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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • This is why we can't have safe cancellation points
  • Gentoo on my Tesla
  • Lessons learned: Five years of colocation

    Back in 2011, I decided to try out a new method for hosting my websites and other applications: colocation. Before that, I used shared hosting, VPS providers (“cloud” wasn’t a popular thing back then), and dedicated servers. Each had their drawbacks in different areas. Some didn’t perform well, some couldn’t recover from failure well, and some were terribly time consuming to maintain.

    This post will explain why I decided to try colocation and will hopefully help you avoid some of my mistakes.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/16

    Tumbleweed seems to have found its rhythm at around 4 snapshots per week. I will cover the snapshots 0414, 0415, 0416 and 0417. After that, it took unfortunately a bit of effort to get more stagings ready. This then lead now to the fact that the next snapshot (0422) will be rather large. I will mention more about this further down.

  • Kubuntu 16.04 LTS Arrives with New Plasma Discover Software Center, KDE Plasma 5

    The Kubuntu team was proud to announce the official release and general availability of the Kubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, which has been unveiled yesterday as part of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS launch.

    Just like its bigger brother, Kubuntu 16.04 is an LTS (Long Term Support) version that will receive critical security patches and software updates for a few more years than regular releases, such as Kubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) whose end-of-life support will be reached around July 2016.

  • Xubuntu 16.04 Screenshot Tour
  • This Teddy Bear Steals Your Ubuntu Secrets

    Ubuntu just came out with the new long-term support version of their desktop Linux operating system. It’s got a few newish features, including incorporating the “snap” package management format. One of the claims about “snaps” is that they’re more secure — being installed read-only and essentially self-contained makes them harder to hack across applications. In principle.

  • Just After EU Goes After Google For Antitrust, Microsoft Agrees To Drop All Antitrust Complaints About Google [Ed: Ballmer’s “F*ing kill Google!” mission accomplished, now trying to pretend to have nothing to do with the outcome]

    Back in 2011, Microsoft officially filed an antitrust complaint against Google in the EU. At the time, we noted how silly this was, given that the company itself had spent years battling EU antitrust regulations. It almost felt like a "well, if we had to go through that hellish process, let's put it on Google too..." kind of thing. Within less than a year, Google filed its own antitrust complaint back against Microsoft. As we noted at the time, both claims seemed kind of ridiculous and overblown -- and it bothered us greatly that these companies were resorting to stupid political games, rather than just competing in the market.

    So, now, just days after the EU officially took that ball and ran with it, Microsoft and Google have announced that they've buried the hatchet and agreed to drop all antitrust complaints against each other around the globe. They insist this has nothing to do with the EU's move earlier this week. In fact, the writing has been on the wall for some time here. The two companies had ended the patent battle last fall, with everyone dropping all complaints and lawsuits. And, just a couple of months ago there were reports that Microsoft was cutting back on supporting the very coalitions that it had put together and funded: ICOMP and FairSearch.

    It had always been obvious and well-known that both groups were Microsoft front groups, and now it's official... and over.

  • Bash on Windows: What Does It Mean?

    One discussion that I see a lot on the social network is whether “Ubuntu for Windows” is going to hurt desktop Linux in the long run. Currently, many Windows users need to dual boot with Linux or run it in VM to be able to use such tools. That need created a user base; it created a mind share.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Top 3: KaOS 2016.04, TurnKey 14.1 and pfSense 2.3

    KaOS is a KDE optimized Linux distribution that is now being updated, with the new Plasma 5.6.2 desktop environment. Additionally the distro benefits from the new Calamares installer framework which has been updated to version 2.2.1.

  • Simple Control Interface for Linux Computers: pyLCI

    It’s becoming increasingly clear to makers that single board computers and the DIY devices based on them need control interfaces that are simpler and faster to use than desktop peripherals or even full-on PCs. Pičugins Arsenijs believes he’s come up with a much simpler alternative.

  • Forking impressive, devs go nuts for Hazelcast

    Operational in-memory computing company Hazelcast -- known for its open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) -- has shared its community growth numbers from the Github repository.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Emacs vs VI: Which is better

    Vi(m) proponents complain about Emacs’s startup time. Yes, Emacs is slow to start up, but this is not a big deal: you start Emacs once per session, then connect to the running process with emacsclient. So Emacs’s slow startup is mostly a myth.

    There’s one exception, which is when you log in to a remote machine and want to edit a file there. Starting a remote Emacs is (usually) slower than starting a remote Vim. In some situations you can keep an Emacs running inside Screen. You can also edit remote files from within Emacs, but it does break the flow if you’re in an ssh 0session in a terminal. (Since XEmacs 21 or GNU Emacs 23, you can open an Emacs window from a running X instance inside a terminal.)

