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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Open Source Challenge: Why One Band Chose Linux To Record Their New Album
  • AMD Publishes Platform QoS Patches For Next-Gen Processors

    This afternoon AMD sent out their first Linux kernel patches for what might end up being a new feature for the "EPYC 2" / Zen 2 processors.

  • Education Ecosystem Joins Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux Foundation

    Education Ecosystem, a blockchain company building the Netflix for professional development has today announced that it is joining two nonprofit organizations. Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) the world's largest open source blockchain initiative & the Linux Foundation, an organization dedicated to building sustainable ecosystems around open source projects to accelerate technology development and industry adoption.

  • Enterprise Ethereum Alliance & Linux partners with Netflix developer, Education Ecosystem

    The world of blockchain witnessed a new event with Education Ecosystem partnering with Linux Foundation and Enterprise Ethereum Alliance. The notification released on 25th September suggests that the latter two are non-profitable firms. Linux Foundation is one of the prominent technology developers of the world, whereas, Enterprise Ethereum Alliance [EEA] is directed towards promoting applications based on Ethereum blockchain platform.

  • openSUSE Conference 2020: Call for Hosts

    The openSUSE Project is pleased to announce that it is accepting proposals for openSUSE Conference 2020. The Call for Hosts will be open until April 15, 2019.

    The openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will review the submissions with the hopes of having a decision announced about the location of oSC20 at the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany. Community members and open-source enthusiasts are encouraged to follow the Conference How To guide on the wiki to submit a proposal on hosting the conference. The guide offers a How to Bid and How to Checklist to help with submitting a proposal.

    The proposals will need to be submitted to the openSUSE Marketing mailing list and the openSUSE Conference Organizational Team will discuss the proposals as it plans this year’s conference.

    While the openSUSE Project intends to move the conference to different worldwide locations in the future, the project has two locations (Nuremberg, Germany, and Prague, Czech Republic) to host the annual community conference if no proposals are submitted during the Call for Hosts.

  • VLC in Debian now can do bittorrent streaming

    Back in February, I got curious to see if VLC now supported Bittorrent streaming. It did not, despite the fact that the idea and code to handle such streaming had been floating around for years. I did however find a standalone plugin for VLC to do it, and half a year later I decided to wrap up the plugin and get it into Debian. I uploaded it to NEW a few days ago, and am very happy to report that it entered Debian a few hours ago, and should be available in Debian/Unstable tomorrow, and Debian/Testing in a few days.

  • macOS Mojave Privacy Bypass Flaw Allows Access to Protected Files
  • macOS Mojave Has A Security Flaw That Lets Hackers Access Your Contacts [Ed: Apple already gives all your contacts to the US government (NSA PRISM and beyond); now it'll give these to anyone...]

    A security flaw has been unearthed in macOS Mojave, Apple’s latest desktop OS update, by a well-known security researcher Patrick Wardle.

    As reported by Bleeping Computer, Wardle has discovered a bypass flaw in macOS Mojave using which hackers can gain access to contacts data from the address book with the help of an app that does not have the required permissions.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CLVK Is Piping OpenCL On Top Of Vulkan

    The concept has been talked about before and there has been some previous work in this direction while "CLVK" is a newly-established effort for getting OpenCL running on top of Vulkan drivers.

    The challenge of OpenCL on Vulkan might not be as big as it seems to an outside observer considering both modern OpenCL and Vulkan rely on the SPIR-V intermediate representation, etc. There is also a plethora of tooling catering both to these compute and graphics APIs like clspv, which this CLVK project happens to rely upon as its compiler.

  • Guerilla UX Testing, and Other Experiences From Akademy

    It’s about a month now since the end of Akademy 2018 and I’ve finally found the time to write up some of my impressions from my favorite event of every year, and to encourage all of you to embrace both your inner User Experience (UX) Researcher and your inner guerilla.

  • Akademy 2018: I was there! part 2

    As you may know, a little more than a month ago Akademy happened at the beautiful place of Vienna. On my first post, I told you about how I was freaking out before giving my talk about Atelier.

    So, to continue my history, on the following days of Akademy, Tomaz brought his printer from Munich so we could test Atelier and try to dig up what we need to do to improve it.

    [...]

    After that fix, Akademy was happening really fast for me. We had Atelier BoF, and as in my talk, I was amazed at all the people that have shown interest in the project and the willingness to help us. Tomaz and I received a few inputs, and we are working with Chris and Patrick on how to achieve them and the goals of this project.

