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European Patent Office Threatens Blogger With Defamation Lawsuit For Criticism

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Legal
Misc

In fact, to argue that Schestowitz's post is defamatory is crazy. Threatening Schestowitz with a defamation claim is much crazier and dangerous than even Schestowitz's own interpretation of the EPO's memo. If you're working for a government agency, such as the EPO, you have to be willing to accept some amount of criticism, even if you disagree with it. To claim it's defamation and to threaten a lawsuit is really, really screwed up.

[...]

I'm having trouble thinking of any other governmental agency that has ever threatened a public critic with defamation. Basic concepts around free speech suggest that the EPO should suck it up. If it disagrees with Schestowitz's interpretation of what it's doing, then it can come out and explain its side of the story. Threatening him with defamation actually only makes me think that perhaps his interpretation hits closer to home than I originally believed.

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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • AWS launches EC2 Dedicated Hosts so you can bring your own Linux licence

    AMAZON WEB SERVICES (AWS) has announced the arrival of a new service called EC2 Dedicated Hosts.

    The new feature will allow companies to run the software they pay for on multiple virtual machines using a single server, giving more granular management to finding what applications are working on what virtual machine.

    AWS has outlined the advantages of EC2 Dedicated Hosts in a blog post by evangelist Jeff Barr.

  • Unikernels, meet Docker!

    The demo described here is just the beginning. There are many implementations of unikernels and there’s plenty of work ahead to ensure they can all reap the benefits of integration, as well as improving Docker itself to make the most of these new technologies. Look over the collection of unikernel projects and contribute your experiences to this blog!

  • AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition Is A Letdown On Linux

    While leaked slides indicate AMD was planning better gaming on Linux for Crimson, in the end they really didn't deliver. Even for their mentioned games, when testing various Linux OpenGL games on three different systems the performance was largely unchanged.

  • New HPCG Benchmark List Goes Beyond LINPACK to Compare Supercomputers

    The High Performance Conjugate Gradients (HPCG) Benchmark list was announced this week at SC15. This is the fourth list produced for the emerging benchmark designed to complement the traditional High Performance LINPACK (HPL) benchmark used as the official metric for ranking the TOP500 systems. The first HPCG list was announced at ISC’14 a year and a half ago, containing only 15 entries and the SC’14 list had 25. The current list contains more than 60 entries as HPCG continues to gain traction in the HPC community.

  • New Opera 34 Beta Is Based on Chromium 47.0.2526.58, Brings Linux and Mac Fixes

    Opera Software, through Aneta Reluga, has announced the release and immediate availability for download and testing of a new Beta build for the upcoming Opera 34.0 web browser for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • Hamster rediscovered

    If you like to track your time in a fine granular way, consider to use project-hamster with the GNOME Shell extension.

  • Distro hopping: feeling good with my time on LXLE

    Well the time has come to officially switch off from LXLE. This time around however I find myself in a weird spot. I’ve honestly struggled with LXLE; not in using the distribution itself but rather coming up with things to write about it. That isn’t to say that LXLE is bad by any stretch of the imagination, in fact it is quite good, it’s just that once you get used to the light weight desktop environment (DE) there is a perfectly capable “heavy weight” distribution underneath. What I mean by this is that once you get used to the DE and it fades into the background you’re left with a perfectly functional distribution that could just as easily have been Ubuntu or Linux Mint or Fedora or {insert your favourite one here}.

  • Netrunner 17 'Horizon' is here -- download the Kubuntu-based Linux distro now

    About a week ago, the Netrunner team released an update to its rolling release operating system. Based on Arch/Manjaro, I advised Linux beginners to steer clear, and instead opt for the Kubuntu-based variant. There are a couple of reasons for this. For one, the Ubuntu community is arguably friendlier and better for newbies -- there are a ton of instructions and .deb files available too. More importantly, however, the rolling release could be less stable overall.

  • Netrunner 17 Screenshot Tour
  • KNOPPIX 7.6.0 Screenshot Tour
  • Tumbleweed install for November

    For this month, I installed Tumbleweed on my laptop. I had installed Leap 42.1 to overwrite my previous Tumbleweed install on that laptop.

    This computer uses legacy booting. I gave Tumbleweed a 40G partition, which I formatted as “ext4”. I also allowed it to use the swap and home file systems from my encrypted LVM on that computer.

