Company who generously stepped in and sponsored my work on this – thank you all!

    I’ve worked away during the fall adding a whole bunch of new contents and the documentation people over at The Qt Company has joined in and helped with a language review. One frustrating aspect of the QmlBook project has unfortunately been that the CI/CD system has been broken for a very long time. This means that even the small typo fixes made over the past months has not made it beyond the source git repository.

  • GUADEC 2018 - Product Management In Open Source

    This year at GUADEC in Almería I was lucky enough to give a talk entitled “Product Management in Open Source”. I’ll give a text synopsis of the talk below but if you prefer you can watch the whole thing as delivered at the Internet Archive or have a look at the slides, which are entirely mysterious when viewed alone:

    The talk begins like so: I’m Nick Richards. I’ve been a GNOME User for 20 years and a contributor and Foundation Member - 10 years (off and on). These days, the Free Software project I’m most passionate about is Flathub.

    These days I’m a Product Manager at Endless. Endless OS ships a customised, forked version of GNOME shell and a plain version of the rest of the GNOME platform. It’s currently based on 3.26 but with plenty of activity going on upstream.

  • Archman 2018.12 JWM Screenshot Tour
  • ArchLabs Linux 2018.12.17 overview

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of ArchLabs Linux 2018.12.17 and some of the applications pre-installed.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • DPDK — One API to Rule Them All?

    The Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) Summit 2018 was held at the Club Auto Sport in San Jose, California, last week, a unique and appropriate location given that DPDK is the engine that powers many NFV platforms today, including auto-focused platforms. As presenters shared the latest research and developments with DPDK in an automobile-themed environment, it was clear that the DPDK initiative’s scope is expanding beyond its original Intel roots. While Intel still has an outsized role within the project, DPDK’s home at the Linux Foundation lends more credibility to its outreach efforts.

  • Antergos 18.12 Installation and Distribution Overview
  • MX-18 Release Candidate 1 available for testing

    The latest updates from debian 9.6 (stretch), antiX and MX repos.

    GIMP 2.10 (with plugins)
    MESA 18.2.6
    updated firmware
    4.19.5 kernel (with blk-mq file system corruption patch)
    Updated packages (sample)
    Browser: Firefox 64.0
    Video Player: VLC 3.0.3
    Music Manager/Player: Clementine 1.3.1
    Email client: Thunderbird 52.9.1
    Office suite: LibreOffice 6.0.1
    Some Xfce components updated (Xfce-settings, Thunar, etc...)

  • Slackware End of Year Updates

    MATE Developers are still working on next major update, MATE 1.22, but in the meantime, they are still pushing updates to the latest stable release: MATE 1.20. Several packages were getting fixes while others have received translations updates and they have been pushed to public for few days. I'm a little bit behind as i'm focusing on stabilizing Cinnamon packages and it seems they are now in stable states as LinuxMint 19.1 has been released. I can now focus on my MATE project again.

  • Unity8: a project that uses Mir

    Unity8 is a graphical shell targeting a range of devices and form factors including phones, tablets, laptops and desktops. Unity8 uses the facility to customize Mir’s default window management to give its “convergent” experience.

    In addition to the phones and tablets supported by Ubuntu Touch work is in progress to adapt Unity8 for use on PostmarketOS, Arch, Fedora, Debian in addition to Ubuntu.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 557
  • How To Install Microsoft .NET Core SDK On Linux [Ed: Microsoft does not reciprocate; it’s always about making GNU/Linux subservient to Microsoft.]
  • Vulkan 1.1.96 Released With Many Corrections & Clarifications

    Vulkan 1.1.96 is out this morning and while it doesn't introduce any new extensions, it does have a number of corrections and clarifications to this graphics/compute API's documentation.

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • On the first day of Christmas, Microsoft gave to me... an emergency out-of-band security patch for IE

    Microsoft today emitted an emergency security patch for a flaw in Internet Explorer that hackers are exploiting in the wild to hijack computers.

    The vulnerability, CVE-2018-8653, is a remote-code execution hole in the browser's scripting engine.

    Visiting a malicious website abusing this bug with a vulnerable version of IE is enough to be potentially infected by spyware, ransomware or some other software nasty. Thus, check Microsoft Update and install any available patches as soon as you can.

    Any injected code will run with the privileges of the logged-in user, which is why browsing the web using Internet Explorer as an administrator is like scratching an itch with a loaded gun.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Microsoft flings untested Windows 10 updates to users! (Oh no it doesn't!)

    Roundup As Microsoft's Xmas elves toiled long into the night on Santa's Windows 10 upgrade, the software giant found time to unleash static Azure websites and an unfortunately worded blog in this week's Microsoft round-up.

    Windows Update – a special Insider Ring of its own? (oh no isn’t)
    Sometimes it is hard not to feel sorry for Microsoft, as Windows corporate veep Michael Fortin kicked off a self-inflicted storm over the quality of Windows 10 updates.