    Sometimes I don’t believe that I was out there, far from my house and my boyfriend to konquer the world. However, since the internet era, we have all this amazing technology that can record people talking, I had my talk record and it’s alive on youtube. And yes, I still don’t have the courage to watch.

  • I want to talk to the (Font) Manager

    You like fonts, don’t you? Well, we all do. So what happens if you want to install a fresh new font in your Linux distribution, and that distribution happens to be running, say, a Gnome desktop environment? You will have probably noticed that the font management facility available in the system settings tool is rather limited.

    First, there’s the actual issue of how to handle fonts in the first place – Gnome Tweak Tool – and then, you only have the ability to select from the existing range of fonts, but not really install any new ones. At the moment, it would seem, your one option is to manually copy font files into either the system or home directory fonts folder. Well, there’s a better way. Meet GTK+ Font Manager. Manager, meet your new user.

  • Philip Chimento: JavaScript news from GNOME 3.30

    Welcome back to the latest news on GJS, the Javascript engine that powers GNOME Shell, Endless OS, and many GNOME apps.

    I haven’t done one of these posts for several versions now, but I think it’s a good tradition to continue. GNOME 3.30 has been released for several weeks now, and while writing this post I just released the first bugfix update, GJS 1.54.1. Here’s what’s new!

  • My Open-Source Activities from April to August 2018

    Welcome readers, this is a infrequently updated post series that logs my activities within open-source communities. I want my work to be as transparent as possible in order to promote open governance, a policy feared even by some “mighty” nations.

  • Saying Something Suitable in September

    So far the folks in the Ubuntu Podcast Chatter group have seen bits and pieces stating that I have been fussing over a Mythbuntu installation. It has been rough. I have two aerials in place connected to HDHomeRun Duo boxes. There is some reception of local stations. The problem with this is that I've had to put the antennae in the garage. When you understand that my part of northeast Ohio is essentially life in the deciduous forest, you'll also understand that the main Directv dish also is mounted on the garage as it had the only vantage point with a clear shot to the satellite(s). Eventually I will make further progress.

  • OpenCV 4.0 Alpha Released Now As A C++ Library, DNN Improvements, Better Performance

    OpenCV, the popular Open-Source Computer Vision real-time library, is nearing its big "4.0" release with a number of improvements for this widely-used library.

  • Sculpt OS With "Visual Composition" Posted For Latest Genode OS

    The Genode open-source operating system framework written from scratch with a micro-kernel design has been working on Sculpt OS as a general purpose operating system. This week the project reached its latest milestone.

    The third version of Sculpt OS is now available, "Sculpt with Visual Composition", which as part of this latest goal is working on transitioning more of their offerings from text-based user-interfaces to a GUI for administrative tasks. The text-based user interfaces will be maintained for those interested.

  • Chrome Now Logs all Google Users Into the Browser. Should You Care?

    I understand where Green is coming from, particularly after he clicked no for so long. But if this is the moment that Google leverages its browser in an unseemly way, I’m not seeing it. Sync isn’t enabled by default, meaning there’s not much of a change for users from a practical privacy standpoint. Green disagrees, because he’s seeing settings now that he didn’t have to think about before. But Google isn’t seeing any more or less of his data now than before, and won’t unless users opt in.

  • AI and HPC GPU Acceleration Benefit from Open Source Efforts [Ed: openwashing and AI-washing by AMD]

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • GUADEC 2018 Reminiscences

    This year’s GUADEC in Almería, Spain, was over two months ago, and so here is a long overdue post about it. It was so long ago that I might as well call it a reminiscence! This will be a different kind of post than the ones I’ve done in past years, as plenty of other bloggers have already posted summaries about the talks.

  • Rugged, Linux-ready transportation PC has four SIM slots

    Nexcom’s Apollo Lake based “VTC 6220-BK” in-vehicle PC features triple displays, 2x SATA bays, 3x GbE with optional PoE, Ublox GPS, and 4x mini-PCIe or M.2 slots paired with SIM slots.

    Intel-based in-vehicle computers have been around for a while — here’s a Linux-friendly Kontron model from 2004 -– but over the last year or two the market has picked up considerably. Like many in-vehicle systems, Nexcom’s VTC 6220-BK is not an automotive IVI computer, but like Lanner’s Apollo Lake based V3G and V3S systems, is designed for buses. The rugged VTC 6220-BK straddles the IVI and telematics worlds, offering triple display support for passenger entertainment plus CAN and OBD connections.

