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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Chromebookify Your Laptop Now!

    A few years ago there was a project designed to boot generic laptops so they functioned as Chromebooks. It was a cool project, but unfortunately, the compatibility wasn't great, and it wasn't reliable to use on a daily basis. Although Chromebooks are old news these days, it still would be quite useful to transform aging laptop computers into Chromebooks. Because they have such low system requirements, older laptops running the ChromeOS can become quite useful again.

  • AppStream 0.9 Brings Many Changes, Breaks API/ABI

    Version 0.9 of AppStream is now available. As a refresher, AppStream is a FreeDesktop.org specification backed by multiple major Linux distributions as a cross-distribution effort of standardizing Linux component metadata.

  • Mesa 11.1 Will Likely Support The Raspberry Pi 3D Support In Linux 4.5

    In Linux 4.4 there wasn't 3D support, but that's changing with Linux 4.5. However, besides needing the Linux 4.5+ kernel, you also need a supported VC4 Gallium3D driver. While there's been the VC4 Gallium3D driver developed in mainline Mesa over the past many months, the branched code currently present for the imminent Mesa 11.1 release doesn't support the DRM driver as set to be shipped in Linux 4.5.

  • Intel Broxton OpenCL Support Added To Beignet
  • Snapshot 1.0.344.34 - move tabs between windows
  • Latest Vivaldi Web Browser Snapshot Lets Users Move Tabs Between Windows

    Earlier today, December 14, 2015, the developers behind the cross-platform and free Vivaldi web browser announced the release of a new snapshot build towards the second Beta version of the software.

  • Install NetXMS with Ubuntu 15.10
  • How to install Composer on Debian / Ubuntu Linux
  • How To Make Python Run As Fast As Julia
  • The Funding Crowd 54, the latest in Linux crowdfunding news

    Read the latest in crowdfunding news for Linux in the last issue of The Funding Crowd this year. We have an even mix of hidden gems and biggies this time, as well as a few bonus picks that might be worth checking out.

  • Best distro of 2015 poll

    Let's do it again. Last year, in a first-of-its-kind Dedoimedo best distro vote poll, I asked you about your favorite operating system, and you responded in kind. With exactly 1,900 votes, you opined on the state of the Linux. It's that time of the year once more.

    I am going to post an article reflecting my own view on how this year of distro testing went, but I would also very much like to hear from you. Like in 2014, I used the THP on Distrowatch and selected the top ten entries for the poll. But there's also a free field for you to add any other distro you like, as well as comments. It ought to be interesting, and hopefully not too quiet. After me.

  • Mageia: Some news of what’s boiling in the Cauldron

    For those of you who are most familiar with Mageia and its development, you are starting to know the drill: Cauldron is the place where we break stuff by upgrading everything that we tried to keep stable during the previous release cycle, and then we work on making it stable again. We are now in this stabilization phase and we were aiming internally for a first development snapshot of Mageia 6 as a set of ISO images, but there are still a number of factors that make it difficult right now.

  • Dropping Plasma 4

    Since the KDE 4 desktop has been unmaintained for several months and it's becoming increasingly difficult to support two versions of Plasma, we are removing it from our repositories. Plasma 5.5 has just been released and should be stable enough to replace it.

  • Enlightenment 0.20.1 Released With Fixes
  • And the date winners are: Kdenlive Café #1 and #2
  • Video Series

    I’m nearly a month down on a branch for Builder 3.20. It’s goal is to radically simplify the process of creating plugins, and prepare for external plugins. We really wanted to create a solid plugin story before doing that and things are progressing nicely.

  • CentOS 7 1511 Updates To GNOME 3.14, KDE 4.14
  • Linux Top 3: Rockstor, Koozali SME and Chapeau

    In the world of Linux distributions, there are many that are based on Debian and Ubuntu, but those are the only two distro that have fueled a following of derivative distros, Fedora and CentOS have too.

  • Monthly News – November 2015

    Our apologies for posting these news so late. Since the website and forums went down, we’ve been hit by two new server issues. Two of our repository servers lost their hard drives. That’s a total of 3 servers going down in just a few weeks. This time around we had full backups though and we were able to minimize downtime (no downtime at all on the Mint and LMDE2 repositories, a few hours yesterday on the LMDE 1 repositories). We’re eager to resume work on Linux Mint but at the moment most of our focus is still on server administration, on recovery, on configuration but also on making sure we’re stronger and issues like these have less of an impact on us going forward.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 OEM images available

    Reminder: OEM images are for computer vendors and manufacturers. They allow Linux Mint to be “pre-installed” on a machine which is then used by another person than the one who performed the installation. After an OEM installation, the computer is set in such a way that the next reboot features a small setup screen where the new user/customer has the ability to choose his/her username, password, keyboard layout and locale.

