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today's leftovers

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  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers

    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.

  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library

    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements.

    The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.

  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.

  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid

    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.

  • vcswatch is now looking for tags

    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories.

    Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

today's leftovers

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  • What is Linux?
  • The Rumors Aren’t True

    I was listening to my usual round of amazing Linux Podcasts this week (you know who you are) and one of the discussions that made the rounds was about hardware compatibility issues with Linux. One of the hosts was bemoaning the issues with running linux on a repurposed MacBook and trying to get the wireless drivers to work. That led to a discussion about proprietary vs. non-proprietary drivers and you can pretty much guess how the conversation went from there.

  • Download Linux Voice issue 19

    Issue 19 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • LabXNow – Code, Develop, and Test Software From Anywhere on the Cloud

    LabXNow is a cloud service provider that offers a free and personal online environment to different users with direct access from a web browser. You can think of it as your personal remote lab, where you can play around, code, develop or whatever you want. You can access it from anywhere with an Internet connection.

  • BoilingSteam has a nice podcast episode with the creator of SteamOS tools
  • Please, Don’t Touch Anything now supports Linux, don't you dare touch that button

    You all just want to buy it so you can press the button don't you? I know I do. Please, Don’t Touch Anything is now officially available on Linux with a nice discount.

  • Meet KDE Neon, A New Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu Linux

    KDE Neon is the latest and probably the best technology the KDE Community has developed, and I stand to be corrected if it is not so. You can call it a new Linux distro but KDE Neon is basically built comprehensively on Ubuntu Linux as the core, to bring the latest and hottest software developed by the KDE Community in a rolling release format to KDE desktop environment users.

    The KDE Neon project is intended to provide users cutting-edge features on a highly configurable and yet stable desktop in a single package. The packages made in KDE Neon are based on Ubuntu and are not compatible with other Linux distros such as Arch Linux and OpenSUSE as stated by Jonathan Riddell, one of the project heads and who was previously in charge of the Kubuntu Linux project.

  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!

    Many people liked the Interface of Windows 10 because now it carries all those features which Linux already have from years. Do you like the look of Windows 10 but don't want to use it? Here we brought Windows 10 GTK themes for you, this theme offers two versions Light and Dark, you can use whatever you like. But hold on, now many people will say like 'why you are so obsessed by other operating systems and so, Linux is great OS', yeah I do agree that many geeks consider Linux above all operating systems. The superiority of the Linux shows that you can do whatever you like to do with your OS, change look/design and so, that's called freedom. We should appreciate new comers to Linux instead of letting them down, and people leave Linux because they think it is quite difficult to survive with this OS.

  • Manjaro Update 2016-05-22 (stable)

    We are happy to announce our first update for Manjaro 16.06-rc1 (Daniella)!

  • Hackfest 1.2 (Day 2)

    Welcome to Day 2 of the Solus Hackfest 1.2!

  • This Week in Solus – Install #29
  • Unixstickers Gives Back to FOSS Projects
  • Chalet OS 16.04LTS
  • ChaletOS 16.04 - See What's New
  • New Gentoo LiveDVD "Choice Edition"
  • Chromium 51 packages available
  • Debian: Outreachy, Debian Reproducible builds Week 1 Progress Report
  • Puppet 4 uploaded to Debian unstable

    Puppet 4 has been uploaded to Debian unstable. This is a major upgrade from Puppet 3.

    If you are using Puppet, chances are that it is handling important bits of your infrastructure, and you should upgrade with care.

    Here are some points to consider.

  • Pocket CHIP $49 Indie Game Console

    Last year, we were impressed by Next Thing Co's $9 CHIP computer. At Maker Faire 2016, we were able to check out their PocketCHIP housing, which puts CHIP into a portable console package that runs Linux and indie game console Pico-8. Here's what you can do with the $49 system!

  • Finnish Govt Disappointed with Microsoft’s Job Cuts, Says They Impact Economy

    Microsoft has recently announced a new round of job layoffs at its Mobile unit in Finland, as it moves forward with its restructuring and reorganization plan following the acquisition of Nokia’s Devices and Services unit.

  • The Nokia Saga Predictions on This Blog: Full Listing with Links[Ed: Microsoft killed Nokia]

    So lets understand the context of when Elop came in. Nokia in 2009 sold 67.8 million smartphones globally (with 39% market share). This was a world record obivously and Nokia set record profits in its smartphone unit. In 2010 Nokia then grew 35.8 million new smartphone sales (growth rate of 53% !!!!). Nokia from 2009 to 2010 grew MORE than Apple even thought Apple released its most popular new iPhone model ever, the iPhone 4. Apple grew 22.4 million units but Nokia grew more, Nokia grew 35.8 million new smartphones. Very literally mathematically irrevocably true - Nokia was WINNING against Apple iPhone in 2010. Nokia GREW MORE than Apple with its MOST iconic new smartphone. The GAP between Nokia and Apple was NOT CLOSING, it was GROWING. Nokia was PULLING AWAY from Apple in 2010. Look at the numbers side-by-side...

