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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.2 Release Candidate 2
  • Linux 4.2-rc2 Kernel Released, Just Another Update
  • OS/2 HPFS File-System Now Has TRIM Support On Linux

    The High Performance File-System (HPFS) that was originally designed for the OS/2 operating system now has SSD TRIM support for its Linux kernel support while reading/writing from these old partitions.

    While I don't know of anyone off-hand still relying upon the OS/2 HPFS file-system support in Linux, it was updated in the post-merge-window (due to waiting on related patches, the original work was sent during the merge window but not committed) of the Linux 4.2 kernel merge window.

  • NVIDIA Opens Up OpenACC Toolkit, But Only For Academia

    NVIDIA is announcing today the release of a new OpenACC Toolkit for enhancing GPU computing, but sadly it's only free in the long-run for academia developers and researchers.

  • Two More GL4 Extensions Enabled In Mesa 10.7 Git For RadeonSI
  • Marek At AMD Has Been Finishing Up EGL 1.5 Support In Mesa

    The latest patches sent out by this prolific open-source Mesa developer over the past few years add exposing sRGB visuals to the DRI Gallium3D state tracker, adding EGL_KHR_gl_colorspace support, adding support for the new features to the DRI2 render query extension, and other changes.

  • KStars – A new look!

    With more than a month remaining, my Google Summer of Code project has almost come to an end! KStars is now able to display all 88 western constellations. I want to thank my mentor, Jasem, for helping me by making a dialog box that would display constellation images with parameters in real time. This made my job simpler by a very large margin. Instead of using mathematical equations to figure out the ‘best fit’ for an image, I have simplified the task by simply noting down the RA/DEC coordinate pairs for ‘midpoints’ of constellations from Stellarium. This helped me figure out ‘where’ to translate the image in the sky map. Then I played around with the position angle, width and height for each image so as to ‘best fit’ the constellation lines. I had to do this repetitively for 88 consecutive times, but this was still a much simpler solution. Lastly I replaced all the 88 images with transparent backgrounds, so as to avoid cutting neighbouring images by the black background which was previously present. KStars looks good now, and I feel happy seeing the results! Here’s the new look of KStars!

  • Marble 1.11.3 for Windows


  • Kodi 15.0 "Isengard" RC2 Released

    The second release candidate to Kodi 15.0 "Isengard" is now available. Since Kodi 14.2 there have now been about 1,080 code changes so far towards this next major release.

  • Kodi Is Working On Chromium CEF Integration
  • DIY Net Player

    The cherry ear net player, based on raspberry pi and HifiBerry Amp+.

  • Top 30 Apps from the Tizen Store for first half 2015

    As we wave goodbye to the first half of 2015, we can report on the top 30 most popular apps from the Tizen Store of the first half of 2015. Much of these applications were the same as we’ve seen in May 2015 with the addition of games like Nitro Racer, Funny Face Changer, App Locker, Video Downloader and WhatsApp Status. Great progress has been made in the Tizen Store as its service coverage has recently expanded to 182 countries and the Samsung Z1 being released in India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, with over 1 Million handsets sold since January 2015.

  • Friday's security updates
  • Security advisories for Thursday
  • Encryption with backdoors is worse than useless -- it's dangerous

    Last week FBI Director James Comey testified before a Senate Judiciary Committee about the use of encryption among terrorist groups. For anyone who understands the critical role that encryption plays in the Internet and our private data networks, many of the exchanges between Comey and the senators on the panel were not only revealing, but rather disturbing.

  • Hacking Team orchestrated brazen BGP hack to hijack IPs it didn’t own

    Spyware service provider Hacking Team orchestrated the hijacking of IP addresses it didn't own to help Italian police regain control over several computers that were being monitored in an investigation, e-sent among company employees showed.

  • Hacking Team email leaks show they were thinking about helping India hack RIM servers

    Try to cast your mind back to 2010/2011, BlackBerry maker, RIM, and India were at loggerheads after the state in India wanted access to RIM’s servers. India managed to get RIM to allow access to consumer messaging services but they wouldn’t give them access to the BlackBerry Enterprise Server. Documents from the Hacker Team leak now show that Hacking Team were considering a proposal to the Indian government to better intercept data sent through RIM’s servers.

  • UA Cyber security expert and former longtime CIA officer breaks down big goverment data breach affecting millions
  • Feds: Hack affected 21.5 million people
  • Hacks of OPM databases compromised 22.1 million people, federal authorities say

    Two major breaches last year of U.S. government databases holding personnel records and security-clearance files exposed sensitive information about at least 22.1 million people, including not only federal employees and contractors but their families and friends, U.S. officials said Thursday.