  • LEAD Technologies Advances Document, OCR and Medical SDK Technology for Windows and Linux
  • Steam Beta Client Adds New Steam Controller Abilities, SteamVR Refinements
  • Xfce 4.12 mega update coming to EL-7
  • KDE at Augsburger Linux-Tag

    On Saturday, 16 April I had the honor of representing KDE at the 15. Augsburger Linux-Tag, one of the oldest and largest Linux gatherings in southern Germany.

  • Escuelas ‘School’ Linux 4.4 Released

    The Mexican distro Escuelas, or ‘School,’ Linux was designed to give extended life to aging hardware in financially strapped school districts in Latin America and is based on Bodhi Linux.

    On Monday, a GNU/Linux distro designed to be used in schools, Escuelas Linux, released version 4.4. Just how dedicated to education are the developers of this distro? Plenty. In case your Spanish is as rusty as ours, the Spanish name Escuelas translates to “school” in English.

  • Has Ubuntu become a boring distribution?

    Many new Linux users start out with Ubuntu, and become enthralled with all of the new possibilities Linux has to offer. But has Ubuntu matured to the point where it has become boring? One Linux redditor shared his thoughts after transitioning from Windows to Ubuntu.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Man who allegedly deleted his startup with one line of code is a huge troll

    You might’ve heard the tragic-but-kind-of-funny story of Marco Marsala, who allegedly deleted his entire startup with a single line of code this past week. It was the ultimate case of IT bad luck – or carelessness, as some commenters suggested.

  • What to do with the “rm -rf” hoax question

    It turns out the the recent question regarding the misuse of rm -rf in Ansible was actually just a hoax in some kind of viral marketing effort. It become quite famous on various media and gathered a large number of views.

    Since I don't think we should allow ServerFault to be abused in such way, I deleted the question once I learned about the hoax. However, this will rob the kind people that took the time to answer him of the rep points they earned for this, in particular the Journeyman Geek with 185 upvotes.

  • Party 2 in Review

    Last night (Friday 15th April, 19:00 UTC) we held the second of our Kubuntu packaging parties. Using the new conference server provided by BigBlueButton (BBB), things worked like a dream.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #26

    We now ship locales for Firefox and Thunderbird. This makes it easier to switch to the language you desire / need without having to jump through the hoop of installing addons.

  • Slackware-Based Zenwalk 8.0 Is Coming Soon, First RC Build Released for Testing

    The developers of the Slackware-based Zenwalk GNU/Linux operating system announced this weekend the general availability of the first and probably the last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Zenwalk 8.0 distro.

    During the past four months, Zenwalk 8.0 has received a total of three Beta releases, and now it has finally reached the RC state, as most of the issues have been fixed by now. Moreover, the development cycle of the Slackware 14.2 operating system is nearing its final stages as the second Release Candidate was announced the other day.

  • Arch Linux Now Uses Kernel 4.5

    As you may know, Arch Linux is among the most popular rolling release Linux systems. On April 14, Arch has received a major kernel upgrade, replacing Kernel 4.4.5 with Kernel 4.5, which has been added to the Testing repositories some time ago.

    The Arch developers have skipped the Kernel 4.4.6 and Kernel 4.4.7 and adopted kernel 4.5 directly. Among others, Kernel 4.5 brings better support for AMD Radeon GPUs, comes with support for the AMD PowerPlay power management technology and brings enhancements to the AMDGPU open-source driver.

  • [OBS] Beta One of Version 2.7 Released

    We are happy to announce the first preview release of the upcoming Open Build Service (OBS) version 2.7. Two highlights that you should check out are the download on demand support which makes it possible to include external software repositories and the new git work flows.

  • UDOO X86 Is Your PC’s Replacement — The Most Powerful Hacker Board Ever Made

    DOO X86 single board computer combines the benefits of a PC and Arduino 101 to become one of the most appealing devices for a maker. This open source board is about 10 times faster than Raspberry Pi 3 and based on Quad-Core 64-bit generation x86 Intel processors.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Teaching New Linux on Old Hardware

    The decision I faced was life-changing either way I went. My inclination was to go back to school and get the certs I needed to work in the Linux administration field. I already had the base knowledge and experience; it was just a matter of jumping through the hoops to get a piece of paper saying I already knew what I was learning. Not that I wouldn’t learn a thing or two along the way.

  • Xfce 4.14 Development Is Focused Around GTK3 Porting

    It will likely be quite some time before the Xfce 4.14 desktop environment is released while the main focus this development cycle is on porting to the GTK+ 3.x tool-kit.

