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today's leftovers

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  • Oracle Loses Again, Red Hat Competes With FOSS & More…

    Also included: has a birthday, six new distro releases, Ubuntu considering dropping 32-bit support and the feds were after Snowden.

  • Is Your OS Working For You Or Enslaving You?

    Essentially, folks bought a PC to use, run their applications and browse their networks and MS has installed malware on them to advertise “10”. Malware. That’s what this is. If the guy who made your OS deliberately installs malware on your PC, what are you going to do?

  • Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware goes FULL SCREEN in final push

    As the Windows 10 free upgrade period draws to a close, Microsoft is stepping up its operating system's nagware to full-screen takeovers.

    The Redmond software giant confirmed today it will start showing dark blue screens urging people to install the latest version of Windows. The full-screen ads will pop up on Windows 7 and 8.1 desktops from now until July 30, when the free upgrade period ends.

  • Check out 'Why, Phil?', new Linux audio webshow series

    Philip Yassin has recently started an upbeat Linux audio webshow series called 'Ask Phil?'. Only recently started, the series has already notched up an impressive 7 episodes, most of which revolve around Phil's favourite DAW, Qtractor.

  • Pitivi: An Open Source and Powerful Video Editor for Linux

    Pitivi is a well known video editor, the initial release was back in May, 2004 and still in active development. It is an open source, non-linear video editor for Linux developed by various contributors from all over the world, licensed under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL). It aims to be a powerful and flexible video editor that can attract to prosumers and professionals.
    In February, 2014 the project held a fundraising campaign through Gnome foundation, the goal was to raise €100,000 for further development. The fundraiser did not reach the goal but raised above €23,000 as of 2015, which allowed partially funded development.

  • Plasma 5.6.5 and Frameworks 5.23 now in Backports for Kubuntu 16.04

    Plasma 5.6.5 brings bugfixes and translations from the month of June thanks to contributors, while Frameworks 5.23 brings new fixes in KWallet, KWayland, Breeze and much more!

  • This Week in GTK+ – 7
  • Builder Designs

    Thanks to the wonderful design skill of Allan, Builder got a bunch of new designs this last month. Last week, after arriving home from the Toronto hackfest, I started reshaping Builder to match.

  • Mageia 6 Release Notes
  • The next step towards Mageia 6 is here, sta1 has been released

    Everyone at Mageia is very happy to announce the release of the next step in the path to Mageia 6.

  • Bear is working for its money

    Since I made the new Slackware 14.2 data available 24 hours ago, the server has been pushing out 1.67 Terabytes of data, at an average of 155 MBytes/sec. Needless to say that this server was a good investment, I could never have managed this on my old platform.

  • Zacks EPS Estimates For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Is $0.41
  • Python 3 in Fedora

    At the 2016 Python Language Summit, Petr Viktorin, who is the team lead for the Python maintenance group at Red Hat, described the progress that Fedora has made in switching to Python 3 by default. He also presented some work that has been done to split up the standard library to try to reduce Python's footprint for cloud deployments.

    Viktorin pointed to a site that is tracking Fedora's Python 3 porting efforts. In particular, he showed the history graph that displays the progress since October 2015. Some 1300 packages are now either able to run on both Python 2 and 3 or just on 3, though there are still 1700 or so to go.

  • GSoC 2016 Weekly Rundown: Breaking down WordPress networks

    At the moment, there are not any plans to set up or offer a blog-hosting service to contributors (and for good reason). The only two websites that would receive the benefits of a multi-site network would be the Community Blog and the Magazine. For now, the intended scale of expanding WordPress into Fedora is to these two platforms.

  • Hacker Tells How To Crack Android Encryption On Millions of Smartphones

today's leftovers

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  • Calamares 2.3 Installer Released
  • ANNOUNCE: libosinfo 0.3.1 released

    I am happy to announce a new release of libosinfo, version 0.3.1 is now available, signed with key DAF3 A6FD B26B 6291 2D0E 8E3F BE86 EBB4 1510 4FDF (4096R). All historical releases are available from the project download page.

  • There and Back Again: The MongoDB Cloud Story

    Before it was a database company, MongoDB was a cloud company. Founded in 2007 and originally known as 10gen, the company originally intended to build a Java cloud platform. After building a database it called MongoDB, the company realized that the infrastructure software it had built to support its product was more popular than the product itself, and the PaaS company pivoted to become a database company – eventually taking the obvious step of renaming itself to reflect its new purpose.

  • C++17: New Features Coming To 33-Year-Old Programming Language

    The C++17 standard is taking shape and adding new features to the vintage programming language. This major update aims to make C++ an easier language to work with and brings powerful technical specifications.

  • Clearing the Keystone Environment

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  • Permabit Debuts Only Complete Data Reduction for the Linux Storage Stack

    Permabit Technology Corporation, the leader in data reduction technology, today announced the latest release of its Virtual Data Optimizer (VDO) software, VDO 6. The newest release of VDO delivers the company's patented deduplication, HIOPS Compression™ and thin provisioning in a commercial software package for Linux, expanding availability beyond the OEM marketplace to include the leading Professional Services organizations that are enabling today's modern Hybrid Cloud data centers.

