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Misc

Systemd and Openwashing

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Misc
  • DistInst Updates, Boot Sequence Optimization (installer work), Misc. Upstream News

    Another interesting development that’s been coming along over the past two weeks is a conversation centered around an overhaul of the entire boot process. The goal is to reduce the amount of time we get to the desktop by optimizing the boot sequence from the moment you turn on your computer.  Instead of using grub to load the kernel and the initramfs on UEFI systems, we’re going to be using systemd-boot, the modern incarnation of gummiboot. But to make this work, we need a mechanism to copy the kernel and initramfs images to the EFI System Partition(ESP) where systemd-boot expects them to be in order for the boot to initiate. Since the Ubuntu kernels do not have an existing mechanism to these operations, we use kernelstub. Kernelstub, when it runs, copies the kernel image and initramfs image onto the ESP and configures systemd-boot with the entries for the copied files. If you need to change kernel parameters, kernelstub has a manual mode that will allow you to do so in case your machine needs additional parameters. The general use is that kernelstub can copy the kernel and the generated initramfs when a new kernel becomes available. This current work is still in the experimental phase and part of the new installer and initial login work that is ongoing.

  • System76's Pop!_OS Switching From GRUB To Systemd-Boot

    System76's Pop!_OS started off mostly as a re-branded spin of Ubuntu for the company's pre-loaded Linux laptops/desktops, but lately they have been venturing to more interesting changes at varying levels of the stack.

    Aside from various desktop and theming changes, they have been working on reworking the installation process, possible disk encryption by default, and better HiDPI support. The latest is they are planning to use systemd-boot as their bootloader.

  • Exploring the open source challenges Open Banking brings to incumbent firms

    Open Banking, which came about as a result of the result of the PSD2 rules around opening customer data, promises customers a better service experience. The concept has spread and is now a global trend, albeit in different guises. But as night follows day, Open Banking, with its emphasis on open source technologies, brings challenges.

    As financial firms position themselves for success in this rapidly evolving environment, open source technologies play a key role in industry organizations. According to Axel Winter, former global head of enterprise architecture at Standard Chartered Bank in Singapore and currently CTO at Thai business conglomerate Central Group.

  • Open source PowerShell not a straight swap for Windows PowerShell [Ed: Microsoft is just openwashing the malware writers' favourite shell to make it the 'standard']

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Worth Saving?

    A friend the other day casually called Linux Journal "the journal of record for the Open Source community". I think that's a good description of what we were for 23 years—because one sign of our "of record" status is how many people have told us that they have a collection of LJ issues going back many years.

    So I asked myself, what other magazines do people tend to keep, that might be models for Linux Journal as it grows into something much bigger in the world—while doing a better job than ever tending its Linux roots?

  • Poll: Best Linux Distribution

    e're working on 2018 Readers' Choice Awards. First poll... which do you consider to be the best distribution?

  • Linux Desktop Success – Unleaded Hangout

    Linux Desktop Success. What’s it going to take to get us there? Have we already hit the tipping point with ChromeOS? Perhaps instead, it’s a matter of greater OEM adoption? We discuss.

  • Portworx Delivers STORK as an Open Source Stateful Storage Project

    Acronym fans rejoice! Just weeks after releasing a wonderfully acronym-free reference configuration with Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), Portworx unveiled an avian-based tag for a new open source stateful storage project.

    The Storage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes, more fluidly known as STORK, uses the extensibility of Kubernetes to support stateful applications. This allows DevOps teams to run stateful applications – think databases, queues, and key-value stores – on Kubernetes.

  • Radeon Linux Graphics Stack, RadeonSI Shaders Update From FOSDEM 2018

    In addition to the Nouveau driver crew talking about their Vulkan plans and other open-source work, Nicolai Hähnle of AMD represented the company's work on their Radeon Linux graphics driver stack(s) and the work they have going on for improving their GPU driver support.

