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today's leftovers

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  • What are the Best Youtube Video Downloader for Ubuntu

    Downloading videos from Youtube to your PC comes in handy especially when you know you are going to be offline for long periods of time, for instance when you are catching a flight or a train.

    What's more is that it gives you the convenience of watching your videos without interference should the internet connection suffer some degradation. In this article, we will see the different tools that you can use to download YouTube videos in Ubuntu 18.04.

  • Announcing the Fractal Hackfest in Seville

    It’s been an exciting year for Fractal, the GNOME Matrix client. Since our last hackfest in May, we’ve decided to split the application, refactored large parts of the backend, implemented new features such as the media viewer, made the message history adaptive, and laid the groundwork for end-to-end encryption.

    Now that we have most of the foundations in place that will enable our long-term goals (such as adaptive layout, E2E, and the app split), we’re getting together again to push these initiatives forward. This is why we’re having another hackfest on December 11-14 in Seville, Spain.

  • Apollo Lake Pico-ITX doubles down on GbE and M.2

    IEI is launching a Pico-ITX form-factor “Hyper-AL” SBC with a dual-core Celeron N3350 and a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, and M.2 ports plus HDMI, LVDS, SATA, and serial connections.

    The Hyper-AL (for Apollo Lake) was part of a recent group announcement that also included IEI’s first Arm-based SBC — the Rockchip RK3399 based Hyper-RK39. With the Hyper-AL, IEI is more in its comfort zone with an Intel dual-core Celeron N3350 with up to 2.4GHz clock and 6W TDP. Recent Apollo Lake based Pico-ITX boards include Aaeon’s PICO-APL4.

  • Mbed Linux Extends Arm's IoT OS Ambitions

Red Hat and Google: today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Episode 41 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux. There were a ton of new releases this week! Ubuntu and all of the Ubuntu Flavours released 18.10 this week. New versions of elementary OS and Pop!_OS also released this week. We also so new releases from Ubuntu Touch, Lightworks, Turtl, PeerTube and more. Later in the show we’ll talk about the LibSSH vulnerability that was discovered recently and we’ll talk about the latest olive branch from Microsoft. All that and much more!

  • AMD EPYC Sees Some Performance Improvements With Linux 4.19

    I am still finishing up work on my Linux 4.19 kernel stable benchmarks given it's been (and continues to be) a very busy month for Linux hardware testing, but of interest so far has been seeing a few EPYC performance improvements in some of the real-world workloads.

    While a featured article looking at the Linux 4.19 kernel performance is on the way from a diverse selection of hardware, below are some benchmarks from the new Dell PowerEdge EPYC 2P server we began testing a few weeks ago. It was exciting to see that there are some performance improvements with the freshly minted Linux 4.19 stable kernel on top of the already very competitive (and in some instances jaw-dropping) performance.

  • Ibase’s Taiwan Excellence Award winners include two new railway computers

    SI-324 — This Ubuntu-ready signage PC runs on an AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC backed up by up to 32GB DDR4. The SI-324 provides four HDMI 2.0 ports for up to four simultaneous [email protected] displays or dual [email protected] displays. Other features include 2x GbE, 2x USB 3.0, mini-PC and M.2 expansion, and remote EDID management.

  •  

today's leftovers

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  • [Mesa-dev] 18.3 release plan
  • Mesa 18.3 Gets A Release Date Towards The End Of November

    Intel open-source developer Dylan Baker has laid out a proposed release schedule for the upcoming Mesa 18.3 quarterly feature release. 

    There are two key dates: 31 October is the proposed branching date and 21 November is the proposed Mesa 18.3.0 release date. Between those two dates would be the usual weekly release candidates and there is the potential for the Mesa 18.3.0 release to be drawn out to the end of November or early December depending upon any open blocker bugs, which is common for the Mesa quarterly feature releases.

  • Google Code-in 2018 is about to start!

    After a break in 2017, the KDE community is participating in the Google Code-in contest as a mentoring organization. This means that pre-university students aged 13 to 17 from all over the world will be able to contribute to the Free Software movement by helping KDE develop software products that give users control, freedom, and privacy.

    Google Code-in is a global online contest with the goal of helping teenagers get involved in the world of open source development. Mentors from the participating organizations lend a helping hand as participants complete various bite-sized tasks in coding, graphics design, documentation, and more.

    This year we have tasks from KDE Connect, a project that enables all your devices to communicate with each other; GCompris, an educational software suite; KDE Partition Manager, our disk partitioning utility; and the KDE Visual Design Group, our interface usability experts.

  • Celebrating KDE’s 22 years and embracing new contributors at LaKademy 2018

    Almost two weeks ago we had the seventh edition of the LaKademy, an event that has been held in Brazil since 2012. As you may know LaKademy’s main goal is to get together the Latin American contributors of KDE community and to attract new ones. We don’t have talks like in Akademy because the event’s idea is to be a space for sprints. So people work in small groups doing specific tasks like fixing bugs, developing new features or translating software and documentation.

