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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • POWER8 Talos Workstation Drops Price Slightly, Long Way From Being Funded

    Last month the Talos Secure Workstation launched on crowd-funding as a fully-open libre, modern system powered by a POWER8 processor priced at $4k for the motherboard or $18k for the complete system. They have only raised less than 10% of their funding goal so far but have now cut costs a bit.

  • Pitfalls to Avoid When Implementing Node.js and Containers

    The use of containers and Node.js are on the rise as the two technologies are a good match for effectively developing and deploying microservice architectures. In a recent survey from the Node.js Foundation, the project found that 45 percent of developers that responded to the survey were using Node.js with this technology.

    As more enterprises and startups alike look to implement these two technologies together, there are key questions that they need to ask before they begin their process and common pitfalls they want to avoid.

    In advance of Node.js Interactive, to be held Nov. 29 through Dec. 2 in Austin, we talked with Ross Kukulinski, Product Manager at NodeSource, about the common pitfalls when implement Node.js with containers, how to avoid them, and what the future holds for both of these technologies.

  • Weaveworks Debuts Weave Cloud for Container Control and Monitoring

    After months of availability in the beta test cycle, the commercial edition of the Weave Cloud Software-as-a-Service platform is now generally available.

    Weaveworks announced the general availability of its Weave Cloud Software-as-a-Service platform on November 17, providing organizations with container networking and monitoring capabilities.

    The Weave Cloud platform first entered public beta in June 2016. As a company, Weaveworks has raised $20 million in funding to date as the company has been building open-source projects that help to enable the nascent market for containers and micro-services.

  • AMD Planning To Enable GLAMOR By Default For R600 & Newer GPUs
  • NVIDIA Posts Initial Signed PMU Firmware Support Patches - Currently For GM20B
  • MPV 0.22.0 Video Player Lands with New Options, AudioUnit Output Driver for iOS

    The powerful, open-source, and cross-platform MPlayer-based MPV video player software has been updated earlier to version 0.22.0, a release that introduces a handful of new features, commands, and options, and also addresses many bugs.

    MPV is a true cross-platform application, currently supported on GNU/Linux, macOS, BSD, and Microsoft Windows operating systems, and known to run on x86, IA-32, x86_64, ARM, PowerPC, and MIPS hardware architectures. According to the release notes, it looks like MPV 0.22.0 comes with an AudioUnit output driver for the iOS mobile OS, and introduces support for parsing Matroska (MKV) colorimetry metadata.

  • Talking at Def.camp 2016 in Bucharest, Romania

    Just at the beginning of this month I was invited to going to Bucharest, Romania, for giving a talk on GNOME at this year’s def.camp. The conference seems to be an established event in the Romanian security community and has been organised quite well. As I said in my talk I was happy to be there to tell those people about Free Software. I saw many people running around with their proprietary systems. It seems that certain parts of the security community does not believe that the security of a system greatly increases when it’s based on Free Software. In fairness, the event seemed to be a bit on the suit-and-tie-side where Windows is probably much more common than people want.

  • Travis needs our help

    Long time GNOME contributor and foundation member Travis Reitter had a medical emergency earlier this month. You might consider donating to the gofundme to help him and his family out during the marathon to recovery.

  • Linux & Open Source News Of The Week — Microsoft Joins Linux Foundation, openSUSE And Zorin OS Releases
  • 2 Handy ‘Places’ Indicators for the Ubuntu Unity Desktop

    Back in the (g)olden days, when Ubuntu used the GNOME 2 desktop, a ‘Places’ menu was always accessible from the system panel.

    Handy, this menu let you quickly jump to a specific folder or drive instantly, without needing to open a file manager to navigate there.

  • Ubuntu-based Zorin OS 12 Linux, 'aping' Windows?

    Could Windows every become open source? To be honest, although that discussion is fun to have, it’s really not on the cards right now or up for discussion. This was the avowed verbalisation made by more than one of the senior Microsoft developer division employees at the firm’s recent Connect () 2016 conference in New York.

