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today's leftovers

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  • Andrej Shadura: Bug Squashing Party: Bratislava, 9/10 February 2019

    As I previously announced, I’m organising a BSP in Bratislava during the weekend following FOSDEM. It will be happening at the same time as the BSP in Berlin, so if it’s not practical or possible for you to come to Berlin, consider coming around here.

    The venue this time is Lab.cafe, café/coworking space/maker space in the centre of Bratislava in the building of the old market hall.

  • Khronos Gears Up For A Busy GDC 2019 With Vulkan, OpenXR

    There still is two months to go until the annual Game Developers Conference kicks off in San Francisco while on Wednesday, The Khronos Group published their initial sessions for their developer day during the highly anticipated event.

    To no surprise, The Khronos Group and their members will be having a large presence given the increasing trajector of Vulkan, augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) continuing to be very hot topics, and their other standards like glTF and WebGL also being well received by the game developer community.

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Debian 9.7 released with fix for RCE flaw
  • China Has Blocked Microsoft’s Bing Search Engine: Report
  • “The Linux of social media”—How LiveJournal pioneered (then lost) blogging

    Last April, famed writer and hero-murderer George R.R. Martin announced that he was hoisting his ancient blog from his moldering LiveJournal onto his personal website. For casual Game of Thrones fans, it was a minor hiccup at best—most clicked the new link and never looked back. For a certain strata of enthusiasts, however, this was a far more momentous move. Described as “the last holdout” by longtime LiveJournal volunteer-turned-employee Janine Costanzo, Martin’s blog was perhaps the once-blogging-giant’s last bond to the world of great pop culture. So while the author may never finish his most beloved literary series, his simple act of Web hosting logistics truly marks the end of an era.

    Growing up on the Web at the dawn of the social media age (circa 2007), it felt like all the connectivity-obsessed sites forming the burgeoning core of the new Internet were haunted by a faded spectre called LiveJournal. As a teen, I never actually knew anyone who had one, but I heard whispers and rumors about drama on the service all the time. And based on candid conversations with some of the figures who made LiveJournal what it was, it turns out that impression isn’t far off. LiveJournal, or LJ, as its users lovingly called it, was a different kind of social media service, one that is almost unrecognizable in a world dominated by the anonymity-shattering power of a Facebook or Twitter. But, as many of its former employees attest, LJ ultimately had the opportunity to become one of these “second-generation” social behemoths. Instead, a stubborn userbase and questionable business decisions harried those ambitions. And now, Martin’s latest figurative casualty—the severed LiveJournal—serves as a brief reminder of the platform’s ascendance and the decisions that brought this blogging icon crashing down.

today's leftovers

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  • The Best Chromebooks to Buy In 2019

    Advancements in technology over the past few decades has been all about shrinking down computers. We’ve also seen manufacturers cramming as much power in them as humanly possible. This has led us to the creation of small form factor desktop PCs, portable yet powerful gaming laptops and even handhelds.

    Despite the fact that a faster computer is almost always appreciated, a lot of people don’t need all that power most of the time. Especially when responding to e-mails, or writing up text documents. In this scenario, a lot of people can get away with using a Chromebook every day.

    Chromebooks are different from your traditional Windows laptops. They run on Google’s own version of desktop OS, known as ChromOS. These affordable machines have especially gained popularity among students. This is mainly because of their workflow, most of the time they are writing up essays or watching videos. That is why Chromebooks are so popular in the first place. They are affordable, portable and long-lasting laptops. So, if you’re thinking about getting a Chromebook for yourself, keep on reading to figure out which one is best suited for you.

  • Open-Source Linux Driver Published For Habana Labs' "Goya" AI Processor

    Today they published initial open-source Linux kernel driver patches for review to potentially include in the mainline kernel moving forward.

  • Creating a template in Proxmox VE with cloud-init support
  • Project Trident 18.12 overview | A TrueOS based desktop-focused operating system.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Project Trident 18.12 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch

    My name is Sarah Julia Kriesch. I am 31 years old and a work-experienced Student in Computer Science with a pre-education as a Computer Science Expert for System Integration. I had worked as a Linux System Administrator for an ISP and a Linux Systems Engineer at a Cloud Computing Provider for 4 years.

  • Fedora – I’m coming back…..

    It’s been a while since I’ve done anything Fedora, but I’ve decided that my sabbatical has to end. With this in mind, I’m going to start slowly coming back to the Fedora ecosystem, it’ll be slow to start with, but I’ve missed it, I need to come back. I hope you’ll have me.