    Certainly, it has been a bad year for Windows 10, with a major release accidentally deleting files, and smaller patches leaving Microsoft’s premium devices in a poorly state. Fortin, therefore, wanted to explain that the software giant really did care about quality and reiterated how it all works.

    As most right-minded Reg readers know, Microsoft emits "B" releases (aka Patch Tuesday) on the second Tuesday of each month. These bad boys are the ones the gang at Redmond really want you to install and contain security patches mixed into the fun.

  • Top 10 Best Chromebooks – December 2018 - Android Headlines

    December and its holiday seasons are here but Chrome OS news has been somewhat slow in terms of new devices for the month. A new 14-inch Acer Chromebook 514 is on the way in the budget segment starting at $349 with moderate specs, having finally received its own landing page on the company’s site. However, despite being unveiled at IFA 2018 in August, that’s not quite ready for purchase yet. Aside from that device, the only news on the Chrome OS front has centered around at least one more LTE-enabled Chromebook made by CTL on the Sprint network and rather disappointing initial scores for the first, as-yet-unreleased Snapdragon reference board. Google’s Pixel Slate has landed on our top ten list after beginning to ship this month, knocking one other device from the ranking but for a high cost compared to other Chromebooks with comparable specs.

  • Industry Momentum for Automotive Grade Linux Continues to Grow with Five New Members

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for in-vehicle technology, has announced that BearingPoint, BedRock Systems, Big Lake Software, Cognomotiv, and Dellfer have joined AGL and the Linux Foundation.

    “This has been an exciting year for AGL as open source software continues to gain momentum in the automotive industry,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “We’ve seen rapid growth in both our membership numbers and in the number of new AGL-based products and services coming to market. We look forward to working with our new members as we continue to expand the features and functionalities of the AGL platform.”

  • Dropbox To End Sync Support For All Filesystems Except Ext4 on Linux

    I am only using btrfs for the last few years, without any problem. Drobox’s decision is based on supporting Extended file attributes and even so btrfs supports extended attributes, seems you will get this error:

  • Insync: The Hassleless Way of Using Google Drive on Linux

    Using Google Drive on Linux is a pain and you probably already know that. There is no official desktop client of Google Drive for Linux. It’s been more than six years since Google promised Google Drive on Linux but it doesn’t seem to be happening.

  • Endless OS 3.5.3 Run Through
  • MX Linux 18 RC1 Run Through

    In this video, we look at MX Linux 18 RC1, and it looks great! Enjoy!

  • ArchLabs 2018.12

    It’s December. Almost the end to another year. Most of us will be preparing for the holidays and family time.

    Christmas is just around the corner and so is the New Year and with that Nate, the Team and I are happy to present the ArchLabs 2018.12 release. It has been almost six months since our latest release and this one brings a different approach.

  • Purism Introduces "It's a Secure Life" Bundle Sale, Wave Computing Open-Sourcing MIPS, Red Hat Announces Long-Term Commercial Support for OpenJDK on Microsoft Windows, ArchLabs 2018.12 Now Available and RawTherapee 5.5 Released

    Jupiter Hell is a roguelike I'm following with great excitement, it's serving a the spiritual successor to DRL (previously DoomRL, now called DRL since ZeniMax flexed their legal muscles) and it's looking good.

    After a rather successful Kickstarter, where they managed to get over £70K in funding it's coming along rather nicely.

  • [Debian] RC bugs 2018/49-50

    as mentioned in my last blog post, I attended the Bug Squashing Party in bern two weeks ago. I think alltogether we were quite productive, as seen on the list of usertagged bugs. – here's my personal list of release-critical bugs that I touched at the BSP or afterwards...

  • Linux-friendly Coffee Lake signage player supports new OPS+ spec

    Axiomtek’s “OPS700-520” signage player complies with the OPS Plus spec, which adds a second high-speed combo connector. The compact, Intel 8th Gen based player supports Intel AMT 11.0 and Intel Unite.

    The OPS700-520 is the first Coffee Lake based signage system we’ve seen, as well as the first to offer Intel OPS Plus (or OPS+) compliance. Designed for multi-display applications such as interactive whiteboards (IWBs), digital signage, and video walls, the system is “among one of the most advanced and powerful digital signage players in the market,” claims Axiomtek.

  • Event Report: g0v Summit 2018 — Taipei

    Gov zero summit is a decentralized, grass-roots civic tech community based in Taiwan. Built on the spirits of open source and activism, g0v aims to use technology in the interest of the public good, advocate information transparency and build tech solutions to promote civic engagement. I was lucky my talk got selected and got an opportunity to speak at the event.

  • BBN challenge resolution: Getting the flag from a browser extension

    My so far last BugBountyNotes challenge is called Can you get the flag from this browser extension?. Unlike the previous one, this isn’t about exploiting logical errors but the more straightforward Remote Code Execution. The goal is running your code in the context of the extension’s background page in order to extract the flag variable stored there.