  • My KIWI/OBS talk from oSC'16

    Last Friday, at openSUSE Conference 2016, I was giving a talk together with Christian Schneemann about KIWI and OBS (the software is not able to manage "two speakers for one talk", this is why I am not listed in the schedule).

  • AppliedMicro Announces the Availability of its Mudan Storage Platform at Red Hat Summit 2016
  • AsteroidOS smartwatch OS wants you, developers

    AsteroidOS is a new open source operating system specifically designed to serve software application development on smartwatches. The project is now gaining some traction and has been reported to now be looking for developer and community contribution engagement.

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Top 3: Fedora 24, Peppermint 7 and Solus 1.2

    Perhaps the biggest release of last week was Fedora 24, the first major milestone release from Red Hat's community Linux platform so far in 2016. On the desktop Fedora 24 including the GNOME 3.20 desktop and now supports the Flatpak application packaging approach. The promise of Flatpack much like Ubuntu's Snappy is a single package that can run across multiple Linux distributions.

  • Turns Sixteen

    I'm proud to announce that over the weekend LQ turned 16! I’d like to once again thank each and every LQ member for their participation and feedback. While there is always room for improvement, that LQ has remained a friendly and welcoming place for new Linux members despite its size is a testament to the community.

  • The ARM64 Race

    At a recent talk SoftIron gave a talk about ARM64 versus x86 servery, it was emphasized that comparisons are often apples v oranges. Given the right race, ARM64 is competitive today, say, in storage servery. That’s because smaller cores distributed with lots of storage hanging on each is a better match to the workload. Further, ARM64 is becoming competitive in its 1st generation while x86 is on its umpteenth generation. With the large cast of developers and interest from large customers, growth/maturity could come very rapidly.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.0 Beta 2 Released
  • It's HackWeek @SUSE Again!

    This is our fourteenth HackWeek at SUSE already. HackWeek is a SUSE way of Hackathon

  • UEFI for QEMU now in Fedora repositories

    I haven’t seen any announcement, but I noticed Fedora repositories now contain edk2-ovmf package. That is the package that is necessary to emulate UEFI in QEMU/KVM virtual machines. It seems all licensing issues having been finally resolved and now you can easily run UEFI systems in your virtual machines!

  • Issue 98, HyperKitty, Fedora-Apps

    Last week I also did a heuristics evalaution on Hyper Kitty which a django based archiver for the mailman suite allowing the users to starts new threads, reply to mails and mark them as favorites, I focused on analysing the wesbite with regards to the principles that we have been taught in class. I will be updating the heuristics in a separate blog post.

  • I’m switching from git-annex to Syncthing

    I wrote recently about using git-annex for encrypted sync, but due to a number of issues with it, I’ve opted to switch to Syncthing.

  • DebConf16 schedule available

    DebConf will open on Saturday, 2 July 2016 with the Open Festival, where events of interest to a wider audience are offered, ranging from topics specific to Debian to a wider appreciation of the open and maker movements (and not just IT-related). Hackers, makers, hobbyists and other interested parties are invited to share their activities with DebConf attendees and the public at the University of Cape Town, whether in form of workshops, lightning talks, install parties, art exhibition or posters. Additionally, a Job Fair will take place on Saturday, and its job wall will be available throughout DebConf.

  • DebCamp16 day 3

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Installing Arch Linux. Part 1

    Arch Linux is often rather challenging or scary when it comes to a newbie's first Linux experience. Some reasons you may want to go with Arch would be the Pacman package handler, or the fact that it comes with no bloat software that will allow you to truly make it your own. In the installation process, there is no GUI or "Press Next to Continue" to hold your hand. This usually drives people away. I also found the forums to have lots of impatient people who expect you to magically know what you're doing. Here I will try to provide an in depth guide on how to install and setup your own Arch Linux computer.

  • openSUSE News: openSUSE Conference Day 2

    Frank Karlitschek, founder of Nextcloud and ownCloud, talked about the importance of federation infrastructure and reaching the critical mass. He pointed out that Free Open Source Software projects that offer similar applications to those that are proprietary fail to gain mainstream acceptance. One of the reasons he gave was trying to balance the balance between privacy and openness. He suggested that more projects should work with one another on a cloud-sharing standard and perhaps there should be a Global User Directory. Users could manage their privacy data that is shared or visible on a GUD as an answer to sharing personal cloud-based content with users running different applications or services.

  • DebCamp16 day 0
  • GSoC-Journey till Mid term
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160623-1

    About one month has passed since we did release TeX Live 2016, and more than a month since the last Debian packages, so it is high time to ship out a new checkout of upstream. Nothing spectacular new here, just lots and lots of updates since the freeze.

  • Raspberry Pi Stays on Top in Survey of 81 Open-Spec SBCs

today's leftovers

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  • XCOM 2 - Alien Hunters thoughts, prepare to get frustrated

    So I've been playing through XCOM 2 again, but now with the Alien Hunters DLC enabled and my god it's frustrating.

    To get this out of the way: I freaking love XCOM 2, I think it's an incredibly challenging game, that keeps me coming back for more. I like that it's challenging, I enjoy thinking up different strategies when I've failed numerous times.

