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today's leftovers

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  • Hyper Knights, a surprisingly fun and cheap mix of strategy and action
  • Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel" Released to Support LUKS Encrypted Partitions

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux distribution was proud to announce a few moments ago the release and immediate availability of the Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 "Goedel."

    Dubbed Goedel, in the memory of the mathematician, philosopher, and logician Kurt Goedel, Chakra GNU/Linux 2017.03 is the first ISO snapshot of the KDE Plasma oriented distribution originally based on Arch Linux. The new release comes with a revamped Heritage theme and the Calamares installer with support for LUKS encrypted partitions.

  • Parrot Security OS 3.5 Improves Linux Security Tools Distribution
  • Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE 2 Betsy) Gets Updated ISO Images, Download Now
  • MATE Desktop 1.18 Released, Is Now GTK3 Only

    MATE Desktop 1.18 is now available to download. The release completes the migration to GTK3, and adds a splash of improvements to many of its core apps.

  • Five issues that will determine the future of Internet Health [Ed: It would be awesome if not rather bitter-sweet and ironic now that Mozilla helps make the WWW less 'sanitary' with DRM]

    In January, we published our first Internet Health Report on the current state and future of the Internet. In the report, we broke down the concept of Internet health into five issues. Today, we are publishing issue briefs about each of them: online privacy and security, decentralization, openness, web literacy and digital inclusion. These issues are the building blocks to a healthy and vibrant Internet. We hope they will be a guide and resource to you.

    We live in a complex, fast moving, political environment. As policies and laws around the world change, we all need to help protect our shared global resource, the Internet. Internet health shouldn’t be a partisan issue, but rather, a cause we can all get behind. And our choices and actions will affect the future health of the Internet, for better or for worse.

  • FSFE Newsletter - March 2017
  • Solving Monitoring in the Cloud With Prometheus

    Hundreds of companies are now using the open source Prometheus monitoring solution in production, across industries ranging from telecommunications and cloud providers to video streaming and databases.

  • An Exploration of Citrix Delivery Networks

    While many of us may be more familiar with the virtualization and remote access products from Citrix, Danny Phillips was talking about their products in the networking space during his keynote presentation at LinuxCon Europe.

today's leftovers

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  • A baudy Linux Hack: Hayes Modem modded to Linux Desktop (and modem time machine).
  • Post -Linux Playa at PUCP
  • Surf Demystified

    Surf is a simple, lightweight browser from Suckless Tools, the same people who brought you dmenu and dwm. When compiled and configured right, Surf is incredibly robust and stable, able to handle most websites extremely well, and it has a clean and simple layout without buttons and bars to encroach on the web material you're reading. Unfortunately, Surf is underdocumented, so most who try Surf give up after a few minutes, moving on to Firefox or Chromium or Palemoon or Midori. This web page serves as the needed documentation to make Surf a pleasure to work with.

    Surf gains a new credibility and significance now (2017), because in 2017, most browsers have declined in stability and performance, over the last several years, to the point where several of them are unusable on various distros.
    ...

  • When the memory allocator works against you

    Cloning mozilla-central with git-cinnabar requires a lot of memory. Actually too much memory to fit in a 32-bits address space.

    I hadn’t optimized for memory use in the first place. For instance, git-cinnabar keeps sha-1s in memory as hex values (40 bytes) rather than raw values (20 bytes). When I wrote the initial prototype, it didn’t matter that much, and while close(ish) to the tipping point, it didn’t require more than 2GB of memory at the time.

    Time passed, and mozilla-central grew. I suspect the recent addition of several thousands of commits and files has made things worse.

  • Microsoft's former open source VP Wim Coekaerts [iophk: "Swapnil knows better than that, I guess he's just after money now"]
  • GNU Health, openSUSE Pioneer Shift in Healthcare Management

    The GNU Health Project is one of many noble open-source projects and the openSUSE Project is pleased to announce it has donated 10 Raspberry Pis to help expand the use and development of the project on affordable ARM hardware.

    GNU Health, which is a non-profit, non-government organizations (NGO), delivers free open-source software for health practitioners, health institutions and governments worldwide.