  • FreeBSD Desktop – Part 16 – Configuration – Pause Any Application

    After using UNIX for so many years I knew that I could freeze (or pause) any process in the system with kill -17 (SIGSTOP) signal and then unfreeze it with with kill -19 (SIGCONT) signal as I described in the Process Management section of the Ghost in the Shell – Part 2 article. Doing it that way for the desktop applications is PITA to say the least. Can you imagine opening xterm(1) terminal and searching for all Chromium or Firefox processes and then freezing them one by one every time you need it? Me neither.

    Fortunately with introduction of so called X11 helper utilities – like xdotool(1) – it is now possible to implement it in more usable manner.

  • Custom Sustes Malware Infects Linux and IoT Servers Worldwide [Ed: This only impacts poorly-secured and already-cracked servers. The article overstates the risk.]

    The dangerous characteristic is the fact that an estimate of the infected computers cannot be made at this time. The only way to prevent the infiltrations is to strengthen the network security of the Linux and IoT servers exposed in public. It is very possible that further attacks will be carried out with other distribution tactics.

  • C Programming | Introduction | Features – For Beginners

    C is a general-purpose programming language developed by the ultimate god of the programming world, “Mr.Dennis Ritchie” (Creator of C programming ).

    The language is mainly used to create a wide range of applications for operating systems like windows and iOS. The popularity of the language can be clearly seen as this language has made to the list of top 10 programming languages in the world.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 178

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 178.

  • WinWorld – A Large Collection Of Defunct OSs, Software And Games

    The other day, I was testing Dosbox which is used to run MS-DOS games and programs in Linux. While searching for some classic programs like Turbo C++, I stumbled upon a website named WinWorld. I went through a few links in this site and quite surprised. WinWorld has a plenty of good-old and classic OSs, software, applications, development tools, games and a lot of other miscellaneous utilities which are abandoned by the developers a long time ago. It is an online museum run by community members, volunteers and is dedicated to the preservation and sharing of vintage, abandoned, and pre-release software.

    WinWorld was started back in 2003 and its founder claims that the idea to start this site inspired by Yahoo briefcases. The primary purpose of this site is to preserve and share old software. Over the years, many people volunteered to improve this site in numerous ways and the collection of old software in WinWorld has grown exponentially. The entire WinWorld library is free, open and available to everyone.

  • How to Encrypt USB Drive on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
  • The excellent 2D action RPG 'CrossCode' is now officially out

    CrossCode from Radical Fish Games is a rather great 2D action RPG and today it was officially released across multiple stores.

    It's a fun idea, having you play as a character who is actually in an MMO set in the far future, where your avatar has a physical form. It's 2018 after all, we have films like Ready Player One that follow a guy running around in VR…

    Inspired by some of the classic JRPGs, CrossCode has a lot of familiar RPG elements and anyone who has played an action-RPG will feel right at home. I've been waiting so long for this to be finished and it's absolutely worth the wait.

  • Transhuman Design has removed the Linux version of BUTCHER due to issues in favour of Steam Play

    It seems Transhuman Design have removed the Linux version of BUTCHER after users reported issues, opting instead to ask Steam to add it as an approved Steam Play title.

    [...]

    After digging into the Steam forum, I came across this forum topic started in August, where four users mentioned trouble starting the game. That doesn't seem like a lot of people to make such a big decision, but it's understandable that with a tiny team and little time they're trying to make it so Linux gamers still have a good experience. Probably a good case for Valve to allow people to have a choice between native and Steam Play's Proton.

  • Tumbleweed Gets New Versions of KDE Plasma, Applications

    A total of four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were delivered to users of the rolling release this past week and the snapshot brought new versions of KDE Plasma and KDE Applications.

    The most recent snapshot 20180917 updated three packages. The GNOME package dconf-editor was updated to 3.30.0. Users of the ext2 filesystem will notice the utility package e2fsprogs 1.44.4 will fix the debugs ncheck command to work for files with multiple hard links; the updated package also has new debugfs commands for dumping xattr blocks and i_blocks array. Another GNOME package was updated with the iagno 3.30.0 package for the game reversi, which shows that GNOME 3.30 packages are starting to be integrated into Tumbleweed snapshots.

    Another three packages were updated in the 20180916 snapshot. The GNU Project debugger, gdb 8.2, added several patches and support access to new POWER8 registers. A fix was made for a GNU Compiler Collection 8.1 warning with the perl-DBD-mysql 4.047 updated, which also added options needed for public key based security. The other package that was updated in the snapshot was perl-Glib 1.327.