  • Q3 Smartphone Market Numbers, Top 10 brands, OS Wars, Installed Base

    In the OS wars, its pretty much all Android with iOS doing its bit at 12%. Windows is selling at a level below half a percent so we now round out Windows OS to zero. So 87% for Android, 12% for iOS, and less than 1% covers all others from Tizen to Windows to Sailfish etc.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ubuntu Mate, Windows 10 and macOS Sierra: A marriage of 3 OSs

    I gave myself a little gift recently and revisited Ubuntu Mate by virtue of a transplanted hard disk.

    In my case, Mate was a gift that was giving and giving until it wasn’t.

    When the eMachines T6528 went belly up due to leaky logic board capacitors, I parted this tank of a tower out, half-heartedly vowing to get back to this low-footprint Linux distribution as soon as I could.

    Fast forward several months and with some precious free time on my hands, I was finally able to make good on the promise.

  • Ubuntu Core [Comic]

    Nowadays, Linux processes are forever in conflict. Is there somewhere out there for them to live together in harmony... perhaps by separating them via full resource isolation?

  • The Dashbot is a $49 gadget that turns your car into Knight Rider's KITT
  • Dashbot is a $49 hands-free, in-car controller for your phone (crowdfunding)
  • Quick Notes from Smartphone Wars - Kodak, Nintendo, Lenovo and Blaupunkt

    A few quick notes from a few less-familiar players in smartphone wars. So yes, I'll do the math shortly on Q3 smartphone market (nothing exciting there, we know Samsung, Apple, Huawei are the top 3, the excitement is long gone from that 'race').

    But first off, as I was doing some back-log Tweets of old tech news items to cover, on Twitter, today, I noticed a few interesting tidbits of smartphone-related news. These are all October-timeframe news items (so they're old but went to cover them anyway).

  • BH 1.62.0-1

    The BH package on CRAN was updated to version 1.62.0. BH provides a large part of the Boost C++ libraries as a set of template headers for use by R, possibly with Rcpp as well as other packages.

    This release upgrades the version of Boost to the upstream version Boost 1.62.0, and adds three new libraries as shown in the brief summary of changes from the NEWS file which follows below.

  • Rcpp 0.12.8: And more goodies

    Yesterday the eighth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R where the Windows binary has by now been generated too; the Debian package is on its way as well. This 0.12.8 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, and the 0.12.7 release in September --- making it the twelveth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. While we are keeping with the pattern, we have managed to include quite a lot of nice stuff in this release. None of it is a major feauture, though, and so we have not increased the middle number.

  • Axcient Introduces Expanded Support for Linux on Fusion Platform
  • ESG Validates One-Hour Recovery of Data Centers with Axcient Fusion
  • Axcient Announces Linux Support and Enhanced Orchestration for Fusion

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How did you get started with Linux?

    Linux has been around for quite a long time now, and there are always new folks finding their way to it. One Linux redditor recently asked how his fellow users got into Linux, and some of their answers are quite interesting.

  • Report: Linux, NoSQL, Nginx set foundation for AWS app dominance

    Sumo Logic’s report, entitled “The State of the Modern App in AWS,” uses statistics gathered from the company’s base of 1,200 customers to get an idea of how their apps are created and what they run on.

  • Sumo Logic Releases Groundbreaking 'State of Modern Applications in AWS Report'
  • Trends in High Performance NFV

    It’s clear that in the service provider space, using a standard cloud platform to deliver carrier-class applications may not be sufficient. Service provider applications such as virtual private networks (VPNs), VoIP, and other virtual network functions (VNFs) can’t always be delivered by a best-effort cloud approach.

  • Fujitsu and SUSE Expand Strategic Alliance to Develop and Support Open Source Products
  • Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 Available Now

    After entring Beta staged of development three weeks ago, Red Hat's commercial Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 suites are now generally available and ready for deployment in production environments.