    If you haven’t looked at this challenge yet, feel free to stop reading at this point and go try it out. Mind you, this one is hard and only two people managed to solve it so far. Note also that I won’t look at any answers submitted at this point any more. Of course, you can also participate in any of the ongoing challenges as well.

  • MIPS Processor ISA To Be Open-Sourced In 2019

    Months after MIPS Technologies was acquired by Wave Computing, the company announced it's working on open-sourcing the MIPS processor instruction set architecture.

    The MIPS ISA will be open-sourced with both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions opening up and will be free of any licensing or royalty fees as well as access to existing MIPS patents.

Leftovers: Linux in the Ham Shack and Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

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  • LHS Episode #264: The Weekender XXI

    Welcome to the 21st Weekender episode of Linux in the Ham Shack. This time around, we talk about the few contests and special event stations that are around for December. We also touch on Linux distros to try, things to do in the amateur radio and open source world and then we dive straight into hedonism, discussing good food, good music and good spirits. Thank you for listening and Happy Holidays.

  • The Golden Age of the iPhone Is Ending

    Apple’s premier gadget faces a less certain future than ever as the market shifts under its feet.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Get notifications for your patches

    We are trialing out a new feature that can send you a notification when the patches you send to the LKML are applied to linux-next or to the mainline git trees.

  • A simple blank makes the difference

    OFX is the Open Financial eXchange protocol used by various financial institutions in a few countries. KMyMoney provides an OFX client implementation using the open source LibOFX library allowing users to import transactions directly from the bank’s server without using the detour through a web-browser and a downloaded file into the ledger of the application.

  • Fractal December'18 Hackfest (part 1)

    The Tuesday 11th started the second Fractal Hackfest. I've organized this hackfest in Seville, the city where I studied computer science and here I've a lot of friends in the University so is a good place to do it here.

    The weather was important too for the hackfest selection, in December Seville is a good choice because the weather is not too cold, we're having sunny days.

    The first day was a good day, thinking about some relevant issues and planning what we want to do. We talked about the work needed for the interface split, about the E2EE support, new features and the need for a new release.

    We're having some problems with the internet connection, because the University has a restricted network policy and we ask for the guess internet connection the Monday, but we're still waiting.

  • Unexpected fallout from /usr merge in Debian

    Back in 2011, Harald Hoyer and Kay Sievers came up with a proposal for Fedora to merge much of the operating system into /usr; former top-level directories, /bin, /lib, and /sbin, would then become symbolic links pointing into the corresponding subdirectories of /usr. Left out of the merge would be things like configuration files in /etc, data in /var, and user home directories. This change was aimed at features like atomic upgrades and easy snapshots. The switch to a merged /usr was successful for Fedora 17; many other distributions (Arch, OpenSUSE, Mageia, just to name a few) have followed suit. More recently, Debian has been working toward a merged /usr, but it ran into some surprising problems that are unique to the distribution.

    Debian and its derivatives are definitely late to the /usr merge party. Systems running Debian testing that were initially installed before June 2018 still have /bin, /sbin, and /lib as normal directories, not as symbolic links. The same applies to Ubuntu 18.10. But both Debian and Ubuntu want to make the switch to a merged /usr. Debian tried, but it hit something completely unexpected.

    The Debian /usr merge history started in 2016, when Marco d'Itri got the usrmerge package into Debian unstable. This package contains a Perl script that converts an existing system into the state with a merged /usr. Also, a change was made to the debootstrap program (which installs a Debian system into a chroot), so that it could create the needed symbolic links by itself before installing any packages. The end result is the same in both cases.

    [...]

    The Debian package sed also has /bin/sed, not /usr/bin/sed. In the bug report, the problem is treated like a one-off issue, to be solved by a rebuild. However, on the debian-devel mailing list, Ian Jackson quickly pointed out that the problem is, in fact, due to /usr merge on the build daemons. He suggested that the change should be reverted. Dirk Eddelbuettel seconded that suggestion, and noted that he expects "much more breakage to follow". Indeed, similar problems were triggered in sympow, pari, and monitoring-plugins. Other bugs of this nature can be found by searching the Debian bug tracking system for a special tag (but this search also finds other kinds of issues).

    [...]

    The discussion is still in progress, though; no consensus has been reached. A bug was filed against debootstrap by Jackson to revert the change to merge by default for the next release of Debian. Due to the disagreement of the debootstrap maintainer to the proposed change, Jackson reassigned the bug to the Debian Technical Committee, which is the ultimate authority for resolving otherwise unresolvable technical disputes within Debian. There is also a request from the Debian backports FTP master that the default should be the same in Debian stable backports and in Debian testing. Emilio Pozuelo Monfort, a member of the release team, also spoke in favor of reverting to non-merged /usr in new installations.