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • FLOSS Weekly 389: Best Practices Badge
  • OpenGL 4.5 For The Intel Mesa Driver May Be Imminent

    Intel has been rapidly advancing their OpenGL 4.x support and OpenGL 4.5 is even in sight now.

    Kristian Høgsberg today landed GL_KHR_robustness support in the i965 DRI driver, a requirement for OpenGL 4.5.

  • Shotwell vs. digiKam

    How to manage your photos? – That is probably the biggest question for anyone doing anything with a photo camera. As resolutions of cameras grow, the data we have to manage is growing ever. In my case I am talking about more than 50000 photos and videos measuring up to about 200Gb of disk space, constantly growing. There are several photo management softwares out there, I guess the most commonly used ones are Shotwell for the Gnome desktop, digiKam for the KDE world, and FotoXX. I have not used Shotwell and digiKam for quite some time, and collect here my experiences of strength and weaknesses of the two programs. FotoXX seems to be very powerful, too, but I haven’t tested it till now.

  • Tweet your database with db2twitter

    db2twitter is developed by and run for, the job board of th french-speaking Free Software and Opensource community.

  • Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Screenshot Tour
  • Annoying myths about Linux that won't go away

    Linux has been around for many years, and has gotten better and better as time has gone by. Yet there are some enduring, inaccurate, and annoying myths about Linux that persist to this day.

    A Linux redditor started a thread about Linux myths and got some interesting responses from his fellow Linux users:

  • GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2016

    After missing the last few GStreamer hackfests I finally managed to attend this time. It was held in Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. The city is located by the sea side and the entire hackfest and related activities were either directly by the sea or just a couple blocks away.

  • My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later
  • Isenkram with PackageKit support - new version 0.23 available in Debian unstable

    The isenkram system is a user-focused solution in Debian for handling hardware related packages. The idea is to have a database of mappings between hardware and packages, and pop up a dialog suggesting for the user to install the packages to use a given hardware dongle. Some use cases are when you insert a Yubikey, it proposes to install the software needed to control it; when you insert a braille reader list it proposes to install the packages needed to send text to the reader; and when you insert a ColorHug screen calibrator it suggests to install the driver for it. The system work well, and even have a few command line tools to install firmware packages and packages for the hardware already in the machine (as opposed to hotpluggable hardware).

today's leftovers

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  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu specs and features

    Canonical's Meizu line of smartphones may not mean a lot to UK readers, but the Pro 5 should help to raise its profile.

    Unlike its competitors the Meizu Pro 5 runs the Ubuntu operating system. This approach means it relies less on apps and more on an integrated experience.

    It's just as powerful as the Samsung Galaxy S6, but does that mean it's worth your cash?

  • What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels.

  • Coming soon! First ever certification for open hardware

    At the Summit, OSHWA will launch the first ever (version 1) of the open source hardware certification, administered by OSHWA. This certification is designed to benefit at least two parts of the open source hardware community.

    First, it benefits purchasers of open source hardware by making it easy to identify truly open source hardware in the marketplace. Projects and products obtaining certification and displaying the certification logo clearly communicate a commonly agreed upon definition of openness with customers and users. While certification is not a condition for openness, obtaining certification is a way to make it clear to others that a given project is open source hardware.

  • 3 alternatives to resumes for hiring talent

    By 2020, there will be 1.4 million new computer science jobs but only 400,000 computer science students. The number of computer science jobs is growing twice as fast as the national average for job growth. Hiring is not a filtering problem anymore, it's a sourcing problem. We need to "sell" our companies and hire the most qualified people before our competitors do.

  • Open-source blueprint Pepperoni released for mobile development

    Named Pepperoni, the development team behind this open-source project has been working for more than 10 months trying to build apps and learning the best ways to do it using React Native. The company powering Pepperoni is Futurice, a software consulting company that creates digital services for its customers. Futurice is also behind the open-source social impact Spice Program, where it serves as advocate of open-source projects.

  • Install GrandCMS on an Ubuntu VPS
  • Install GLPI (IT and asset Managemet Software) on Ubuntu 16.04 Server

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • 5 Security Tools for Containers and Microservices

    Containers and microservices from vendors like Docker and CoreOS offer innovative solutions for running apps and storing data in the cloud without the overhead of traditional virtualization. But they also present special challenges when it comes to security and protecting the data inside containers. Answers for container security are still emerging, but here's a look at what the ecosystem has produced so far.