  • Consumer Reports to Begin Evaluating Products, Services for Privacy and Data Security

    The standard as it’s now written is a first draft. We hope that everyone from engineers to industry groups to concerned parents will get involved in shaping future versions of it. We’ve placed the standards on GitHub, a website that’s widely used by software developers to share ideas and work on group projects. Because GitHub can be hard for newcomers to navigate, we’ve also built a website that has the same information.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Foundation Highly Relevant to Data Center Networking Evolution Says SDxCentral Report

    Data centers must continue to evolve to handle the increasing network load generated by our frequent use of applications and services like voice activated network applications (OK Google, Alexa), video, mobile phones, IoT devices, and more, according to SDxCentral’s 2017 Next Gen Data Center Networking Report.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux to Get a Revamped Heritage Theme in Upcoming ISO Snapshot

    Neofytos Kolokotronis from the Chakra GNU/Linux development team is announcing that the default Heritage desktop theme will get a well-deserved revamp soon as part of a new ISO snapshot that should be released very soon.

    Those who have used the Chakra GNU/Linux distribution before know that it comes with a specially crafted, in-house built theme for the KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, called Heritage. We don't even know when was the last time Chakra devs updated the theme, so the time has come for a refreshed version.

  • 6 best free Linux firewalls of 2017

    Note: Our best free Linux firewalls round-up has been fully updated. This feature was first published in June 2010.

  • Parrot Security OS 3.5 is released

    Parrot Security, the Debian-based distribution just got new release Parrot 3.5 available to download.The Parrot team proudly announced the release of this new release after a call for Beta-testers and final fixes(must be made) based on it. Just a few days back the team has come up with an announcement of a release date as 8th march and here they are.

  • Systemd Gets Important Commit in Tumbleweed

    A total of five snapshots this week brought openSUSE Tumbleweed users and developers several new packages and an important systemd commit.

    Topping this week’s updates were Wireshark, Wayland and KDE Frameworks 5.31.0.

  • New Linux Kernel Security Update for Debian 8 "Jessie" Patches 9 Vulnerabilities

    Debian Project, through Salvatore Bonaccorso, has announced the availability of a new Linux kernel security update for the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" stable operating system series.

    According to Debian Security Advisory DSA-3804-1, a total of nine kernel vulnerabilities discovered recently have been patched in the new kernel version that's not available for installation in the stable repositories of Debian Jessie. "Several vulnerabilities have been discovered in the Linux kernel that may lead to a privilege escalation, denial of service or have other impacts," said Salvatore Bonaccorso.

  • Updated Debian packaging example: PHP webapp with dbconfig-common
  • Extended temp COM offers Snapdragon 410E, WiFi, BT, and LVDS

    Ka-Ro’s rugged, SODIMM-style “TXSD-410E” COM runs Linux with U-Boot on a Snapdragon 410E, and offers WiFi, Bluetooth, LVDS, and a choice of dev kits.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What Drives Linux Guru Wim Coekaerts? Have Fun, Build Things People Will Use [Ed: I'm sorry, but Wim Coekaerts is not a "Linux" guru; he sold his soul to Microsoft, which does this]

    When Wim Coekaerts is solving problems and building things, he’s happy. When he’s not, he’s not.

    In his long career, he’s found joy working on early database appliances, and later guiding Oracle’s effort to make Linux, the open source operating system he’d played with since his school days in Belgium, its OS of record. Now, “Linux has become the operating system of the cloud,” Coekearts says, so he sees lots more fun on the horizon.

  • How an amateur opera singer uses MuseScore
  • From dotCloud to Docker
  • How to Easily Hide Files and Folders in Linux
  • Call Ansible or Ansible Playbooks without an inventory
  • Canonical Launches New Ubuntu Tutorials Website
  • openSUSE Developers Implement Rolling Development Phase of openSUSE Leap 42.3

    openSUSE Project's Ludwig Nussel is announcing today that the rolling development phase of the upcoming openSUSE Leap 42.3 operating system is now up and running.

    What this means exactly is that the download server will also serve development builds of openSUSE Leap 42.3 if they are good enough for testing, besides the latest OBS builds. However, you should know that this doesn't mean that openSUSE Leap 42.3 will follow a rolling release model because that's what openSUSE Tumbleweed is designed for.

    "That means just like with Tumbleweed, the download server doesn't just serve the latest build OBS produces. A build only shows up there if the automated testing results of openQA are sufficiently green. So from now on until the gold master zypper dup will update step by step to the final 42.3," explains Ludwig Nussel in the announcement.

  • Equity Perception: Analyst’s Indicator Review for Unum Group (UNM), Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Pico-ITX SBC runs Linux on quad Cortex-A53 Snapdragon

    F&S unveiled a Linux-ready “armStone A53SD” Pico-ITX SBC with a Snapdragon 410E, up to 8GB LPDDR3 and 32GB eMMC, plus Ethernet, WiFi, BT, and 4x USB ports.