  • The nostalgia of Windows is everyday Linux.

    A few days ago, I read a mailing list discussion about the advantages of running a computer in the 1980s. A few, like the lack of Digital Rights Management (DRM), were points well-taken. Others may have been tongue-in-cheek, but might also express personal preferences. However, most of the rest were advantages that I still enjoy (or could enjoy) as a Linux user thirty years later, partly because that is how Linux is designed, and partly because of my personal choices.

  • Kernel hacking workshop

    As part of our "community" program at Collabora, I've had the chance to attend to a workshop on kernel hacking at UrLab (the ULB hackerspace). I never touched any part of the kernel and always saw it as a scary thing for hardcore hackers wearing huge beards, so this was a great opportunity to demystify the beast.

  • More Banks Are Trying Out Ripple’s Blockchain For Fund Transfers

    The San Francisco-based financial technology company Ripple has signed up seven more banks to potentially use its blockchain for cross-border payments.

  • Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" Gets New 64-Bit UEFI Boot Capability, F2FS Support

    Today, June 23, 2016, Barry Kauler, the creator of the Puppy Linux distribution, has proudly announced the release and immediate availability for download of Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko."

    Puppy Linux 6.3.2 "Slacko" appears to be a point release to the Puppy Slacko 6.3 series, and as usual, it has been built from the binary TXZ packages of the Slackware 64-bit 14.1 GNU/Linux operating system. However, it looks like the distro is now powered by a kernel from the Linux 3.14 LTS series, version 3.14.55.

  • openSUSE Conference – First Impressions of Day One

    Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016. Long awaited openSUSE Conference (oSC) finally started. I arrived half an hour before the keynote to join an impressive crowd at the reception desk. Upon registration, like all attendees, I received the beautiful oSC 2016 T-shirt.f

  • Preparing my Chikiticluster in Frankfurt to my presentation

    I am excited that I will give a poster presentation about my experiences with HPC at #ISC16 I was selected to do it as part of the Women HPC:)

  • I've bought some more awful IoT stuff

    Today we're going to be talking about the KanKun SP3, a plug that's been around for a while. The idea here is pretty simple - there's lots of devices that you'd like to be able to turn on and off in a programmatic way, and rather than rewiring them the simplest thing to do is just to insert a control device in between the wall and the device andn ow you can turn your foot bath on and off from your phone. Most vendors go further and also allow you to program timers and even provide some sort of remote tunneling protocol so you can turn off your lights from the comfort of somebody else's home.

  • IBM to deliver 200-petaflop supercomputer by early 2018; Cray moves to Intel Xeon Phi

    More supercomputer news this week: The US is responding to China’s new Sunway TiahuLight system that was announced Monday, and fast. First, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory is expected to take delivery of a new IBM system, named Summit, in early 2018 that will now be capable of 200 peak petaflops, Computerworld reports. That would make it almost twice as fast as TaihuLight if the claim proves true. (We had originally reported in 2014 that both Summit and Sierra would achieve roughly 150 petaflops.)

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Android Leftovers

  • Google Pixel review: The best Android phone, even if it is a little pricey
    Welcome to the age of Google Hardware. Apparently tired of letting third-party Android OEMs serve as the stewards of Android handsets, Google has become a hardware company. (Again). Earlier this year Google, launched a hardware division with former Motorola President Rick Osterloh at the helm. With the high-ranking title of "Senior Vice President," Osterloh doesn't oversee a side project—his group is on even footing with Android, Search, YouTube, and Ads. The hardware group is so powerful inside Google that it was able to merge Nexus, Pixel, Chromecast, OnHub, ATAP, and Glass into a single business unit. The group's coming out party was October 4, 2016, where it announced Google Home, Google Wifi, a 4K Chromecast, the Daydream VR headset, and the pair of phones we're looking at today: the Google Pixel and Google Pixel XL. The arrival of the Pixel phones marks the apparent death of the Nexus line; Google says that it has "no plans" for future Nexus devices. With the new branding comes a change in strategy, too. The Pixel brand is about making devices that are 100 percent Google, so despite Google's position as the developer of Android, get ready for Google-designed hardware combined with exclusive Google software.
  • Hands-on with the LeEco Le Pro3: services first, Android second
    LeEco’s flagship Le Pro3 smartphone isn’t trying to compete with the Google Pixel, which puts modern Google services in front of a stock Android backdrop. After playing with the Le Pro3 at the company’s U.S. launch event in San Francisco today, I’m left feeling that it’s an easy, low-cost way to get the full experience of LeEco’s applications. There are proprietary LeEco utility tools like the browser, email, calendar, messages, notes, and phone apps, along with bloatware like Yahoo Weather, but mostly the Pro3 is a means of distribution for the LeEco apps, like Live, LeVidi, and Le. There is also a standard-issue My LeEco app for managing services like EcoPass membership. Under it all is the EUI custom user interface. If you swipe left from the home screen, you see videos that LeEco recommends you watch — not Google Now.
  • Report: Google reaches agreement with CBS for 'Unplugged' web TV service - Fox and Disney may follow