  • openSUSE Security Update For Leap

    openSUSE has released an updated kernel for Leap 42.3 to address several vulnerabilities. An attacker could exploit some of these vulnerabilities to cause a denial of service or escalate their privileges.

  • Death Road to Canada adds 4-player local co-op along with new game modes

    In today’s post, we’re talking about failure. In episode 4, “Fail Better,” we learn how Google has systematically learned to embrace (each and every) failure as an opportunity to learn, grow, and prevent classes of similar problems from happening again. We also learn how one of the most popular video game franchises of all time may not have been so successful had the developers been successful in their first attempt at an algorithm for some rather prominent non-player characters (NPCs).

    Whether we like it or not, some amount of failure is inevitable. To this end, I started this week’s discussion with Jared and Michael by asking about how an early failure may have led to a different—or even a beneficial—outcome.

  • Failure as a catalyst: Designing a feedback loop for success

    Emotional Resonance (context): I was turned down by Red Hat for a scrum master position because I wasn’t “qualified enough” even though this is what I had been doing prior to my job search. Red Hat was a fantastic opportunity for me and an opportunity to work on tech at a software company. I really wanted to work there. I longed to work there. (Note: Red Hat saw the error of their ways 4 months later and offered me a position that was hand crafted for my experience. The rest is history. And I’m forever grateful to my hiring manager.)

  • Arm expands DesignStart program for Linux embedded designs

    Arm has expanded its DesignStart program to include the Cortex-A5 CPU, Arm's low-power and Linux-capable application processor, according to the processor IP vendor. Developers can now accelerate embedded and IoT SoC design for applications including medical, smart home, gateways and wearables.

    [...]

    When ready to tape out a custom chip, time to market can be accelerated with Arm's Artisan physical IP. Developers can also benefit from design enablement platforms being supported by 18 foundry partners with process technology ranging from 250nm to 5nm, Arm said.

    Earlier in October 2018, Arm announced its DesignStart program would be offering Cortex-M processors without any license fee or royalty on Xilinx FPGAs. Through expanding the program to offer Cortex-A5, Arm is looking to support innovation across the entire design spectrum of embedded and IoT devices. DesignStart also helps speed up SoC implementation with free access to the industry-leading library of physical IP, tailored for a range of fabs and process nodes, through Arm Artisan physical IP.

  • Inexpensive Webcam

     

    Using a $5 Rpi Zero W from Microcenter, physically soldered the tiny webcam wires to the Zero: 3 V black to pin 1 on GPIO, ground to pin 6, D+ to PP22 pad next to the microusb and D- to PP23 usb pad. This wasn’t easy and I made a mess of the usb pads, but it works!  

  • The Best Android Phones Under $300

today's leftovers

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  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux to Exhibit Software-Defined Storage Solutions at All Things Open
  • Warning: 'Soul Calibur 6' Is Causing A Serious Problem For Linux Gamers

    The good news: right out of the box, Soul Calibur VI seems to offer decent performance on Linux via Steam Play and Proton. The bad news? The game fails to detect an online network, and then when gamers switch over to play on Windows they're finding themselves completely blocked from playing the fighter online.

  • Latte Dock, new painting is coming...

    In the video you can see the upcoming coloring mechanism of Latte's next version. Even though I am using plasma 5.14 and I love it, it is also the reason I am already expecting impatiently plasma 5.15 this January!! Smile This functionality can be supported only with plasma 5.15 .

  • BGP LLGR: robust and reactive BGP sessions

    On a BGP-routed network with multiple redundant paths, we seek to achieve two goals concerning reliability:

    A failure on a path should quickly bring down the related BGP sessions. A common expectation is to recover in less than a second by diverting the traffic to the remaining paths.

    As long as a path is operational, the related BGP sessions should stay up, even under duress.

  • Measuring the speaker frequency response using the AUDMES free software GUI - nice free software

    My current home stereo is a patchwork of various pieces I got on flee markeds over the years. It is amazing what kind of equipment show up there. I've been wondering for a while if it was possible to measure how well this equipment is working together, and decided to see how far I could get using free software. After trawling the web I came across an article from DIY Audio and Video on Speaker Testing and Analysis describing how to test speakers, and it listing several software options, among them AUDio MEasurement System (AUDMES). It is the only free software system I could find focusing on measuring speakers and audio frequency response. In the process I also found an interesting article from NOVO on Understanding Speaker Specifications and Frequency Response and an article from ecoustics on Understanding Speaker Frequency Response, with a lot of information on what to look for and how to interpret the graphs. Armed with this knowledge, I set out to measure the state of my speakers.