    It is impossible to predict now how the Technical Committee will rule. In the worst case for /usr-merge proponents, proper introduction of a merged /usr into Debian may be delayed by a few more years. But, if it votes for keeping the status quo, new end-user systems in the next stable release of Debian will have merged /usr, old but upgraded ones won't, and the build daemons will reliably build packages suitable for both cases, just like what's planned for Ubuntu 19.04. No flag day is needed in this scenario, so it would follow the best Debian traditions of not forcing transitions onto users.

  • Compiz: Ubuntu Desktop's little known best friend

    The best part is that it takes no time at all to get up and running! I’ll show you how to transform Ubuntu into a desktop that is functionally similar to Mac.
     

  • How to use TOAD The Open Source Android Deodexer

    Deodexing Android can be a time-consuming process which involves pulling /system files from your Android device, deodexing them using PC tools, and installing them back on your phone. Not to mention that whenever Google releases a new Android version, the process for deodexing ROMs alters – which means tools for deodexing need to play catchup. Many deodexing tools have become defunct due to lack of update from the developers.

    A new tool called TOAD (The Open Source Android Deodexer) has been released, which aims to not only be incredibly easy, its open-source nature allows the development community to keep it updated with the latest deodexing methods. TOAD utilizes batch files for processing odexed files, so new batch files can easily be added or modified by the development community.

  • Linux group plans show and tell

    The Linux Users’ Group of Davis presents Open Source Computing “Show and Tell” event, an informal open night to talk about and demonstrate programs, computer projects or tricks and tips.

    Feel free to bring something to show or tell for 10 minutes, from a Raspberry Pi project to tools or utilities that you find handy. Everyone is welcome to join in the fun, whether you’re a hobbyist, coder, enthusiast or sysadmin.

  • Windows 10 tip: Run Ubuntu Linux in an enhanced Hyper-V session [Ed: When Microsoft's Ad Bot (Ad Bought?) covers Ubuntu it's about putting it as a slave of Vista 10, complete with back doors]
  • ​MS-Linux? Lindows? Could Microsoft release a desktop Linux? [Ed: It’s like CBS wants to just hire pro-Microsoft slants; propaganda and clickbait.]
  • How Facebook Made a Universal Open Source Language for the Web

    THE CODE THAT runs the web is a melting pot of programming languages and technologies. JavaScript, the most popular language on the web, is the standard for writing code that runs in your browser. But the server side is much more diverse. Java (no relationship to JavaScript) remains popular, as do PHP, Python, and Ruby. Mobile app developers, meanwhile, have their own preferred languages, like Kotlin for writing Android apps or Apple's Swift for iOS.

  • C Programming Tutorial Part 2 - Preprocessors

    In the first part of our ongoing C programming tutorial series, we briefly touched on the preprocessing stage. In this tutorial, we will discuss it in a little more detail so that you have a basic idea about it before learning other C programming aspects.

  • Microsoft patches 'dangerous' zero-day already being exploited by [cracking] groups

    This vulnerability in kernel image ntoskrnl.exe was reported to Microsoft on 29 October by security vendor Kasperky Lab. Listed as CVE-2018-8611 and classified as 'important', it is a local privilege escalation bug. Kaspersky Lab researchers say it has already been exploited by [cracking] groups FruityArmor and SandCat.

  • Security updates for Thursday
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More in Tux Machines

Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers and SUSE Servers

  • The Rise of Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers
    While most instances of Kubernetes today are deployed on virtual machines running in the cloud or on-premises, there is a growing number of instances of Kubernetes being deployed on bare-metal servers. The two primary reasons for opting to deploy Kubernetes on a bare- metal server over a virtual machine usually are performance and reliance on hardware accelerators. In the first instance, an application deployed at the network edge might be too latency-sensitive to tolerate the overhead created by a virtual machine. AT&T, for example, is working with Mirantis to deploy Kubernetes on bare-metal servers to drive 5G wireless networking services.
  • If companies can run SAP on Linux, they can run any application on it: Ronald de Jong
    "We have had multiple situations with respect to security breaches in the last couple of years, albeit all the open source companies worked together to address the instances. As the source code is freely available even if something goes wrong, SUSE work closely with open source software vendors to mitigate the risk", Ronald de Jong, President of -Sales, SUSE said in an interview with ET CIO.
  • SUSE Public Cloud Image Life-cycle
    It has been a while since we published the original image life-cycle guidelines SUSE Image Life Cycle for Public Cloud Deployments. Much has been learned since, technology has progressed, and the life-cycle of products has changed. Therefore, it is time to refresh things, update our guidance, and clarify items that have led to questions over the years. This new document serves as the guideline going forward starting February 15th, 2019 and supersedes the original guideline. Any images with a date stamp later than v20190215 fall under the new guideline. The same basic principal as in the original guideline applies, the image life-cycle is aligned with the product life-cycle of the product in the image. Meaning a SLES image generally aligns with the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server life-cycle and a SUSE Manager image generally aligns with the SUSE Manager life-cycle.