  • Python 3 Porting FAD: Lessons Learned
  • Fossetcon 2015 Orlando Florida – Lake Buena Vista Hilton 19 – 21 November 2015
  • Reproducible builds: week 30 in Stretch cycle

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why ChromeOS Tops Linux, Mac and Windows

    Much like mishandling a sharp stick, any operating system that easily allows you to access root or super user powers is potentially dangerous. In 2015, the single biggest threat to your computer's security is sitting at your desk, typing on your keyboard. This is why more people than ever are gravitating towards tablets, smart phones and yes, Chromebooks as their main computing device.

    All of these devices come locked down so that accessing something dangerous to that device is much more difficult to do. Whether you run rm -r / on a Mac or on Linux, or install something terrible on Windows – there are simply too many opportunities for the less tech savvy to destroy their operating system installation.

  • 5 Use Cases for Linux Virtual Desktops

    Many people liked the idea of running a Linux desktop; but in reality, when asked if Linux desktops were running on their physical systems, the answer was also No. Now, however, it seems like the tide has turned and more enterprises are starting to run Linux desktops. That means they're looking for a more secure and manageable way to deal with them.

  • Netrunner 17 Linux OS Launches with Gorgeous KDE Plasma 5.4.3 Desktop

    On November 23, the Netrunner Team was happy to announce the final release and immediate availability for download of the Netrunner 17 GNU/Linux operating system, dubbed Horizon.

  • The Pebble that Can Protect Your Home Network From Cyber Perils

    Yossi adds that the device features the capacity to know whenever your TV is recording your voice even if it is switched off and when it uploads the information to the cloud.

    "We all lock our front doors and yet our devices are wide open", explains Yossi Atias, Dojo-Labs' CEO and cofounder.

    Security systems devoted to the Internet of Things are becoming more common and more sophisticated.

    The number of connected devices now exceeds 4 billion, according to Gartner, and is expected to surge to 6 billion in 2016. The proliferation of Wi-Fi-enabled things-from baby monitors to smart locks-makes the home vulnerable to cyber threats, of which the Federal Bureau of Investigation recently issued a warning. The device is created to monitor the behavior of each device that is connected to your home network and help ensure your privacy. And it grows more intelligent with each new gadget and intrusion.

  • Snowdrift.coop Joins OSI as Newest Affiliate Member

    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), recognized globally for promoting and protecting open source software and development communities, announced today the affiliate membership of Snowdrift.coop. Snowdrift.coop is building a sustainable funding platform for freely-licensed works. Unlike the one-to-one matching used in traditional fundraising, Snowdrift.coop uses a many-to-many matching pledge that creates a network effect (like the internet itself) so that each donation and even projects reinforce one another. A fundamental difference between Snowdrift.coop and one-time fundraising campaigns that help projects get started is that Snowdrift.coop pays out monthly to provide sustainability for ongoing work.

  • Mirantis and FusionStorm Team on OpenStack Appliances

    Mirantis, which is already well-known for its laser focus on the OpenStack cloud computing platform, has delivered a flurry of announcements this week. Earlier, we covered the news that its Fuel toolset has become an official OpenStack component under the project's "big tent" organizational policy. Fuel has been successfully used to deploy OpenStack in environments ranging from personal proof-of-concept micro-clouds to production infrastructures composed of hundreds of nodes running tens of thousands of instances.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Dual Boot Deception

    In this video, I’ll go through many of the perils of dual booting and I’ll also explain why I don’t usually support systems that are configured in a dual boot environment. It’s not just Linux that has problems in a dual boot setup; Windows seems to come up with strange issues when paired with Linux as well. There is also a psychological factor to consider. Constantly comparing and keeping up with two operating systems on the same machine can trigger all kinds of OCD behavior.