  • Cybersecurity Researchers Are Hunted from All Sides

    ybersecurity researcher Peter Kruse, founder of CSIS Security Group in Denmark, thought his mother was calling. Her number appeared on his phone, but when he answered, it wasn’t her. Instead, a male voice told him to stop what he was doing as a computer expert.

    “They checked my family members,” he said, referring to his anonymous tormenters. “They did their homework.”

    Security researcher Costin Raiu at Kaspersky Lab in Romania has a similar story. While he was analyzing Stuxnet, a worm written by the US and Israel and considered to be the first cyber weapon, someone broke into his house.

  • Torrent websites infect 12 million users a month with malware [Ed: propaganda for blanket silencing/censoring sharing sites]

    Institutions such as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) are fighting a losing battle in relation to preventing this type of piracy, simply because of the sheer number of people across the world tapping into the technology to download their favourite television show or album.

  • Raspberry Pi Zero: What you need to know

    Everything you need to know about the tiny $5 computer that is the newest member of the Raspberry Pi family.

  • Want Windows 10 on the Raspberry Pi? It's virtually possible

    Work to turn the $35 Raspberry Pi board into a thin client for Windows and Linux virtual desktops appears to be paying off.

  • The Gear S2 Is the Gear Live 2: Samsung Sidelines Android Wear

    Have you been anticipating a Gear Live 2 from Samsung running Android Wear? Well, we’re way past Google’s 2015 I/O Conference, so I think it’s safe to say that the Android Wear-powered Gear Live 2 is a no-show. With that said, however, I don’t think the Gear Live 2 was ever meant to be. I don’t think the Gear Live 2 was ever in the cards for Samsung, ever on the Korean giant’s “to make” list. To find out why, though, the key lies in Samsung’s latest smartwatch, the Tizen-powered Gear S2.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Apple CEO Tim Cook lashes out at Google’s Chromebooks

    Chromebooks have been for quite some time now, and that success has also happened in the classroom. Many schools have opted for Chromebooks over more expensive laptops or iPads from Apple, and that doesn’t sit well with Apple CEO Tim Cook.

    [...]

    While I can understand why the success of Chromebooks has irritated Apple’s CEO, I’m glad that they are available for the students and schools that want to use them. Chromebooks aren’t perfect but they definitely offer a low-cost and very viable alternative to more expensive devices, and they work amazingly well for the folks that use them.

    And what is wrong with that? It’s good that schools and students have options these days. I remember the dark days when everything was Microsoft-oriented, and I’m very happy that those days are well and truly behind us. Those were the dark ages of computing, and I never liked the idea of one company owning a particular market. Competition breeds innovation, and it offers real choices for consumers.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook labelled 'out of touch' after naming Chromebooks test machines

    TIM COOK has been labelled "out of touch with reality" after his comments that Google Chromebooks are merely "test machines" and are only successful because they are cheap.

    Cook made the remarks during an interview with Buzzfeed during a surprise visit to Apple's new Upper East Side retail store in New York ahead of its Hour of Code program, which kicked off in all of its retail stores on Thursday.

    A small education technology firm called Neverware has since been so outraged by his remarks that it has decided to write to the Apple CEO and give him a good telling off.

  • Dell Will Begin Making Their UEFI Firmware Easy To Update From Linux
  • Dell Frees UEFI, iXsystems Wins Double Silver & More…

    Dell Fixing UEFI for Linux? Linux users may be able to update their UEFI firmware on devices, if Dell has their way. The computer manufacturing giant is looking at making things easier for Linux users, and Richard Hughes writes on his GNOME blog that this capability might be available as early as Fedora 24. “With Dell on board, I’m hoping it will give some of the other vendors enough confidence in the LVFS to talk about distributing their own firmware in public,” Hughes writes, and we have our fingers crossed here.

  • HPC Myths Need Not Hamper the Technology’s Growth

    Many HPC systems use standard operating systems, most notably Linux, which increases the familiarity for most network administrators. HPC manufacturers have also taken steps in recent years to improve the usability of their systems. In fact, more business users now directly access HPC servers and clusters to run high-end data analysis applications.

