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today's leftovers

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  • All FreeDesktop.org Projects Now Appear To Have A Contributor Covenant

    X.Org, GStreamer, Wayland, LibreOffice, Mesa, VA-API, Harfbuzz, and SPICE are among the many projects hosted by FreeDesktop.org that now appear to be on a contributor covenant / code of conduct.

    The Contributor Covenant for those unfamiliar with it is trying to promote a code of conduct for open-source projects that is trying to promote diversity and equality of contributors to libre software projects. From the covenant's website, "Part of this problem [of "free, libre, and open source projects suffer from a startling lack of diversity, with dramatically low representation by women, people of color, and other marginalized populations"] lies with the very structure of some projects: the use of insensitive language, thoughtless use of pronouns, assumptions of gender, and even sexualized or culturally insensitive names."

  • Dell introduces two Ubuntu Linux laptops that are the most powerful in the world right now

    Ubuntu Linux-powered machines that feature impressive hardware are few and far between but Dell has introduced two of the most powerful portable notebook workstations running a completely different operating system. The exciting part is that both of these machines are available to purchase on Dell’s online website right now, but let us walk you through the specifications first to see which machine is the right one for you.

  • Old Vista Laptop Into A Linux ZFS File Server

    You might be surprised at how much potential for usefulness still remains in older equipment.

    My wife’s old laptop originally booted with Windows Vista, which (apart from being a generally substandard OS – Microsoft employees ran into so many problems with it, they reportedly didn’t even use it internally*) is no longer supported*(2). Mainstream support for Vista ended back in 2012, and as of April 11 2017, Vista will be officially dead

  • Vulkan 1.0.47 Released

    Another week, another update to the Khronos Vulkan specification. This Saturday morning brought the Vulkan 1.0.47 release.

  • GP10B & GP107 NVIDIA Support Land For Nouveau Linux 4.12

    Ben Skeggs has queued up some of the last patches from NVIDIA's open-source enabler who last week left the company and queued up the code in DRM-Next for introduction in Linux 4.12.

    These patches authored by Alexandre Courbot include enablement of the GP10B and GP107 for this open-source NVIDIA DRM driver. GP10B is the GPU found within the Tegra X2 SoC on the recently released Jetson TX2 board. This is a mobile Pascal graphics processor that packs a fair punch on this SoC. As usual for Maxwell+ GPUs, GP10B requires some new firmware images.

  • RHEL 7 STIG v1 updates for openstack-ansible-security
  • Univention Corporate Server 4.2 released
  • Skylake takes flight on industrial EBX and Mini-ITX boards

    Perfectron announced a rugged, Linux-ready EBX SBC with Skylake-H Xeon and Core CPUs, plus an industrial Skylake-S Mini-ITX board.

    Perfectron, which recently announced a rugged, 3.5-inch OXY5361A SBC with Intel 6th Gen Core Skylake-U CPUs, has unveiled EBX and Mini-ITX boards with 6th Gen Skylake-H and Skylake-S chips, respectively. The rugged, EBX form-factor OXY5739A SBC lists support for Fedora 20 and Ubuntu 13.04/13.10/14.04 in addition to Windows, while the full-height Mini-ITX INS8349B makes no mention of OS support.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google Kahlee: The First AMD-Powered Chromebook

    After years of many Intel and ARM Chromebooks, the first AMD-powered Chromebook appears to be gearing up for release.

    Continuing with tradition, the AMD Chromebook is using Coreboot. Thus we have the first signs of it via Coreboot code review with this new Google board being codenamed "Kahlee." The Coreboot code began appearing for review just minutes ago after other Kahlee references in the Chrome OS world have been found in recent weeks.

  • Put down your coffee and admire the sheer amount of data Windows 10 Creators Update will slurp from your PC

    Next week Microsoft will begin the slowish rollout of its big update to Windows 10, the Creators Update.

    Right now, it's doing a little damage control, and preempting complaints about privacy, by listing the types of information its operating system will automatically and silently leak from PCs, slabs, and laptops back to Redmond.

    When Windows 10 came out, Reg readers were alarmed by the volume of information the software was collecting and sending back to base. Ever since then, Microsoft has been fighting a PR battle to reassure people that such data slurping isn't all bad – it's "just" telemetry and diagnostics and potentially your files.

    Now Redmond's had a little rethink for the Creators Update, and decided to come clean on exactly what the software will phone home – even insisting the closed-source operating system will scoop up less surveillance this time.

  • Can Linux OpenSwitch Project help startups get network 5G ready?

    The network bottleneck needs all the tech talent startups can throw at it. The Linux Foundation’s OpenSwitch Project wants to remove lower-stack roadblocks that might stifle their innovation.