  • Some thoughts on The Lion’s Song, a narrative-rich adventure

    This point and click game meshes stories of people trying to create and discover new truths in prewar Vienna. I’ve completed the episodic series and have a few thoughts to share.

  • Looking for ways to spice up your gaming? Here’s a few games with awesome mods

    With the continuous stream of new releases, it’s sometimes hard to remember that there's still plenty of excuses to fire up games you already own. User-made modifications are one of the best things about being a PC gamer and so I’ve taken the time to make a very biased list of games that have great mods.

    For the uninitiated, a mod or modification is some sort of change that’s made to an existing game by fans and players. It can be anything from massive graphical overhauls, new story lines to simple interface tweaks or changing the game balance and difficulty. While not really limited to PC games anymore, it's still something that's predominantly with the platform.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 4

    This was a big week for Usability & Productivity. Before I get to the list of improvements we landed, I’d like to make an exciting announcement: we’re scoping out the work to add FUSE support to KIO for remote locations like Samba shares. This should vastly improve the experience of interacting with files on Samba and FTP locations (among others) when using non-KDE software with KDE Plasma. No timelines or promises yet, but it’s now on our radar screens.

  • The Real Reason Red Hat Is Acquiring CoreOS
  • TRUE Private Wealth Advisors Purchases New Holdings in Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)
  • Fedora Red Team on ITProTV

    Back at BSidesDE — which was awesome, BTW — I was interviewed by ITProTV, and had the opportunity to discuss the Fedora Red Team.

  • Free software log (January 2018)

    The only sofware releases I got out this month were both for work: versions 0.4.0 and 0.4.1 of groupy, the client library for Merou, the authorization management system we use. We're not doing formal releases of the latter yet, just building from Git, and probably need to settle on a final public project name before we do.

    At some point I'll build proper software release pages for both of these, since I seem to be doing most of the release management for groupy.

  • January 2018 report: LTS

    I have already published a yearly report which covers all of 2017 but also some of my January 2018 work, so I'll try to keep this short.

  • January 2018 is gone

    It is not that there were not interesting topics to write about.  I could have posted, for example, about the release of the Elive beta 2.9.22, which promised Korean and Japanese support. However, I could not even get the release.

  • Nokia HMD Comeback? First Year Finishes with 8.5 Million Smartphones Shipped and 1.0% Market Share by Year-End

    I will still wait, in case any other analysts report any Nokia numbers. When we have all data in, I'll do a forecast for this year.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Heptio launches its Kubernetes ‘un-distribution’

    Heptio holds a special place in the Kubernetes startup ecosystem. Its co-founders, Craig McLuckie and Joe Beda, are, after all, also two of the co-founders of the Kubernetes project (together with Brendan Burns), which launched inside of Google. Heptio also raised $8.5 million when it launched in 2016 (and another $25 million last year), but it was never quite clear what the company’s actual business plan looked like beyond offering training and professional services. That’s becoming quite a bit clearer now, though, as the company today announced the launch of the Heptio Kubernetes Subscription.

  • CIOs buried under mounting IT complexity: survey

     

    A global survey of 800 chief information officers by digital performance management company Dynatrace has found that a little more than three-quarters fear that the complexity of IT setups in organisations would soon make the management of digital performance impossible.  

  • Karen Sandler Delivered Keynote at Linux.conf.au

    Director Karen Sandler delivered a keynote "Six Years Later, or Hey, did you ever get the source code to that thing in your heart?" In her first LCA keynote 6 years ago, Karen first told the people of LCA about her heart condition and the defibrillator that she needed to have implanted. This year she described her continued quest to receive the source code for the software running in her defibrillator, and how far she has been able to get in obtaining the source code that she's been requesting for over a decade now.

    Karen discussed the continued impact that non-free software is having and will have on society, as people entrust more of their lives to it, whether that be in their self-driving cars or the litany of home appliances they have that are all starting to talk to each other, and how we can help curtail some of these problems through legislation and promoting free software licenses like the GPL.

  • Behind The Scenes – Linux Skype Alternatives Parody (2016)

    How I made the Linux Skype Alternatives A-Team Parody (2016) video.

  • The Big DRM Update Lands In Linux 4.16: DC Multi-Display Sync, More Cannonlake

    dding to the list of big feature additions for Linux 4.16 is the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) pull request that has already been honored by Linus Torvalds.

    DRM subsystem maintainer David Airlie refers to DRM for Linux 4.16 as a "comparatively quieter merge window", but there still is a lot of stuff in here for improving these open-source GPU/display kernel drivers. It is quieter though for open-source NVIDIA users with this pull not having any Nouveau DRM updates for Linux 4.16.

  • Wine 3.1 is now available to kick off another development cycle

    The Wine team officially announced today the release of Wine 3.1 to kick off the start of another development cycle for what will eventually be Wine 4.0.

  • Massively multiplayer cooperative game 'Dead Maze' to release this month

    Dead Maze [Steam, Official Site] is a colourful and quite interesting free MMO that has Linux support. It's currently in a closed beta, but they've now announced the release date for everyone.

  • Get Sid Meier's Civilization VI (Mac and Linux versions) For 50% Off
  • This week in Discover, part 4

    In preparation for the impending release of Plasma 5.12, this was a big bug-squashing week in Discover thanks to lead Developer Aleix Pol, who knocked out a huge number of reliability and stability issues in Discover! We also got in a few UI polish and usability improvements, too.

  • GNOME 3.28 Beta Is Next Week Marking The Feature/UI Freeze

    The GNOME 3.28 beta (v3.27.90) is due to happen next week that also marks a number of freezes for the desktop components ahead of the official release next month.

    GNOME 3.27.90 components are due by end of day Monday for making the beta release. At that time it also marks a lock on the API/ABI, user-interface and feature freeze, string change announcement period, and the beginning of assembling the release notes.

  • Red Hat undertakes radically open brand evolution project

    This year, Red Hat is embarking on a collaborative journey to upgrade and modernize our logo and brand system. The Open Brand Project is a transparent, inclusive and widely collaborative effort, open to everyone with a stake in Red Hat’s identity.

    Red Hat is a community-powered company. We depend on and serve the technologists who both build our products and use them. Upstream and downstream, people who work with us feel a sense of belonging, and their participation and collaborative partnership give them a sense of ownership. Our corporate logo is more than a trademark; it is a meaningful symbol closely tied to a powerful story. For us, our logo does more than represent our company;  a key part of our corporate identity is our commitment to software freedom. For many, the “secret agent” element of our logo, affectionately known as Shadowman, is an icon of the open source movement, as well as the personification of Red Hat’s unique culture.

  • Twin Capital Management Inc. Sells 38,579 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) registers a price change of -0.58% while Castlight Health, Inc. (CSLT)
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Holdings Trimmed by Twin Capital Management Inc.
  • Compact Denverton-powered security appliance rocks 6x GbE ports

    Aaeon unveiled an “FWS-2360” network security appliance based on Intel’s server-class Atom C3000 SoCs. The compact, fanless device offers 6x GbE ports, 1x SATA 6.0Gb/s, 2x USB3.0, up to 32GB ECC RAM, 16GB eMMC, and a 2.5-inch drive bay.

    The FWS-2360 network security appliance is the latest in a long line of Aaeon fanless desktop network appliances. Others we’ve encountered include the Apollo Lake-based FWS-2272, Braswell-powered FWS-2260, and Bay Trail-driven FWS-2251 and FWS-2250.

DRM Stories

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Misc
  • Catalog of Missing Devices Illustrates Gadgets that Could and Should Exist

    Bad Copyright Law Prevents Innovators from Creating Cool New Tools

    San Francisco - The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has launched its “Catalog of Missing Devices”—a project that illustrates the gadgets that could and should exist, if not for bad copyright laws that prevent innovators from creating the cool new tools that could enrich our lives.

    “The law that is supposed to restrict copying has instead been misused to crack down on competition, strangling a future’s worth of gadgets in their cradles,” said EFF Special Advisor Cory Doctorow. “But it’s hard to notice what isn’t there. We’re aiming to fix that with this Catalog of Missing Devices. It’s a collection of tools, services, and products that could have been, and should have been, but never were.”

  • Remove the DRM from iTunes movies with TunesKit

    Since then, I'm able to watch videos purchased through iTunes using any iOS video app I want to, on my computer or Android handset. If you're so inclined, you can still watch your videos and transfer them to your iPhone using iTunes, too. It's worth mentioning that the software works on content rented from iTunes as well. But removing the DRM from rented videos to keep after the rental period is up is theft, plain and simple. Do what's right for you.

  • Documentary on the DRM-breaking farmers who just want to fix their tractors, even if they have to download bootleg Ukrainian firmware to do it

    Motherboard's short documentary, "Tractor Hacking: The Farmers Breaking Big Tech's Repair Monopoly" is an excellent look at the absurd situation created by John Deere's position that you can't own your tractor because you only license the software inside it, meaning that only Deere can fix Deere's tractors, and the centuries-old tradition of farmers fixing their agricultural equipment should end because Deere's shareholders would prefer it that way.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Kubernetes in 2018: When the going gets good, the good get boring

    Backers of the open-source Kubernetes container-orchestration project could be forgiven for taking a victory lap this week at Kubecon 2017, given the growth in adoption and capitulation of competitive projects. But the path to ongoing success for this project now lies in making Kubernetes boring again, according to several keynote speakers.

  • Swing Trade Earnings Bullish Momentum With Options in Red Hat Inc
  • Purism Hopes To Default To GNOME On The Librem 5 Phone, But Still Supporting KDE

    Purism has been supporting both the GNOME and KDE projects with their mobile ambitions and looking to have both desktop environments feature their wares on the in-development Librem 5 smartphone. But as far as the default user experience/interface goes on the Librem 5, they are leaning towards GNOME.

    While KDE Plasma Mobile is a lot further along than GNOME on the mobile front, Purism is hoping to see the converged GNOME Shell working in time for the Librem 5 iMX-powered smartphone that will hopefully be shipping in early 2019.

  • Android 9.0 Developer Preview 1 Might Be Almost Ready For Release

    In a digital puzzle dropped last week, Google hid the date of the Google I/O conference, which is now known to happen between May 8 and May 10. One of the prominent hot topics for the developer conference is Android 9.0.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 80 - GPS tracking and jamming
  • How to add a repository on your Linux machine
  • Modify SVG using GSVGtk: First Repor

    GSVGtk is a library to provide GTK+ widgets you can use to access SVG files. It is powered by GSVG, in a way it can access each shape and its properties using a GObject API based on W3C SVG 1.1 specification.

    Currently, GSVGtk uses Clutter to encapsulate SVG shapes, render them inside Clutter Actors, through librsvg, and maps events to source SVG in order to eventually modify original definitions, like its position.

    In the following video, you can see GSVGtk’s Container based on Clutter, loading an SVG file, take some shapes from it to show on the scene.

  • logo.png for default avatar for GitLab repos

    I added a logo.png to GNOME Tweaks at GNOME and it automatically showed up in Salsa when I imported the new version.

  • What’s New in Peppermint OS 8 Respin

    Peppermint OS 8 respin is the latest release of Peppermint OS Linux Distribution. This release based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), powered by linux kernel 4.10 series, using LXDE desktop environment with new “Pepirus” xfwm4, GTK+ and icon themes. Also, brings 64 bit and 32 bit installation images. The 64 bit release provides complete support for UEFI systems and secure boot.

  • Imagine the world's biggest Kanban / Scrumboard

    Imagine a Kanban board that could aggregate issues from multiple backends, including your CalDAV task list, Bugzilla systems (Fedora, Mozilla, GNOME communities), Github issue lists and the Debian Bug Tracking System, visualize them together and coordinate your upstream fixes and packaging fixes in a single sprint.

    [...]

    If you'd like to see this or any of the other proposed projects go ahead, you don't need to be a Debian Developer to suggest ideas, refer a student or be a co-mentor. Many of our projects have relevance in multiple communities. Feel free to get in touch with us through the debian-outreach mailing list.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Torvalds Releases Linux 4.15 With Improved Meltdown, Spectre Patches

    CPU security issues required the longest Linux kernel development cycle since 2011, as Linus Torvalds releases Linux 4.15

    Linus Torvalds released the first new Linux kernel of 2018 on Jan. 28, after the longest development cycle for a new Linux kernel in seven years.

    During the release Linux Kernel release cycle, Torvalds typically issues a release candidate once a week, with most cycles including six to eight release candidates.

  • Microsoft Hyper-V Guests Get PCID Support With Linux 4.16

    With the in-development Linux 4.16 kernel there is now support for PCID with Microsoft Hyper-V virtualization guests.

  • AT&T plans to accelerate White Box adoption by releasing dNOS into open source

    AT&T has announced  that it will open source its Disaggregated Network Operating System (dNOS) project and that it will soon be hosted by the Linux Foundation. The dNOS project provides a software framework to speed the adoption and use of white boxes in a service provider’s infrastructure. The idea is that telcos, software developers, cloud providers, hardware makers and networking application developers can quickly create new white box infrastructure to meet evolving carrier requirements – and, perhaps just as importantly, do it in a more cost-effective way.

  • PodCTL #23 – Microservices with Istio
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)- Stocks Hammered on Sluggish Data
  • Webmail and whole class of problems.

    I am sure some people would suggest either Emacs or alpine or some other tool which works and I’m sure it worked right out of bat for them, for me I wanted to have something which had a GUI and I didn’t have to think too much about it. It also points out the reason why Thunderbird was eventually moved out of mozilla in a sense so that community could do feature and bug-fixing more faster than either mozilla did or had the resources or the will to do so.

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Dockah! Dockah! Dockah!

    I have been dabbling with docker for quite sometime, to be honest when it was introduced to me I didn’t understand it much but as time passed and I started experimenting with it I got to know the technology better and better. This made me understand various concepts better. I understood virtualization, containerization, sandboxing and got to appreciate how docker solves the problem of works on my machine.

    When I started using docker I use to just run few commands and I could get the server running, this I could access through browser that was more than enough for me. When I use to make changes to the code I could see it getting reflected in the way I am running the application and I was a happy man.

  • Intel SSD 760p 256GB NVMe SSD For $99 USD On Linux

    If the extremely fast Intel Optane SSD 900p is out of your budget with its 3D XPoint memory, this week Intel rolled out the SSD 760p series with 64-layer TLC 3D NAND memory. For less than $100 USD you can get the 256GB capacity Intel 760p SSD, which is what we are benchmarking today under Ubuntu Linux.

  • KDE-Focused Netrunner Rolling 2018.01 Released

    For those still in search of a KDE-focused Linux distribution that's rolling-release and desktop-friendly, Netrunner Rolling 2018.01 has been released.

  • Adventure platformer 'Celeste' from the creators of TowerFall has released with Linux support

    Good news for fans of tight adventure platformers, as Celeste [Steam, itch.io] from the creators of TowerFall released with same-day Linux support.

  • A summary of my 2017 work

    New years are strange things: for most arbitrary reasons, around January 1st we reset a bunch of stuff, change calendars and forget about work for a while. This is also when I forget to do my monthly report and then procrastinate until I figure out I might as well do a year report while I'm at it, and then do nothing at all for a while.

    So this is my humble attempt at fixing this, about a month late. I'll try to cover December as well, but since not much has happened then, I figured I could also review the last year and think back on the trends there. Oh, and you'll get chocolate cookies of course. Hang on to your eyeballs, this won't hurt a bit.

  • Opening up the GnuBee open NAS system

    GnuBee is the brand name for a line of open hardware boards designed to provide Linux-based network-attached storage. Given the success of the crowdfunding campaigns for the first two products, the GB-PC1 and GB-PC2 (which support 2.5 and 3.5 inch drives respectively), there appears to be a market for these devices. Given that Linux is quite good at attaching storage to a network, it seems likely they will perform their core function more than adequately. My initial focus when exploring my GB-PC1 is not the performance but the openness: just how open is it really? The best analogy I can come up with is that of a door with rusty hinges: it can be opened, but doing so requires determination.

  • Mycroft Mark II: Smart Speaker with an open source voice assistant (crowdfunding)

    And then there’s Mycroft. It’s a voice assistant platform that’s designed to work just like the others… but it’s an open source project that places an emphasis on privacy.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • prrd 0.0.2: Many improvements

    The prrd package was introduced recently, and made it to CRAN shortly thereafter. The idea of prrd is simple, and described in some more detail on its webpage and its GitHub repo. Reverse dependency checks are an important part of package development and is easily done in a (serial) loop. But these checks are also generally embarassingly parallel as there is no or little interdependency between them (besides maybe shared build depedencies). See the following screenshot (running six parallel workers, arranged in split byobu session).

  •  

  • DXVK Begins Working For Even More D3D11-Over-Vulkan Games On Wine

    The progress is stunning made by a lone developer on the DXVK project for mapping the Direct3D 11 graphics API on top of Vulkan for allowing better performance/support for D3D11 games on Wine.

    DXVK is only a few months old and the work of Philip Rebohle who has been working on it nearly daily. It was just a few days ago I wrote about DXVK Is Making Significant Progress In Implementing Direct3D 11 Over Vulkan while already more games are beginning to work.

  • openSUSE – Meltdown & Spectre Update – 26 Jan 2018

    This is an update to our current Meltdown and Spectre situation on openSUSE Leap and Tumbleweed.

    We have released kernels with initial Meltdown and Spectre mitigations begin of January.

  • Ruby, YaST, Plasma 5.12 Beta Get Updates in Tumbleweed

    A total of six snapshots arrived and brought new versions of Ruby, YaST, KDE’s Plasma 5.12 Beta and many others.

    The latest snapshot, 20180124, switched the default for Ruby to version 2.5. Package improvements were made to the command line tool SUSEConnect 0.3.7. A change to cups-filters 1.19.0 in order to allow builds on systems without python2 was made with python3-cups rather than using python-cups. Enscript 1.6.6 fixed a handful of bugs and spec-cleaner 1.0.2 added groups for Rust and made the switch to pytest. Git, squid and perl-Encode also received minor updates in the snapshot.

  • Inside a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs Residency – Part 1

    This series takes the reader on a journey, taking a peek inside life in a Red Hat Open Innovation Labs residency. This is the top tier experience for any customer; exposing them to open collaboration, open technologies, and fast agile application delivery methods.

    This experience often escapes organizations attempting digital transformation. Through submersion in an Open Innovation Labs residency, Red Hat shares its experience in managing, developing, and delivering solutions with communities, open technologies, and open collaboration.

    Join me as I share experiences from inside a real life residency, watching Red Hat work intimately with a customer. This will expose new ways of working and leveraging open technologies using fast, agile application delivery methods and open collaboration.

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Moving 2.15% in Session
  • Stock Alert: Red Hat Inc Stock Volatility Hits A Rock Bottom Low
  • A peek at the Snapcraft Summit

    The Snapcraft Summit, taking place in Seattle from January 29th to February 2nd, is a forward-thinking five day software hackathon being attended by major software vendors and snap developers working to move the industry forward with software delivery.

    In the style introduced by the famous BarCamps of old, the agenda is totally free-form and attendee-generated. Of course, that doesn’t mean we’ll sit down and relax! There are many things planned that need tackling. Every attendee already has a long laundry list of things to work on; as a group we will move forward and check things off the list as the days go by. We are going to be covering a wide range of technologies and domains, from GUI oriented electron based applications and its development stack to robotics, with a spice and language frameworks and command line tools for the cloud would be the few to mention.