  • Slim signage player features Radeon E8860 GPU and six HDMI ports

    Ibase’s high-end “SI-626” signage player runs Windows or Linux on 7th or 6th Gen Intel Core CPUs with Radeon E8860 graphics, and offers 6x HDMI 1.4b ports, EDID remote management, and a 30mm profile.

    Ibase’s new SI-626 digital signage and video wall player combines high-end functionality with a slim 30mm height — 1.5mm thinner than its AMD Ryzen V1000 based SI-324 player. Like the SI-324, the SI-626 features hardware based EDID remote management with software setting mode to prevent display issues due to cable disconnection or display identification failures.

  • 15 Best “Lite” Android Go Apps To Save Battery And Storage In 2018
  • Hide your real name in Open Source

    If you’re thinking about contributing to Open Source, please take a moment to think of the negative impact it could have on your career…

  • Thermal Microconference Accepted into 2018 Linux Plumbers Conference

    As the energy density of computer systems has increased, thermal issues have become an increasingly hot topic across the spectrum from hand-held systems to internet datacenters. Because the need for thermal management is relatively new, there is a wide variety of hardware and firmware mechanisms, to say nothing of a wide variety of independently developed software to interact with these mechanisms. This in turn results in complex and almost-duplicate code to manage and control thermal excursions. This microconference will therefore look to see if it is possible to consolidate or at least to better align the Linux kernel’s thermal subsystems.

    This microconference will therefore discuss better handling of low ambient temperatures, userspace thermal control, improvements to thermal zone mode, better support for indirect (virtual) temperature measurement, sensor hierarchy, scheduler interactions with thermal management, and improvements to idle injection as a way to cool a core.

  • Debian: DSA-4298-1: hylafax security update

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • NVIDIA 410.57 Linux Beta Released With RTX 2080 Support, OptiX/Vulkan Ray-Tracing

    The Linux driver I've been using today for the just-posted GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux benchmarks is now publicly available. This NVIDIA 410 Linux driver is most exciting for Volta and Turing GPU owners, but there are also some EGL and Vulkan updates along with other changes.

  • Multiboot Pinebook KDE neon

    Here’s a picture of my Pinebook running KDE neon — watching Panic! At the Disco’s High Hopes — sitting in front of my monitor that’s hooked up to one of my openSUSE systems. There are still some errata, and watching video sucks up battery, but for hacking on documentation from my hammock in the garden, or doing IRC meetings it’s a really nice machine.

    But one of the neat things about running KDE neon off of an SD card on the Pinebook is that it’s portable — that SD card can move around. So let’s talk about multiboot in the sense of “booting the same OS storage medium in different hardware units” rather than “booting different OS from a medium in a single hardware unit”. On these little ARM boards, u-boot does all the heavy lifting early in the boot process. So to re-use the KDE neon Pinebook image on another ARM board, the u-boot blocks need to be replaced.

  • Glade in Libre Application Summit

    As usual, it was a great opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new ones specially outside the GNOME community.

    This opportunity I talked about the plans I have to integrate Glade with Gnome Builder and other IDEs

  • Linux-ready Apollo Lake mini-PC offers optional Movidius AI

    Aaeon’s rugged “Boxer-6405” mini-PC features an Apollo Lake SoC plus 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 3x or 4x serial, and an HDMI port. Options including SATA, wireless, and an UP AI Core card with Movidius technology.

    Aaeon announced a Boxer-6405 mini-PC that will be unveiled at the 20th China International Industry Fair, held Sep. 19-23 at the Shanghai National Exhibition Center. The compact embedded system will be demonstrated along with the UP AI Vision Kit at Aaeon’s Smart Factory Artificial Intelligence Edge Computing display.

  •  

  • Video: Hackers To The Rescue – Defining Good Hacking

    Noci, the fictional city attacked by malevolent hackers during ICON2018, was saved and the challenge was won by a Swiss team. What is a hacker, how do they define themselves? Two members of ICON, a young non-governmental organisation in Geneva, answered that question for Intellectual Property Watch, with the same affirmation: a hacker is first and foremost a curious mind. View the IP-Watch video interviews below.

    ICON 2018, “The journey to digital trust”  co-organised by ICON, the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP,) and the MCI group, took place on 13-14 September. The event held what the organisers qualified as the “World premiere cyber-attack simulation.”

    Participants came from France, Italy, Norway and Switzerland, selected after a qualifying competition at the global level, according to an ICON press release. In the end, the challenge was won by Swiss participants Team Sw1ss, it said.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Opus 1.3 Codec Library Nears, New Tools Release

    Back in June was the first release candidate of Opus 1.3 (libopus v1.3) with this open-source audio codec allowing to use SILK down to bitrates of about 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved security, improved Ambisonics support, and much more. Libopus 1.3 RC2 is now available along with some tooling updates.

    Libopus 1.3 RC2 was released on Tuesday to fix issues with bandwidth detection, enable Ambisonics support by default, and enables security hardening by default.

  • Akademy 2018

    I had the awesome opportunity to attend Akademy in Vienna this year. First off, a big thank you to the organising team for pulling off this years Akademy without a hitch.

    This Akademy was a bit more special, since it was decided to switch up the format, which in my opinion worked quite well. There were training’s that ran alongside the talk’s and BoF’s, which I think was a great idea. I signed up to the Public Speaking Training and the Non Violent Communication training, which I think were run exceptionally. I hope that these training sessions are run again next Akademy because I found them exceptionally valuable.

  • NetworkManager Merges An Initrd Generator For Early Boot Handling

    Days following the NetworkManager 1.14 release, feature activity on the next release is progressing and the newest addition is nm-initrd-generator.

    The NetworkManager Initrd Generator is used to generate an early-boot NetworkManager configuration. This new utility scans the command line for supported options and from there generates a network configuration and the necessary configuration files to handle an early instance of NetworkManager that runs from the initial ramdisk during the system's early boot stage.

  • Mageia at fête de l’humanité 2018

    The booths were in a different place from previous years, and we had a lot more visitors. We gave out all the flyers we brought by Saturday evening – there was only one left for Sunday – so we gave out Mageia stickers instead. We did not sell any T-shirts, but we sold two USB sticks.

    Many people asked for general information; I spoke so much that I lost my voice! We had strong interest, coming from people already using a Linux distribution as well as from people wishing to turn to free software.

  • Troubleshooting FDB table wrapping in Open vSwitch

    When most people deploy an Open vSwitch configuration for virtual networking using the NORMAL rule, that is, using L2 learning, they do not think about configuring the size of the Forwarding DataBase (FDB).

  • Test Day: Fedora Silverblue

    Fedora Silverblue is a new variant of Fedora Workstation with rpm-ostree at its core to provide fully atomic upgrades. Furthermore, Fedora Silverblue is immutable and upgrades as a whole, providing easy rollbacks from updates if something goes wrong. Fedora Silverblue is great for developers using Fedora with good support for container-focused workflows.

    Additionally, Fedora Silverblue delivers desktop applications as Flatpaks. This provides better isolation/sandboxing of applications, and streamlines updating applications — Flatpaks can be safely updated without reboot.

  • Understand Fedora memory usage with top

    Have you used the top utility in a terminal to see memory usage on your Fedora system? If so, you might be surprised to see some of the numbers there. It might look like a lot more memory is consumed than your system has available. This article will explain a little more about memory usage, and how to read these numbers.

    [...]

    Your system has another facility it uses to store information, which is swap. Typically this is an area of slower storage (like a hard disk). If the physical memory on the system fills up as needs increase, the OS looks for portions of memory that haven’t been needed in a while. It writes them out to the swap area, where they sit until needed later.

    Therefore, prolonged, high swap usage usually means a system is suffering from too little memory for its demands. Sometimes an errant application may be at fault. Or, if you see this often on your system, consider upgrading your machine’s memory, or restricting what you run.

  • Global Open-Source Learning Management Systems Software Market Size, Status and Forecast 2022
  • The Commons Clause vs. Open Source controversy, explained [iophk: "if it has the "Commons Clause" in it then it does not qualify as Open Source"]

    So, what is Commons Clause and why isn’t it the same thing as open source?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to get Apple-like gestures on the Linux desktop

    I understand a big part of the problem is that Apple owns patents on trackpad gestures, something which hinders the open source community's ability to create a quality experience. But that hurdle shouldn't equate to a bad experience, which many people have. Not only does Linux install without any sort of multi-touch gestures, it is sometimes over sensitive or under sensitive. I've installed Linux on laptop hardware and found the trackpad configuration was a losing battle—until I discovered Fusuma.

  • How to fix missing Python for Ansible in Fedora Vagrant
  • Did your open source career begin with video games?

    Certainly you don't need to be a gamer as a child to grow up and become a developer, nor does being a gamer automatically set you up for a career in technology.

    But there's definitely a good bit of overlap between the two.

    After listening to the first episode of Command Line Heroes, and reading Ross Turk's story of how MUDs led him to a career in coding, I've thought a bit about how gaming has influenced my own journey into technology, and how it lead to a career in open source.

    For me, that first important game was WarCraft II. Sure, I played games before it, and after it. But shortly after my family replaced our faithful Apple IIc with a blazing fast (by comparison) 486 PC with amazing features like color, and a sound card, and even a 2400 baud modem (that would take about three months to download the equivalent of an hour of Netflix today).

  • openSUSE to Have Summit in Nashville

    The openSUSE community is headed to Nashville, Tennessee, next year and will have the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville April 5 through April 6, 2019, during the end of SUSE’s premier annual global technical conference SUSECON.

    Registration for the event is open and the Call for Papers is open until Jan. 15. Partners of openSUSE, open-source community projects and community members are encourage to register for the summit and submit a talk.

    The schedule for the openSUSE SUmmit Nashville will be released at the beginning of February.

  • How selfless is your open organization?

    "Community" is a defining characteristic of open organizations. A community could be many things—a "team," a "group," a "department," or a "task force," for example. What makes any of these groups a true community is two distinct factors: a well-defined purpose and clear investment in or value of that purpose.

    How does a person balance a community's values with his or her own, personal values? How does that person negotiate this relationship when setting goals? Answers to these questions will expose and speak to that person's character.

  • Andres Rodriguez: MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 released

    I’m happy to announce that MAAS 2.5.0 beta 1 has been released.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 545

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 545 for the week of September 9 – 15, 2018.

  • Arm delivers production-ready open source Bluetooth Low Energy software stack to unleash IoT innovation

    Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is quickly becoming the Internet of Things (IoT) connectivity protocol of choice for a variety of use cases, including smart lighting, smart cities and asset tracking, where low-cost, power consumption and small footprint are fundamental requirements. According to the 2018 Bluetooth Market Update, there will be more than 5 billion Bluetooth device shipments by 2022, with 97% of them containing Bluetooth Low Energy technology. The advances in Bluetooth 5 technology, along with the introduction of Bluetooth Mesh are driving new market opportunities across building automation, sensor networks, and other IoT solutions.

  • Digital Minimalism and Deep Work

    Through Newport's blog I learned that the title of his next book is Digital Minimalism. This intrigued me, because since I started thinking about minimalism myself, I've wondered about the difference of approach needed between minimalism in the "real world" and the digital domains. It turns out the topic of Newport's next book is about something different: from what I can tell, focussing on controlling how one spends one's time online for maximum productivity.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Zinc Launches UK’s First Open Source Blockchain-Based Hiring Software

    London: Zinc, a UK based start-up, today launches its blockchain based hiring software, which promises to eliminate many of the inefficiencies associated with recruitment within the technology sector.  Available to the public from today, Zinc has been successfully tested in beta with customers including GoCardless and Booking.com.

  • Lumina Networks Expands Engineering Management to Drive Product Innovation and Open Source Leadership

    Open source networking leader Lumina Networks today announced the addition of three industry leaders to their engineering team.  Avinash Parwaney joins Lumina’s executive team as VP of Engineering. Parwaney is formerly from Cisco where he was Senior Director of Engineering. Prem Sankar Gopannan has joined Lumina as Director of Engineering and Iyappa Swaminathan has joined as Director of Technical Product Management.

    “I am pleased to welcome Avinash to lead the Lumina engineering team. He brings a wealth of real-world experience in large scale service provider networking,” said Andrew Coward, CEO of Lumina Networks. “Avinash will help Lumina accelerate our open source-based networking platforms and applications from proof of concept trials into production deployment. The addition of Prem and Iyappa to the team will further strengthen our ability to help lead the open source networking community, driving innovation and productization.”

  • EU antitrust ruling on Microsoft buy of GitHub due by October 19
  • which spare laptop?

    I'm in a perpetual state of downsizing and ridding my life (and my family's life) of things we don't need: sometimes old computers. My main (nearly my sole) machine is my work-provided Thinkpad T470s: a fantastic laptop that works so well I haven't had anything to write about it. However, I decided that it was worth keeping just one spare, for emergencies or other odd situations. I have two candidate machines in my possession.

    [...]

    Surprising myself perhaps more than anyone else, I've ended up opting for the Toshiba. The weight was the clincher. The CPU performance difference was too close to matter, and 3G RAM is sufficient for my spare laptop needs. Once I'd installed a spare SSD as the main storage device, day-to-day performance is very good. The resolution difference didn't turn out to be that important: it's still low enough that side-by-side text editor and browser feels crowded, so I end up using the same window management techniques as I would on the X61s.

    What do I use it for? I've taken it on a couple of trips or holidays which I wouldn't want to risk my work machine for. I wrote nearly all of liquorice on it in downtime on a holiday to Turkey whilst my daughter was having her afternoon nap. I'm touching up this blog post on it now!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • An "obsessive," "anti-imperialist" Turing Complete computer language with only one command

    Daniel writes, "An obsessive programmer, frustrated with not only the inefficiencies of mainstream OSes like Windows, but what he sees as their 'imperialistic oppression,' built an entire operating system using a subleq architecture. Subleq is a OISC, a language with only a single command. It lacks the most basic features of programming languages, and yet is Turing Complete.

  • PHP 7.3-RC1 Released, Benchmarks Looking Good For This Next PHP7 Update

    Released this week was the first RC milestone for the PHP 7.3 feature update due out before year's end. This weekend I ran some fresh PHP benchmarks looking at its performance.

    The PHP 7.3 release candidate is made up of many fixes ranging from memory corruption and segmentation faults to undefined symbols and other problems. The list of changes can be found via the NEWS entry.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: GIMP 2.10

    GIMP 2.10 landed in Debian Testing a few weeks ago and I have to say I'm very happy about it. The last major version of GIMP (2.8) was released in 2012 and the new version fixes a lot of bugs and improved the user interface.

  • Political strategy game Democracy 4 announced with Linux support

    Positech Games have announced Democracy 4 [Official Site], the next evolution of their political strategy game and it's coming with Linux support. For those who think they can run a country or would like to have a go at it, this is probably the closest you will ever get.

    This is good to see, because we had Democracy 3 that supported Linux, but Democracy 3 Africa did not support Linux. A shame too, because I rather liked what I saw in Democracy 3 which is why I'm quite happy about this news.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wine-Staging 3.16 Released With ~880 Patches Still Atop Wine

    Busy since Friday's release of Wine 3.16, the volunteers maintaining the Wine-Staging tree with the various experimental/testing patches atop upstream Wine are out with their adjoining update that continues with just under 900 patches being re-based.

  • Some thoughts on State of Mind from Daedelic Entertainment
  • Summer’s End Roundup 2018

    Although it looked from the outside as if Mageians were sleeping through August, it wasn’t so! And now that it’s Autumn – fall for you folks in the North Americas – we’ll be more communicative, we promise.

  • Overriding misreported screen dimensions with KMS-backed drivers

    With Qt5 gaining support for high-DPI displays, and applications starting to exercise that support, it’s easy for applications to suddenly become unusable with some screens. For example, my old Samsung TV reported itself as 7″ screen. While this used not to really matter with websites forcing you to force the resolution of 96 DPI, the high-DPI applications started scaling themselves to occupy most of my screen, with elements becoming really huge (and ugly, apparently due to some poor scaling).

    It turns out that it is really hard to find a solution for this. Most of the guides and tips are focused either on proprietary drivers or on getting custom resolutions. The DisplaySize specification in xorg.conf apparently did not change anything either. Finally, I was able to resolve the issue by overriding the EDID data for my screen. This guide explains how I did it.

  • Technology streamlines computational science projects

    Researchers use ICE to study topics in fields including nuclear energy, astrophysics, additive manufacturing, advanced materials, neutron science and quantum computing, answering questions such as how batteries behave and how some 3-D-printed parts deform when exposed to heat.

    Several factors differentiate ICE from other workflow management systems. For example, because ICE exists on an open-source software framework called the Eclipse Rich Client Platform, anyone can access, download and use it. Users also can create custom combinations of reusable resources and deploy simulation environments tailored to tackle specific research challenges.

  • Google Chrome 69 gives worldwide web a stay of execution in URL box

    Google Chrome 70 arrived as a beta release on Thursday, bringing with it a handful of meaningful improvements and some more esoteric features of interest to developers.

    Available on the Chrome Beta channel for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows – the iOS beta requires participation in Apple's TestFlight program – Chrome 70 implements a Shape Detection API that allows web apps to do things like detect faces in images, read barcodes and parse text in images.

    The API is particularly promising for mobile web apps, which can now return the location of facial features within an image, turn barcodes and QR codes into strings and read Latin alphabet text found in pictures.

  • PostgreSQL 11 Won't Ship With Its Faster JIT Support Enabled By Default

    One of the coolest innovations landing this year in PostgreSQL was LLVM-based JIT support to speed up database queries. But it's not going to be enabled by default in the upcoming PostgreSQL 11 release.