    “We’re seeing startups come in and do really, really interesting things really, really well,” said Drew Schulke (pictured), vice president of converged networking at Dell EMC.

    However, they could do more in less time if the foundation of their work were provided in advance, he added. To this end, Dell contributed the base operating system for the OpenSwitch Project.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.10.8, Receives Flatpak 0.9

    openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio is back with news for users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system series, informing them about the latest technologies and updated applications that landed in the repositories.

    The developer starts his weekly report by reminding us that openSUSE Tumbleweed was the first GNU/Linux distribution to ship the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment to its users. A total of eighteen snapshots appear to have been released for Tumbleweed users, bringing all the newest apps, including the Mozilla Firefox 52.0.1 web browser and KDE Plasma 5.9.4 desktop environment.

  • Red Hat and Fedora Teams Welcome Ubuntu to GNOME and Wayland with Open Arms
  • Canonical Refocus

    And, Mark, Jane, I know this will have been a tough decision to come to, and this will be a tough day for the different teams affected. Hang in there: Ubuntu has had such a profound impact on open source and while the future path may be a little different, I am certain it will be fruitful.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Linux Foundation: Not a Friend of Desktop Linux, the GPL, or Openness

    The Linux Foundation has no respect for FOSS. Nor does it seem care about any users of Linux who aren't connected with the enterprise. It's been that way since the beginning. It now appears that the Foundation also has little respect for the GPL...you know, Linux's license. Nor does it appear to be much of a believer in the notion of transparency.

  • Nageru 1.5.0 released

    I just released version 1.5.0 of Nageru, my live video mixer. The biggest feature is obviously the HDMI/SDI live output, but there are lots of small nuggets everywhere; it's been four months in the making.

  • Manipulated, a short puzzle-platformer where you need some brains

    Manipulated [Steam] is a short puzzle-platformer that warns you about having to think. It's certainly not wrong.

  • Shovel Knight’s 3.0 patch lands, with plenty of new content

    The fun and charming platform inspired by 8-bit era visuals has gotten a shiny new campaign. This isn’t the only major addition and there’s plenty other new content available to enjoy.

  • Conference to have Daily Keynote Speakers

    The openSUSE Conference is about seven weeks away and this year will again have high-quality keynote speakers.

    Keynote speakers for this year’s conference at the Z-Bau in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 26 – 28 will be from SaltStack, KDE and Free Software Foundation Europe.

    Matthias Kirschner, President of FSFE, will take the stage on May 26 at 10 a.m. and provide attendees an exorbitant amount of information about governance and open source.

    Later that evening, there will be entertainment and a Brazilian style barbecue, so stick around for the Friday night fun.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • New Regulations Appear To Authorize Chinese Law Enforcement To Hack Into Computers Anywhere In The World

    A recurrent theme here on Techdirt has been the way in which the West has ceded the moral high ground in so many areas involving the tech world. For example, in 2010, we noted that the US had really lost the right to point fingers over Internet censorship. The moral high ground on surveillance went in 2013 for people, and in 2014 for economic espionage. Meanwhile, the UK has been shown to be as bad as the most disreputable police states in its long-running blanket surveillance of all its citizens.

    The UK's most recent move to cast off any pretense that it is morally superior to other "lesser" nations is the Investigatory Powers Act, which formalizes all the powers its intelligence services have been secretly using for years. One of the most intrusive of those is the power to carry out what is quaintly termed "equipment interference" -- hacking -- anywhere in the world.

  • Android 7.1.2 Nougat Update Now Rolling Out to Nexus and Pixel Devices; Brings Fixes for Numerous Issues
  • Waze for Android Auto is finally on its way as beta testing prepares to kick off
  • Mouser Boosts Open Source Lineup with DFRobot, Globally Distributes Plug-and-Play Sensors Series

    Mouser Electronics, Inc., the New Product Introduction (NPI) leader that empowers innovation, announces a global distribution agreement with DFRobot, a leading robotics and open source hardware provider. The agreement brings DFRobot's robotics and maker-focused products to Mouser's growing open source lineup.

    [...]

    The Gravity Arduino Starter Kit is a plug-and-play electronics toolkit that helps beginners easily learn how to work with sensors and the Arduino platform. The kit includes a DFRduino UNO R3 microcontroller, which functions exactly the same as Arduino UNO, and 12 popular Gravity components and sensors. The Gravity 27-Piece Sensor Kit for Arduino offers a robust selection of sensors that are fully compatible with the Arduino platform. The kit features a bundle of the most popular DFRobot Gravity sensors, including those for light, CO2, sound, touch, and distance, plus an accelerometer and a relay module. Both the Starter Kit and Sensor Kit use the IO Expansion Shield for connecting sensors to the Arduino board.