    Prominent new features included in the Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 suite are the latest MySQL 5.7 and Redis 3.2 open-source databases, PHP 7.0 and Perl 5.24 dynamic open-source programming languages, along with the Git 2.9 open-source project management tool, Thermostat 1.6 Java virtual machine (JVM) monitoring utility, and Eclipse Neon 4.6.1 integrated development environment (IDE).

  • Fedora Hubs and Meetbot: A Recursive Tale

    One of the planned features of Fedora Hubs that I am most excited about is chat integration with Fedora development chat rooms. As a mentor and onboarder of designers and other creatives into the Fedora project, I’ve witnessed IRC causing a lot of unnecessary pain and delay in the onboarding experience. The idea we have for Hubs is to integrate Fedora’s IRC channels into the Hubs web UI, requiring no IRC client installation and configuration on the part of users in order to be able to participate. The model is meant to be something like this:

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff: 'The new Microsoft is actually the old Microsoft'

    Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has made it clear he's no longer a fan of the "new" Microsoft under CEO Satya Nadella.

    Speaking at the Code Conference on Monday, Benioff talked about the short-lived bromance between the two companies and how it all ended up falling apart in just two years.

    In particular, Benioff pointed to a meeting that took place between him and Microsoft's cloud boss, Scott Guthrie, that really killed the trust he had placed in the company.

    The story goes that Benioff took a meeting with Guthrie after Microsoft chairman John Thompson, a friend of his, connected the two last year. He believed the meeting was intended to share more about Salesforce's business in hopes of possibly becoming an Azure cloud customer one day. But that wasn't Microsoft's real goal, according to Benioff.

  • Linux hardware support, Creative Commons translation, and more open source news

    While many hardware enthusiasts get excited by the announcement and release of shiny new hardware products, those who are dedicated desktop Linux users have learned to temper their excitement with the reality that when devices lack proper drivers and adequate documentation, it'll take a while before they are made useful. The 2016 MacBook Pro seems to be no different. An early adopter reported that several devices: the built-in keyboard and mouse, as well as the SSD, don't work at all right now for him under Linux. While support may eventually come, it won't be immediate.

  • 2016 MacBook Pro can't run Linux

    There is a subset of the Linux community that likes running Linux on Apple hardware. Strange as it may sound, these users enjoy the virtues of Linux and the elegance of Apple’s computers. Unfortunately, it looks like the 2016 MacBook Pro is not currently compatible with Linux.

  • Don’t Leave Software Testers Out of DevOps
  • Tilling the Brownfield: Bumps on the Road to the Container Dream
  • The overengineering of ALSA userland

    This is a bit of an interesting corner case of a rant. I have not written this when I came up with it, because I came up with it many years ago when I actively worked on multimedia software, but I have only given it in person to a few people before, because at the time it would have gained too much unwanted attention by random people, the same kind of people who might have threatened me for removing XMMS out of Gentoo so many years ago. I have, though, spoken about this with at least one of the people working on PulseAudio at the time, and I have repeated this at the office a few times, while the topic came up.

  • Intel SDK OpenCL 2016 R3 Brings OpenCL 2.1 & SPIR-V To Linux

    Intel's SDK for OpenCL Applications 2016 Release 3 was quietly made available earlier this month and it offers some interesting Linux changes.

  • Radeon Open Compute 1.3 Platform Brings Polaris & Other Features
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 M2 Brings FlameGrapher, Other Improvements

    The second development milestone/test release of the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana is now available for your cross-platform, open-source benchmarking needs.

  • CMake support in Qt Creator (and elsewhere?)

    Kitware released CMake version 3.7 on Friday night. There is one feature mentioned at the very bottom of the feature list that makes this a really exciting release for people writing tools that integrate with CMake: The server-mode.