Steam's Slipping Grip and Release of Wine-Staging 4.2

  • Steam's iron grip on PC gaming is probably over even if the Epic Games Store fails
     

    It doesn’t matter though. Whether Epic succeeds or not, Steam has already lost. The days of Valve’s de facto monopoly are over, and all that matters is what comes next.

  • Wine-Staging 4.2 Released - Now Less Than 800 Patches Atop Upstream Wine
    Wine 4.2 debuted on Friday and now the latest Wine-Staging release is available that continues carrying hundreds of extra patches re-based atop upstream Wine to provide various experimental/testing fixes and other feature additions not yet ready for mainline Wine.  Wine-Staging for a while has been carrying above 800 patches and at times even above 900, but with Wine-Staging 4.2 they have now managed to strike below the 800 patch level. It's not that they are dropping patches, but a lot of the Wine-Staging work has now been deemed ready for mainline and thus merged to the upstream code-base. A number of patches around the Windows Codecs, NTDLL, BCrypt, WineD3D, and other patches have been mainlined thus now coming in at a 798 patch delta.

OSS Leftovers

  • Tomorrow is Good: #Freethemodels: we need open source energy models
    The transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy is arguably the biggest operation in human history. But it’s increasingly based on secret models with a bad track record. That has to change! For me, this journey started in 2007 (Dutch link). I was doing some research in my spare time and it struck me that solar, wind and electric vehicles were on course to become cheaper than fossil alternatives. What struck me even more, was that the predictions of ‘authoritative’ institutions like the International Energy Agency and the Energy Information Administration seemed to ignore this development. At first, it seemed unrelated to my work in computers, the Internet and mobile phones. Then I realized the similarity: I had been ‘fighting’ with ‘trusted experts’ in Telecom for the past 15 years. They had been denying the future of PCs, the Internet and mobile phones all through my career. The lesson I take from this: experts of the old cannot fathom the new.
  • Google open-sources PlaNet, an AI agent that learns about the world from images
    Reinforcement learning — a machine learning training technique that uses rewards to drive AI agents toward certain goals — is a reliable means of improving said agents’ decision-making, given plenty of compute, data, and time. But it’s not always practical; model-free approaches, which aim to get agents to directly predict actions from observations about their world, can take weeks of training. Model-based reinforcement learning is a viable alternative — it has agents come up with a general model of their environment they can use to plan ahead. But in order to accurately forecast actions in unfamiliar surroundings, those agents have to formulate rules from experience. Toward that end, Google in collaboration with DeepMind today introduced the Deep Planning Network (PlaNet) agent, which learns a world model from image inputs and leverages it for planning. It’s able to solve a variety of image-based tasks with up to 5,000 percent the data efficiency, Google says, while maintaining competitiveness with advanced model-free agents.
  • eLife invests in Texture to provide open-source content production tools for publishers
    Originally created by Substance Software GmbH (Substance) as a JavaScript library of tools for web-based content editing, Texture has been supported by a community of organisations collectively known as the Substance Consortium and including Érudit, the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) and SciELO. eLife has now invested in Texture's development to support its own open-source publishing platform, but - as with the organisation's other open-source projects - any new features will be added to the tool in such a way that they can be repurposed by other publishers.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Principled GraphQL
    GraphQL is quickly becoming the preferred approach for working with APIs. It is a query language for APIs, and is designed to give users more insight and understanding into the data inside their APIs. According to GraphQL platform provider Apollo, it’s also so much more than a query language. “It’s a comprehensive solution to the problem of connecting modern apps to services in the cloud. As such, it forms the basis for a new and important layer in the modern application development stack: the data graph. This new layer brings all of a company’s app data and services together in one place, with one consistent, secure, and easy-to-use interface, so that anyone can draw upon it with minimal friction,” the company wrote.
  • Open source your automation testing for the mobile web with OpenTest
    Testing is a crucial part of the development cycle. How else will we find out if that cool new idea actually works in practice? Entering a crowded field, OpenTest offers developers a new tool for standardizing functional tests across a wide variety of platforms and teams. OpenTest is an open source functional test automation tool for web applications, mobile apps and APIs. With a wide variety of features and a focus on mainstream testing practices, OpenTest gives developers a spectacular foundation to evaluate their applications for the mobile web. What’s more, it is an easy to use tool for beginners as well as experts.
  • Facebook Open-Sources PyText NLP Modeling Framework
    Facebook AI Research is open-sourcing PyText, a natural-language-processing (NLP) modeling framework that is used in the Portal video-calling device and M Suggestions in Facebook Messenger. NLP is a technology for parsing and handling human languages and is a key component of chatbot or smart-assistant applications. Engineers developing NLP algorithms often turn to deep-learning systems to build their solutions, such as Facebook's PyTorch platform. PyText builds on top of PyTorch by providing a set of interfaces and models specifically tuned for NLP. Internally, Facebook is using PyText to power NLP in their Portal video-calling device and in their Messenger app's M Suggestion feature.
  • Fasttoken Is Making Its Codes Open Source