  • The Democratization of Containerization
  • Scribus 1.5.2 Open-Source Desktop Publishing Software Adds HiDPI Improvements

    Scribus remains the number one open-source, cross-platform, and free desktop publishing software, and the latest release further advances the work towards the upcoming major version, Scribus 1.6.0.

    Scribus 1.5.2 arrives today after being in development for the past three months, during which the development team behind the open-source DTP software managed to improve the HiDPI (High Dots Per Inch) support for the canvas rendering functionality, as well as to implement a new configuration section for the built-in Autosave and File Recovery system.

  • Top 10 command line tools for downloading in Linux

    When we think about Linux, definitely a back and white terminal will come in the mind, a true Linux user always prefer to work from terminal even for downloading, a command line downloading tool can help user to download anything from internet more quickly, in comparison to some GUI tool. There are lots of downloading tools for general purpose and even for torrents also but only few tools like curl or wget are more popular in comparison to other tools. In this tutorial we will discuss top 10 command line tools for downloading in Linux. Let us discuss these cli tools one by one.

  • This Simple Hack Lets You Make Skype for Web Calls on Linux
  • Best stocks of the day: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Jennison Associates LLC Increased Red Hat INC (NYSE:RHT) by $48.85 Million as Shares Declined
  • LATE: F23-20160512 Lives & F24 Betas Available.

    Back on May 12th, the team re-spun the Lives with the 4.4.9-300 kernel.

  • Digital signage solution Screenly chooses Canonical's Ubuntu Core software

    Today Screenly, a digital signage solution for the Raspberry Pi, and Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, an open-source platform, jointly announced a partnership to build Screenly on Ubuntu Core, according to a press release from Screenly. Screenly is adopting Ubuntu Core to give its customers a platform that is secure, simple to manage and available on the Raspberry Pi.

  • Wireless-rich “WaRP7” module aims i.MX7 at wearables, IoT

    NXP and Element14 unveiled a tiny “WaRP7” module for wearables and IoT that combines an i.MX7 Solo SoC with WiFi, Bluetooth, BLE, NFC, and MikroBus expansion.

    Element14 has partnered with NXP on an update to the original Freescale WaRP board, which ran on the Freescale (now NXP) i.MX6 Solo SoC. The WaRP7 shares the same Wearables Reference Platform (WaRP) branding as the WaRP, and is similarly a sandwich-style COM with I/O daughter card design running Linux and Android.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.

OSS in the Back End

  • AtScale Delivers Findings on BI-Plus-Hadoop
    Business intelligence is the dominant use-case for IT organizations implementing Hadoop, according to a report from the folks at AtScale. The benchmark study also shows which tools in the Haddop ecosystem are best for particular types of BI queries. As we've reported before, tools that demystify and function as useful front-ends and connectors for the open source Hadoop project are much in demand. AtScale, billed as “the first company to allow business users to do business intelligence on Hadoop,” focused its study on the strengths and weaknesses of the industry’s most popular analytical engines for Hadoop – Impala, SparkSQL, Hive and Presto.
  • Study Says OpenStack at Scale Can Produce Surprising Savings
    Revenues from OpenStack-based businesses are poised to grow by 35 percent a year to more than $5 billion by 2020, according to analysts at 451 Research. In its latest Cloud Price Index, 451 Research analyzes the costs associated with using various cloud options to determine when it becomes better value to use a self-managed private cloud instead of public or managed cloud services. The idea is to createa complex pricing model that takes into consideration the major factors impacting total cost of ownership (TCO), including salaries and workload requirements.The 451 study found that because of the prevalence of suitably qualified administrators, commercial private cloud offerings such as VMware and Microsoft currently offer a lower TCO when labor efficiency is below 400 virtual machines managed per engineer. But where labor efficiency is greater than this, OpenStack becomes more financially attractive. In fact, past this tipping point, all private cloud options are cheaper than both public cloud and managed private cloud options.
  • How OpenStack mentoring breaks down cultural barriers
    Victoria Martinez de la Cruz is no stranger to OpenStack's mentorship opportunities. It's how she got her own start in OpenStack, and now a few years later is helping to coordinate many of these opportunities herself. She is speaking on a panel on mentoring and internships later this week at OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, Spain. In this interview, we catch up with Victoria to learn more about the details of what it's like to be a part of an open source internship, as well as some helpful advice for people on both sides of the mentoring process.