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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mycroft: Linux’s Own AI

    The future is artificially intelligent. We are already surrounded by devices that are continuously listening to every word that we speak. There is Siri, Google Now, Amazon Alexa, and Microsoft’s Cortana. The biggest problem with these AI “virtual assistants” is that users have no real control over them. They use closed source technologies to send every bit of information they collect from users back to their masters.

  • Three "Open Source" Investing Strategies to Start Using Today

    More and more tech companies are building their success by going "open source."

    By that, I mean they're using open-source tech platforms like Linux and Hadoop – which are free and open to the public to use – to write code, create cloud storage, and develop Big Data applications. With these platforms, they're saving money, running their business more efficiently… and raking in the profits.

    I thought of open-source platforms recently – on New Year's Eve.

  • Security Updates For Linux 4.5 Brings Improvements For Smack, EVM & TPM

    Linus Torvalds pulled in the security subsystem updates this weekend for the Linux 4.5 kernel.

    Security updates for Linux 4.5 include TPM/TPM2 enhancements for the Trusted Platform Module, Smack now supports file-receive process-based permission checking for sockets, and EVM has support for loading an x509 certificate from the kernel into the EVM trusted kernel keyring. There are also bug-fixes and other minor improvements as part of these security updates for Linux 4.5.

  • NVIDIA Publishes Nouveau Patches For Secure Boot, Unified Firmware Loading

    NVIDIA has released new patches today for helping the open-source Nouveau driver step towards properly supporting the GeForce GTX 900 "Maxwell" graphics cards as well as better supporting Tegra.

  • Intel NUC Skylake NUC6i3SYK Linux Benchmarks

    These open-source benchmark results complement other recent Intel NUC Skylake Benchmarks On Linux and thanks to the Phoronix Test Suite and OpenBenchmarking.org they are all easily-reproducible and support side-by-side comparisons.

  • KDE Made Much Progress In 2015 Thanks To Student Developers With GSoC

    While Google's annual Summer of Code has been done for several months now, the KDE project published this weekend their final overview of all the progress that was made this past summer by these promising student developers.

    Among the work that came to KDE over the summer of 2015 thanks to GSoC was porting more software to KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5, a checker framework for KDevelop, Kdenlive improvements, handling of OpenStreetMap files within Marble, PDF tags/layers within Okular, a new configuration module for pointing devices, a GnuPGP-plugin for Kopete, and other improvements.

  • A brief 360° overview of my first board turn

    You’ve certainly noticed that I didn’t run for a second turn, after my first 2 years. This doesn’t mean the election time and the actual campaign are boring Smile

    If you are an openSUSE Member, we really want to have your vote, so go to Board Election Wiki and make your own opinion.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Karen Sandler: I’m Running for the Linux Foundation Board of Directors

    As we begin a new year, I’m super excited that Conservancy has almost reached our initial target of 750 Supporters (we’re just 4 Supporters away from this goal! If you haven’t signed up, you can push us past this first milestone!). We launched our Supporter program over a year ago and more recently, in November, we asked you all to become Supporters now so that Conservancy can survive. Conservancy is moving toward a funding model primarily from individuals rather than larger corporate sponsors. While we are about to reach our minimal target, we still have a long way to go to our final goal of 2,500 Supporters — which will allow us to continue all of Conservancy’s critical programs, including copyleft enforcement. Many individuals have come forward to donate, and we hope that many more of you do so too! I was really excited about the statement of support published last week by the GNOME Foundation, and in particular their point that enforcement is necessary and benefits GNOME and free software as a whole.

  • Get new users…
  • GNOME Devs Are Defining a Clear Set of Core Apps for the Desktop Environment

    We always bring our readers the latest news from the GNOME Project, and today we have some interesting story to share with you all, especially GNU/Linux operating system vendors.

  • Reproducible builds: week 38 in Stretch cycle
  • The Penguicon Lucas Tech Track

    So if you’re in Detroit on the weekend of 29 April-1 May, come by and see me bloviate about:

    PAM: You’re Doing It Wrong
    the ZFS File System
    Networking for Systems Administrators
    Encrypted Backups with Tarsnap
    BSD Operating Systems in 2016
    Senior Sysadmin Panel

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What is the best mouse for Linux (and everything else)?
  • 2016 Has Been Off To A Great Start For Open-Source & Linux

    We are only half-way through January yet there's been so much exciting news already for open-source and Linux enthusiasts as well as when it comes to interesting computer hardware.