  • 5 cool C/C++ app dev tools

    As compelling as new languages like Rust are for building systems, C and C++ remain fundamental for writing applications that run close to the metal, despite the waxing and waning of their usage statistics.

    What's more, the culture of tools for C/C++ development remains deep and fruitful. Here are five C-related projects -- compilers, libraries, and support tools -- that caught our eye recently, whether for bolstering existing projects or starting new ones.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Tesla’s software update for internet browser, Linux update and new features coming in ~6 weeks, says Elon Musk

    When Tesla started pushing its 8.1 software update to its fleet this week, it was really light on UI improvements and instead focused almost entirely on Autopilot 2.0 updates.

    Several of the changes that CEO Elon Musk previously associated with the upcoming 8.1 update have been pushed another ~6 weeks.

    We are talking about the expected internet browser update, Linux kernel update, and several bug fixes – especially having to do with Tesla’s media app.

  • Linux-Fu: Applications on the Web

    Did you know you can run remote Linux GUI programs in a browser with HTML5 support? It’s even secure because you can use SSH tunneling and that little trick means you don’t even need to open additional ports. If this sounds like gibberish, read on, it’s actually pretty easy to get up and running.

    I recently was a guest on a Houston-based podcast, and the hosts asked me if the best thing about writing for Hackaday was getting to work with the other Hackaday staff. I told them that was really good, but what I like best was interacting with people (well, most people) in the comments. That sometimes you’d post an article and someone would bring a topic up in comments that would really knock your socks off. This is how I wound up with this nearly ideal remote access solution, that requires nothing on the remote side but a web browser.

  • Philips Hue Uses Kubernetes to Keep the Lights On

    The open-source Kubernetes container management and orchestration system isn't just for hyper-scale data center operators, it can also benefit consumer electronics vendors. Speaking at the Kubecon / Cloud Native con even in Berlin this week, Mark Van Straten, Senior Developer at development firm Q42, detailed how Philips embraced Kubernetes to help enable the next generation of the Philips Hue smart light bulb product.

  • Netrunner Desktop 17.03 'Cyclotron' Debian-based KDE Linux distro now available

    When you choose a Linux-based operating system, you also choose a desktop environment. For many users, the DE sort of is the operating system. In other words, for some, they will really only interact with the user interface -- especially if they avoid the command line. A good operating system will get out of the user's way, allowing them to focus on the apps and tools they need.

    If you are moving from Windows to Linux, KDE can be a great desktop environment. It is very reminiscent of the traditional Windows 95 to Windows 7 experience. Unfortunately, KDE can be a bit tedious to set up. Sure, it works fine "out of the box," but customizing it can be daunting. Luckily, there is a Debian-based operating system that is configured beautifully -- especially for those leaving Microsoft's OS. Called "Netrunner Desktop," it comes pre-loaded with many useful programs, making it an absolute joy to use. Today, it reaches version 17.03, code-named "Cyclotron."

  • Technicals in Focus for Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • This was Fedora at CS50x.ni

    On Tuesday, March 14th, the Fedora Nicaragua community and the CS50x.ni staff, with the support from Fundación UNO and the Fedora Project, we had the opportunity to meet to see a series of lectures in which the speakers shared their experience using Free Software, the importance and benefits of the different software tools used in the CS50x.ni course. The lectures were aimed for anyone who is taking the CS50x.ni course currently, or who wants to take it in the future or people interested in learning more about free software and more specifically about the Fedora Project.

  • When the 'S' in HTTPS also stands for shady

    Just when we'd learned the importance of HTTPS in address bars, spammers and malicious hackers have figured out how to game the system.

    Let's Encrypt is an automated service that lets people turn their old unencrypted URLs into safely encrypted HTTPS addresses with a type of file called a certificate. It's terrific, especially because certificates are expensive (overpriced, actually) and many people can't afford them. So it's easy to argue that the Let's Encrypt service has done more than we may ever realize to strengthen the security of the internet and users everywhere.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]

    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.

  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution

    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.

  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project

    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).

  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services

    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.

  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)

    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.

  • GUADEC accommodation

    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.

  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal

    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.

  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW

    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

today's leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices. Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own. Read more

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts
    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.
  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications
    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations. What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.
  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge
    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.
  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released
    Based on Slackware64-current Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers :-)
  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro
    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.
  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]
    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.
  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Software and Games Leftovers

  • LXD Weekly Status #35
    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while. We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week. On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.
  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released
    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!
  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade
    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.
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  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience
    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.
  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price
    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.
  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th
    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.