  • Linux Mint 18 will include Cinnamon 3.0 and Mate 1.14 versions

    The Linux Mint developers have been working hard on version 18 of the popular desktop distribution. Linux Mint 18 will offer Cinnamon 3.0 and Mate 1.14 versions when it is released. There are also be some other new goodies that will be included in Linux Mint 18.

  • Little-bitty Ubuntu mini-PC takes quad-core Atom to extremes

    Stealth.com has launched a tiny, Ubuntu-ready “LPC-175F” mini-PC with a quad-core Atom E3845, dual GbE ports, and -20 to 70°C support.

    The 145 x 84 x 35mm LPC-175F is one of the smallest mini-PCs ever built by Stealth.com. By comparison, its 250 x 146 x 42mm and up, Intel 3rd Gen. Core based LPC480x mini-PC series seems more like a maxi-PC series.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Vivaldi Browser Hits Version 1.0, Has Roots in Opera and Chromium
  • Tar vs Rsync
  • Configuring a Raspberry Cluster with MPI
  • A profiler of our own

    So now that you are all aware that I’ve been working to modernize Sysprof, you might not be surprised to read that I decided to push things in a bit more interesting of a direction.

  • A Pisi Video!

    This is an animated short video featuring some known characters from Pisi Linux.

  • Fedora nightly image finder

    Finding nightly Fedora builds has always been a bit of a pain. For quite a while we had this page, which just linked to a couple of canned Koji searches. It kinda worked, but it was terribly slow and the results weren’t the nicest thing to look at; it also couldn’t find you installer images, as they don’t come out of Koji. It doesn’t work any more, as the Koji tasks it searches for are no longer correct; it could easily be ‘fixed’ but it’d still be a bad experience.

  • BrickHack 2016 and Fedora: Event Report

    As an event sponsor, the Fedora Ambassadors of North America had a table for the event. The Ambassadors offered mentorship and assistance to BrickHack 2016 programmers, gave away some free Fedora swag, and offered an introduction to Linux, open source, and the community. This report is a recollection of some highlights from the event and also focuses on the impact we made as an event sponsor.

  • Announcing validated Debian packages for Mitaka
  • Finally... power management on Nokia N900

    After long long fight, it seems power management on Nokia N900 works for me for the first time. N900 is very picky about its configuration (you select lockdep, you lose video; you select something else 50mA power consumption... not good). That was the last major piece... I hope. I should have usable phone soon.

  • Dynamsoft’s barcode reader SDK adds PHP support on Linux

    The new PHP barcode reader toolkit for Linux supports PHP x64 version 5.3 to 5.6. Both Thread Safe (TS) and Non Thread Safe (NTS) options are provided. The Dynamsoft toolkit works with Linux Debian, Ubuntu, and CentOS operating systems.

  • Standardizing secure by default

    "Privacy by design" and "security by design" have become common terms to describe the process of building privacy and security into technology at the start, rather than bolting it on after the fact. It may seem perplexing to consider security an afterthought, especially to those of us whose careers are dedicated to information security, but -- based on human nature’s desire for functionality first -- developers have a tendency to wait until a technology has reached maturity before integrating security capabilities. This mentality is changing now that data breaches are making headlines on a regular basis, however. We are finally starting to build security into networks, applications and even chips from the get-go.

  • Sweden Military Servers Hacked, Used in 2013 Attack on US Banks

    The servers were used in a so-called DDoS attack (distributed denial of service) which pounded the websites of US financial institutions, among Citigroup, Capital One and HSBC with overwhelming requests for information.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Download Linux Voice issue 17

    Issue 17 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • OpenStack 'Mitaka' materialises

    The next version of OpenStack, Mitaka, has materialised.

    The OpenStack-Announce list went into overdrive on Thursday to deliver news of .0 versions of projects galore.

    This time around the OpenStack's made ease of use and scalability its watchwords.

  • Linus Torvalds On Stage at TED2016
  • Linus Torvalds Speaks Openly about Work and Code at TED2016 [Video]

    Torvalds went on to discuss his belief that “code either works or it doesn’t.” He should know. The current Linux kernel is one of the largest collaborative projects ever attempted, with more than 20 million lines of code and more than 12,000 contributors so far. Additionally, an average of 185 changes are accepted into the kernel every day -- nearly 1,300 per week -- and Torvalds ultimately has the final say on what code is accepted.