    One of the most common problems facing the Ethereum blockchain is scaling. While Ethereum has seen its fair share of proposed scaling solutions, state channels appear to be the best solution so far. State channels are a form of block communication that occurs outside of the blockchain and can be used to support greater scalability. And that’s not in the distant future – state channels are already available.
  • Novel Software May Help Detect Heart Diseases: Study
    Researchers have developed a new software that could spot potentially lethal heart diseases and may lead to improvements in prevention and treatment, says a new study. The software - ElectroMap - which measures electrical activity in the organ, is a new open-source software for processing, analysis and mapping complex cardiac data.
  • This new software reads cardiac data, can predict risk of heart disease
    The ElectroMap software is an open-source software for processing, analysis and mapping complex cardiac data, said experts at the University of Birmingham Dubai.  The heart's pumping ability is controlled by electrical activity that triggers the heart muscle cells to contract and relax.  In certain heart diseases such as arrhythmia, the organ's electrical activity is affected.  Cardiac researchers can already record and analyse the heart's electrical behaviour using optical and electrode mapping, but widespread use of these technologies is limited by a lack of appropriate software, according to the study published in the journal Scientific Reports.
  • Gadgetbridge is an open-source replacement for the Android app of Pebble, Mi Band, Amazfit, and other smart bands
    Purchasing a Smart Band or a smart wrist-based fitness tracker means that you not only purchase a product, but you also purchase yourself into an ecosystem of services controlled by the manufacturer. The functionality that is present on your smart band flows to you through the manufacturer, meaning that your data always goes through one extra pair of hands than is required. For most smart bands, you have to create an account with the manufacturer and continue tracking your activity and data through the manufacturer’s app — something that may not appeal to everyone in this privacy-conscious world. Enter Gadgetbridge, an open-source app that focuses on removing the manufacturer out of the equation.
  • The Pros and Cons of Open Source Cloud Computing
    Open source software is becoming increasingly more common in the technology world. True to its name, the underlying base of open source software is available for its users to study and tinker with. As such, dedicated userbases for open source technology have propped up to provide resources, updates, and technical help for open source programs.
  • You Can Now Use Open-Source Machine Learning Tools In Your Ableton Sessions
    Despite having become buzzwords in music technology over the last few years, it has often felt like “artificial intelligence” and “machine learning” were experiments taking place in secluded computer labs or only with established musicians. The tools that promised to revolutionize the way we make music never seemed to trickle down to the “we” of your regular bedroom producer. Magenta Studio might be set to change all that. Developed by the Google AI team and first showed at Ableton Loop in Los Angeles last year, Magenta is now available standalone and on Ableton (both Mac and Windows), giving you the chance to experiment with the powerful data analysis that machine learning provides.
  • 5 Open-source ML Tools You Can Use Without Coding
    As the demand for machine learning and artificial intelligence goes up, leading tech giants realised the need to give developers access to tools to build and deploy models. From the industrial perspective, there aren’t enough skilled programmers and data scientists within the industry to develop these systems. Tech giants are now open sourcing their platforms and developer tools to lower the barrier for entry in AI/ML. In this article, we list down 5 such tools that are making ML and AI accessible: Lobe:Lobe is an easy-to-use visual mechanism that lets users to build custom deep learning models, promptly train them, and ship them immediately in a user desired app without writing any code. Users can begin by dragging in a folder of training examples from there desktop. Lobe automatically builds its users a custom deep learning model and starts training. User can export the trained model and ship it directly in their app.
  • Healthcare Design Studio Publishes Open Source Health Finance Visualization
    “The Healthscape visualization serves two purposes. The first is to provide the public and professionals interested in the healthcare space a way to increase understanding and explore how all the pieces fit together. The second is to give providers, patient advocacy groups, health policymakers, and health economists a visual communication tool to discuss issues at the higher health systems level,” said Juhan Sonin, director of GoInvo.
  • HUAWEI's open source WATCH GT smartwatch is coming to America
    The company is hoping American consumers will also be interested in its wearables, as today, it reveals the previously announced HUAWEI WATCH GT is finally coming to America. While not the company's first smartwatch to hit the USA, it is definitely the most intriguing. It runs an open source operating system called LiteOS, and battery life can apparently reach two weeks. No, that is not a typo -- two weeks! It focuses heavily on health -- it can monitor fitness and sleep. Best of all, it is compatible with both iOS and Android, so it won't lock you into either platform.
  • Argonne’s Innovative Community Software Is on Weather Scientists’ Radar
    In 2015, the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART) made its open-source debut. After 4 years, and with contributions from 34 individual editors, it is now a staple in radar science. The toolkit helps scientists analyze radar data to improve models of the Earth’s systems; its growth illustrates the power of community software. Py-ART is an architecture for working with radar data in the Python programming language. It ingests data from a wide variety of atmospheric radars to produce visualizations that enable users to draw meaningful conclusions. Institutions across the world — including the National Weather Service, MeteoSwiss, IBM and the University of Illinois — use Py-ART to organize and analyze radar data. [...] Inspired by Py-ART’s success, scientists have launched the OpenRadar Partnership, an informal collaboration across Europe, Canada and the United States on open-source radar software education and inter-compatibility.