  • Orange Pi 3 single-board computer sells for $30 and up

    Shenzhen Xunlong Software has been selling single-board computers under the Orange Pi brand for years. The name is obviously inspired by the most famous low-cost, low-power SBC, the Raspberry Pi. But while Orange Pi devices don’t have the same level of community support as their Raspberry Pi rivals, they often make up for it by offering a decent set of features at an affordable price.

    Case in point: the company’s new Orange Pi 3 models sell for between $30 and $40 and offer offer a number of features (some optional, some standard) that you don’t get with the latest Raspberry Pi models.

  • We Need Open Hosting Platforms

    I think he’s starting with a reasonable, positive call: we can’t just decry the state of things, we have to make things. And we have to make good things. The open web should be better.

    I fear a moralizing approach to advocacy pushes people away, makes it harder for people to care about the values we are espousing. When we frame something as depressing or hopeless we encourage people to pay attention to other things. So yes: the open web should be the best web.

    But ignoring my advice, I’m going to point out a depressing fact: open source products aren’t successful. Open source is not in line to be part of any solution.

    Open Source has done a lot for developers, but it’s not present on the surface of the web – the surface that people interact with, and that defines the “open web”. Actual sites. Actual interfaces. Open source is used everywhere except at the point of interaction with actual people.

  • FOSDEM 2019

    In just over a week's time, Collabora will be heading to Brussels to take part in the 2019 edition of FOSDEM, a two-day event organised by volunteers to promote the widespread use of free and open source software. Taking place at the ULB Solbosch Campus on February 2 & 3, FOSDEM is widely recognized as the best and biggest conference of its kind in Europe.

  • GitKraken

    There is a new tool available for Sparkers: GitKraken

  • The LLVM Codebase Is Moving Past C++11 This Year, Likely To C++14

    As was discussed in 2018 and has largely reached consensus, the LLVM code-base and its sub-projects like Clang will move past being bound by C++11 and will moving to a newer C++ standard so they can begin making use of newer language features in the development of this compiler stack. 

  • We all love bonking to pay, but if you bonk with a Windows Phone then Microsoft has bad news

    Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to honour the memory of yet another Windows mobile technology. The rabidly unpopular Microsoft Wallet for the much beloved Windows Phone is for the chop.

    Microsoft has quietly updated its Microsoft Pay page to reflect the demise of the tap-happy mobile technology, though it broke developments to the masses in an odd way.

    "Breeze through checkout by using your Windows phone. Just tap, pay, and you're on your way. Starting on Feb. 28, 2019, the Microsoft Wallet app will be officially retired."

  • Too Late for Jenkins? | Coder Radio 341

    Mike and Wes are back to debate the state of developer tools and ask where Jenkins fits in 2019.

    Plus some some anger at Apple, and Mike reveals the latest language that’s caught his eye.

  • mintCast 300.6 interview 6 Isaac

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Compact Bay Trail SBC has option for third GbE port

    Axiomtek’s “CAPA84E” is a 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC with an optional third GbE port, dual M.2 slots, plus VGA, DisplayPort, USB 3.0, SATA, and -20 to 70°C support.

    Axiomtek’s motto may well be: “If first you succeed, iterate until you don’t.” The king of the spinoffs has released yet another iteration of one of the first Intel Bay Trail SBCs, the CAPA841, which in 2015 was followed by the slightly scaled down CAPA840. The new CAPA84R similarly supports Bay Trail and conforms to the 3.5-inch form factor, but with a different mix of features.

  • Letting people work where they want shows how much you value them

    Open organizations are inclusive. They aren't inclusive solely because it's the right way to be but because it produces better outcomes. Inclusivitiy enables a more diverse set of viewpoints.

  • Cities agree on minimal interoperability mechanisms

    Over a hundred European cities have agreed on ‘Minimal Interoperability Mechanisms’ defining the communication between software programmes and building blocks to allow co-creation and sharing of services. The MIMs, advocated by the Open & Agile Smart Cities (OASC) initiative, are “simple steps towards using new technology”, OACS chairman Martin Brynskov said on Thursday.