  • NVIDIA Releases New Vulkan Linux Driver With Better Multi-Threaded Scaling

    While NVIDIA mainlined their Vulkan driver support in the NVIDIA 364 driver series, they issued another Vulkan-focused driver update yesterday for Linux and Windows for developers and enthusiasts wanting to try out the latest support for this high-performance graphics API.

    The NVIDIA 364.16 driver is this special Vulkan driver release and is available for download from developer.nvidia.com rather than the usual channels.

  • Munich Presentation: From OpenGL To Vulkan
  • GUADEC 2017 call for bids

    The GNOME Foundation would like to invite bids for hosting GUADEC 2017.

    GUADEC is the biggest gathering of GNOME users and developers, which takes place in Europe every year, and you could make it happend next year!

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • OpenSSL 1.1.0 Series Release Notes
  • Linux.PNScan Malware Brute-Forces Linux-Based Routers
  • St. Jude stock shorted on heart device hacking fears; shares drop
    The stock of pacemaker manufacturer St. Jude Medical Inc (STJ.N) fell sharply on Thursday after short-selling firm Muddy Waters said it had placed a bet that the shares would fall, claiming its implanted heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attacks. St. Jude, which agreed in April to sell itself for $25 billion to Abbott Laboratories (ABT.N), said the allegations were false. St Jude shares closed down 4.96 percent, the biggest one-day fall in 7 months and at a 7.4 percent discount to Abbott's takeover offer. Muddy Waters head Carson Block said the firm's position was motivated by research from a cyber security firm, MedSec Holdings Inc, which has a financial arrangement with Muddy Waters. MedSec asserted that St. Jude's heart devices were vulnerable to cyber attack and were a risk to patients.
  • BlackArch Linux ISO now comes with over 1,500 hacking tools
    On a move to counter distros like Kali Linux and BackBox, BlackArch has got a new ISO image that includes more than 1,500 hacking tools. The update also brings several security and software tweaks to deliver an enhanced platform for various penetration testing and security assessment activities. The new BlackArch Linux ISO includes an all new Linux installer and more than 100 new penetration testing and hacking tools. There is also Linux 4.7.1 to fix the bugs and compatibility issues of the previous kernel. Additionally, the BlackArch team has updated all its in-house tools and system packages as well as updated menu entries for the Openbox, Fluxbox and Awesome windows managers.

Server Administration

  • Big Blue Aims For The Sky With Power9
    Intel has the kind of control in the datacenter that only one vendor in the history of data processing has ever enjoyed. That other company is, of course, IBM, and Big Blue wants to take back some of the real estate it lost in the datacenters of the world in the past twenty years. The Power9 chip, unveiled at the Hot Chips conference this week, is the best chance the company has had to make some share gains against X86 processors since the Power4 chip came out a decade and a half ago and set IBM on the path to dominance in the RISC/Unix market. IBM laid out a roadmap out past 2020 for its Power family of processors back at the OpenPower Summit in early April, demonstrating its commitment the CPU market with chips that are offer a brawny alternative to CPUs and accelerators compared to the Xeon and Xeon Phi alternatives from Intel and the relatively less brawny chips from ARM server chip makers such as Applied Micro and Cavium and the expected products from AMD, Broadcom, and Qualcomm. We pondered IBM’s prospects in the datacenter in the wake of some details coming out about next year’s Power9 processors, which IBM said at the time would come in two flavors, one aimed at scale-out machines with one or two sockets and another aimed at scale up machines with NUMA architectures and lots of sockets and shared memory.
  • ARM Announces ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions: Aiming for HPC and Data Center
    Today ARM is announcing an update to their line of architecture license products. With the goal of moving ARM more into the server, the data center, and high-performance computing, the new license add-on tackles a fundamental data center and HPC issue: vector compute. ARM v8-A with Scalable Vector Extensions won’t be part of any ARM microarchitecture license today, but for the semiconductor companies that build their own cores with the instruction set, this could see ARM move up into the HPC markets. Fujitsu is the first public licensee on board, with plans to include ARM v8-A cores with SVE in the Post-K RIKEN supercomputer in 2020.
  • The Sad State of Docker
    I have always been a big fan of Docker. This is very visible if you regularly read this blog. However, I am very disappointed lately how Docker handled the 1.12 release. I like to think of version 1.12 as a great proof of concept that should not have received the amount of attention that it already received. Let’s dive deep into what I found wrong. First, I do not think a company should market and promote exciting new features that have not been tested well. Every time Docker makes an announcement, the news spreads like a virus to blogs and news sites all over the globe. Tech blogs will basically copy and paste the exact same procedure that Docker discussed into a new blog post as if they were creating original content. This cycle repeats over and over again and becomes annoying because I am seeing the same story a million times. What I hate most about these recent redundant articles is that the features do not work as well as what is written about them.
  • Containers debunked: DevOps, security and why containers will not replace virtual machines
    The tech industry is full of exciting trends that promise to change the face of the industry and business as we know it, but one that is gaining a huge amount of focus is containers. However, problems lie with the technology and threaten to root itself deep in the mythology about it, namely the misconceptions over what the technology is, what can be done with it, and the idea that they replace virtual machines. Lars Herrmann, GM, Integrated Solutions at Red Hat spoke to CBR about five common misconceptions, but first the benefits. Herrmann, said: “Containerisation can be an amazingly efficient way to do DevOps, so it’s a very practical way to get into a DevOps methodology and process inside an organisation, which is highly required in a lot of organisations because of the benefits in agility to be able to release software faster, better, and deliver more value.”
  • Rackspace Going Private after $4.3 Billion Buyout
    The company released Rackspace Private Cloud powered by Red Hat in February. Using the Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, the product helped extend Rackspace's OpenStack-as-a-service product slate.
  • SoylentNews' Folding@Home Team is Now in the Top 500 in the World
    It has only been six short months since SoylentNews' Folding@Home team was founded, and we've made a major milestone: our team is now one of the top 500 teams in the world! We've already surpassed some heavy hitters like /. and several universities, including MIT. (But now is not the time to rest on our laurels. A certain Redmond-based software producer currently occupies #442.) In case you aren't familiar with folding@home, it's a distributed computing project that simulates protein folding in an attempt to better understand diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's and thereby help to find a cure. To that end, SoylentNews' team has completed nearly 16,000 work units.

