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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Singing About the Year of the Linux Desktop

    The first song I heard about the Linux Desktop was Hold On, It’s Coming, released in 1971 by Country Joe McDonald. This was an amazing prediction, considering that Linus Torvalds was only two years old at the time. Is it possible that young Linus heard this piece and it spurred him to create the GNU/Linux operating system? We may never know.

  • IBM Moves to Advance Blockchain in the Enterprise

    IBM delivers blockchain as a service for developers and commits to making the technology ready for business.

  • Container networking offers opportunity to simplify networks

    It's nearly impossible to go to any technology conference and not hear the words Docker containers at least once. Containers were an old and decidedly niche technology until Docker emerged with a new use case and changed the game, helping usher in a new era of DevOps by enabling developers to rapidly package and deploy applications.

  • Release of ctioga2 version 0.14

    The day has finally come again to release a new version of my plotting program, ctioga2.

  • Canonical Shows Off Its Immense Ubuntu Stand at MWC 2016, Convergence Awaits You

    With MWC (Mobile World Congress) 2016 just around the corner, Canonical now teases users with the latest preparations for its awesome stand at the number one mobile congress event.

    We've already told you what Canonical's plans are this year at MWC 2016, but we will once again remind you that you'll finally be able to taste the latest Ubuntu convergence features, as well as to get your hands on the newest Ubuntu-powered devices.

  • Zephyr Project — Linux Foundation Announces Open Source Operating System For IoT
  • Android device manager app vuln leaves millions at risk of pwnage

    Flaws in a widely used Android device manager app leave users at risk of phone data hijacking and malicious code execution unless they update their smartphones, security researchers warn.

    Flaws in the AirDroid, a free device manager app which allows users to access their Android devices through their computers, leave an estimated 50 million users exposed to potential hacking unless they patch, Check Point warns.

    Attacks could take the form of something as simple as a booby-trapped SMS message or contact request. Once exploited, the security flaw would enables attackers to execute malicious code on a compromised device before siphoning off sensitive data or pulling off other hacker attacks.

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  • Kali Rolling ISO of DOOM, Too.

    A while back we introduced the idea of Kali Linux Customisation by demonstrating the Kali Linux ISO of Doom. Our scenario covered the installation of a custom Kali configuration that contained select tools required for a remote vulnerability assessment. The customised Kali ISO would undergo an unattended autoinstall in a remote client site and automatically connect back to our OpenVPN server over TCP port 443. The OpenVPN connection would then bridge the remote and local networks, allowing us full “layer 3” access to the internal network from our remote location. The resulting custom ISO could then be sent to the client who would just pop it into a virtual machine template and the whole setup would happen automagically with no intervention – as depicted in the image below.

  • Manjaro Now Available for Raspberry Pi

    While Manjaro Linux has been available for desktop Linux environments for a few years now, it has not been available for ARM devices. This past week marked a huge turning point for Raspberry Pi users, as the Manjaro Arm project marked its first alpha release. The reason this is such big news is that many Raspberry Pi users did not have a great entryway into Arch Linux prior to the Manjaro Arm Project. Arch has always been available for the Raspberry Pi, through either a direct download or using NOOBS, but neither is as user friendly as most other Raspberry Pi distros. This is where Manjaro Linux comes into the picture. Manjaro provides a more user-friendly approach to Arch with the goal of getting users into the Arch space who found either the installation or documentation a bit overwhelming.

  • An update about the HA stack on Debian
  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition
  • Interviews: 'Ubuntu Unleashed' Author Matthew Helmke Responds

    Is there a way to get systemd to not throw away... stderr? This is driving us nuts when we have about six hundred Ubuntu servers, and simple problems are harder to solve because stderr is not displayed in the terminal or saved in the journal.

  • Pimoroni Competition Winners

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  • Linux Foundation whistles up 'Fido' for SDN, NFV

    The Linux Foundation has kicked off a new collaboration designed to push open I/O closer to the metal, to squeeze higher performance out of the white-box world. – which the outfit assures the world is pronounced “Fido” – builds on efforts like Intel's Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK).

    The other foundation technology under Fido might come as a surprise: Cisco has dropped its vector packet processing (VPP) technology into the effort.

  • QDirStat 0.86-Beta1 announced

    Every hard disk, however large it may be, is filled up to capacity after some time. Then it's about time to find out where all that disk space has gone, and to reclaim some of it.

    This is what KDirStat was all about. The original KDirStat was a KDE 3 application. Now, there is the brand-new QDirStat, based on the same code, but with most of it rewritten with newer technology based on the latest Qt 5. It no longer depends on KDE; rather, it's now desktop agnostic, running just as well under GNOME, Xfce and all thoser other X11-based Linux/BSD desktops.

  • GNOME Maps 3.20 Now Available for Beta Testing with OpenStreetMap Editing

    The GNOME Project is about to come up with the first Beta build of the upcoming major release of the open source desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems, GNOME 3.20, so they're updating most of the core apps and components.

  • SUSECON 2016 Global Conference Set for Washington, D.C.

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  • Hyperledger Project Moves Forward Open Source Blockchain Digital Technology
  • distribution specific details

    To state the obvious: my personal preference is to run Debian GNU/Linux. My current workplace is a CentOS shop and usually I'm the first to claim that it doesn't matter at all, and distribution specific implementation details are irrelevant for what we do (running a JVM).