  • Containers On The Edge

    There are two major families for the choice of operating system and ecosystem: RTOS-based and Linux-based families. Smaller, cost-constrained devices tend to benefit from the simplicity of RTOS-based, while more full-featured and complex devices benefit from the richness of Linux (see The Shift to Linux Operating Systems for IoT for more background on the reasons for these approaches in IoT). Linux has been used in embedded devices for almost as long as it has existed (see here for an excellent timeline of early embedded Linux usage by Chris Simmons). The focus here is on Linux based products, as they have the needed functions such as access controls and memory segregation that allows for upgrading portions in a controlled fashion.

  • YouTuber Fits A Fully Functional Computer Into A Mouse

    While the YouTuber’s original plan was to squeeze a Raspberry Pi inside of a regular computer mouse but was unable to do so due to size constraints. Hence, he 3D printed a computer mouse to fit the components of the computer inside the mouse.

    Dubbed as “The Computer Mouse”, the device consists of a Raspberry Pi Zero W computer, a 1.5-inch color OLED LCD display with a resolution of 128 x 128 pixels, a 3D-printed mouse, a rechargeable 500 mAh battery, and a tiny Bluetooth retractable keyboard for text inputs and more complicated commands. It also has a power button at the edge to start the tiny computer. Further, it runs GNU/Linux-based operating systems such as Raspbian.

  • Microsoft Wallet for Windows Phone to be retired in February

    Support is set to end for all Windows 10 Mobile devices by the end of this year, and Microsoft is already beginning to retire apps in anticipation. In an update to the , Microsoft has noted that the app will be "officially retired" on February 28, 2019.

    Microsoft Wallet is the official tap-to-pay method for Windows Phones, similar to Apple Pay and Google Pay on iPhones and Android devices. The app also allows users to load up their loyalty and membership cards, allowing them all to be stored in one place.

  • mintCast 300.5 interview 5 Joe Ressington

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux systems: Scraping up information about apt updates
  • Kiwi TCMS is going to FOSDEM 2019

    We are turning 10 years old and we have presents for you!

  • MDN Changelog – Looking back at 2018

    December is when Mozilla meets as a company for our biannual All-Hands, and we reflect on the past year and plan for the future. Here are some of the highlights of 2018.

    The browser-compat-data (BCD) project required a sustained effort to convert MDN’s documentation to structured data. The conversion was 39% complete at the start of 2018, and ended the year at 98% complete. Florian Scholz coordinated a large community of staff and volunteers, breaking up the work into human-sized chunks that could be done in parallel. The community converted, verified, and refreshed the data, and converted thousands of MDN pages to use the new data sources. Volunteers also built tools and integrations on top of the data.

    The interactive-examples project had a great year as well. Will Bamberg coordinated the work, including some all-staff efforts to write new examples. Schalk Neethling improved the platform as it grew to handle CSS, JavaScript, and HTML examples.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Scylla

    With data having an impact on almost every part of today’s business, Scylla wants to make sure applications are powered by a database that can handle the influx of data without compromising performance.

    Scylla is a NoSQL database that provides low latency, always-on availability, high throughput, is scalable, easy to use, and community-backed.

    “Scylla is an open source NoSQL database that offers the horizontal scale-out and fault-tolerance of Apache Cassandra, but delivers 10X the throughput and consistent, low single-digit latencies. Implemented from scratch in C++, Scylla’s close-to-the-hardware design significantly reduces the number of database nodes you require and self-optimizes to dynamic workloads and various hardware combinations,” Peter Corless, technical marketing manager for Scylla, wrote in a post.

  • NomadBSD 1.2-RC1 released!

    The first release candidate of NomadBSD-1.2 is available! If you notice any problems, please let us know.

  • Winds of change? Winds of mediocrity.

    You'd think the world of open-source would escape this cheap reduction of human intellect. But no. The world's saddest violin is playing mightily loudly in the halls of Tux, too. Linux distributions are, by far and large, less stable, less ergonomic and less capable than they were five or six years ago. Lots of activity, few results.

    And when you do get results, they are made by devs for devs, object-oriented software solutions that intrude into the user space and complicate things without any benefits. Systemd is a good example. Wayland is another. Network tools yet another. Then, we also have the flattification of UI elements, the same kind of stuff that Google's been doing. And everyone is doing it, because hey, if Google does it, then if they imitate Google, they will be like Google, right. None of these things help, but we can tolerate them because they don't really make any difference in the overall story of human survival.

    [...]