  • Espionage Lessons from the OPM Hack

    It has almost been a month since the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) infiltration was made public and shockwaves of the hack reverberates in Washington, D.C. and beyond. In response, officials have shut down the E-QIP background investigation system. Security and privacy professionals seem united in their demands that OPM director Katherine Archuleta be held accountable for the security lapses in the organization. Commenter after commenter diagnoses the problems in our systems, institutions, and infrastructure, demanding accountability and change. While we continue to extract negatives from the story of the OPM hack, three lessons emerge that might give us hope for a secure future.

today's leftovers

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  • The People Who Support Linux: SysAdmin Rigs Raspberry Pi for Racing Pigeons

    “I got a very minimal Linux running (kernel 0.93p11) and then later bought a set of disks from Duke University (kernel 0.93p13still SLS),” he said. “My first really useful Linux was Kernel 1.2.8 Slackware 2.3. I couldn't get X Windows to run but this was MS DOS days so color Bash was pretty cool. I had an offline packet reader for mailing lists from bulletin boards. I also used minicom to dial up GEnie. Later I started using SLIP to get to to the Internet and dropped GEnie.”

  • Google Not Scoffing at AI, Files Patent Applications

    Linus Torvalds was interviewed by Slashdot last week and his comments on artificial intelligence has been making the rounds since. He basically said AI would not lead to human-like robots because the neural network would remain limited. Despite that, Google has "applied for at least six patents on fundamental neural network and AI." In other news, Kali Linux 2.0 is expected at DEFCON 23 and the Free Software Foundation has approved another Linux OS for its "fully free" list. Docker 'Tinkerer Extraordinaire' said Open Source is hostile to women and Megatotoro posted Pisi Linux is still alive and kicking.

  • The Other Companies Participating The Most In Mesa/DRI Discussions
  • AMD Catalyst 15.7 Stable Linux Driver Released After a Long Absence

    The AMD developers have announced that a new Catalyst Linux driver, 15.7, has been released and is now available for download. It's been a while since we had a stable version of the Catalyst driver, but it's still not all that impressive.

  • Unvanquished Alpha 41 Released, Still Moving Towards NaCl VM Usage

    It's been a while since last reporting on Unvanquished (mostly because it seems their RSS feed is broken), but they've continued moving along with their open-source game and Daemon engine. This first person shooter is now up to its 41st monthly alpha release.

  • Pisi Linux...Still Alive!

    I'm happy that Pisi is still with us. It has become too silent and almost secluded, but I still hope Pisi does not go extinct.

  • Alpine Linux 3.2.1 Is Out Now. Text Based Installation Steps

    The design goal for Alpine Linux is to provide a secure and lightweight distribution, which should cater the needs of most of the Linux users. It is based on musl and BusyBox; today Alpine Linux 3.2.1 has been released, in this article we will be reviewing the noteworthy features of this Linux distribution and the installation process for this latest release.

  • Kali Linux 2.0 Release Day Scheduled

    We’ve been awfully quiet lately, which usually means something is brewing below the surface. In the past few months we’ve been working feverishly on our next generation of Kali Linux and we’re really happy with how it’s looking so far. There’s a lot of new features and interesting new aspects to this updated version, however we’ll keep our mouths shut until we’re done with the release. We won’t leave you completely hanging though…here’s a small teaser of things to come!

  • Point Linux 3.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Flock, unified globalization, weak dependencies, end of life vs. end of world…

    Flock is our big, annual contributor conference, where we get together to talk about what we’re working on and what we want to do in future releases, and also actually get in rooms together to hack on ideas. It’s also great fun, and a celebration of our “Friends” foundation.

  • libav and FFmpeg: switch over
  • Snappy Personal Desktop

    " It is still a WIP and it is also quite early, but if you want to try out Snappy Personal Desktop,"

  • Ubuntu Making Progress On Snappy Personal Desktop

    For those interested, it's becoming possible to play with Ubuntu's Snappy next-generation package manager from a personal desktop.

  • Lenovo To Ship Laptops With Ubuntu In India, Starting At 48,000 INR

    Lenovo is preparing to ship laptops preloaded with Ubuntu in India. The first of these systems will be the Lenovo Thinkpad L450, featuring only one of two CPUs, but the selection may widen over time and expand to other countries.

  • Canonical partners with Lenovo to launch Ubuntu-powered ThinkPad L450 laptops in India

    Canonical, the commercial sponsor of Ubuntu, has partnered with computer OEM Lenovo to launch the ThinkPad L450 series running the Linux distro in India. Starting at Rs 40,000, the laptops will be available to purchase from selected commercial resellers and distributors.

  • Ubuntu Version Of Intel Compute Stick Available For $110 at Amazon, Newegg And Best Buy
  • Open Source Virtual Reality Platform now Supports Android

    The Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR), an organization working towards an open standard for virtual reality devices, has announced that OSVR software now accommodates Android devices, adding to existing distribution for Windows and Linux.