    The first hurdle was that AUDMES hadn't seen a commit for 10 years and did not build with current compilers and libraries. I got in touch with its author, who no longer was spending time on the program but gave me write access to the subversion repository on Sourceforge. The end result is that now the code build on Linux and is capable of saving and loading the collected frequency response data in CSV format. The application is quite nice and flexible, and I was able to select the input and output audio interfaces independently. This made it possible to use a USB mixer as the input source, while sending output via my laptop headphone connection. I lacked the hardware and cabling to figure out a different way to get independent cabling to speakers and microphone.

  • Arm Offers Lower Cost Cortex-A5 License

    Arm is now offer a low-cost route to developing Cortex-A5 based Linux-capable ASICs for embedded Internet of Things (IoT) devices featuring advanced edge processing, with a new one-year license fee of $75,000. This fee provides access to the CPU IP and one year of design support, through Arm's DesignStart program.

  • Arm DesignStart program expands to accelerate Linux-based embedded design

    While the breadth of IoT provides endless possibilities for advanced software development, it also holds challenges for designers. In a rapidly changing and competitive market, designers need to differentiate their products and deliver enhanced designs at the lowest cost in the fastest time possible.

    One avenue for differentiation is “rich embedded processing”, which we define at Arm as providing an advanced level of performance and sophistication. Sometimes that includes an interactive user interface, but on the whole, it is about offering advanced capability. These products use a comprehensive set of software stacks and benefit from the breadth of ready-to-run middleware and applications available on fully featured operating systems such as Linux. Companies developing rich embedded IoT designs are now turning toward application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) to meet their specific needs.

today's leftovers

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  • Destination Linux EP92 – Elementary My Dear Distro

    On this very special episode of Destination Linux, we are joined by 2 friends of the show. Unfortunately, Zeb was sick this week so we needed a last minute guest host, thankfully Gabriele Musco of TechPills stepped up to help out. If that wasn’t special enough, Daniel Foré from elementary joined us for a segment to discuss the latest release of elementary OS 5.0 (Juno). This episode we discuss a ton of hot topics in the Linux world including Microsoft making 60,000 patents available to the Open Invention Network (OIN), Plex joins the universal package format game with a new Snap, Google+ announces it is shutting down after a security bug debacle, there were some patches proposed to the Linux kernel’s new Code of Conduct. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

  • Tune Into Free Live Stream of Keynotes at Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, October 22-24!
  • ethtool Commands and Examples
  • WHAT TO DO AFTER INSTALLING ELEMENTARY OS 5.0
  • Weblate 3.2.2

    Weblate 3.2.2 has been released today. It's a second bugfix release for 3.2 fixing several minor issues which appeared in the release.

  • Kiwi TCMS 6.1

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.1! This release introduces new database migrations, internal updates and bug fixes. It is a small release designed to minimize the number of database migrations by squashing them together. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org.

    NOTE: there is the 6.0.1 release which resolves an upgrade problem caused by non-applied migrations which have been later squashed and released in the same release! It is best to jump through the intermediate releases to ensure a smooth upgrade!

  • NeuroFedora update: week 42

    There is a lot of software available in NeuroFedora already. You can see the list here. If you use software that is not on our list, please suggest it to us using the suggestion form.

  • FPgM report: 2018-42
  • Asynchronous bodhi-ci
  • Fuchsia Friday: New ‘Sherlock’ prototype offers more questions than answers

    That brings us to today, with the newly developed Sherlock prototype. First introduced earlier this month, Sherlock features 2GB of RAM and an Amlogic T931 processor. There’s no public information about this processor, beyond it having at least 4 cores, but Amlogic’s T series chips have been almost exclusively built into Smart TVs.

    What makes me hesitant to definitively call Sherlock a Smart TV is a feature that the overwhelming majority of Smart TVs no longer have: a camera. A few short years ago, Smart TVs began to include microphones and cameras to offer things like voice control and Skype video calling.

    It didn’t take long for it to be discovered how vulnerable these devices were and that people probably don’t want their TV watching them back. Then again, that isn’t stopping a rumored Facebook set-top TV box with built-in camera.

  • Google’s Fuchsia OS could mean the end of Android

    If you’ve had your ear to the Google grapevine the past couple of years, you might already know about Fuchsia. As early as 2016 there were whispers and rumors about a new OS for Android, and little more has trickled down to public knowledge since then.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-Focused Penguin Computing Banking On AI Infrastructure
  • Spinnaker: The Kubernetes of Continuous Delivery

    Comparing Spinnaker and Kubernetes in this way is somewhat unfair to both projects. The scale, scope, and magnitude of these technologies are different, but parallels can still be drawn.

    Just like Kubernetes, Spinnaker is a technology that is battle tested, with Netflix using Spinnaker internally for continuous delivery. Like Kubernetes, Spinnaker is backed by some of the biggest names in the industry, which helps breed confidence among users. Most importantly, though, both projects are open source, designed to build a diverse and inclusive ecosystem around them.

