Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LQ Turns 16 so We Talk With Founder Jeremy Garcia

    LinuxQuestions.org (LQ) recently turned 16, which means we can sing the Chuck Berry song “Sweet Little Sixteen” to it. Even better, this means the site is old enough to drive in most states. Hot stuff! And today’s interviewee, Jeremy Garcia, is the founder and still head LQ-er. In this video, he’ll tell you how he once expected to get *maybe* 100 members, and talks about how he would (or wouldn’t) do things differently if he was starting LQ today.

  • Will Linux run well on a MacBook?

    When you think of Linux, you probably don’t think of Apple or its products. But some Linux users actually prefer to run it on Apple’s MacBook laptops. A MacBook owner recently asked if Linux would run well on his laptop, and he got some interesting responses in the Linux subreddit.

  • Kubernetes 1.3 Steps Up for Hybrid Clouds

    The Kubernetes community on Wednesday introduced Version 1.3 of its container orchestration software, with support for deploying services across multiple cloud platforms, including hybrid clouds.

    Kubernetes 1.3 improves scaling and automation, giving cloud operators the ability to scale services up and down automatically in response to application demand, while doubling the maximum number of nodes per cluster, to 2,000, says Google (Nasdaq: GOOG) Product Manager Aparna Sinha in a post on the Kubernetes blog. "Customers no longer need to think about cluster size, and can allow the underlying cluster to respond to demand," Sinha says.

  • Container Trends: Plans, Orchestration and CI – A Dataset from Bitnami

    Once again the level of manual deployment, be it either with a CI system or as a completely manual approach was very surprising, looking further into this data, we did a breakdown across the main orchestration tools, and looked at which CI tools participants are using in conjunction with the various orchestration tools.

  • uTidylib 0.3

    Several years ago I've complained about uTidylib not being maintained upstream. Since that time I've occasionally pushed some fixes to my GitHub repository with uTidylib code, but without any clear intentions to take it over.

    Time has gone and there was still no progress and I started to consider becoming upstream maintainer as well. I quickly got approval from Cory Dodt, who was the original author of this code, unfortunately he is not owner of the PyPI entry and the claim request seems to have no response (if you know how to get in touch with "cntrlr" or how to take over PyPI module please let me know).

  • GPS for Linux

    After a typically long period of deliberation, I finally decided to buy myself a proper GPS tracker for recording my MTB rides. I have had a GPS tracker/mapper on my phone for some time now, but with the possibility for ranging further a field on a potential bike-packing trip in future, I did not want to rely on my mobile phone. I also wanted to get a wireless HRM that would work with the GPS tracker so that I could understand how hard I was working on my various routes.

  • Bluetooth LED bulbs

    The best known smart bulb setups (such as the Philips Hue and the Belkin Wemo) are based on Zigbee, a low-energy, low-bandwidth protocol that operates on various unlicensed radio bands. The problem with Zigbee is that basically no home routers or mobile devices have a Zigbee radio, so to communicate with them you need an additional device (usually called a hub or bridge) that can speak Zigbee and also hook up to your existing home network. Requests are sent to the hub (either directly if you're on the same network, or via some external control server if you're on a different network) and it sends appropriate Zigbee commands to the bulbs.

  • DIY Mobile Backup Device for Photographers

    Backup anxiety syndrome is not a real medical condition, but as a photographer, you might be familiar with the main symptom all too well: the constant worry about keeping your photos safe, especially when you are traveling. So what can you do to alleviate this debilitating condition? Besides the obvious, but far from practical, solution of lugging your laptop around as a glorified backup device, you have two options: splurge on something like WD My Passport Wireless Pro or build a backup device yourself. Going with the former option seems like a no-brainer: a simple financial transaction gives you a decent, albeit expensive, backup solution. So why bother wasting time and effort on reinventing the wheel and building a DIY backup device from scratch? Because it’s neither difficult nor time-consuming.

  • Android malware being created faster than it can be patched [Ed: This article is mixing two things: malware, which users have to actually install, and flaws that need patching]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How Open Source Can Help Telcos Evolve

    Open source developments, such as the OPEN-Orchestrator (OPEN-O) Project that is developing software for service orchestration over NFV, SDN and legacy network infrastructure, can play a key role in the evolution of telco strategies, says Marc Cohn of the Linux Foundation.

  • GTK Scene Kit Continues Making Progress With New API, Offloading More Work To The GPU

    GNOME developer Emmanuele Bassi has shared the latest work he's been doing on GSK -- the GTK Scene Kit and the much anticipated improvements it will bring.