  • OpenStack Liberty and Debian

    It’s been a long time I haven’t written here. And lots of things happened in the OpenStack planet. As a full time employee with the mission to package OpenStack in Debian, it feels like it is kind of my duty to tell everyone about what’s going on.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • DevOps explained in issue #159

    Docker, Puppet, Vagrant, CoreOS, Otto and more inside the new issue. Plus, code a Breakout game in Pygame Zero

  • 3D Printing Under Arch Linux

    3D technology and 3D printing are under quick development at this time. They have big future and can involve all parts of our live. But they are still quite expensive for normal user. BUT …. everything is changing. The 3D printing based on FDM technology is suitable and accessible for everybody.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2015/47
  • Red Hat Cut to “Hold” at Vetr Inc. (RHT)
  • Red Hat Focuses on Containers with Enterprise Linux 7.2

    It's been a week full of container news. Docker, which has driven the trend toward running application code in containers instead of widely used virtual machines, announced new tools that can help companies work with containers without getting rid of existing infrastructure. The Docker Universal Control Plane tool can run in data centers, and can also be useful in public cloud environments.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2015.20151116-1

    One month has passed since the big multiarch update, and not one bug report concerning it did come in, that are good news. So here is a completely boring update with nothing more than the usual checkout from the TeX Live tlnet distribution as of yesterday.

  • Openly Thankful
  • Community Appreciation Day

    Today is Ubuntu Community Appreciation Day, but this year I am going to expand my appreciation beyond the boundaries of the Ubuntu Community to include anyone in open source that has impacted my journey in open source.

  • Raspberry Pi: Simple forms of input

    It’s time to play with some affordable methods of getting input into your tiny Linux machine.

  • Future for Windows in smartphones is grim, Gartner says

    Gartner is predicting a grim future for Microsoft's Windows mobile OS, saying it won't make its mark in consumer smartphones, remaining relegated to enterprise users.

    Microsoft's Windows 10 mobile OS is just now reaching devices, but prior versions didn't fare so well. Windows Mobile was in just 5.87 million handsets shipped during the third quarter this year, declining from 9.03 million in the same quarter a year ago.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Docker Reaches Across Universes at Dockercon EU

    The open-source Docker container project provides tooling that enables application virtualization in a way that is more agile than other traditional approaches.

    The agility of Docker containers is being used by developers in a number of unique and innovative ways to solve challenges big and small. At the Dockercon EU conference in Barcelona, Spain this week, the best and the brightest of those innovative Docker use-cases were on display.

  • Wine Is Now Under A Code Freeze For Wine 1.8

    It was announced today via WWN 402 that last week's Wine 1.7.55 is the last development freeze with now going into a code freeze for version 1.8.

    Wine 1.8 will likely be released by year's end and until then will be weekly release candidates to ensure sufficient test coverage, as noted by the World Wine News.

  • Library versioning

    KDE Frameworks (and, in the past, kdelibs) approached this by defining some arbitrarily high minor version (typically 90+) to indicate pre-releases for the next major release. So the pre-release Frameworks were numbered like 4.90.1.

    So where is all of this going? Well, CMake provides a helpful function to write package version information files that allow find_package() calls to only find compatible versions. So if you use the SameMajorVersion scheme, find_package(Foo 4.3) will find Foo 4.3.0 and Foo 4.5.2, but not Foo 4.2.5 or Foo 5.1.1. However, if project Foo uses the “high minor = next version prerelease” scheme, it will also find Foo 4.90.1, which is not compatible with Foo 4.3.

  • Wireshark 2.0 Open-Source Network Protocol Analyzer Officially Released with New GUI
  • Wireshark 2.0 Released, UI Rewritten In Qt5

    Wireshark, the well known open-source network packet analyzer, has finally reached version 2.0!

    While its user interface was originally written for GTK+, Wireshark 2.0 marks the point that it's been rewritten in Qt! It's been more than two years of work and now this Qt version of Wireshark is out there after going through several development releases.

  • GNOME Shell Browser Plugin Crash in Mozilla Firefox Patched for GNOME 3.18

    The GNOME developers have announced the general availability of a new maintenance release for the GNOME Shell component of the stable GNOME 3.18 desktop environment.

  • systemd 228 Arrives for GNU/Linux Systems with Over 20 Improvements
  • G11n team ends Fedora Activity Day on high note

    On November 1st – 3rd, 2015, the Fedora Globalization (G11n) team held their Fedora Activity Day (FAD) in the Red Hat office in Tokyo, Japan. A Fedora Activity Day is a mini-conference where contributors get together to work on major tasks related to Fedora. The G11n team met with objectives of working on Fedora 24 development plans, brainstorming on a Fedora globalization workflow, and deciding strategy for different Fedora products.

  • Here's What's New In Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 for Ubuntu Phones

    While many of us are still waiting to receive the Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 software update on our Ubuntu Phone devices, the developers have just published the entire changelog with all the juicy details.