  • Furnace turns up heat on data streaming apps
  • Furnace – New, Serverless, Open Source Platform -- Lets Developers Create Advanced, Data-Intensive Apps In Hours, Not Months
  • Why Use Open Source to Gain More Visibility into Network Monitoring
  • 8 Free & Best Open source bare metal hypervisors (Foss)
  • Open Robotics turns its focus to ROS 2.0
    Open Robotics, previously known as the Open Source Robotics Foundation, is pouring its development efforts into rewriting the core of the Robot Operating System (ROS) 1.0 this year. ROS has been around since 2007, and while version 1.0 is already being used in a number of different applications and solutions, the robotics industry is changing and Open Robotics is determined to see that the technology changes with it. Despite its name, ROS is not exactly an operating system. It is a collection of software libraries and tools used to develop robot applications. According to Brian Gerkey, CEO of Open Robotics, when the organization first started working on ROS, many of the robotics solutions already available were in the form of traditional robot arms used in factories or in such things as floor-cleaning robots for consumers. “Since that time we’ve seen an explosion of products in other domains, especially mobile robots that do everything from transport goods, to provide facility security, to entertain. And of course we’ve seen the impossible to ignore trend of investment and advancement in autonomous vehicles,” he said. The ongoing evolution of the robotics industry, and the need for more advanced solutions, is what led Open Robotics to rethink the core system.
  • MITRE Announces Compass™, a New Open-Source Application to Collect Common Oncology Data
  • New geometric model improves predictions of fluid flow in rock
    "Relationships once thought to be inherently history-dependent can now be reconsidered based on rigorous geometric theory," McClure said. The team used the open source Lattice Boltzmann for Porous Media (LBPM) code, developed by McClure and named for the statistics-driven lattice Boltzmann method that calculates fluid flow across a range of scales more rapidly than calculations using finite methods, which are most accurate at small scales. The LBPM code, which uses Titan's GPUs to speed fluid flow simulations, is released through the Open Porous Media Initiative, which maintains open-source codes for the research community.
  • Over 16,000 bugs later, Google’s fuzz tester is now open source
    Here comes another tool open sourced by Google! This time, security and testing take the center stage. ClusterFuzz helps find bugs in your software so you can exterminate them with its scalable fuzzing infrastructure. Open sourced on February 7, 2019, this service focuses on stability and security. ClusterFuzz already has some impressive numbers to brag about. So far, it found over 16,000 bugs in Chrome, as well as over 11,000 bugs in open source projects integrated with OSS-Fuzz. If you use Chrome as your browser of choice, then you owe some of your experience to ClusterFuzz. Now you too can harness that power for good and keep your own projects secure and bug-free. As always, it is a great plus to all developers when a useful tool gets open sourced. Contributing to open source is becoming the new normal, with even large organizations getting on board. Hopefully FOSS will continue to grow and help break down silos.
  • Continuous Fuzzing for all? Google open sources ClusterFuzz bug hunter
    Google has open sourced ClusterFuzz, a scalable fuzzing infrastructure project that has already helped to get rid of more than 16,000 Chrome bugs. It is also the tool used for Google’s Oss-Fuzz initiative, which aims at helping maintainers of open source projects get their project as ready to deal with anything users throw at it as possible – an offer over 160 projects have accepted in the last two years. Fuzzing is a sort of testing approach which confronts a system with random inputs to help developers to find security flaws and unexpected behaviour.  ClusterFuzz has been written to offer fuzzing at scale and in a continuous manner, which is why Google claims to have it running on over 25,000 cores for Chrome. There it is integrated into the development workflow and provides users with a web interface for managing and viewing crashes caused during testing. To ensure no issue goes unnoticed, it also includes automatic bug filing and closing for the Monorail issue tracker.
  • Rubrik Launches Open Source Community Called Build
    Rubrik announced an open source community, Rubrik Build, which aims to simplify improvement of existing projects and ease creation of applications, automation tooling, and integrations. It’s based on a set of APIs providing pre-built use cases, quick-start guides, and integrations with popular tooling. A goal is inclusion. “Many people in the tech community do not come from a traditional software engineering background, and this can make contributing to open source seem daunting,” Rubrik Principal Technologist Rebecca Fitzhugh told SDxCentral. “The goal of Rubrik Build is to break down these barriers so anyone can contribute to a project.”
  • Rubrik just launched an open source community
    Rubrik just announced Rubrik Build, a new 100 percent public, 100 percent Open Source community built around use cases and integrations that consume Rubrik APIs. As part of Rubrik Build, contributors can leverage existing software development kits, tools, and use cases or contribute their own ideas, code, documentation, and feedback. The goal of Rubrik Build to establish a community around consuming Rubrik's world-class APIs to quickly get started with pre-built use cases, quick start guides, and integrations with popular tooling. The Build program was designed with customers in mind, easing their transition to consuming APIs.
  • A former Marine explains how her service helped prepare her to lead a new open source initiative for $3.3 billion startup Rubrik
     