  • Qt Creator Gets Excited For CMake Server-Mode

    With last week's CMake 3.7 release one of the less-advertised features is the build system's server-mode functionality, which is sure to excited integrated development environments (IDEs).

  • Lyon GNOME Bug day #1

    Last Friday, both a GNOME bug day and a bank holiday, a few of us got together to squash some bugs, and discuss GNOME and GNOME technologies.

    Guillaume, a new comer in our group, tested the captive portal support for NetworkManager and GNOME in Gentoo, and added instructions on how to enable it to their Wiki. He also tested a gateway related configuration problem, the patch for which I merged after a code review. Near the end of the session, he also rebuilt WebKitGTK+ to test why Google Docs was not working for him anymore in Web. And nobody believed that he could build it that quickly. Looks like opinions based on past experiences are quite hard to change.

  • Solus Linux Distribution Review

    Between Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSUSE, you have a choice of well-supported distributions with lots of up-to-date software and commercial backing, as well as a choice of almost any desktop environment like GNOME, Unity or KDE.

    There are many others, however. Linux Mint brings the stability of Ubuntu with a more familiar desktop for ex-Windows users, while Elementary OS gives a more simplified, streamlined desktop which may fare well with ex-Mac users.

  • Springdale Linux 7.3 RC released
  • Black Lab Linux 8.0 released
  • Open Build Service in Debian needs YOU!

    openSUSE distributions’ build system is based on a generic framework named Open Build Service (OBS), I have been using these tools in my work environment, and I have to say, as Debian developer, that it is a great tool. In the current blog post I plan for you to learn the very basics of such tool and provide you with a tutorial to get, at least, a Debian package building.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2016

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Monthly News – November 2016

    The latest XApps and the new MATE 1.16 desktop environment were pushed towards the Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” and LMDE 2 “Betsy” repositories.

    We just finished addressing some issues with MDM, and we’re currently working on a few compatibility issues which affect the Cinnamon screensaver in LMDE and in Slackware before announcing the official release of Cinnamon 3.2.

    We were expecting Cinnamon 3.2 to be out at the end of October and this probably will push the release of Linux Mint 18.1 into the month of December.

  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for October 2016

    Last month was a very busy month for the Tizen store as lots more games / apps have started being released on the Tizen platform. A recent boost to the ecosystem has been the launch of the world’s first 4G Tizen smartphone, the Samsung Z2, which has helped drive more Tizen apps to the store.

  • Game: SEA Conflict: Naval Artillery for Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3

    Taking the role of a Coast Guard Ship, you will fight the Chinese, protecting South East Asia Sea. They will send various ships and you will need to be precise because of the winds, strong or light, you will need to aim correctly with the right amount of power.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A few drawings about Linux

    For the last few days, I’ve been doing a drawing about Linux on my Twitter every day. Here they are.

    It’s been really lovely to see the response to these – some of these (like /proc) I’ve known about for quite a while, and it makes me really happy to hear “wow, I didn’t know that! That’s really cool!”

    I’ll try to keep up making one a day for the rest of November.

    Drawing these is a fun puzzle – I can’t draw most things (a cat? forget it!) so I need to figure out which things are within my capabilities (a lighting bolt? stars? hearts? okay!) and will communicate what I want.

  • GNU/Linux Still Relevant On The Desktop

    The future is now, I suppose. Lots of folks still have fleets of PCs running That Other OS. They don’t need to spend the time, money and freedom that OS demands. They can have Free Software with GNU/Linux to access their web-applications just as they do from their smartphones and tablets. There just isn’t much reason to depend on a tyrannical single-source for software for your PCs. Free Software is software you can run, examine, modify and distribute according to the accompanying licence. What a refreshing change to more and more difficult commandments than God makes for your soul. The cost of a licence is ~$0 too. It’s a bargain. You get to keep your soul and your money.