    GTK GSK has been talked about for a while with striving for a scene graph and cleaning up other rendering work in the GTK+ tool-kit code-base. GSK has yet to be merged but it's previously been talked about that it might be ready for GNOME/GTK+ 3.22 this fall.

  • GSK Demystified — A GSK primer

    Using OpenGL to generate pixel-perfect results is complicated, and in some cases it just goes against the expectations of the GPU itself: reading back data; minuscule fragments and tesselations; tons of state changes — those are all pretty much no-go areas when dealing with a GPU.

  • LibreOffice 5.1.4 (bugfix release)

    The Document Foundation released Libreoffice 5.1.4 on June 23, but I was kept busy with preparing my own packaging and scripting stuff for the release of Slackware 14.2. In addition, a new release of Plasma (5.7) is near, for which I promised a Live ISO to be available on July 5.

  • The Summit and the Bodhi

    More on this discussion by Corrinne, I applaud her efforts into making develop girl it a force to reckon with within the community. I myself was a part of “Girl Develop It” in the Seattle/Ann Arbor area and used to attend their casual meetups. I remember when I had just started to learn to code, I was afraid of asking for help. Even if I am stuck, it was hard to find someone willing to understand and provide the right guidance. “Girl Develop It” made that learning process easier for me by providing the right mentorship and guidance throughout my earlier attempts at coding. Not only I was receiving feedback but I had similar people like me trying to understand and develop confidence while learning to code. During her talk at the Summit too, she mentioned about some success stories that had helped many women across the United States. I attended this talk along with women who were a part of the Women Leadership Community-Westford. Further, I would like to thank Garima (Performance Team) for putting all the efforts to arranging this meetup and discussion for us that day.

  • Tech Stocks News Ring: Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT), Electronic Arts Inc. (NASDAQ:EA)
  • Fedora PSA: Why is my new Fedora account listed as spamcheck_waiting or spamcheck_denied?
  • DRAM contract prices to rise 4-8% in 3Q16, says DRAMeXchange

    On the demand side, mobile and server applications will continue to spur demand for DRAM and help boost average contract prices for the memory in the third quarter, DRAMeXchange noted. Weak PC demand, and Windows 10 licensing scheme, which sets fees according to system specs, will further discourage PC vendors from increasing the memory content per box for their products, DRAMeXchange said.

  • Windows 10: Microsoft launches intrusive full-screen upgrade reminder

    Microsoft’s aggressive push to get users to upgrade to Windows 10 has been turned up a notch as the company begins pushing full-screen upgrade pop-up notifications to Windows 7 and 8.1.

    The “Sorry to interrupt” notification will take over the whole screen and force users to select either to upgrade at once or to be reminded later, which will cause the pop up to reappear every three days.

    Two more less prominent options, accessed via smaller links to the left, will allow the user to select to be notified three more times in total or never to be notified again.

    The screen takeover warns users that the free Windows 10 upgrade period will end on 29 July, after which Microsoft will charge a fee to install Windows 10, and forms the latest step in the company’s campaign to get users switching from the six-year-old Windows 7 and two-year-old Windows 8.1.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Oracle Loses Again, Red Hat Competes With FOSS & More…

    Also included: LinuxQuestions.org has a birthday, six new distro releases, Ubuntu considering dropping 32-bit support and the feds were after Snowden.

  • Is Your OS Working For You Or Enslaving You?

    Essentially, folks bought a PC to use, run their applications and browse their networks and MS has installed malware on them to advertise “10”. Malware. That’s what this is. If the guy who made your OS deliberately installs malware on your PC, what are you going to do?

  • Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

    As the Windows 10 free upgrade period draws to a close, Microsoft is stepping up its operating system's nagware to full-screen takeovers.

    The Redmond software giant confirmed today it will start showing dark blue screens urging people to install the latest version of Windows. The full-screen ads will pop up on Windows 7 and 8.1 desktops from now until July 30, when the free upgrade period ends.

  • Check out 'Why, Phil?', new Linux audio webshow series

    Philip Yassin has recently started an upbeat Linux audio webshow series called 'Ask Phil?'. Only recently started, the series has already notched up an impressive 7 episodes, most of which revolve around Phil's favourite DAW, Qtractor.