  • Linux Mint 17.3 Beta "Rosa" MATE Edition Is Out and Ready for Testing

    The MATE edition of Linux Mint 17.3 Beta "Rosa" was released along with the Cinnamon one and it's one of the two main flavors of the Linux Mint distribution. There are also Xfce and KDE versions, not to mention edition that are based on Debian, but those are not the main focus of the team.

  • Rugged 3.5-inch SBC runs Linux on Bay Trail, is loaded with I/O

    Arbor Technologies unveiled the “EmCORE-i230G,” a 3.5-inch form factor SBC featuring Intel Atom E3800 CPUs, a wide array of I/O, and -40 to 85°C operation.

    Like many other single-board computers targeting applications such as outdoor kiosks or industrial signage, Arbor’s EmCORE-i230G leverages the high-speed processing and graphics performance of Intel’s E3800 processors, along with their low power consumption. The board’s 3.5-inch form-factor remains one of the most popular SBC formats for embedded and industrial applications, alongside the ever popular Mini-ITX. Other recent Bay Trail-based SBCs in 3.5-inch format have included Aaeon’s GENE-BT06, ADL’s ADLE3800HD, Axiomtek’s CAPA840 and CAPA848, Nexcom’s EBC 355, and the WinSystems SBC35-CC405.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • KNewPasswordWidget lands in KWidgetsAddons

    A new widget called KNewPasswordWidget has been added to the KWidgetsAddons framework, starting from 5.16. I decided to create this widget because sometimes you cannot just use KNewPasswordDialog to ask the users for a new password. This is the case when you need to add further options to the same dialog. This widget is meant to be easily embedded in such a custom password dialog, without having to code it from scratch.

  • Handing over the reins

    As some of you might know, I started the application Cantor in KDEedu a couple of years ago, since I didn’t want to rely on comercial computer algebra systems during my studies, and because all the free alternatives seemed to lack a decent graphical interface. Since then Cantor has grown to support all kinds of different mathematical languages due to numerous contributors from all over the world.

  • fwupd and DFU

    Once all this new code has settled down I’m going to be re-emailing a lot of the vendors who were unwilling to write vendor-specific code in fwupd. I’m trying to make the barrier to automatic updates on Linux as low as possible.

  • PaperTrail - Powered by IBM Watson

    On the final semester of my MSc program at Columbia SEAS, I was lucky enough to be able to attend a seminar course taught by Alfio Gliozzo entitled Q&A with IBM Watson. A significant part of the course is dedicated to learning how to leverage the services and resources available on the Watson Developer Cloud. This post describes the course project my team developed, the PaperTrail application.

  • Google’s new ‘Wallpaper Art’ app puts beautiful artwork on your Chromebook

    Google has many side initiatives, and one of them is the Cultural Institute that digitizes works of art from museums and archives around the world and puts them online.

    Today, their Art Project released an app for Chrome OS that updates the wallpaper of your device to a different piece of art from their collection every day. Expect “masterpieces ranging from Van Gogh and Monet, all the way to contemporary works from street artists around the world,” according to Chrome evangelist François Beaufort in announcement post. If today’s piece doesn’t jive with your artistic taste, you can skip to the next wallpaper in the app.

  • Google Wallpaper Art app turns your Chromebook into an art gallery

    Chromebooks have been red hot sellers on Amazon for some time now. But if you're someone who has had a boring desktop on your Chromebook, you can now spice it up with Google's new Wallpaper Art app. The app will refresh artwork every day and features many different wallpapers from noted artists from the past and present.

  • Calculate 15 Scratch KDE Screenshot Tour
  • Netrunner 2015.11 Rolling Screenshot Tour
  • Blogging, Podcasting, or Video?

    While I was initially attracted to the notion of sharing some of these thoughts in an audio format, I have decided to focus instead more on writing. This was partially informed by my back of the napkin research, but also in thinking about how we best present thoughts.

  • Bad Voltage Episode 54 Has Been Released

    Every two weeks Bad Voltage delivers an amusing take on technology, Open Source, politics, music, and anything else we think is interesting, as well as interviews and reviews.

  • Almost a beta

    Yet another 200+ lines of updates in the ChangeLog.txt of slackware-current. It’s obvious that Pat has been watching the LinuxQuestions threads closely. And we are again very bleeding edge, with the Gnu Compiler Collection 5.2.0!