    F&S Elektronik Systeme is expanding its line of armStone-branded Pico-ITX boards, including its i.MX6-based ArmStone A9-v2, with an armStone A53SD SBC that employs Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 410E. Other Snadragon 410E embedded boards include Inforce Computing’s Inforce 6309L SBC and Inforce 6301 COM.

  • Firefox 52 Brings WebAssembly and Security fixes

    Mozilla patches Firefox for 28 different vulnerabilities, with seven rated as having critical impact.

    Mozilla released Firefox 52 on March 7, providing users of the open-source web browser with new features as well well as patches for 28 security vulnerabilities. The Firefox 52 release is the second major milestone release of Firefox in 2017 so far, following the Firefox 51 milestone that debuted on Jan. 24.

  • Firefox 52 Released with WebAssembly Support, Enhanced Sync

    Mozilla Firefox 52 has been released and is now available to download. Among new features in Firefox 52 is support for WebAssembly. Mozilla describes this as “an emerging standard that brings near-native performance to Web-based games, apps, and software libraries without the use of plugins.”

  • Establishing a Clean Software Baseline for Open Source License Compliance

    One of a company’s first challenges when starting an open source compliance program is to find exactly which open source software is already in use and under which licenses it is available.

    This initial auditing process is often described as establishing a clean compliance baseline for your product or software portfolio. This is an intensive activity over a period of time that can extend for months, depending on how soon you started the compliance activities in parallel to the development activities.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Litebook Linux Laptop Launches From $249

    A new Linux laptop has been launched this week and is available to purchase from $249 in the form of the Litebook, which is equipped with a 14 inch display offering users a resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels.

    The Litebook is powered by an Intel Celeron N3150 quad-core Braswell processor supported by 4 GB of RAM and loaded with an Elementary OS Linux software. Although there are a few points that that need to be discussed before you part with your hard owned cash.

  • Kernel Podcast for March 6th, 2017

    In this week’s kernel podcast: Linus Torvalds announces Linux 4.11-rc1, rants about folks not correctly leveraging linux-next, the remainder of this cycle’s merge window pulls, and announcements concerning end of life for some features.

  • Solus' Linux Driver Management Tool Enables "Always-On" Nvidia Optimus Support

    Joshua Strobl from the Solus Project has managed to publish a new weekly newsletter to inform users of the independently-developed Solus operating system about the latest developments.

    It would appear that Solus' development team is still working hard these days to improve the upcoming Linux Driver Management (LDM) tool, which is now capable of detecting multiple system configurations, including hybrid Intel and AMD Radeon or Intel and Nvidia GPUs, but also computers with AMD APUs by automatically configuring the graphics stack.

  • [Stable Update] 2017-03-06 – Mesa, Xorg-Server, Deepin, Tesseract, Plasma5 [Ed: #Manjaro 17.0 released]

    Some more updated Deepin, Bluez and Haskell packages round-up this update for today. Please test and give us feedback as usual

  • Latest Weekly Build of Black Lab Linux Improves Microsoft Surface Studio Support

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert is informing Softpedia today about the availability of a new weekly snapshot of the Ubuntu-based Black Lab Linux operating system.

    At the end of February, we informed you that Black Lab Software decided to release weekly builds of Black Lab Linux, keeping users up-to-date with the latest GNU/Linux technologies, but also patching security flaws and fixing some of the most annoying bugs.

  • 3.5-inch Skylake SBC offers 4x SATA, 4x PCIe, and 5x USB 3.0

    ADL’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ADLQ170HDS” SBC offers Intel’s 6th Gen Core CPUs with extended temp support and plenty of of SATA 3, PCIe, and USB 3.0.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to Install Debian, Ubuntu, or Kali Linux on Your Chromebook

    At the same time, you can also access all the Linux utilities, whether it’s sshing into your server or using applications like GIMP and LibreOffice. To be honest, I do most of my consumer side work in Chrome OS; it has almost all commercial and popular apps and services. Whether I want to watch Netflix, HBO Now, Hulu, or Amazon Prime, I can do this on the same machine where I can also use core Linux utilities and manage my servers easily.

  • Adapt or Die: The New Pattern of Software Delivery

    In recent years, however, we’ve seen an explosion of new developments in software; each intended to achieve the above-stated goal. The current nexus of software development, also referred to as ‘Cloud Native Computing’ does just that and lies at the intersection of containers, microservices, Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery/Deployment and the modern cloud.

  • BlackArch Linux 2017-03-01 Hacking Distro Released With 50 New Tools And Kernel 4.9.11

    Whenever we talk about Linux Kali alternatives, we often end up talking about Parrot OS. But, there’s another great option that’s based on Arch Linux. Yes, I’m talking about BlackArch Linux. I keep tracking its releases regularly, and today I’ll tell you about the freshly baked BlackArch Linux 2017-03-01.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • A Brief History of Blockchain

    Many of the technologies we now take for granted were quiet revolutions in their time. Just think about how much smartphones have changed the way we live and work. It used to be that when people were out of the office, they were gone, because a telephone was tied to a place, not to a person. Now we have global nomads building new businesses straight from their phones. And to think: Smartphones have been around for merely a decade.

  • A Flurry of Open Source Graphics Milestones

    The past few months have been busy ones on the open-source graphics front, bringing with them Wayland 1.13, Weston 2.0, Mesa 17.0, and Linux 4.10. These releases have been quite interesting in and of themselves, but the biggest news must be that with Mesa 17.0, recent Intel platforms are fully conformant with the most recent Khronos rendering APIs: OpenGL 4.5, OpenGL ES 3.2, and Vulkan 1.0. This is an enormous step forward for open-source graphics: huge congratulations to everyone involved!

    Mesa 17.0 also includes the Etnaviv driver, supporting the Vivante GPUs found in NXP/Freescale i.MX SoCs, amongst others. The Etnaviv driver brings with it a 'renderonly' framework for Mesa, explicitly providing support for systems with a separate display controller and 3D GPU. Etnaviv joins Mesa as the sixth hardware vendor to have a supported, fully open-source, driver.

  • TechRadar Pro readers have voted for their preferred Linux distro

    Linux is steadily building up steam as a viable platform on all sorts of fronts, including gaming as we’ve seen recently, but which is the most popular of all the many distros out there?

    The results of our survey from earlier this month (which had almost 900 participants) have now been totted up, in which we asked you to name the three distros you used the most. And the clear winner – king-of-the-hill, top-of-the-list, a-number-one – was Ubuntu which was cited by 24% of respondents.

    The popular OS had a clear lead over second-place Mint, which was used by 14.5% of those surveyed. And the bronze medal was just secured by Fedora which snared 10.1%, only a fraction ahead of Debian which finished on 10% bang-on.

  • ArchBang Spring Release

    Openbox, Tint2 and Conky are back.

  • Manjaro-Arm Linux for embedded devices shutting down due to lack of contributors

    Manjaro-Arm provided a simple out-of-the-box solution for Linux on embedded boards since 2015, but due to its lack of contributor involvement, the project’s sole maintainer announced that it is shutting down.

  • Hackweek 15 - the YaST Integration Tests

    I decided to spend the last SUSE Hackweek with YaST and find a way which would allow us to write and run YaST integration tests easily. See the details in the project Hackweek page.

    Some time ago I found the cucumber-cpp project. It is a cucumber support for the C++ programming language.

    The reason is that the YaST UI uses the libyui library which is written in C++. If we want to control and check the YaST UI we need to implement it on the libyui level.

  • Buy or Sell? What Analysts Recommends: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Global Payments Inc. (GPN)
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Mean Rating At $1.47
  • Free software activities in February 2017
  • Technologic Systems integrates Ubuntu Core with Computer on Module
  • Ubuntu Core ported to an i.MX6 COM, a Dell IoT gateway, and a LimeNET base station

    Ubuntu Core is available on Technologic’s i.MX6-based TS-4900 COM, will run on Dell’s Edge Gateway 3000, and will soon appear on a LimeNET base station.

    At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Canonical announced several more takers for its IoT-oriented Ubuntu Core distribution. When Dell unveiled its compact, $399-and-up Edge Gateway 3000 series of Intel Atom-driven IoT gateways, Canonical revealed that the devices will be available with Ubuntu Core when they ship in early summer.

  • Linux Journal March 2017

    Like most fancy tech terms, "Cloud Computing" has lost its newness, and it's now just a commodity we purchase. It's often so much easier to provision virtual machines than it is to buy and host your own servers. Yes, there are concerns over privacy and security when your data is in the cloud. When you host in your own data center, however, there's still the possibility of a rogue cleaning crew getting to your servers. (We've all seen the movies; it just takes a mop and a blue jumper to get you into the most secure data center.) Regardless of your stance on cloud computing, it's here to stay. This month, we talk a bit about how to live in this bold new world.

today's leftovers

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