  • Tracktion 7 – A Full Featured Digital Audio Workstation for Music Creators [Ed: When "free, cross-platform" is just a marketing term for proprietary software with a restrictive licence]

    FossMint has covered software for audio creation and manipulation in the past (e.g. Ardour and Audacity) and we even covered Operating Systems created with media creation in focus (e.g Ubuntu Studio and AV Linux).

    Today, we bring you an amazing tool for professional use that anybody with an interest in music creation and time can easily make use of. It goes by the name of Tracktion 7.

    Tracktion 7 is a free, cross-platform, DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) for music creators of all classes. It features an equalizer, input, waveform, level, pan, and plugins which are all displayed left-to-right in an intuitive single-screen interface.

    Its users have access to an unlimited number of audio and MIDI tracks coupled with tools to facilitate easier music composing, recording, mixing, and sharing processes.

  • KDE Bugsquad – Konsole Bug Day on October 20th, 2018

    We will be holding a Bug Day on October 20th, 2018, focusing on Konsole. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

    This is a great opportunity for anyone, especially non-developers to get involved!

  • KDE Plasma5 for Slackware – october ’18 batch

    Today the Plasma developer team released Plasma 5.14.1 which was what I was waiting for. I was a bit hesitant to add a major new release (5.14.0) to my monthly refresh for Slackware and opted for this point release.

    And now “KDE-5_18.10” has been uploaded to the ‘ktown‘ repository. Again I was able to offer a full set of updates.

    What’s new

    The October release of KDE Plasma5 for Slackware contains the KDE Frameworks 5.51.0, Plasma 5.14.1 and Applications 18.08.2. All this on top of Qt 5.11.2 which was updated inbetween the two monthly ‘ktown’ releases.
    There were two updates in the ‘extras’ section for Applications: new versions for ‘krita’ and ‘okteta”. The ‘deps’ section saw some changes as well: ‘PyQt5’ was updated to work properly with Qt 5.11.2, a newer version of ‘sip’ had to be added for that same reason – it replaces the somewhat older Slackware package. And a new package ‘python-enum34’ package had to be added, it is a dependency for the Python2 support in PyQt5.

  • How to accelerate your digital transformation with open source technologies

    Businesses worldwide are on track to spend $1.1 Trillion on Digital Transformation in 2018 according to IDC. Executives tasked with driving transformation have to balance funding innovation initiatives with keeping the lights on. Maintaining existing infrastructure is necessary but when much of the budget is used to maintain the status quo, transformation efforts slow down to a crawl. New competitors disrupting established companies are not saddled with the burden of maintaining legacy infrastructure. They can innovate faster, using new business models and technologies like Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence, industrial IoT, and Real Time Analytics. What do all these technologies have in common? The foundation for these transformational technologies is open source software.

  • Shutter Removed From Ubuntu 18.10 And Debian Unstable, New PPA Available

    The popular screenshot tool, which uses Gtk2 and Perl, was one of the very few packages that blocked Debian (and Ubuntu) from removing the obsolete libgnome2-perl and libgnome2-vfs-perl from the repository archive. Since Shutter doesn't work without these packages, it was removed from the Debian Unstable and Ubuntu 18.10 repositories.

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  • La Frite Linux Mini Computer Looks Like An Ultra-affordable Raspberry Pi Alternative

    Raspberry Pi has been able to inspire a wide range of open source Linux computer boards. Some of the notable names include Orange Pi, Asus Tinker Board, Banana Pi, etc. Also, from time-to-time, new and promising projects keep appearing on Kickstarter and Indiegogo that promise to provide a better value at lower cost.

    Just recently, I came across a similar project that goes by the name La Frite. This open source mini computer is available for backing and it aims to ship in November. The project has already crossed its $10,000 aim.

  • The New Kindle Paperwhite is Waterproof, Still Affordable [Ed: These run Linux, but Bezos uses these to remotely delete your books...]
  • The new Kindle Paperwhite is thinner and waterproof

    The Voyage may be dead, but the Kindle line still has some life left in it. This time last year, Amazon upgraded the high-end Oasis model, and now the mid-range Paperwhite is getting a little love.The workhorse of the company’s devoted e-reader line just got a handful of upgrades that will give users a more premium experience, while keeping the device’s starting price at $130.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Update KB4468550 Fixes Audio Issues Caused In Windows 10 October Patch [Ed: Alternative (better) headline is, Microsoft admits breaking your machine]

    If your Windows is updated to the latest Windows 10 October 2018 update then there are chances that you might be facing audio problems , something along the lines of “No Audio Output Device is installed”.

    The October 2018 patch caused this issue on many machines running Windows 10 version 1803 or above. Many users tweeted about this problem almost instantly as it was happening on such a wide scale when they realized that they Windows has stopped giving them audio when they start playing games, or launch a video player all while the sounds on their browser as well as the system sounds were working perfectly fine.

  • Linux v4.18: Performance Goodies

    Linux v4.18 has been out a two months now; making this post a bit late, but still in time before the next release. Also so much drama in the CoC to care about performance topics Tongue As always comes with a series of performance enhancements and optimizations across subsystems.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Enables Telematics and Instrument Cluster Applications with Latest UCB 6.0 Release

     

    Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) is an open source software platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

     

    [...]

     

    The AGL UCB 6.0 includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. Key features include: [...]

  • Install, install, install! The dance of panic!

    3. PicarOS Diego. My daughter's desktop dual-boots Mageia and PicarOS Diego, a great MiniNo GalpON respin for children. Since the game she likes is neither running with WINE on Mageia 6.1 nor with Windows Vista, I tried to run it on WINE in PicarOS. The packages were old, so I updated the system. Big mistake! In the end, I was left with an up-to-date MiniNo that removed all the special tweaks for children and, to add insult to injury, the game would not run at all!

today's leftovers

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  • Vulkan Cracks 2,500 Projects On GitHub

    After cracking 2,000 projects referencing Vulkan on GitHub earlier this year, this week it passed the milestone of having more than 2,500 projects.

    Granted, some of these projects referencing Vulkan are still in their primitive stages, but of the 2,500+ projects are a lot of interesting Vulkan-using projects from RenderDoc to countless game engine initiatives, various code samples, the AMDVLK driver stack, and countless innovative efforts like GLOVE for OpenGL over Vulkan to Kazan for a Rust-written CPU-based Vulkan implementation and a heck of a lot more.

  • GNOME's Geoclue 2.5 Brings Vala Support, WiFi Geolocation For City-Level Accuracy

    GNOME's Geoclue library that provides a D-Bus service for location information based on GPS receivers, 3G modems, GeoIP, or even WiFi-based geolocation has been baking a lot of changes.

  • Geoclue 2.5.0

    Here is the first release in the 2.5 series.

  •  

  • Wine-Staging 3.18 Released With Some New Patches While Other Code Got Upstreamed

    It has been a very exciting weekend for Linux gamers relying upon Wine for running Windows titles under Linux... There was the routine bi-weekly Wine 3.18 development release on Friday but yesterday brought transform feedback to Vulkan and in turn Stream Output to DXVK to fix up a number of D3D11 games. Today is now the Wine-Staging 3.18 release.

    Wine-Staging 3.18 doesn't incorporate any changes around the Vulkan code (there is a Wine patch needed by DXVK for this new functionality), but does include a lot of other stuff. Wine-Staging 3.18 implements more functions in the user32 code, including cascade windows, GetPointerType, and others. On the Direct3D front are a few additions to WineD3D, including the ability for the Direct3D 10 support to work with the legacy NVIDIA Linux driver. There is also a kernel fix for allowing Steam log-ins to work again with Wine Staging.

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OSS Leftovers

  • Android Open Source Project now includes the Fuchsia SDK and a Fuchsia ‘device’
     

    In a new commit posted today to Android’s Gerrit source code management, two Fuchsia-related repos have been added to the primary “manifest” for the Android Open Source Project. For the unfamiliar, this manifest is used to inform Google’s download tool “Repo” of what should be included when you download AOSP.

  • Google Fuchsia: Why This New Operating System Solves a Huge Coding Problem
     

    The mobile layout has been code-named “Armadillo” and the other view has been dubbed “Capybara,” reported 9to5Google. Both sides of Fuchsia will work together using a tab system that will make up a majority of the user experience.

  • Lessons in Vendor Lock-in: Shaving
    The power of open standards extends beyond today into the future. When my son gets old enough to shave, I can pass down one of my all-metal, decades-old antique razors to him, and it will still work. While everyone else in a decade will have to shave with some $20-per-blade disposable razor with three aloe strips, seven blades, and some weird vibrating and rotating motor, he will be able to pick any razor from my collection and find affordable replacement blades. This is the power of open standards and the freedom to avoid vendor lock-in.
  • Help us to make document compatibility even better
    The Document Liberation Project (DLP) is a sister project to LibreOffice, and provides many software libraries for reading and writing a large range of file formats – such as files created by other productivity tools. Thanks to the DLP, LibreOffice (and other programs) can open many legacy, proprietary documents, but there’s always room for improvement! Check out this short video to learn more:
  • GNU Guix: Back from SeaGL 2018
    SeaGL 2018 has concluded. Thank you to everyone in the local Seattle community who came to participate! As previously announced, Chris Marusich gave a talk introducing GNU Guix to people of all experience levels. Some very Guixy swag was handed out, including printed copies of this handy Guix reference card. The room was packed, the audience asked great questions, and overall it was tons of fun! If you weren't able to come to SeaGL this year, that's OK! You can watch a video of the talk below.