    The idea, says Fitzhugh, is to encourage an open source ecosystem to flourish around Rubrik, though the company's main offering is not offered as open source.  

  • The Internet Was Built on the Free Labor of Open Source Developers. Is That Sustainable?
     

    In a recent interview with New Left Review, Stallman described how MIT’s AI lab fostered a culture of collaboration and radical openness to the point where the lab’s giant computer wasn’t protected with passwords and the doors to the lab were always unlocked. To be sure, Stallman acknowledged that some of this culture of openness was a product of circumstance: Minsky, for instance, was always losing his door keys and the researchers in the lab couldn’t help but share the room-sized computer because it was the only one. Nevertheless, the spirit of the lab made an impression on Stallman.  

    In 1983, he posted a message to a Usenet group—basically a proto-forum—in which he declared his intention to create an operating system and “give it away free to everyone who can use it.” Stallman called the operating system GNU, a recursive acronym for “Gnus Not Unix,” a challenge to the dominant proprietary OS of the time—Unix, which was used internally at Bell Labs—embedded in its very name.  

    GNU was the opening salvo in the free software movement, whose principles Stallman summarized in the 1985 GNU Manifesto: “I consider that the Golden Rule requires that if I like a program I must share it with other people who like it. Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way.”  

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  • Open-Source Biology and Biohacking Hack Chat
    Justin Atkin‘s name might not ring a bell, but you’ve probably seen his popular YouTube channel The Thought Emporium, devoted to regular doses of open source science. Justin’s interests span a wide range, literally from the heavens above to the microscopic world. His current interest is to genetically modify yeast to produce spider silk, and to perhaps even use the yeast for brewing beer. He and the Thought Emporium team have been busy building out a complete DIY biology lab to support the effort, and have been conducting a variety of test experiments along the way.

FOSS in Networking: O-RAN Alliance, AT&T, OMEC/ONF

  • The Telecoms.com Podcast: Europe, Huawei, O-RAN & Legere
    They move on, inevitably, to Huawei and its ongoing drama, before concluding with a look at the growing O-RAN Alliance and the unique qualities of T-Mobile US boss John Legere.
  • AT&T Building 5G Network on an Open Source Foundation
    "We made a big bet that open source was the right way to go," Ryan Van Wyk, AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) associate VP, network cloud software engineering, tells Light Reading. And that bet paid off handsomely, he says. AT&T last week described a substantial, multi-year project to build its 5G network on a cloud based on Kubernetes and OpenStack. The telco has implemented OpenStack on Kubernetes in more than 20 regions to date, with more to come. (See AT&T Inks '8-Figure' Kubernetes & OpenStack 5G Deal With Mirantis.)
  • AT&T signed an '8-digit' deal that isn't good news for VMware, Cisco, or Huawei — but could be great for Google Cloud
    AT&T is in the midst of an ambitious project called Airship that could have sweeping implications for the $350 billion telecom equipment industry. Late last week, AT&T signed an "8-figure," three-year deal with a company called Mirantis. According to Mirantis, the company will help AT&T build out and manage the infrastructure it needs for its 5G network. Airship means that if you want to build a cloud, specialized hardware and software from vendors like VMware, Cisco, Juniper, and Huawei are unnecessary, Mirantis' cofounder and chief marketing officer, Boris Renski, tells us.
  • ONF to address CSPs’ Core issues with new open source projects
    Taking at a look at OMEC first, the ONF envisages it as a high performance, scalable, open source mobile core platform. It is being established under the CORD project umbrella in collaboration with Sprint (there are plenty of “umbrellas” in the open source community, and let’s not forget that the ONF is a member of the Linux Foundation). CORD, incidentally, is an acronym for Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter – an ONF project that combines NFV and SDN with the elasticity of commodity clouds to bring datacenter economics and the traditional telco Central Office. The OMEC project is intended to become an open source production grade Evolved Packet Core (EPC). OMEC is being built using an NFV architecture that is optimised for Intel platforms and has reportedly already been tested for scale. It is 3GPP Release-13 compatible, features a DPDK-based data plane to support large subscriber numbers (hence the Intel connection), and provides full connectivity, billing and charging capabilities. It is also designed for lightweight and cost-effective deployments, including IoT and edge applications.
  • ONF and Sprint Launch Open Evolved Mobile Core (OMEC) Open Source Project
    ONF, the recognized leader driving transformation of the networking industry through collaborative development of open source platforms, today announced the launch of Open Mobile Evolved Core (OMEC), an industry-first high performance scalable open source Mobile Core platform.  ONF, in collaboration with Sprint, is launching OMEC under the CORD® project umbrella.  The project is intended to become an open source production grade Evolved Packet Core (EPC).