    Don't embrace the change. Evaluate the change. Judge it. Be strict. Because we've come too far as a race to allow stupidity to become the driving factor. That's an insult to the billions of humans who have died to mosquitoes and common flu and famine so that we could reach an evolutionary point where people accept low-quality, low-efficiency nonsense into their lives, and then sermonize about that with the obtuse optimism of religiously passionate fanboys.

    But there's a happy side to this story, too. Not that long ago, I wouldn't contemplate rejecting the "modern" technology that much or that often. There was almost a thought of discomfort at such a move. But now? It does not seem so bad. Having gone through a few cycles of big tech changes, I don't see anything special or revolutionary in the Peckham water that companies are dishing out to the masses. It's an almost liberating thought, sprinkled with illumination, epiphany and other long words. Perhaps I should thank the agile crowds for this unintentional contribution of disdain and apathy. Good stuff, I'd say. Be if you're still out there, wondering if you can change the world, start by small things. Say no to stupid things. Don't embrace the change, embrace critical thinking.

  • mintCast 300.3 interview 3 SiKing

today's leftovers

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  • MuseScore 3.0.1 Released with Redesigned New Score Wizard

    Free Scorewriter MuseScore released version 3.0.1 yesterday with some improvements and numerous bug-fixes.

    MuseScore 3.0.1 redesigned New Score Wizard for easy searching templates, better score previews, and accessibility improvements for blind users. The new release also features better import of 2.X scores, better automatic placement of hairpins and dynamics, and reworked Mixer UI.

  • MuseScore 3.0.1 Release

    Today we are pleased to release MuseScore 3.0.1. This is the first in what we intend to be a regular series of updates to MuseScore 3, the ground-breaking version of the world’s most popular music notation software.

  • Microsoft Updates Skype for Windows and Linux with Blurred Background Feature
  • Fedora 29-20190115 updated Live isos released
  • What Are Various Debian Installation Discs

    Ever got confused by the amount of disc made available for downloading on Debian servers? Worry not, if this is your approach looking around the Internet for an explanation why and what are those various discs for installing Debian on your beloved computer, you are at the right place. I'll try to be quick and concise so you can get on with Debian installation within 2 minutes read Smile

  • Arm Posts Initial Ares CPU Tuning Support For GCC, Helps SPEC Performance By ~1%

    Arm continues plumbing the open-source GNU compiler toolchain support for their next-generation "Ares" high-performance server/HPC core. 

    Back in November they presented the initial Ares compiler patches for GCC. Those patches presented Ares as an ARMv8-based design that has statistical profiling, dot product, and FP16 extensions by default. We've also seen other Ares toolchain patches by Arm developers like the recent GNU Assembler support.

  • ANAVI Thermometer open source temp and humidity sensor board

    Anavi Technology has this month launched a new product via the Crowd Supply in the form of the ANAVI Thermometer, an ESP8266-powered, open source, wireless dev board equipped with temperature and humidity sensors. The Anavi Thermometer Development board is fully compatible with the Arduino IDE, PlatformIO, and Home Assistant via the MQTT messaging protocol. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the open source dev board and its features.

    The development team behind the ANAVI Thermometer explain more about its hardware and specifications:

today's leftovers

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  • Archman 2019.01 Openbox Run Through

    In this video, we look at Archman 2019.01 Openbox.

  • And the Race is On! 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections Enter Campaign Phase

    Marina is a very active Italian openSUSE Advocate, involved in the Project since 2009, deeply involved in LibreOffice.  She relocated to Munich last June, where she is working for CIB mainly on its LibreOffice team as Senior Migrations & Deployments Engineer.  You may read more about Marina on her Wiki User page.

    Marina joins an already impressive line-up of Quality Candidates who announced they were stepping up during the past week, adding to what will be very tough decisions for the Voters in the upcoming Elections.  Official openSUSE Members in Good Standing are qualified to vote in the Elections, and they will have to make difficult choices for who should take the three open Board Seats, choosing between Marina, incumbent Christian Boltz aka cboltz, Dr. Axel Braun aka DocB, incumbent Sarah Julia Kriesch aka AdaLovelace, Sébastien Poher aka sogal, Vinzenz Vietzke aka vinzv, and Nathan Wolf aka futureboy and CubicleNate on IRC.

    Sarah and Sébastien’s run for the Board was announced in last Wednesday’s openSUSE News, while the Candidacies of Christian, Dr. Braun, Vinzenz, and  Nathan were announced in the next day’s news article.