Servers: Kubernetes, CNCF, Red Hat and More

  • ​Bitnami Kubernetes Production Runtime released
    If you want to use a safe third-party container, smart people know they should turn to Bitnami. This company packages, deploys, and maintains applications in virtually any format for any platform. Now, at KubeCon in Seattle, Bitnami announced its Kubernetes release: Bitnami Kubernetes Production Runtime (BKPR) 1.0, a production-ready open source project. So, with everyone and their cloud provider offering Kubernetes, why should you care? Well, first, BKPR provides built-in monitoring, alerting, and metrics automatically, thereby enabling developers to avoid reinventing the wheel when they rollout a Kubernetes application.
  • Why the Cloud-Native Market Is Expanding at KubeCon
    The KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America event is a beacon for news, with vendors showcasing their wares and making multiple announcements. KubeCon + CloudNativeCon runs here from Dec. 11-13 and has brought 8,000 attendees and more than 187 vendors into the exhibit hall. Kubernetes itself is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which is also the home now to 31 open-source cloud projects. In this eWEEK Data Points article, we look at the major areas of innovation and new services announced at the conference.
  • Add It Up: Enterprise Adoption of Kubernetes Is Growing
    A recently updated user survey from monitoring software provider Datadog confirms an increase in Kubernetes adoption. We believe this is the result of three factors: 1) more organizations using containers in production; 2) Kubernetes has emerged as the leading orchestration platform; 3) organizations are choosing to adopt Kubernetes earlier in cloud native voyage. There is also some evidence that Kubernetes adoption is more likely among organizations with more containers being deployed. This article highlights findings from several studies released in conjunction with KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America, a Kubernetes user conference being held this week in Seattle. Cloud Foundry’s most recent survey of IT decision makers shows container production usage jumping from 22 percent in early 2016 to 38 percent in late 2018, with these deployments increasingly being described as “broad.” The Cloud Foundry report also found an increase in the number of containers being deployed — in 2016, only 37 percent of cont
  • Oracle Q&A: A Refresher on Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel
    Oracle caused quite a stir in 2010 when it announced its Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel for Oracle Linux. We’ve checked in with Sergio Leunissen, Vice President, Linux and VM Development at Oracle, for an update on the ABCs of this important introduction as well as the company’s latest take on Linux.
  • Get the Skills You Need to Monitor Systems and Services with Prometheus
    Open source software isn’t just transforming technology infrastructure around the world, it is also creating profound opportunities for people with relevant skills. From Linux to OpenStack to Kubernetes, employers have called out significant skills gaps that make it hard for them to find people fluent with cutting-edge tools and platforms. The Linux Foundation not only offers self-paced training options for widely known tools and platforms, such as Linux and Git, but also offers options specifically targeting the rapidly growing cloud computing ecosystem. The latest offering in this area is Monitoring Systems and Services with Prometheus (LFS241). Prometheus is an open source monitoring system and time series database that is especially well suited for monitoring dynamic cloud environments. It contains a powerful query language and data model in addition to integrated alerting and service discovery support. The new course is specifically designed for software engineers and systems administrators wanting to learn how to use Prometheus to gain better insights into their systems and services.
  • Red Hat Container Development Kit 3.7 now available
  • CodeReady Workspaces for OpenShift (Beta) – It works on their machines too
    “It works on my machine.” If you write code with, for, or near anybody else, you’ve said those words at least once. Months ago I set up a library or package or environment variable or something on my machine and I haven’t thought about it since. So the code works for me, but it may take a long time to figure out what’s missing on your machine.
  • OpenShift & Kubernetes: Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going Part 2
    The growth and innovation in the Kubernetes project, since it first launched just over four years ago, has been tremendous to see. In part 1 of my blog, I talked about how Red Hat has been a key contributor to Kubernetes since the launch of the project, detailed where we invested our resources and what drove those decisions. Today, that innovation continues and we are just as excited for what comes next. In this blog, I’d like to talk about where we are going and what we’re focused on, as we continue driving innovation in Kubernetes and the broader cloud native ecosystem and building the next generation of OpenShift.
  • Red Hat OpenStack Platform and making it easier to manage bare metal
    Bare metal is making a comeback. At Red Hat we have been observing an increase of the use of bare metal in general. And we aren’t the only ones. In 2017’s OpenStack User Survey there had been a growth of bare metal in production environments from 9% to 20% of the production deployments. The 2018 survey says that adoption of Ironic is being driven by Kubernetes, with 37% of respondents who use Kubernetes on OpenStack using the bare metal provisioner. And there are many reasons for this growth. A great blog post about Kubernetes on metal with OpenShift by Joe Fernandes described this growth in the context of containers on bare metal with Kubernetes as a driver for this growth. But, it doesn’t stop there - High-Performance Compute (HPC), access to hardware devices or scientific workloads such as AI/ML or data lake management are also contributing to this increase.
  • etcd finds new home at CNCF
    CoreOS has moved to secure the independence of etcd by donating the distributed key-value store to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. The project was started by Core OS – now part of Red Hat – in 2013 to handle coordination between container instances so that a system reboot was possible without affecting the uptime of applications running on top. Its name can be seen as an hint to the management of configuration files, which over the years have grown to be stored in /etc directory in Unix systems.