  • Android Candy: Google Photos
  • 8 penetration testing tools that will do the job

    If the probability of your assets being prodded by attackers foreign and domestic doesn’t scare the bejesus out of you, don’t read this article. If you’re operating in the same realm of reality as the rest of us, here’s your shot at redemption via some solid preventive pen testing advice from a genuine pro.

  • Could a Presidential Election be Hacked?

    Now that’s an intriguing question, isn’t it? Just about every other computerized process has proven to be vulnerable, and as voting becomes even more technology based, it becomes increasingly vulnerable as well. Computer systems are generic processing hosts, and to a computing platform, data is simply data. The fact that certain information tallies votes rather than credit card transactions does not make it any harder to hack. Moreover, the U.S. has a long history of documented voting fraud, so there’s no reason to assume that politicians, and their backers, have suddenly become paragons of virtue. Indeed, there’s plenty of evidence to the contrary.

    When you come down to it, the only thing that’s different today is that altering votes might be easier, and that those motivated so do so may be harder to catch. So why aren’t we hearing more about that risk?

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Gummiboot Is Dead

    Gummiboot is dead, of course, because it was spun into systemd to form systemd's SD-Boot (U)EFI boot manager. SD-Boot has been in there since systemd 220 as an optional feature and can be used for doing some cool stuff.

  • Linux Top 3: Linux 4.2 rc1, 4MLinux 13 and antiX15
  • It’s okay if I die now, says Linux creator [Ed: Rewriting the headline of an old article to create bait]

    While Linux is open-source, which allows people to change it as they please, Torvalds remains the lone official arbiter of the software, guiding how Linux evolves. He is The Decider.

  • Someone Is Already Working On SPIR-V For The Nouveau Driver
  • How to use Nvidia Optimus to switch active GPUs and save power on Linux laptops
  • GNOME Commander 1.4.7 (Total Commander-like File Manager) Brings Bug-Fixes Only

    As you may know, GNOME Commander is an open-source two panel file manager similar to Norton Commander or Midnight Commander, being very popular among the Linux power users.

    Among others, it has support for tabs, permits the users to select or deselect files, has support for FTP, SAMBA, folder bookmarks and history, integrated command-line, embedded file viewer and other useful features.

  • New LibreOffice packages for Slackware 14.1 and -current

    LibreOffice galore! Last week saw the announcement of the latest in the 4.x series, and I decided to build LibreOffice 4.4.4 packages. This time however, they are created for Slackware 14.1. The stable release of Slackware deserves the latest stable office suite to keep you guys productive.

  • OpenSSL tells users to prepare for a high severity flaw

    Server admins and developers beware: The OpenSSL Project plans to release security updates Thursday for its widely used cryptographic library that will fix a high severity vulnerability.

    OpenSSL implements multiple cryptographic protocols and algorithms including TLS (Transport Layer Security), which underpins encryption on the Web as part of protocols like HTTPS (HTTP Secure), IMAPS (Internet Message Access Protocol Secure) and SMTPS (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Secure).

  • The Mob's IT Department

    A few days earlier, small USB drives had been inserted into the company’s computers. They were programmed to intercept the nine-digit PINs that controlled access to DP World’s shipping containers. Besides fruit, metals, and other legitimate cargo, some of these containers carried millions of euros in heroin and cocaine. To get their drugs out of the port, often traffickers use low-tech methods: They hire runners to jump fences, break open containers, and sprint away before guards can catch them, earning as much as €10,000 ($11,200) a trip. Stealing PIN codes is more elegant and less risky. Whoever has the codes can pull into the terminal, enter the PIN into a keypad, wait as robot-controlled loaders put the container on their truck, and drive off—sometimes minutes ahead of the cargo’s legitimate owner.


    There was only one condition of the release: Van De Moere had to give Okul an intensive training session on Linux, the operating system on which Metasploit, the hacking software, is based. A few weeks later, according to police and interviews, he did so over one weekend at a Holiday Inn in Ghent. In November, Van De Moere returned two antennas and had a couple of beers with Okul. That was the last either man would see of the Turks.

  • Anti Evil Maid 2 Turbo Edition

    Joanna Rutkowska came up with the idea of Anti Evil Maid. This can take two slightly different forms. In both, a secret phrase is generated and encrypted with the TPM. In the first form, this is then stored on a USB stick. If the user suspects that their system has been tampered with, they boot from the USB stick. If the PCR values are good, the secret will be successfully decrypted and printed on the screen. The user verifies that the secret phrase is correct and reboots, satisfied that their system hasn't been tampered with. The downside to this approach is that most boots will not perform this verification, and so you rely on the user being able to make a reasonable judgement about whether it's necessary on a specific boot.

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