  • Containers Gain Fans: From Finance to Entertainment Worlds

    In the last several years, the hype surrounding containers has grown, but so has their usage. At the Tectonic Summit earlier this month, the focus wasn't on hype, but rather on real-world use-cases, as container technology enters mainstream IT. Tectonic is a commercial product built by CoreOS, and includes CoreOS Linux as the operating system, the rocket (Rkt) container platform and the Kubernetes container management system. CoreOS competes and collaborates with Docker Inc., the lead commercial sponsor of Docker containers. Users and real-world deployment stories dominated the event. Financial services firms were well-represented among the users. Goldman Sachs and Bank of America Merrill Lynch discussed how and why they are using containers. The International Securities Exchange (ISE) explained how it is using a CoreOS container-based infrastructure to enable its trading platform and 150 million messages a minute. Also at the summit, entertainment giant Viacom detailed how it's using containers and why it's moving the popular MTV.com Website to a container infrastructure. We look at some of the highlights of the Tectonic Summit as well as the use cases presented.

  • Xiaopan OS - Pentesting Distribution for Wireless Security Enthusiasts
  • ROSA Desktop Fresh R6 Linux OS Switches to the LXQt 0.10.0 Desktop Environment

    The developers behind the ROSA GNU/Linux operating system have announced the release and immediate availability for download of the first ROSA Desktop Fresh R6 LXQt edition of the project.

  • C++ ABI change
  • Arch Linux Switches To The New C++ ABI

    The noted posted this morning to ArchLinux.org confirms the switch to the new ABI. Arch Linux developers recommend rebuilding all non-repo packages against the new application binary interface.

  • Manjaro Linux Project Releases KDE Plasma 5.5 Live Media, Download Now

    The Manjaro development team, through Philip Müller, has had the pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the first development release of Manjaro Linux 15.12 "Capella" KDE Plasma 5.5 Live OS.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2015/50

    The last week was no perfect one for openSUSE Tumbleweed: not a single snapshot could be published. Sadly, there were some issues with OBS ‘refusing to build’ new medias, which means snapshots could not be passed on to openQA or even be considered for release.

  • Bits from the Debian Continuous Integration project

    It’s been almost 2 years since the Debian Continuous Integration project has been launched, and it has proven to be a useful resource for the development of Debian.

  • Why You Should Go To UbuCon in Los Angeles in January

    The 21st – 22nd January 2016 are some important dates you need to pencil into your calendar. The reason? That is when the UbuCon Summit is happening in Pasadena, California, USA.

  • Meet Linux Mint 17.3 Rosa Cinnamon Edition – Video Overview and Screenshots

    Linux Mint 17.3 Cinnamon has been released and announced by Linux Mint Team, this release featuring the latest version cinnamon 2.8 desktop environment, based-on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, linux kernel 3.19, Xorg 1.17, Mesa 10.5.9 and will get updates and security patch until 2019.

  • Mint 17.3 (Rosa) on the Dell XPS 13 (9343)

    I’m a big fan of the Dell XPS 13. It is the first laptop I’ve felt an emotional attachment to since my first Powerbook. The only issue is that I have not been able to run my distro of choice, Linux Mint, due to severe issues with the trackpad.

  • Rikomagic MK36S is a Windows or Ubuntu mini PC with a Cherry Trail CPU

    Rikomagic’s latest mini-desktop computer features an Intel Atom x5-Z8300 Cherry Trail quad-core processor, 2GB of RAM, 32GB of storage, and 802.11ac WiFi.

  • 3 open hardware projects for beginners

    I'm part of the Lunchbox Electronics team where we create innovative, new products with great imagination and passion for open source hardware. Our goal is to combine the art and engineering of an R&D Lab with playful products and projects. We believe that learning should be intuitive and fun.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Exploding the Linux Container Host

    Ben Corrie discusses Project Bonneville, how to create a shared Linux kernel for privileged containers, running containers without Linux, and VMware's dynamic resource constraints of a container host.

  • GNOME Content Apps Hackfest

    From December the 2nd to the 4th, a dozen of GNOME Hackers and LibreOffice Hackers joined forces in Medialab Prado, Madrid, to hack on our content apps.

    During these three days we had important discussions about the future of these apps. Topics such as: sharing resources between apps, planning how the Share of content is going to be done in the future, new designs and development plans for each app, and bugfixes.

  • Getting Qt 5 right in your application

    I’m sure many of you already read about Clazy. For those who didn’t, it’s a quite convenient tool for checking your code and making sure you’re getting Qt’s API right. There’s some non-trivial quirks here and there that aren’t very important but once polished can push your system considerably, especially on those cases that are ran repeatedly.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 Screenshot Tour
  • Debian Fun in November 2015
  • A few weekend security updates
  • D-Link DCS-2630L Full-HD 180-Degree WiFi Camera Review

    The D-Link DCS-2630L is an indoor security camera which features full high definition video, responsive recording, 2-way audio, night vision, 802.11ac WiFi connectivity and the company's first 180-degree Ultra-Wide view, delivering the widest angle lens available on a consumer surveillance camera.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Does Ubuntu stand Windows 10 and OSX?