  • Entry-level Bay Trail SBC ready for workhorse duty

    Acrosser’s 3.5-inch “AMB-BT19S1” SBC runs on an Intel Bay Trail SoC and offers up to 8GB RAM, dual display support, plus SATA, mSATA, mini-PCIe, serial, USB 3.0, and GbE ports.

    With newer Atom processor families such as Cherry Trail, Braswell, Apollo Lake, and now Gemini Lake, the popular, five-year old Bay Trail product line appears to be close to “legacy” status. Yet, aside from graphics capabilities and support for the latest memories and peripherals, there’s not that much separating Bay Trail from Gemini Lake in terms of CPU performance and power consumption. Depending on the price, an “entry level” Bay Trail SBC like Acrosser’s 3.5-inch AMB-BT19S1 board could be the smart move for some applications.

today's howtos and leftovers

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HowTos
  • How to Setup DRBD to Replicate Storage on Two CentOS 7 Servers
  • How to Install WebStorm on Debian 9
  • How to install FFmpeg on CentOS 7
  • Facebook AccountKit with Qt/C++ on Android

    Facebook’s AccountKit is an authentication service that can use your email or phone number to login to your services, it doesn’t require that the user has a Facebook account, just a valid email or phone.

    The cool thing about it is that it sends SMS for free, and although sending SMSs is cheap being free of charge is something you might want to look when creating a new App, in fact here in Brazil some big Apps do make use of it.

    So long story short story I wanted to add this to my Qt Android App.

  • NeuroFedora updated: 2019 week 2

    We had our first meeting of the year. The full logs from our meeting are available here on the Fedora mote application. I have pasted the minutes of the meeting at the end for your convenience.

    The meeting was broadly for the team to come together and discuss a few things. We checked on the status of current tasks, and discussed our future steps. We've got to work on our documentation, for example. There's a lot to do, and a lot of cool new things to learn---in science, computing, and community development. If you'd like to get involved, please get in touch.

  • Alibaba Snaps Up data Artisans for €90 million: Open Sources “Blink”

    Streaming analytics market projected to reach $47 billion by 2025

    Alibaba has bought Berlin-based startup Data Artisans for a reported €90 million (£80 million) in a deal that will see the $39 billion (by 2017-2018 revenues) Chinese juggernaut take its in-house Apache Flink code developments open source.

    Data Artisans was founded in 2014 by the creators of data stream processing engine Flink. It won Intel Capital funding for its Series A round in 2016 and appears to have also had Alibaba backing in an unreported Series B.

  • LCZero Chess Engine Performance With OpenCL vs. CUDA + cuDNN vs. FP16 With Tensor Cores

    A Phoronix reader pointed out LCZero (Leela Chess Zero) a few days ago as an interesting chess engine powered by neural networks and supports BLAS, OpenCL, and NVIDIA CUDA+cuDNN back-ends. Particularly with the FP16 cuDNN support, this chess engine can be super fast on NVIDIA's latest Turing GPUs with tensor cores. 

    With LCZero's build process being sane for its different back-ends and the program turning out to be benchmark-friendly and meeting my requirements, it's now available via the Phoronix Test Suite with a simple phoronix-test-suite benchmark lczero (granted, the back-end support may obviously vary depending upon your hardware/driver support) and more details over on OpenBenchmarking.org.

  • NASA Publishes Proposal for Air Traffic Management Blockchain Based on HyperLedger

    The United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has proposed an air traffic management blockchain, according to a paper published on the agency’s official website on Jan. 10.

today's leftovers

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  • Smith and Winston Enters Early Access for Linux and Windows

    The rise of Geometry Wars 15 years ago on the original Xbox led to a slew of imitators across all platforms. However, the biggest thing it did was revive the long-dead twin-stick shooter genre. Small attempts had been made to revive it in the form of a new Robotron game in the late '90s, but nothing stuff until Bizarre Creations' fun little side game brought the shooting sub-genre back into the limelight again. Later full-fledged entries saw it gain even more popularity, and since then, it's had a bit of a downward turn once again. Enter Smith and Winston - beyond its gun brand-inspired name, you have a game that blends retro with modern in a unique way.

  • FPgM report: 2019-02
  • Investment in open source software is soaking up investment by IT firms

    Traditional IT providers have seen the light and are shifting their focus to new technologies supporting open source software development.

    In recent months, the HPE’s, Cisco’s and VMware’s of the industry are offering their core customers cloud services previously dominated by the big three providers: Amazon, Microsoft and Google.

    The latest buzzword is DevOps, and it refers to a merging of the responsibilities between data centre operations teams and developers.

  • Get your tickets while they’re hot!

    For the fourth year running, foss-north is taking place. Now bigger than ever.

    It all started as a one day conference in a room with too much people in it. We gathered ten speakers and started something that continues to this day.

  • Etch a Sketch lives on in browser-based Chrome Labs project

    Everyone who remembers the Etch A Sketch slabs of yesteryear remembers how difficult it was to translate your vision onto its "magic screen," and how proud you felt upon success. Now, Google's Chrome Labs has translated that experience (quite literally) for the digital age with the fun Web A Skeb project. It's a browser-contained version of an Etch A Sketch that you can use to draw and doodle—if you can get the hang of its dials.

    [...]

    Google's Chrome Labs lets developers make weird, fun, and interesting projects to show the power that a simple Web browser has. Those involved have produced things like the open source image compression tool Squoosh, the Web actor library Clooney, and Project VisBug, a Chrome extension that lets users edit webpages using design tool interactions and hotkeys.

    Web A Skeb is available not only in Chrome but in other desktop and mobile browsers as well. It's actually a bit easier to draw on mobile, since you can use both of your thumbs to turn the dials at the same time. Those interested can check out the source code on GitHub.

  • AWS, MongoDB database collision stirs open source tensions

    AWS' introduction of the DocumentDB managed database service sparks competition with the backers of the popular MongoDB database, as well as debate over the nature of open source licensing.

    DocumentDB is a fully managed document database service that is compatible with MongoDB workloads. Rather than build on MongoDB's core code base, it implements an API that supports workloads from MongoDB 3.6 and earlier. This effectively emulates the responses that a MongoDB client expects from a MongoDB server, and customers can use their existing MongoDB drivers and tools, AWS said.

    MongoDB is the fifth-most popular database today, according to ranking site DB-Engines.com. Its parent company provides commercial support for the service, which went public in October 2017 and is now valued at more than $4 billion.

  • Ockam Open Sources its IoT SDK
  • Global Industry Leaders to Showcase Real-World Digital Transformations at 2019 Alfresco Day San Francisco
  • Wikipedia is using Google Translate to make its articles available in more languages

    Wikipedia’s goal is to make the world’s knowledge accessible to everyone on the planet, but it would be the first to admit that its efforts are skewed somewhat toward those who read English. To help fix this, the Wikimedia Foundation (which runs Wikipedia) announced today that it’s partnering with Google to take advantage of the company’s AI translation skills.

  • Wavestore releases feature-loaded v6.14 Linux-based Video Management Software

today's leftovers

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  • AT&T's Conversion to Virtualization, Software Control On Track

    ONAP resulted from The Linux Foundation combining two of its open source projects into one for automating virtual network functions in software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) implementations.

  • Texas Linux Fest 2019 in Dallas

    A few years ago I started to suggest to TXLF staff that coming to Dallas was a good idea. I wanted there to be more tech conferences in Dallas, and I love the community organized nature of TXLF and similarly SCALE. Plus, it was Texas Linux Fest, it can't always be in Austin! This year I was able to convince them to take the risk and try a year in Dallas. It is a huge risk, as it is likely that many sponsors and regular attendees might not be interested in traveling up I-35 to attend. Being in Dallas also opens up huge opportunity to reach new audiences and new sponsors. Now to prove that.

  • Linux Fu: The Kitchen Sync

    One of the great things about Linux and similar operating systems is they are configurable. If you don’t like something, there’s a great chance you can change it easily with a few entries in a file somewhere. For example, take bash — a very popular shell by any measure. If you want a different style of command line editing, there’s an option. You want the tab key to match files regardless of case? Another option. Usually, these are set in one of your so-called profile files like .bashrc in your home directory.

    As long as you are sitting in front of your single computer working, this is great. You customize your .bashrc and other files to your heart’s content and then you work in an environment that acts the way you want it to. The problem is when you have a lot of computers. Maybe you have a web server, a desktop, a firewall machine, and a few dozen Raspberry Pi computers. How do you keep all the configurations the same? Then once they are the same, how do you keep them up to date?