  • Pitivi: An Open Source and Powerful Video Editor for Linux

    Pitivi is a well known video editor, the initial release was back in May, 2004 and still in active development. It is an open source, non-linear video editor for Linux developed by various contributors from all over the world, licensed under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL). It aims to be a powerful and flexible video editor that can attract to prosumers and professionals.
    In February, 2014 the project held a fundraising campaign through Gnome foundation, the goal was to raise €100,000 for further development. The fundraiser did not reach the goal but raised above €23,000 as of 2015, which allowed partially funded development.

  • Plasma 5.6.5 and Frameworks 5.23 now in Backports for Kubuntu 16.04

    Plasma 5.6.5 brings bugfixes and translations from the month of June thanks to contributors, while Frameworks 5.23 brings new fixes in KWallet, KWayland, Breeze and much more!

  • This Week in GTK+ – 7
  • Builder Designs

    Thanks to the wonderful design skill of Allan, Builder got a bunch of new designs this last month. Last week, after arriving home from the Toronto hackfest, I started reshaping Builder to match.

  • Mageia 6 Release Notes
  • The next step towards Mageia 6 is here, sta1 has been released

    Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of the next step in the path to Mageia 6.

  • Bear is working for its money

    Since I made the new Slackware 14.2 data available 24 hours ago, the server has been pushing out 1.67 Terabytes of data, at an average of 155 MBytes/sec. Needless to say that this server was a good investment, I could never have managed this on my old platform.

  • Zacks EPS Estimates For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Is $0.41
  • Python 3 in Fedora

    At the 2016 Python Language Summit, Petr Viktorin, who is the team lead for the Python maintenance group at Red Hat, described the progress that Fedora has made in switching to Python 3 by default. He also presented some work that has been done to split up the standard library to try to reduce Python's footprint for cloud deployments.

    Viktorin pointed to a site that is tracking Fedora's Python 3 porting efforts. In particular, he showed the history graph that displays the progress since October 2015. Some 1300 packages are now either able to run on both Python 2 and 3 or just on 3, though there are still 1700 or so to go.

  • GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Breaking down WordPress networks

    At the moment, there are not any plans to set up or offer a blog-hosting service to contributors (and for good reason). The only two websites that would receive the benefits of a multi-site network would be the Community Blog and the Magazine. For now, the intended scale of expanding WordPress into Fedora is to these two platforms.

  • Hacker Tells How To Crack Android Encryption On Millions of Smartphones

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Calamares 2.3 Installer Released
  • ANNOUNCE: libosinfo 0.3.1 released

    I am happy to announce a new release of libosinfo, version 0.3.1 is now available, signed with key DAF3 A6FD B26B 6291 2D0E 8E3F BE86 EBB4 1510 4FDF (4096R). All historical releases are available from the project download page.

  • There and Back Again: The MongoDB Cloud Story

    Before it was a database company, MongoDB was a cloud company. Founded in 2007 and originally known as 10gen, the company originally intended to build a Java cloud platform. After building a database it called MongoDB, the company realized that the infrastructure software it had built to support its product was more popular than the product itself, and the PaaS company pivoted to become a database company – eventually taking the obvious step of renaming itself to reflect its new purpose.

  • C++17: New Features Coming To 33-Year-Old Programming Language

    The C++17 standard is taking shape and adding new features to the vintage programming language. This major update aims to make C++ an easier language to work with and brings powerful technical specifications.

  • Clearing the Keystone Environment

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Permabit Debuts Only Complete Data Reduction for the Linux Storage Stack

    Permabit Technology Corporation, the leader in data reduction technology, today announced the latest release of its Virtual Data Optimizer (VDO) software, VDO 6. The newest release of VDO delivers the company's patented deduplication, HIOPS Compression™ and thin provisioning in a commercial software package for Linux, expanding availability beyond the OEM marketplace to include the leading Professional Services organizations that are enabling today's modern Hybrid Cloud data centers.

  • My KIWI/OBS talk from oSC'16

    Last Friday, at openSUSE Conference 2016, I was giving a talk together with Christian Schneemann about KIWI and OBS (the events.opensuse.org software is not able to manage "two speakers for one talk", this is why I am not listed in the schedule).

  • AppliedMicro Announces the Availability of its Mudan Storage Platform at Red Hat Summit 2016
  • AsteroidOS smartwatch OS wants you, developers

    AsteroidOS is a new open source operating system specifically designed to serve software application development on smartwatches. The project is now gaining some traction and has been reported to now be looking for developer and community contribution engagement.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos