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today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Running The Intel NUC6i7KYK On Linux With Skylake Iris Pro Graphics

    I've managed to get my hands on an Intel NUC6i7KYK "Skull Canyon" NUC featuring the Core i7 6770HQ Skylake CPU with Iris Pro Graphics 580. When paired with 32GB of RAM and a Samsung 950 PRO 500GB NVMe SSD, it makes for a very speedy, small form factor Linux-friendly PC.

  • Fresh Arch Linux Benchmarks Of AMDGPU & AMDGPU-PRO
  • GNOME's GTK Vulkan Renderer Faster Than OpenGL, Now Working On Windows

    GNOME's GTK Vulkan renderer continues advancing in Git for GTK+ 4.0. This Vulkan renderer for the GTK Scene Kit is forming into a nice alternative to its OpenGL renderer.

    With the latest Git, there is now support for Vulkan context creation under Windows. So now their Vulkan code should work for GTK Windows users too and just not Linux.

  • Random Musings on the New Year and Changes

    Come Mageia 6 and I will have to wave farewell to KDE 4. OpenMandriva has been training me on the ways of Plasma 5, so I will only have to forget about the wallpapers, just like I had to forget about GRUB when GRUB 2 came along. Who knows, maybe a new secret feature of Plasma 5 will make me love the DE, just like when I grew to love the ROSA SimpleWelcome screen in Mandriva 2011...

    Mageia 6 Sta1 has been on my laptop since September (for testing). When Mageia 6 is finally released, I will have an additional partition on my HD if I replace my current Mageia 5 install.

  • 2016 SDN trends: The year of the software-defined WAN

    As 2016 draws to a close, SD-WAN paced SDN trends as it permeated the SDN world; Cisco and VMware dominated SDN deployments; and concerns remain about training.

  • Out of the comfort zone: OpenSuSE support for an ordinary user - f*ck my morals

    A friend of mine choose for $reasons to install the latest OpenSuSE 42.2 release as his new laptop operating system. It's been a while that I had contact with the SuSE Linux distribution. Must be around 12 years or so. The unsual part here is that I've to support a somewhat eccentric, but mostly ordinary user of computers. And to my surprise it's still hard to just plug in your existing stuff and expect it work. I've done so many dirty things to this installation in the last three days, my system egineering heart is bleeding.

  • Comprehensive Stock Analysis of: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Shares in the Spotlight: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Top 10 Linux news stories of 2016
  • Bye bye, 2016: The Linux, Chromebook, and open-source stories of the year
  • How and Why to Switch to Linux

    I switched to Linux a few years ago. Four, I think. It wasn't my first time— I remember driving with my friend Phil to pick up a Slackware Linux CD in 1997, being very excited about how different it was, and then switching back to Windows a couple weeks later when I wanted my computer to be usable again.

  • Acer's new Aspire C Series of all-in-one PCs offers Linux, FreeDOS options

    Looking to get a jump on the forthcoming deluge of CES news, Acer has released a new all-in-one PC family that adds a couple of interesting wrinkles to the popular desktop category.

  • A Brief History of the Cloud

    How we use computing infrastructure has changed drastically over the past two decades, moving from buying physical servers to having tools and technologies that make it easy for companies and individual developers to deploy software in the cloud. In his LinuxCon Europe keynote, Dan Kohn, Executive Director of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), provided us with a brief history of the cloud and how CNCF fits with where we are now.

    [...]

    This brings us up to the present with the 2015 formation of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Kohn says that “cloud native computing uses an open source software stack to segment applications into microservices, packaging each part into its own container and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization.” The value propositions from cloud native computing include isolation, no lock-in, unlimited scalability, agility and maintainability, improved efficiency and resource utilization, and resiliency.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Container Storage Vendor ClusterHQ Shuts Down

    ClusterHQ which had been an early pioneer in the container storage market with its open-source Flocker project, ceases operations.

    Container storage vendor ClusterHQ announced on December 22 that it is shutting down the company's operations, effective immediately. ClusterHQ raised $18 million in venture capital funding to help fuel its efforts to build a commercially supported stateful container storage technology.

    In a 2014 interview with eWEEK, ClusterHQ co-founder Luke Marsden explained the core premise of his business and its primary open-source project called Flocker. Simply put, Flocker was built to help solve the challenge stateful storage for containers.

  • Wine 2.0-rc3 Released

    The Wine development release 2.0-rc3 is now available.

  • Spell-checking for GtkEntry in gspell

    It’s done! Everything that I wanted to do initially for the fundraising of gspell is implemented (for the milestone 1).

  • Updates

    I’m not sure if there is some confusion about the current development model of Shotwell. I noticed that some distributions seem to try to pick up the current development branch (0.25.x). I strongly advise against that at this point in time. It has just seen a major change in the Menu handling code and might still have severe usability regressions.

  • SUSE's YaST Team Ends The Year With Various Enhancements

    SUSE's YaST Team has shared the improvements they've been working on this holiday season for improving the distribution's installer / setup tool.

    Among the improvements en route for SUSE YaST users are improved management of DHCLIENT_SET_HOSTNAME, ensuring installation of needed packages, some changes to the expert partitioner mode, further improving yast2-network, better handling of GPT disks, allowing the Snapper file-system snapshot tool to work without DBus, CASP functionality, and more.

  • Debian GNU/Linux Is Considering “Automatic Upgrades”
  • Devuan Linux explained

    Devuan Linux is new to the Linux world. It can be a good lightweight option to your current system.Devuan Linux made it's way into Linux world on November 2014. It is making nice and steady progress from that time. The distro entered a beta stage in April 2016. It is based on Debian Jesse.

  • ArchWiPi - Raspberry Pi Wireless AP

    Turn your Raspberry Pi into a wireless router/AP. Arch-WiPi is a tiny Arch Linux ARM + create_ap packaged into a downloadable image.

  • Smartphone App: Daily Pictures Quotes for Tizen
  • Samsung to support YouTube HDR Content on 2016 range of Tizen TVs

    Samsung Electronics have announced that they will support YouTube’s global HDR playback on their Tizen TVs via an updated YouTube application. Currently, the app is available on all 2016 Samsung Quantum dot TVs and UHD TVs, and beginning this month will begin a global rollout.

    What is HDR? High Dynamic Range is used differently in TVs opposed to Photos. In the TV it essentially expands the contrast ration and color palette, resulting in a more realistic and vibrant picture. When talking about HDR in Photos the camera combines multiple images that are taken with different exposures to create a single image, which then has a greater dynamic range.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Are Chromebooks Fuelling Rise in Linux OS Marketshare?

    It’s a question many have been asking over the past few months, as open-source enthusiasts rallied around reports that show Linux marketshare gaining ground for another consecutive month.

    ‘Why?’, many asked. Why now, after years of loitering around ~1% mark is Linux lifting off? Why are stat counters and markshare analysts suddenly finding more beans to count in the penguins’ corner?

    The answer could be Chromebooks.

  • Fast Rewind: 2016 Was a Wild Ride for HPC

    Market signals from ARM chip suppliers have been a bit more mixed and it will be interesting to watch ARM traction in 2017, not least traction in China. Here are three articles looking at ARM’s progress and that SoftBank purchase.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 29

    It’s Christmas time and since (open)SUSE users have been nice, the YaST team brings some gifts for them. This is the result of the last development sprint of 2016.

    As you may have noticed, in the latest sprints we have been focusing more and more in making SUSE CASP possible. That’s even more obvious in this last sprint of the year. For those that have not been following this blog recently, it’s probably worth to remember that SUSE CASP will be a Kubernetes based Container As a Service Platform.

    But our daily work goes beyond CASP, so let’s take a look to all the highlights.

  • Raspberry Pi’s PIXEL Linux desktop environment now available for x86 PCs

    In a rather curious turn, the Raspberry Pi foundation has released an x86 PC port of its PIXEL+Debian Linux desktop environment.

    PIXEL (which is a clunky backronym for Pi Improved Xwindows Environment, Lightweight) is an extensively modified version of the LXDE X11 desktop environment. It was originally released in September for use with Raspberry Pi single-board computers, but now it has also been packaged up for x86 PCs. You can boot your Windows or Mac PC into the PIXEL desktop environment right now, if you so wish.

    In the words of Eben Upton, founder of the foundation, PIXEL is "our best guess as to what the majority of users are looking for in a desktop environment [...] Put simply, it’s the GNU/Linux we would want to use." To that end, PIXEL is both clean and modern-looking, but more importantly it is useful, with a wide range of productivity software and programming tools pre-installed. PIXEL doesn't eschew proprietary software, either; it even comes with the Adobe Flash browser plug-in.

  • How to build powerful and productive online communities

    These accidental communities offered tremendous value to their participants with skills development, networking, and relationships. They also offered significant financial value. The Smithsonian valued Wikipedia at tens of billions of dollars and the Linux Foundation deduced that a typical Linux distribution would cost around $11 billion to recreate using traditional commercial methods.

  • FreeBSD Making Progress On Wayland Support, The Basics Are Working

    FreeBSD is making some progress on supporting Wayland/Weston as an alternative to running the X.Org Server.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • [GNOME Maps] Nearing end of year

    So we're approaching the end of 2016, and I thought I should probably give a little update as it was a while since last time now…

    As can be seen in the screenshot below, the route labels will be expanded a to fill out the available space instead of getting ellipsized when there is no headsign label, as is the case for the Staten Island Ferry in the example

  • 5 rock-solid Linux distros for developers

    Developers love things their way and no other way. To that end, Linux stands to be the ultimate developer’s desktop environment. Linux is endlessly customizable, and it provides easy access to nearly all the software a developer might need. But a good Linux for developers must have other key attributes—like a comfortable work environment, good documentation, and useful features that a developer can benefit from generally.

  • Free FPGA programming with Debian

    FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) are increasingly popular for data acquisition, device control and application acceleration. Debian now features a completely Free set of tools to program FPGA in Verilog, prepare the binary and have it executed on an affordable device.

  • What we did at the Debian Edu / Skolelinux gathering in November 2016 in Oslo

    From November 25 to 27 some people met in the hackerspace bitraf in downtown Oslo. On Saturday and Sunday we met in the morning and hacked and translated all day until we went for dinners in the evening. Despite the short time I think we managed to get a lot done and had good fun, so I'm hoping we'll have another gathering in 2017!

  • Permabit Technology Corporation's Albireo VDO for Ubuntu Server

    In perfect alignment with its self-described identity as "the data reduction expert", Permabit Technology Corporation recently announced availability of its Albireo Virtual Data Optimizer (VDO) 6 for Canonical's Ubuntu Server. VDO data reduction enables enterprise hybrid cloud data centers and cloud service providers to reduce their storage footprint, increase data density and avoid costly data-center expansions, resulting in "massive savings on data-center investment".

  • Evaluating Microsoft Versus Linux for IoT

    It is an operating system based on open source software. The underlying source code can be used, distributed or modified (commercially or non-commercially) by anyone under terms of respective licenses. Linux runs on mobile phones, tablets, network routers, TiVo, smartwatches, video game consoles and television sets.

    Android is a derivative of the GNU/Linux operating system, which is an open source, unix-like operating system. Other popular open source products developed over the years and are still extensively used are Chromium, Mozilla Firefox, LibreOffice, Apache HTTP Server, etc.

  • Smartphone App: PhotoFunia Native App comes to Tizen
  • Guide to the Open Cloud: The State of Virtualization

    Is virtualization still as strategically important as it was now that we are in the age of containers? According to a Red Hat survey of 900 enterprise IT administrators, systems architects, and IT managers across geographic regions and industries, the answer is a resounding yes. Virtualization adoption remains on the rise, and is integrated with many cloud deployments and platforms.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • VK9, the open source project to implement d3d9 over Vulkan reaches another milestone
  • openSUSE on ownCloud

    It is Chrismas time and I have got cookie cutters by openSUSE and ownCloud. What can you create as a happy Working Student at ownCloud and an openSUSE Contributor?

    Normally you deploy ownCloud on openSUSE. But do you know the idiom „to be in seventh heaven“ (auf Wolke 7 schweben)?

    I want to show you openSUSE Leap 42.2 on ownCloud 9.

  • Gaining Traction? Stock Update on Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora 25 on the Dell XPS 13 (late 2016 model)

    Fedora 25 Workstation runs beautifully on the new Kaby Lake Dell XPS 13 ultrabook. And since Fedora ships with an up-to-date kernel, everything works out of the box.

  • Printer fun

    The current cartridges were running low for a while, but I didn't need to change them yet. As I printed a user manual at the beginning of the week (~300+ pages in total), I ran out of the black half-way through. Bought a new cartridge, installed it, and the first strange thing was that it still showed “Black empty - please replace”.

    I powered the printer off and turned it on again (the miracle cure for all IT-related things), and things seemed OK, so I restarted printing. However, this time, the printer was going through 20-30 pages, and then was getting stuck in "Printing document" with green led blinking. Waited for 20 minutes, nothing. So cancel the job (from the printer), restart printing, all fine.

    The next day I wanted to print a single page, and didn't manage to. Checked that the PDF is normal, checked an older PDF which I printed successfully before, nothing worked. Changed drivers, unseated & re-seated the extra memory, changed operating systems, nothing. Not even the built-in printer diagnostic pages were printing.

    The internet was all over with "HP formatter issues"; apparently some HP printers had "green" (i.e. low-quality) soldering, and were failing after a while. But people were complaining about 1-2-4 years, not 9 that my printer worked, and it was very suspicious that all troubles started after my cartridge replacement. Or, more likely, due to the recent sudden increase in printing.

  • That Didn't Last Long: Samsung 960 EVO NVMe Already Fails

    I now have my first dead NVM Express SSD and it only lasted one week... It's already time to RMA the Samsung 960 EVO and unfortunately lost a number of benchmarks that I was working on this weekend.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 2016 – The Year of the Hard Shift

    I’m just going to come out and say it. This thing is being rushed because my thoughts are not exactly careening from stream-to-stream. I am so burned out waiting for the moment when Linux finally catches up with the rest of the tech industry.

    I know there are a lot of you out there right now, don’t deny it, who are saying “Well, welcome to Linux! You’ve finally got your citizenship!” That’s not good enough, nor will it ever be good enough for me–not even close. I apologize right away if it offends anyone’s sensibilities. But there are days when I feel like I’m the only one who sees what’s happening.

  • Lenovo's funky Yoga Book laptop will get a Chrome OS option next year

    The Yoga Book is definitely one of the most interesting and divisive laptop designs to come out in a while - users either love or hate its touchscreen/keyboard deck hook. To a digital artist its integrated "Create Pad" is a godsend, but a mechanical keyboard fan probably sees its integrated haptic key layout as sacrilege. Either way, you'll soon have more options if you want to check out that unique hardware: a Lenovo executive told a Tom's guide reporter that the Yoga Book would be sold in a Chrome OS model in 2017.

  • Manjaro Deepin 16.10.3 and various other updates comes in
  • New Slackware-current Live ISOs with latest Plasma

    I am ready with a new batch of packages for Plasma 5 and to showcase that in a Slackware Live Edition, I stamped a new version on ‘liveslak‘.
    Version 1.1.5 is ready, again containing only minor tweaks compared to the previous release. I made a set of ISO images for several variants of the 64bit and 32bit versions of Slackware Live Edition based on liveslak 1.1.5 and using Slackware-current dated “Thu Dec 1 08:49:20 UTC 2016“. These ISO images have been uploaded and are available on the primary server ‘bear‘. You will find ISO images for a full Slackware, Plasma5, MATE and Cinnamon (yes, I did one this time!) variants and the 700MB small XFCE variant.

  • Adobe unifies its Flash plugin releases with version 24

    Adobe has silently been developing an updated version of their NPAPI based Linux Flash Player plugin for a while.

    Remember, NPAPI is the plugin protocol used in Mozilla compatible browsers, for which Adobe was supposedly not releasing any new developments. Instead they only incorporated security fixes to their stone-age version 11 of the Linux player during the past years.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, November 2016

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Christmas-music-carousel-snap - with the Raspberry PiGlow!

    As part of our festive competition to build a seasonal snap on your RaspberryPi...we made an attempt ourselves!

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    Linus Torvalds has accepted the AMDGPU DC display code pull request for the Linux 4.15 kernel. AMD Linux users can now rejoice! Overnight David Airlie sent in the AMDGPU DC pull request for Linux 4.15 and since then Linus Torvalds was active on the kernel mailing list ranting about AMD header files and other unrelated to DC code. He was also pulling in other PRs... It was getting a bit worrisome, given the DC code not being in pristine shape, but it was exciting as heck to see this evening that he did go ahead and pull in the 132 thousand lines of new kernel code to land this AMDGPU DC. Linus hasn't provided any commentary about DC on the kernel mailing list as of writing.
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