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is Switching back to Xorg

    Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will come with the Xorg display server enabled by default. Canonical cites stability and reliability concerns over Wayland as reason for the change.

  •  

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More in Tux Machines

Qseven duo showcases i.MX8M and i.MX8Quad

Seco unveiled a pair Qseven modules that run Linux or Android and offer optional industrial temp support. The Q7-C25 uses NXP’s quad -A53 i.MX8M while the Q7-C26 features the i.MX8Quad, which adds up to 2x -A72 cores. Starter kits are also available. At Computex earlier this month, Seco showed off two 70 x 70mm Qseven 1.2 modules that are still listed as being “under development.” The i.MX8M based Q7-C25 and i.MX8Quad based Q7-C26 run Linux and Android, and are available in 0 to 60°C and -40 to 85°C models. The 5V modules have many similar features, but the Q7-C26 based on the more powerful, up to hexa-core i.MX8Quad adds some extras such as SATA III support. Read more

Android Leftovers

Peppermint 9 Officially Released Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, Here's What's New

Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Peppermint 9 is using the Linux 4.15 kernel and supports both 32-bit and 64-bit hardware architectures. Highlights of this release include a new default system theme based on the popular Arc GTK+ theme, support for both Snap and Flatpak universal binary packages via GNOME Software, which will now be displayed in the main menu. Also installed by default is the Menulibre menu editor, the Xfce Panel Switch utility, xfce4-screenshooter as default screenshot utility instead of pyshot, and xfce4-display-setttings replaces the lxrandr utility for monitor settings. The Htop system monitor utiliy is available as well and has its own menu item, and the Mozilla Firerefox is now the default web browser instead of Chromium. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Equus WHITEBOX OPEN: A Line Of Coreboot/LinuxBoot-Ready Xeon Scalable Servers
    Equus Compute Solutions has announced the release of their new WHITEBOX OPEN server platform that is intended to be cost-optimized and an open hardware platform.
  • LKML archives on lore.kernel.org
    We collected LKML archives going as far back as 1998, and they are now all available to anyone via a simple git clone. We would like to extend our thanks to everyone who helped in this effort by donating their personal archives.
  • PulseAudio 12 Open-Source Sound System Released with AirPlay, A2DP Improvements
    PulseAudio 12.0, a major version of its open-source sound server program designed to work on a wide-range of POSIX operating systems like Linux, BSD, macOS, and others, was released with numerous improvements and new features. Highlights of PulseAudio 12.0 include better latency reporting with the A2DP Bluetooth profile, which also improves A/V sync, more accurate latency reporting on AirPlay devices, the ability to prioritize HDMI output over S/PDIF output, HSP support for more Bluetooth headsets, and the ability to disable input and output on macOS.
  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 2
    In my last post (link), I gave an overview of Welcome window integration in Pitivi. I started working on this task from the first coding day of Google Summer of Code 2018, i.e. May 14, 2018 and after one amazing month of coding it finally got merged (commit) on June 19, 2018. Apparently it was a large change consisting of 702 additions and 329 deletions (link) involving 75 code-review discussions and 29 versions. A special thanks to my mentor aleb for giving constructive reviews on my code.
  • Laura Abbott: What's a kernel devel package anyway
  • Intel’s 7th Gen NUCs Are Now “Ubuntu Certified”
    If you’ve had your eye on an Intel NUC for dev work, IoT shenanigans, or to use as an entertainment hub in the living room, you’ll be pleased to know you can install and run Ubuntu 16.04 LTS without encountering any major issues. Yes: I did say Ubuntu 16.04 LTS there and not Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, the most recent long-term support release. Only the Xenial Xerus is currently certified for use on these device.
  • Ubuntu Suru Icon Theme Now Covers More Filetypes
    As you may know, developers plan to revamp the look and feel of Ubuntu for its next release by shipping the new Communitheme GTK and GNOME Shell theme and the new Suru icon set by default.
  • Toyota Research Institute supports development of open-source automated driving simulator