    This functionality relies upon LLVM for JIT compiling SQL queries rather than passing those queries to the PostgreSQL interpreter. These LLVM JIT'ed queries have led to more efficient code being generated and particularly help with more complex queries.

  • n2k18 Hackathon report: Ken Westerback (krw@) on disklabel(8) work, dhclient(8) progress
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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: NVIDIA, ATI RAGE and Phoronix Test Suite a Decade Later

  • New LTS Kernel 4.19 and NVidia Patch
    Under 24h after Linux Kernel 4.19 LTS is released by Greg, Patrick decided to bump the kernel used in -current to the latest LTS release. This new major version brings tons of new and interesting features, as written in Kernel Newbies. [...] I'm pretty sure it will showed up soon enough as KDE 5 is getting more stable and polished. It has been tested by Eric (and some other) for some time and it's proven to be solid.
  • A 2018 Autumn Linux Driver Update For The ATI RAGE 128 Series
    The open-source display driver for supporting these graphics cards where 32MB of SDRAM was suitable, 250 nm fabrication was standard, and core clocks around 100MHz were competitive is still being maintained... Two decades after the release of the ATI RAGE series, the open-source Linux driver continues seeing some activity and in fact a new driver release. The lone independent driver contributor ushering along the RAGE driver (xf86-video-r128) is Kevin Brace who started working on the VIA OpenChrome open-source driver in recent years and for the past number of months recently shifted focus to the classic RAGE driver. He released the xf86-video-r128 6.12.0 driver today to address two build failures. Besides addressing build problems, he also began writing some of the XAA/EXA 2D acceleration code. He did note of the changes to the 2D acceleration code paths, "It is always possible that I can mess up the code, but it appears that the code is working correctly."
  • OpenBenchmarking.org Serves Up Its 35 Millionth Test Profile/Suite Benchmark Download
    Just a little more than one month after crossing 34 million downloads, the 35,000,000 milestone was achieved -- continuing the trend that's been going on for the past number of quarters. OpenBenchmarking.org serves test profiles/suites separate from the Phoronix Test Suite package itself to allow new tests to be easily introduced without having to upgrade the PTS client itself, update existing tests with version controls, etc. OpenBenchmarking.org is also what allows users to upload their own test results publicly, obtain various hardware/software statistics, and much more.

Fedora Toolbox ready for testing!

As many of you know we kicked of a ambitious goal to revamp the Linux desktop when we launched Fedora Workstation 4 years. We wanted to remove many of the barriers to adoption of Linux as a desktop and make it a better operating system for all, especially for developers. To that effect we have been pushing a long range of initiatives over the last 4 years ago, ranging from providing a better input stack through libinput, a better display system through Wayland, a better audio and video subsystem through PipeWire, a better way of doing application packaging and dependency handling through Flatpak, a better application installation history through GNOME Software, actual firmware handling for Linux through Linux Vendor Firmware Service, better manageability through Fleet Commander, and Project Silverblue for reliable OS updates. We also had a lot of efforts done to improve general hardware handling, be that work on glvnd and friends for dealing with NVidia driver, the Bolt project for handling Thunderbolt devices better, HiDPI support in the desktop, better touch support in the desktop, improved laptop battery life, and ongoing work to improve state of fingerprint readers under Linux and to provide a flicker free boot experience. Read more

Celebrating 15 Years of the Xen Project and Our Future

In the 1990s, Xen was a part of a research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet led by Ian Pratt and Keir Fraser at The University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary. From its beginnings, Xen technology focused on building a modular and flexible architecture, a high degree of customizability, and security. This security mindset from the outset led to inclusion of non-core security technologies, which eventually allowed the Xen Project to excel outside of the data center and be a trusted source for security and embedded vendors (ex. Qubes, Bromium, Bitdefender, Star Labs, Zentific, Dornerworks, Bosch, BAE systems), and also a leading hypervisor contender for the automotive space. As the Xen Project looks to a future of virtualization everywhere, we reflect back on some of our major achievements over the last 15 years. To celebrate, we’ve created an infographic that captures some of our key milestones — share it on social. A few community members also weighed in on some of their favorite Xen Project moments and what’s to come: Read more

Latest Firefox Rolls Out Enhanced Tracking Protection

At Firefox, we’re always looking to build features that are true to the Mozillia mission of giving people control over their data and privacy whenever they go online. We recently announced our approach to Anti-tracking where we discussed three key feature areas we’re focusing on to help people feel safe while they’re on the web. With today’s release, we’re making progress against “removing cross-site tracking” with what we’re calling Enhanced Tracking Protection. Read more