    Given the amount of news already in the first two weeks of the year, here's a look at some of the most popular content on Phoronix already for 2016. Thanks to the Consumer Electronics Show, more Vulkan news, AMDGPU details, the start of the Linux 4.5 kernel cycle, and more, it's been very busy so far.

  • A letter from Gabon to the GNU Health community

    Mr. Armand Mpassy-Nzoumbato has written this letter to the GNU Health community, that I proudly want share with all of you. It shows the importance of Free Software in real-life scenarios, delivering our motto : Freedom and Equity in Healthcare.

  • Fedora Meetup Pune - January 2016

    On 15th January 2016, we had our first Fedora meetup at Pune. The venue was earlier decided to be Red Hat office, Pune but due to unavailability of space the meetup was moved to my apartment.

today's leftovers (GNU/Linux)

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Misc
  • Ocean is a Smartphone-Sized Powerful Linux Server thats Runs on Battery

    Usually servers are large machines that take up huge amounts of space on the floor or lots of space in a rack. But no more, a new Node.js Linux server has launched by iCracked for developers who want to be able to write software for Internet of Things applications and other tasks that is very small. The server is called Ocean and it is about the size of a smartphone. The small size means that you can slip the server in your pocket and carry your work with you wherever you go.

  • Finding the Perfect Linux Laptop

    It looks like a fairly capable device - but, as with lots of products from Shenzen, it's hard to get a direct price quote for the exact Ubuntu model. It appears to be reasonably compatible with the latest version of Ubuntu - but there are a few tales of woe spread around the web.

  • [GIT PULL] f2fs updates for v4.5
  • Linux For Everyone! Goodwill Partnership Yields Exciting Scholarship To Teach You New Skills

    Adult students from underserved communities now have the unique opportunity to enroll in a new program launched by The Linux Foundation in partnership with Goodwill.

  • Brainstorming Further Cooling Improvements To The Linux Benchmarking Room
  • Cruising Altitudes...

    Breaking up in pieces, First I divided the data into parts. Each part is associated with corresponding page which is to be printed. From that I get number of pages which will be required and then actual printing took place in draw-page call. The understanding of GTK Print API helped me. Begin-print signal is the one which is emitted when user is done with page setup ,but before rendering starts. All the calculations done to divide the data and get a count of pages are ensured in this one. In draw-page, actual rendering takes place using Cairo.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #17
  • openSUSE Leap: LibVirt And NetworkManager

    I recently switched to Leap from 13.2. First time i have seen the next generation of kde and plasma. So far i like the experience. But i miss some stuff Sad. If some dev out there needs an idea for his next little plasma widget project please consider porting service monitor. That widget alone could bring me back to kde4 Smile.

  • The Fifth Alpha Version Of The Debian 9.0 Stretch Installer Has Been Released

    Cyril Brulebois, one of the Debian Installer developers has announced yesterday that Debian 9.0 Stretch Alpha 5 installer has been released, permitting the users to test Debian’s Testing system easily.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • TinyCore piCore 7.0 Available To Download With Most Interesting Changes Ever
  • PulseAudio comes to Slackware-current Beta

    Yup folks, thanks to the new bluetooth stack in slackware-current (brought to you by BlueZ 5.x) we have introduced a dependency on PulseAudio. Bluetooth audio no longer accepts ALSA as the output driver.

  • Zulu embedded inside the Internet of Things

    Java runtime solutions company Azul Systems has announced that Zulu Embedded is now available to download on the Wind River Marketplace.

  • The Airtop Is One Of The Coolest Linux-Friendly PCs Ever For Enthusiasts

    Our friends at CompuLab have come out out with their most interesting design yet: the Airtop. CompuLab told be about the Airtop a few days ago and I've been very excited and can't wait to try one out soon. They describe it as, "Airtop is a small and silent desktop with very high performance. The key word is silent. Not 'with a specially designed fan that is very quiet'. Airtop has no fans at all, yet it can dissipate 200W – enough to cool a Xeon CPU and a professional (or gaming) graphics card. Airtop cools itself by generating airflow using no moving parts, just the waste heat from the CPU and the GPU." Yes, a Xeon-powered system with a discrete graphics card and can be all cooled without any fans?!?