  • Linux Top 3: Clonezilla, Raspbian and LPS

    Raspbian is often considered to be the *default* distro for the Raspberry Pi (though of course the Pi has no true default as it's just hardware..). Raspbian is based on Debian, optimized for the ARM chipset and small memory of the Raspberry Pi. The Raspbian 2016-02-03 milestone update is the latest release and according to Rapsbian developer Simon Long, "For most people, this is primarily updates and bug fixes to the existing Jessie image ."


    The Lightweight Portable Security (LPS) distribution is intended to be used as a live CD to help users remain private. While the idea of a privacy focused distro is not unique (think Tails), LPS is developed by the U.S. Department of Defense.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Hyperledger gains 11 major finance players in blockchain initiative
  • Intel Begins Landing Apollolake Support Within Coreboot

    Intel engineers have begun landing support for the next-gen "Apollolake" SoC within Coreboot and support for the initial development board.

    Apollolake (Apollo Lake) is Intel's 14nm SoC for low-cost PC/notebooks, and surely Chromebooks. Apollolake uses the Goldmont CPU core and Skylake Gen9 derived graphics. Apollolake is the successor to Braswell. Apollo Lake systems will be available later in 2016.

  • Russian Government Planning To Replace All Of Its Windows Computers With Linux

    The Russian government is planning to replace all of its Windows-powered computers with some Linux distribution. The government has justified this decision by stating that American technology companies like Google and Microsoft need to pay more taxes.

  • Russia Going To GNU/Linux Late Rather Than Never

    Back in 2010, Putin put into (slow)motion a move to GNU/Linux. There were several projects but nothing concrete and system-wide. Finally, in 2016, thanks to the price of oil, sanctions and global politics, the time is ripe.

  • The Age of Docker is Upon Us

    With Container Summit going on in New York this week, there is a lot of news related to Docker, Kubernetes and various container technology star players. Datawise announced that it has made some key contirubtions to advance Kubernetes, a tool Google developed and used to make containerization more useful by making it possible to manage containerized applications.

  • Handheld Emulation: Achievement Unlocked!

    I love video game emulation. My favorite games were produced in the 1980s and 1990s, so if I want to play them, I almost always have to emulate the old systems. There is usually a legal concern about ROM files for games, even if you own the original cartridges, so I'm not going to tell you where to find ROMs to download or anything like that. What I am going to share is my recent discovery of the perfect handheld gaming system. Oddly enough, it was never intended to be an emulator.

  • GNOME 3.20's Feature Freeze Is Next Week

    Next week marks GNOME 3.20's feature freeze followed by the GNOME 3.20 (v3.19.90) beta release.

    The GNOME Release Team sent out a reminder that next week marks the API/ABI, UI, and feature freezes along with the start of release note writing and the GNOME 3.20 beta release.

  • SUSE and business open source specialist it-novum collaborate to expand Ceph platform’s Storage Management

    Powered by Ceph, SUSE Enterprise Storage is a self-managing, self-healing, distributed software-based storage solution for enterprise customers. The collaboration between it-novum and SUSE will bring centralized management of file, block and object storage via openATTIC's single graphical user interface to future releases of SUSE Enterprise Storage.

  • App: Download Manager for Samsung Z1 / Z3 is Available in Tizen Store

    Download Manager for Tizen Smartphones, namely the Samsung Z1 and Z3, is a powerful download speed booster and an advanced download manager combined into one. A must-have app for the power user that wants to download files off the Internet in a fast and efficient manner.

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  • Free live-booting distro DVD with LU&D #162

    A brand new issue of Linux User & Developer hits the high street and the app stores today – we’ve done something a little different for you this time.

  • Russian government to switch to desktop Linux?

    The Russian government is reported to be contemplating dropping Microsoft Windows and adopting Linux as the operating system for agency PCs according to its internet czar, German Klimenko.

  • The Linux Foundation's big plan to speed up storage, networking

    The Linux Foundation continues to think big. It became a hub for containers by spearheading the Open Container Project and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and it has pushed to make APIs self-standardizing. Now, it's kicked off yet another industry-wide open source initiative: the Fast Data Project (

    The idea of "an I/O services framework for the next wave of network and storage software" (per the Foundation) may not sound as vital as protecting core Internet infrastructure or making it simpler for Web server admins to support HTTPS. But on closer inspection, is in line with the Foundation's ambitions to nurture the future Web.

  • ownCloud Desktop Client Updated with HiDPI Improvements, Better Syncing

    Today, February 10, 2016, ownCloud Inc. was proud to announce the release and general availability of new versions for its ownCloud Desktop and ownCloud Android clients.

  • LibreOffice 5.1 Released with Boatload of Changes
  • Ubuntu Core Now Supports Intel NUC Mini PC

    Canonical has this week announced that the Ubuntu Core now supports the Intel NUC DE3815TY mini PC after working together with Intel the company has now created a standard platform for developers to test and create x86-based IOT solutions using snappy Ubuntu Core.

  • 6 reasons to blog in Markdown with Jekyll

    GitHub pages is a free offering that can host your Jekyll blog for free. It also takes care of generating static HTML files from your Markdown text files, so there's no need to install anything on your computer. You can also use Jekyll with your own domain name (if you have one).

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.