    Toyota Research Institute (TRI) is furthering its support of open source platforms by donating $100,000 to the Computer Vision Center (CVC) to accelerate its development of an open source simulator for automated driving, Car Learning to Act (CARLA). “Technological advances and growth are made possible through collaboration and community support,” said Vangelis Kokkevis, director of Driving Simulation at TRI. “Fostering the development of a common open simulation platform will allow TRI and its academic and industrial partners to better exchange code, information and data.”
  • Cryptocurrencies and Blockchain Technology will Propel “Open Source” Banking
    The banking system today is a closed-source banking system. It is one that recreates every function, competes with other banks, is accountable to governments, and are driven by quarters. An open-source banking system, on the other hand, shares every function, collaborates on standards, are verifiable by people, and are incentivized by tokens. Burton noted one of the most significant problems with the existing banking model is the misalignment of goals. The incentives are unclear because of “back-handers, sweetheart deals, and cheeky kickbacks.”
  • EOS (EOS): Resource Planner is live, know all about the open source tool
    EOS (EOS) announced on Medium that they started working on the EOS Resource Planner three months ago and finally the network is now live. They have finished with the MVP which can be found at https://www.eosrp.io/.
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Initial Keynotes for Open Networking Summit Europe
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Networking Summit Europe, taking place September 25-27 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Rep of the Month – May 2018
    Please join us in congratulating Prathamesh Chavan, our Rep of the Month for May 2018! Prathamesh is from Pune, India and works as a Technical Support Engineer at Red Hat. From his very early days in the Mozilla community, Prathamesh used his excellect people skills to spread the community to different colleges and to evangelise many of the upcoming projects, products and Mozilla initiatives. Prathamesh is also a very resourceful person. Due to this, he did a great job at organizing some great events at Pune and creare many new Mozilla Clubs across the city there.
  • GitHub Coders to Microsoft: Cut Ties With ICE or We'll 'Take Our Projects Elsewhere'
    More than five dozen Github contributors on Thursday signed a letter threatening to abandon the website unless Microsoft canceled its Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) contract. Microsoft, which acquired GitHub, the internet’s largest source code repository, for $7.5 billion earlier this month, is one of several tech companies facing heat for its work on behalf of ICE as a result of the Trump administration policy of separating families at the U.S. border.
  • Moving On From Picasa
    The cross-platform, open-source GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) software is another versatile photo-editing program, but might be a little more technical than some entry-level applications. If it piques your interest, GIMP has an online user manual you can browse before downloading.
  • Bradley M. Kuhn: The Everyday Sexism That I See In My Work
    Back in 2014, Karen and I collaboratively talked about what role would make sense for her and me — and we made a choice together. We briefly considered a co-Executive Director situation, but that arrangement has been tried elsewhere and is typically not successful in the long term. Karen is much better than me at the key jobs of a successful Executive Director. Karen and I agreed she was better for the job than me. We took it to Conservancy's Board of Directors, and they moved my leadership role at Conservancy to be honorary, and we named Karen the sole Executive Director. Yes, I'm still nebulously a leader in the Free Software community (which I'm of course glad about). But for Conservancy matters, and specifically donor relations and major decisions about the organization, Karen is in charge. [...] Interestingly but disturbingly, these incidents teach how institutional sexism operates in practice. Every time I'm approached (which is often) with some subtle situation where it makes Karen look like she's not really in charge, I'm given the opportunity to pump myself up, make myself look more important, and gain more credibility and power. It is clear to me that this comes at the expense of subtly denigrating Karen and that the enticement is part of an institutionally sexist zero-sum game.
  • Goodman One is an Open-Source, 3D-Printed Analog Camera
    Dora Goodman, a maker of handcrafted cameras and straps, has released a new open source camera called the Goodman One that anyone can make if they have access to a 3D printer. Goodman tells PetaPixel that she has been working on the design of the Goodman One for the past two years, and she’s now working to share the camera with as many photography lovers as possible.
  • Security updates for Friday