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Into The Unknown – Sunday, 2016-01-10

    You’d think “Unknown” would actually be known by someone somewhere with such popularity but I can’t find it. How is it more popular than Android/Linux in some places and StatCounter doesn’t know about it?

  • 22 Years of Linux Journal on One DVD - Now Available

    In easy-to-use HTML format, this fully searchable archive offers immediate access to the essential resource for the Linux enthusiast: Linux Journal. The archive contains all 260 issues of the magazine, from the premiere March 1994 issue through the most recent issue, December 2015. That's 260 issues of Linux Journal, with well over 4,100 articles!

  • Google Chrome Users Will Push Content to Chromecast Without Dedicated Extension
  • Should you install Linux on a gaming laptop?

    Linux is everywhere these days, and Linux gamers have never had more games to play than they do right now. But is Linux really well suited for a gaming laptop? One redditor asked about it on the Linux subreddit and got some interesting answers from his fellow Linux users.

  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.60 Stable Update Ships with a New Linux Kernel, Security Fixes

    Earlier today, January 13, 2016, Valve had the pleasure of announcing the release of a new stable update for the SteamOS Brewmaster 2.0 series, which brings many improvements and patches security issues.

    According to the release notes, the most important thing that was implemented in the new stable update for the SteamOS 2.0 Brewmaster branch is a new Linux kernel package, which promises to fix the issues reported by users about the udeb packaging.

  • Hypercharge looks like an amazing UE4 shooter that will support Linux

    Fancy becoming a child's action figure? Hypercharge will let you do this, and destroy your friends in this multiplayer shooter.

    After seeing a quick video and some screenshots from it, I am very interested in this one and will be keeping an eye on it.

  • Partial Fermi Re-Clocking Being Talked About For Nouveau

    Karol Herbst, the independent open-source developer who has been focusing upon Nouveau re-clocking support in recent months, has made a new proposal and patch series concerning NVIDIA GeForce GTX 400/500 "Fermi" re-clocking on this open-source driver.

  • 8-Way ARM Board Linux Benchmark Comparison From The Pi Zero & ODROID To Tegra

    The kind folks at LoverPi.com sent over many of the ARM boards seen in this comparison today. They provided the ODROID C1 Plus, Raspberry Pi 2, Orange Pi Plus, Orange Pi PC, and Banana Pi M2. They will also be allowing some other ARM board Linux tests on Phoronix in the future. Beyond those various ARM SBCs, for this performance comparison I also included a Raspberry Pi Zero, NVIDIA Jetson TK1, and NVIDIA Jetson TX1.

  • FLOSS Weekly 370: MuseScore

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • On Being More Convenient

    As you may or may not know, Plasma’s mantra basically is “help you get stuff done”. This means it helps you to achieve your goals as easily for you as possible. Plasma 5.6 will be one of those releases where we’ve focussed a lot on getting in your way less and removing obstacles in the way between you and your tasks.

  • KDE Plasma 5.6 Bringing More User-Facing Improvements
  • My Tumbleweed install for January 2016
  • UEFI and opensuse Leap 42.1

    Leap 42.1 started out with some UEFI problems. The last of those were fixed in an update yesterday. However, the fix only solves the problem for already installed systems. The install media still have these problems. Since opensuse usually does not re-release install isos, it is unlikely that install problems will completely go away.

  • 10 years TeX Live in Debian

    I recently dug through my history of involvement with TeX (Live), and found out that in January there are a lot of “anniversaries” I should celebrate: 14 years ago I started building binaries for TeX Live, 11 years ago I proposed the packaging TeX Live for Debian, 10 years ago the TeX Live packages entered Debian. There are other things to celebrate next year (2017), namely the 10 year anniversary of the (not so new anymore) infrastructure – in short tlmgr – of TeX Live packaging, but this will come later. In this blog post I want to concentrate on my involvement in TeX Live and Debian.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 KDE and Xfce released

    Linux Mint has long proven to be one of the most popular desktop distributions around. And now the Linux Mint developers have released version 17.3 for KDE and Xfce.