    I have to say I use Ubuntu less these days, but I still love Linux and Ubuntu in particular and I would love to install the next version and see a light, modern UI, it would truly kick some asses!

  • The Oncoming Train of Enterprise Container Deployments

    As many of you know, adoption of containers has skyrocketed over the last year or two. Thus far, containers have been used mostly by early adopters, yet over the next several years we can expect widespread enterprise adoption. In fact, I expect the rate of adoption to exceed that of cloud (IaaS services), or virtualization before that. While it took enterprises perhaps a decade to fully plan and implement their virtualization initiatives, we can expect many enterprises to have production container deployments within three to five years. I fear that many of these implementations will have serious problems. Worse still, container technologies, when misused, inherently force us to own bad solutions for far longer.

  • Geek News Radio

    Geek News Radio will be a new show from Sixgun Productions, who, in the past, have brought you Linux Outlaws. Unlike that show, GNR won’t focus on a relatively narrow topic like Linux and open source software but will instead cover anything remotely geeky that the hosts want to talk about. Despite the name — yes, it’s an obvious Fallout reference — we expect this will be less of a news show and rather have the feel of a few friends shooting the shit over a beer in the pub. Think of it as going back to the very basics of LO, the early years before we started with all the interviews and segments and recurring topics.

  • man-pages-4.03 is released

    I've released man-pages-4.03. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

  • ASoC Support Still Being Worked On For AMD APUs

    Alex Deucher on Friday sent out the latest patches for implementing ASoC support for AMD APUs. These patches provide i2s audio support via a new driver and integrates with the AMDGPU DRM.

  • [Solus Project] Daily ISO 0.201549.3.0 Released

    The Solus Project is happy to announce the release of a new Daily ISO, 0.201549.3.0.

  • Pentoo 2015.0 RC4.6 Has Been Released With A Brand New Installer

    Pentoo 2015.0 RC4.6 is a free and open-source Linux system based on the good old Gentoo Linux, ideal for network engineers and hackers.

    Among others, Pentoo 2015.0 RC4.6 has received a new installer, tested by the team in real-life scenarios, usability improvements have been implemented and a lot of bugs have been squashed as well.

    While this is only a pre-release system, the Pentoo team is prepping for a major release, which should get interesting new features and tools.

  • Oracle Linux 7.2 Screenshot Tour
  • Reproducible Builds World Summit

    This week, I was attending the first Reproducible Builds World Summit in Athens. A while ago, I have fixed some reproducibility bugs in the Haskell compiler GHC (parts of #4012), and that got me a ticket to this fully sponsored and nicely organised event.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 “Rosa” Cinnamon released!
  • Ubuntu 16.04 Has Received Kernel 4.3 On The Master-Next Branch, Kernel 4.4 RC3 Is Also Tracked On The Unstable Channel
  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-8.5 Confirmed, But The Developers Need Some Extra Time

    Łukasz Zemczak, one of the Ubuntu Touch developers has announced that they have to update a lot of packages and so, the development takes more time.

  • Yet Another Ubuntu Touch Port For LG Optimus G Has Been Created

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Other New Budget Laptop For Linux Testing
  • Podcast Season 3 Episode 21
  • December 2015 Issue of Linux Journal

    Anyone who's active in the Linux community knows that while we love open source and we swear by the kernel, the real power of Linux is the people making up the community. Whether it's folks using Linux in a server room, people contributing code or documentation to a project in their spare time, or even geeks putting Linux stickers on their laptops, Linux is about people. This month, Brian Conner has a great interview with Jeremy Garcia, the founder of LinuxQuestions.org. If there's a better example of a healthy and interactive Linux community, you'll be hard pressed to find it. If you want to know the history of LinuxQuestions, find out more about the man behind it, or even what the future holds, you should check out the interview. Jeremy is as cool as you'd expect him to be!

  • Linux Foundation offers OpenStack admin course
  • Minutes of the Board Meeting of December, 1st, 2015
  • Q4OS 1.4.4 Screenshot Tour
  • Arch Linux on your Android phone

    In this tutorial I will show you one of methods how to install Arch linux together with your android system on your phone.
    This method WILL NOT REPLACE your current android system and is safe to use for everybody. It uses independent file which is mounted and you are chrooted to this system. After you can connect via SSH, VNC directly from your phone, PC …

Can We Save Wireless from Regulators?

Filed under
Misc

Linux was born and grew within an ecosystem of norms, not laws. Those norms were those of programming (C), operating systems (*NIX), command shells (bash, etc.), e-mail (SMTP, etc.) licenses (GPL, etc.) and Internet protocols (TCP/IP and the rest).

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