  • Stock in Motion: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fil Ltd Decreased Stake in Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) by $10.36 Million as Shares Declined
  • Red Hat, Inc. Price Target Update

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT): 17 Analyst have given the stock of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) a near short term price target of $85.06. The standard deviation reading, which is a measure by which the stock price is expected to swing away from the mean estimate, is at $5.09. The higher price target estimate is at $92 while the lower price estimates are fixed at $72.

  • Robolinux 8.2 Raptor LXDE Edition (Debian Based OS With Support For Windows Apps) Has Been Released
  • Your donations at work

    I’ve just published the most recent Community Donations Report highlighting where donations made to the Ubuntu community have been used by members of that community to promote and improve Ubuntu. In this report I’ve included links to write-ups detailing how those funds were put to use.

  • Linux AIO: Ubuntu 15.10 available

    Linux AIO is a project to package multiple flavours of a distribution in one ISO within a DVD size limit. Users can try each flavour live or install on their systems. In essence the difference lies mostly in the desktop environments. This is an invaluable source of distributions for distro hoppers. Note that there are issues, some of which are unresolved due to distro dependencies. However, for most of it, the stuff works.

  • NAS boxes double as media players, run Linux plus Android

    Qnap’s TAS-168 and dual-bay TAS-268 NAS devices run both Linux and Android on a dual-core ARM SoC, and offers private cloud and media player capabilities.

    Qnap is positioning the single HDD-bay TAS-168 and dual-bay TAS-268 at the bottom of its Home NAS line below the faster, dual-bay TS-231 and the higher-end, dual-bay TS-251 launched in 2014. Like these systems, the new TAS devices are mini-towers and run Qnap’s Linux-based NAS OS. In addition, Qnap claims the devices are the first home network-attached storage devices that also run Android.

  • H3-OLinuXino fresh out of reflow oven – our first quad core OSHW Linux SBC prototypes are ready

    Now these first prototypes will be put on heavy testing before we run the board in production. We want to see if they will be able to run Linux yet or just Android.

  • Dangerous Exploit found in Chrome for Android

    A rather critical Exploit has been uncovered in Google's own 'Chrome for Android' app which allows malicious programs to be installed without user intervention.

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More in Tux Machines

Octa-core Cortex-A53 hacker SBC sells for $60

FriendlyARM’s $60, open spec “NanoPC-T3” SBC runs Android or Linux on an octa-core Cortex-A53 SoC packed with wireless and media interfaces, plus 8GB eMMC. The over-caffeinated board builders at Guangzhou, China-based FriendlyARM have shipped their highest-end hacker board yet. The NanoPC-T3 is almost identical to the NanoPC-T2 board, but swaps out the quad-core, Cortex-A9 Samsung S5P4418 SoC for a layout-compatible S5P6818 with eight Cortex-A53 cores that can be clocked dynamically from 400MHz to 1.4GHz. Last month, FriendlyARM’ unveiled an $11, quad-core NanoPi M1 single board computer with similarly open source hardware and Android and Linux software. Read more

today's leftovers

Linux and Graphics

Security Leftovers

  • Cockpit 0.104
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. There’s a new release every week. Here are the highlights from this weeks 0.104 release.
  • FFmpeg 3.0.2 "Einstein" Multimedia Framework Released with Updated Components
    Today, April 28, 2016, the development team behind the popular FFmpeg open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has released the second maintenance release in the stable FFmpeg 3.0 "Einstein" series. FFmpeg 3.0 was a massive release announced in mid-February, which brought in numerous existing changes, including support for decoding and encoding Common Encryption (CENC) MP4 files, support for decoding DXV streams, as well as support for decoding Screenpresso SPV1 streams.
  • Using bubblewrap in xdg-app
    At the core of xdg-app is a small helper binary that uses Linux features like namespaces to set up sandbox for the application. The main difference between this helper and a full-blown container system is that it runs entirely as the user. It does not require root privileges, and can never allow you to get access to things you would not otherwise have.
  • Build System Fallbacks
    If you are using Builder from git (such as via jhbuild) or from the gnome-builder-3-20 branch (what will become 3.20.4) you can use Builder with the fallback build system. This is essentially our “NULL” build system and has been around forever. But today, these branches learned something so stupidly obvious I’m ashamed I didn’t do it 6 months ago when implementing Build Configurations.
  • Node.js version 6 is now available