  • How to set up Icinga2 agent monitoring
  • ext3grep – Recover Deleted Files on Debian and Ubuntu
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More in Tux Machines

Games: King of Cards, GOG, Blade Symphony and Monster Logic

  • Shovel Knight's final two expansions King of Cards and Showdown have been delayed
    Yacht Club Games originally announced the final two expansions would be released in April but they've decided to delay them. For those not up to speed, King of Cards is the next and final expansion for Shovel Knight: Treasure Trove. You take on the role of King Knight, through 4 new worlds and more than 30 all new courses. Then we have Showdown, which is a mix of multiplayer madness for up to 4 players as well as giving another new story mode. Both are going to be free updates when released!
  • GOG has another sale on for the 'Lantern Festival' with some good Linux games going cheap
    It seems there's a game sale for every possible event in the world now, not that I am complaining as it's good for our wallets. The current sale over on GOG is their 'Lantern Festival' to celebrate the Year of the Pig. So you too can pig-out out on some of the great deals going. This time, there's not a huge selection for Linux gamers, so I've picked out a few of the best deals.
  • Blade Symphony patch 7 is out with experimental asset streaming, free to play release next month
    Some big news for Blade Symphony today, not only do they have another major patch release they've also announced the free to play release date. On March 7th, the flood gates will officially open on Steam for everyone to jump into Blade Symphony completely free. This is a huge milestone for Puny Human, something they've been solidly working towards for some time now.
  • Monstrous programming puzzle game 'Monster Logic' is coming to Linux this year
    While it has no clear release date other than this year, Monster Logic certainly looks like a sweet programming puzzle game that's coming to Linux.

All-in-One Messaging Application Franz 5 Sees First Stable Release

After 24 beta releases, Franz, an all-in-one messaging application, has reached version 5.0.0 stable. Besides being the first Franz 5 stable release, the latest 5.0.0 version brings automatic spellcheck language detection, an option to quit Franz from the Windows taskbar, updated Electron to version 4.0.4 (from 4.0.2), and small bugfixes and improvements. Franz is a free Electron application for Windows, Linux and Mac that combines almost 70 chat and messaging services into a single window that can run in the background, with multi-account support, notifications and a system tray, spell checking, and other useful features. Read more

5 Good Open Source Speech Recognition/Speech-to-Text Systems

A speech-to-text (STT) system is as its name implies; A way of transforming the spoken words via sound into textual files that can be used later for any purpose. Speech-to-text technology is extremely useful. It can be used for a lot of applications such as a automation of transcription, writing books/texts using your own sound only, enabling complicated analyses on information using the generated textual files and a lot of other things. In the past, the speech-to-text technology was dominated by proprietary software and libraries; Open source alternatives didn’t exist or existed with extreme limitations and no community around. This is changing, today there are a lot of open source speech-to-text tools and libraries that you can use right now. Here we list 5 of them. Read more

Software: CLI File Viewers, 5 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software and Sophos Snakeoil for Linux

  • 3 tools for viewing files at the command line
    I always say you don't need to use the command line to use Linux effectively—I know many Linux users who never crack open a terminal window and are quite happy. However, even though I don't consider myself a techie, I spend about 20% of my computing time at the command line, manipulating files, processing text, and using utilities. One thing I often do in a terminal window is viewing files, whether text or word processor files. Sometimes it's just easier to use a command line utility than to fire up a text editor or a word processor. Here are three of the utilities I use to view files at the command line.
  • 5 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software
    Structured thinking is a process of setting a framework to an unstructured problem. Having a structure not only helps to understand a particular problem, it also helps to identify areas which need more understanding. Structured thinking allows us to map ideas in structured fashion, thereby enabling the identification of areas which require the most thought. Mind mapping is a fairly free flowing concept. This means you need software that is versatile, and can adapt to your requirements. Your idea of a neat and tidy mind map might be another person’s idea of bamboozling. A map can concentrate very complex content in a small space such as a piece of paper. It helps to use both sides of your brain: the logical side and also the creative side. It’s a technique to help organize the way you think and stimulate your creativity: It can help you by developing, sorting and helping to memorize your ideas. Mind mapping software therefore offers an excellent way of capturing your thoughts in a structured way, brainstorming new ideas. Move away from simple lists, and use this software to link ideas in different ways. By thinking creatively, not linearly, we can seize on our big ideas.
  • How to install Sophos Antivirus for Linux [Ed: Installing proprietary software on GNU/Linux would likely cause security issues and/or add back doors, not improve real security]
    Seeing the Ubuntu popularity between both Desktops and serves, here we are using Ubuntu to show how to install Sophos Antivirus for Linux.