Games for GNU/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • SDDM 0.14.0
  • Kodi v17 “Krypton” Beta 1
  • Top 10 Time Tracking Software for Linux
    Just a few days ago we were presenting software for one of the most popular mainstream Linux distribution – Ubuntu. Now let’s cover the progenitor of all free and open-source software. Its operating system was released on October 5, 1991. The creator of Linux, Linus Torvalds, was only 22 years old at that time! Linux is not very popular on the desktop computers (at least among regular users, software engineers, for example, prefer to work on it), but it is the leading operating system on servers, mainframe computers, and virtually all fastest supercomputers. It is also worth mentioning that without Linux there won’t be no Android as we know it now, no network routers, video game consoles, and smartwatches. We really owe a lot to Mr. Linus. According to Wikipedia, the development of Linux is one of the most prominent examples of free and open-source software collaboration. Its source code may be used, modified and distributed—commercially or non-commercially—by anyone under the terms of its respective licenses. Thanks to it we can use some great software like the already mentioned Ubuntu, but also Fedora, Gentoo Linux, Debian and more.
  • MPTCP v0.91 Release
    The MPTCP v0.91 release is based on the Linux Kernel Longterm Support release v4.1.x.
  • Quick Updates: Guake 0.8.7, WebTorrent Desktop 0.12.0, TLP 0.9
    Guake is a drop-down terminal emulator for GNOME (GTK2). The application is inspired from consoles in computer games, such as Quake, in which the console slides from the top of the screen when a key is pressed. In the same way, Guake can be invoked and hidden using a single key (though Guake can also automatically hide when it loses focus).
  • Switch Between Multiple Lists Of Apps Pinned To Unity Launcher With `Launcher List Indicator`
  • MATE Dock Applet Gets Unity-Like Progress Bar And Badge Support
    MATE Dock Applet is a MATE Panel applet that displays running application windows as icons. The applet features options to pin applications to the dock, supports multiple workspaces, and can be added to any MATE Panel, regardless of size and orientation.
  • AppImage – One app framework to distro them all
    Linux is highly portable. Fact. On the other hand, Linux software is the least portable technology in the world. Try running Firefox designed for Debian on Fedora. In fact, try running Firefox designed for one version of Fedora on another Fedora, perhaps a slightly older version. Godspeed, Captain Jack Sparrow. The fanatical rigor with which the Linux backward compatibility is maintained in the enterprise flavors, SUSE and Red Hat, is inversely proportional to all other incompatibilities that exist in the Linux space. This ain’t no news. I have most artfully elaborated on this problem in my illustrated Linux guide. But now, there’s a thing that promises to solve all these problems forever. AppImage.
  • Substance Designer 5.5 Is Here
    This version takes texture creation into the big leagues with MDL material authoring – opening up a whole new world of materials – plus Linux support, fbx camera import and support for VCA. This is a free upgrade for license holders and Substance Live subscribers, or you can get a free 30-day trial version.