    You can download Linux Mint 17.3 KDE and Xfce right now from the Linux Mint site. You can also read the release notes and what's new for Linux Mint 17.3 KDE, as well as the release notes and what's new for Linux Mint 17.3 Xfce.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KDE and Open Source

    Among the many new experiences I have discovered so far, contributing to a project that is devoted to helping other people brings about an unstoppable drive of happiness. The thought of knowing that something that I did was going to benefit someone else in this world is the best feeling and this made me feel more rewarded and fulfilled about my life.

  • KDE's Akonadi Continues To Be Developed In The KF5 World

    While the KDE Akonadi PIM storage service has been criticized as being slow, among other complaints, it's continuing to be developed and improved upon in the Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5 world.

  • Improving my Gtk and Music knowledge

    During the past few weeks I have studied about how to work with Gtk. It was necessary since I didn’t have so many experience with it. Also, I have taken a time to understand how Gnome Music works.

  • Arch Wins First of Two Round Poll

    The voting is over in the first round of our annual GNU/Linux distro poll, which sought an answer to the simple question, “What Linux distro do you currently use most?” The result was a complete surprise, at least to us. By a decisive margin, you voted for Arch Linux. The poll was certainly one for the record books. By the time it was closed to voting, a total of 5,784 of you had cast votes, more than double from any previous FOSS Force poll. The poll was online for approximately one week.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2016/1

    This is the first review of the year – and will cover the four snapshots 20151231, 20160101, 20160105 and 20160107.

  • Fosscomm 2015 at Athens

    My second and I believe most important presentation, this year, was about the excellent QA tool actually used to build our distro, “openQA”. As said by it’s motto, “Life is too short for manual testing!”, thus openQA is used to automate testing of the whole distribution (either as a collection or in individual package basis). You can see some test case examples on it’s homepage, you can also fetch the presentation from my github repo (FOSSCOMM_2015 directory) linked in the blog sidebar.

  • Slackware 14.1 Live Edition FullHD Review (KDE, MATE, Xfce) - 20 Years After The First Linux LiveCD
  • Other Letdowns For Linux / Open-Source Users From 2015
  • OpenStack: a .deb guy on (the) board

    [GP] I discovered Linux in 1994, but only in 1996 things were serious. By the time I just finished high school and I applied for a job in a local Internet Service Provider. At 15 years I was well known in the local community as I was installing and maintaining several BBSes, so it wasn’t hard to get the job. I can say it was love at first sight. I started with Slackware (was the first distro), but I moved into redhat first and then debian. When I was working for the IBM Linux Technology Center, I was in charge of helping porting Linux to PowerPC and backporting LVM to make it similar to AIX. Sun was also a good playground as they acquired Cobalt, a hardware appliance based on debian. Then I shifted more towards Enterprise Linux adoption with 6 years in RedHat and then I went to Canonical. I was happy to go back to Debian and Ubuntu community, because I still believe that Ubuntu Developer Summits (UDS) were the real spirit of a Linux community.

  • Debian Fun in December 2015

    December was the eighth month I contributed to Debian LTS under the Freexian umbrella. It was a bit of a funny month since most of the time most open CVEs were already taken care of by other team members (which is nice) but it resulted in me not releasing a single DLA which feels weird.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-9 Has Received Telephony Improvements And An Updated Thumbnailer
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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Backports and Graphics

  • [Older] Backports and long-term stable kernels
  • What’s New in Wayland and Weston 1.12?
    The Wayland core protocol documentation has received numerous refinements to improve its clarity and consistency. Along with this, many blank areas of the protocol documentation have been fleshed out. A new wl_display_add_protocol logger API provides a new, interactive way to debug requests; along with this are new APIs for examining clients and their resources. This is analogous to using WAYLAND_DEBUG=1, but more powerful since it allows run time review of log data such as through a UI view. There have been improvements to how the protocol XML scanner handles version identification in protocol headers. This enables better detection and fallback handling when compositors and clients support differt versions of their protocols.
  • XDC2016 Wraps Up After Many Wayland, X.Org & Mesa Discussions
    The 2016 X.Org Developers' Conference (XDC2016) wrapped up Friday in Helsinki, Finland. Here is a summary of the major happenings for those that may have missed it or didn't yet watch the video streams.

IBM Claims “New Linux Based Power System Server Kicks Butt

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016