  • Kubernetes etcd data project joins CNCF
    How do you store data across a Kubernetes container cluster? With etcd. This essential part of Kubernetes has been managed by CoreOS/Red Hat. No longer. Now, the open-source etcd project has been moved from Red Hat to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). What is etcd? No, it's not what happens when a cat tries to type a three-letter acronyms. Etcd (pronounced et-see-dee) was created by the CoreOS team in 2013. It's an open-source, distributed, consistent key-value database for shared configuration, service discovery, and scheduler coordination. It's built on the Raft consensus algorithm for replicated logs.
  • Welcome etcd to CNCF
    Etcd has been written for distributed systems like Kubernetes as a fault-tolerant and reliable data base. Clients can easily watch certain keys and get notified when their values change which allows scaling to a large number of clients that can reconfigure themselves when a value changes.
  • etcd: Current status and future roadmap
    etcd is a distributed key value store that provides a reliable way to manage the coordination state of distributed systems. etcd was first announced in June 2013 by CoreOS (part of Red Hat as of 2018). Since its adoption in Kubernetes in 2014, etcd has become a fundamental part of the Kubernetes cluster management software design, and the etcd community has grown exponentially. etcd is now being used in production environments of multiple companies, including large cloud provider environments such as AWS, Google Cloud Platform, Azure, and other on-premises Kubernetes implementations. CNCF currently has 32 conformant Kubernetes platforms and distributions, all of which use etcd as the datastore. In this blog post, we’ll review some of the milestones achieved in latest etcd releases, and go over the future roadmap for etcd. Share your thoughts and feedback on features you consider important on the mailing list: etcd-dev@googlegroups.com.
  • Red Hat contributes etcd, the cornerstone of Kubernetes, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation
    Today Red Hat is thrilled to announce our contribution of etcd, an open source project that is a key component of Kubernetes, and its acceptance into the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), a vendor-neutral foundation housed under The Linux Foundation to drive the adoption of cloud native systems. The etcd project’s focus is safely storing critical data of a distributed system and it demonstrated its quality early on. It is most notably the primary datastore of Kubernetes, the de facto standard system for container orchestration. Today we're excited to transfer stewardship of etcd to the same body that cares for the growth and maintenance of Kubernetes. Given that etcd powers every Kubernetes cluster, this move brings etcd to the community that relies on it most at the CNCF.
  • Banks take next steps to digital refinement
    The financial services industry (FSI) has gotten the message: customer expectations have changed radically. They want to experience banking services through multiple digital channels, and they want those services to go well beyond the generic products that traditional banks typically offer. Customers are looking for personalization, are comfortable with service automation, and are eager to get what they need quickly and easily. As the value chain for financial institutions’ services expands along with the need to deliver new and relevant customer offerings, their dexterity is being put to the test, according to an article by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). To enable the flexibility and agility they need to support a dynamic environment, they’ve begun to create a culture of continuous delivery (CD). This allows for continuous cross-channel development, may allow deployment of features in hours rather than months, and lends support for performing system upgrades with zero downtime and without disturbing the customer experience.
  • CentOS 7-1810 "Gnome" overview | The community enterprise operating system
  • How to prepare for digital transformation with Red Hat Virtualization and Veeam
    Red Hat has a history of helping organizations reduce the cost of IT, from infrastructure to applications, while also helping to lay the foundation for open source digital transformation. More recently, Red Hat has sought to help organizations reduce the cost of virtualization, aiming to make it easier to accelerate their digital transformation journey through innovative technologies such as Red Hat Ansible Automation or Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat’s comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes Platform.
  • Red Hat schedules stockholder meeting to vote on $34B IBM deal
  • INVESTIGATION NOTICE: Kaskela Law LLC Announces Shareholder Investigation of Red Hat, Inc.
  • Red Hat sets date for stockholders to vote on the merger with IBM
  • Arista Works With Red Hat and Tigera on Container Environments for Enterprises
    Arista Networks is working with Red Hat and Tigera to help enterprises adopt containers in both private and public clouds. The three companies are demonstrating a preview of their upcoming offering this week at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2018 in Seattle. The integrated product will include Arista’s containerized Extensible Operating System (cEOS) and CloudVision software along with Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform and Tigera’s Secure Enterprise Edition.
  • Knative Meshes Kubernetes with Serverless Workloads
    Google Cloud’s Knative initiative launched in July is expanding to include an updated version of Google’s first commercial Knative offering along with a batch of new distributions based on serverless computing framework. Knative is a Kubernetes-based platform for building and managing serverless workloads in which cloud infrastructure acts as a server for managing the allocation of computing and storage resources. It is being offered as an add-on to Kubernetes Engine used to orchestrate application containers.
  • Red Hat Steps Up with HPC Software Solutions at SC18
    In this video from SC18 in Dallas, Yan Fisher and Dan McGuan from Red Hat describe the company’s powerful software solutions for HPC and Ai workloads.
  • RedHat contributes etcd, a distributed key-value store project, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon

Microsoft FUD, Openwashing and Entryism

Games: ARMA 3, Steam Play, Valve and More

  • For now, the experimental Linux (and Mac) port of ARMA 3 will not see any more updates
    Sad news for those who purchased ARMA 3 due to the experimental Linux (and Mac) version, as Bohemia Interactive have announced a halt to the updates for it.
  • There's a brand new Steam Play Beta version out with FAudio, also a Steam Play whitelist update
    The day I'm sure many have waited for has arrived, a new Steam Play beta has been officially released today which includes the important FAudio project. On top of that, even more titles have entered the Steam Play whitelist. Don't know what the heck Steam Play is? The "too long; didn't read" is that it enables you to play a lot of Windows games on Linux.
  • Valve Rolls Out New Steam Play Proton 3.16 Beta, 29 More Games Supported
    A new beta relase of Proton 3.16 is now available, the Wine-based software that powers Valve's Steam Play for running many Windows games on Linux.
  • Volcanoids, a steampunk base-building survival game may come to Linux, developer testing
    I know what you're going to say, something about yet another survival game! However, Volcanoids really does look like something you want to pay attention to. I forget who, but someone mentioned this game to me a while ago. The developer seemed interested, but I didn't see them say much about it—until now thanks to another tip. On Steam, a user posted in their forum asking about Linux support and the developer replied showing a screenshot of their progress on a Linux build. The skybox is missing, plus a few other issues but it's promising.
  • Desert Child is a thrilling racing adventure now available with Linux support
    Developed by Oscar Brittain, Desert Child is a fantastic pixel art racing adventure that just released with Linux support.
  • Koruldia Heritage, the awesome looking pixel-painted adventure RPG is fully funded and heading to Linux
    Fully funded on Kickstarter and heading to Linux, the pixel-painted adventure RPG Koruldia Heritage is looking awesome. Against their initial goal of £10K they've smoothly sailed over £15K and so with 6 days left they've done pretty well. It's still not a large amount of money for a team to make such an ambitious game, but it has been in development for a few years already. The funding here, is for some additional help towards the finishing line.
  • The super sweet survival and base-builder 'MewnBase' is now on Steam
    For those who prefer their survival games to be single-player and a little sweeter, MewnBase is now on Steam. Currently, the developer says it's mostly a spare-time gig and so updates aren't always that frequent. It's in Early Access and so it's not finished, with an end-date projected to be by the end of 2019. Hopefully with the Steam release, it will give the developer some additional sales and exposure to progress forwards.
  • The absolutely excellent platformer Slime-san now has a level editor
    Easily one of the best and trickiest platformers around, Slime-san is a seriously underappreciated gem. Another big update recently released, adding in a level editor. Honestly, I don't understand why it has so few reviews and followers. Slime-san is practically one of the best platformers around if you're looking for a true challenge that won't be over quickly.
  • The Universim continues advancing with a crime system, firefighters and more
    Just recently, they put out a whopper of an update which makes the game perform a lot better thanks to a number of optimisations. It performs consistently well above 100FPS and feels noticeably smooth now. They even fixed the issue I noted with the saving system causing massive stuttering, so that's great. Still not sold on needing a building to save, it's a gimmick that doesn't appeal to me but it's a minor gripe. As for the bigger parts of the update, they've introduced a full crime system with police stations where your people can become officers, prisons with guards and so on. You will need to catch criminals quickly, as things can soon escalate from minor crimes to setting everything on fire—ouch! There's two ways to deal with your "nuggets" (your people), you can either fry them up using brutal methods like the electric chair or my preferred method with a Rehabilitation Centre for some therapy to help them deal with their issues.
  • The fun indie FPS 'Ballistic Overkill' adds a new amusing game mode called Juggernaut
    While not as popular as it once was, Ballistic Overkill is still a reasonably good online shooter that I've spent a lot of time in. The latest update sounds quite amusing. If the normal team modes aren't for you, the Juggernaut mode just might be. In this mode, there's a special golden Chainsaw on each map waiting to be grabbed. Once picked up, that player turns into the Juggernaut, a special class with a lot of health. You gain points for the length of time you stay in this mode, however, every other player will know where you are and will try to take you down.
  • ReignMaker 2 combines Match-3 gameplay with Tower Defense and more genres spliced together
    Frogdice, developer of ReignMaker, Stash, Dungeon of Elements and more is back with a new Kickstarter campaign for their genre bending game ReignMaker 2. With a low goal of £799, they've already crossed the finishing line and then some with over £3K pledged so it looks like it's good to go. They're planning Linux support like with their past games, so we should see it sometime around April next year.