  • The status of kernel hardening

    At the 2015 Kernel Summit, Kees Cook said, he talked mostly about the things that the community could be doing to improve the security of the kernel. In 2016, instead, he was there to talk about what had actually been done. Kernel hardening, he reminded the group, is not about access control or fixing bugs. Instead, it is about the kernel protecting itself, eliminating classes of exploits, and reducing its attack surface. There is still a lot to be done in this area, but the picture is better than it was one year ago.

    One area of progress is in the integration of GCC plugins into the build system. The plugins in the kernel now are mostly examples, but there will be more interesting ones coming in the future. Plugins are currently supported for the x86, arm, and arm64 architectures; he would like to see that list grow, but he needs help from the architecture maintainers to validate the changes. Plugins are also not yet used for routine kernel compile testing, since it is hard to get the relevant sites to install the needed dependencies.

    Linus asked how much plugins would slow the kernel build process; linux-next maintainer Stephen Rothwell also expressed interest in that question, noting that "some of us do compiles all day." Kees responded that there hadn't been a lot of benchmarking done, but that the cost was "not negligible." It is, though, an important part of protecting the kernel.

  • Adaptive mutexes in user space

    One of the frustrations of computer programming (almost certainly shared with other engineering disciplines) is that, often, a simple, elegant, and general design doesn't work as well as an ugly hack. Such designs still have value as they are more maintainable and more extensible, so it is not uncommon to need to find a balance between simple elegance and practical efficiency. The story of futex support in Linux could be seen as a story of trying to find just this balance. The latest episode adds a new special case, but provides impressive performance improvements.

  • Announcement: GoboLinux 016 beta
  • Despite New FCC Rules, Linksys, Asus Say They'll Still Support Third Party Router Firmware

    The apocalypse for those who like to tinker with their router firmware may be postponed.

    Last year we noted how the FCC updated router and RF device rules for safety reasons, stating that some illegally modified router radios operating in the unlicensed bands were interfering with terminal doppler weather radar (TDWR) at airports. The rule changes prohibited tinkering with the just the RF capabilities of devices. But some sloppy FCC language worried tinker advocates and custom-firmware developers, who feared that because many routers have systems-on-a-chip (SOC) where the radio isn't fully distinguishable from other hardware -- vendors would take the lazy route and block third-party firmware entirely.

  • The Turris Omnia router: help for the IoT mess?

    The Turris Omnia router is not the first FLOSS router out there, but it could well be one of the first open hardware routers to be available. As the crowdfunding campaign is coming to a close, it is worth reflecting on the place of the project in the ecosystem. Beyond that, I got my hardware recently, so I was able to give it a try.

  • Slender Man Chapter 2: Now available in the Tizen Store

    Kenneth Lemieux has also made Chapter 1 ($0.99 and free) and it is now joined by Chapter 2 for $0.99.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Tresorit Offers Encrypted Cloud Storage for Linux Businesses

    Tresorit for Linux is an end-to-end encrypted file sharing service that allows teams to collaborate securely and easily.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.23 is now available.

  • A Number Of KDE Apps Will Be Dropped If They Don't Get Ported To KF5

    Around three dozen apps from the KDE Applications suite could be dropped if they don't see a port from kdelibs4 to KDE Frameworks 5 within the next year.

    A proposal laid out yesterday would make next summer's KDE Applications 17.08 release be the last to allow applications based on kdelibs4. After that, kdelibs4 applications would not be permitted given that KDE Frameworks 5 has already been around for a while and KDE4 is no longer maintained. In other words, there's just about one year to port the relevant applications to KF5 by interested developers otherwise they will not be present in KDE Applications 17.12.

  • November is Bugsquash month – Open Source Aalborg is joining

    Me and my friend Daniel from Open Source Aalborg will arrange that the local participants from the open source group in Aalborg will join in on the final bug squashing day, November the 30th. OS Aalborg has recently joined a lot of Capture the flag’s and I think we will try to put up some very basic infrastructure (read google forms + spreadsheet) to do something similar for the GNOME Bug Squashing initiative.

  • b2k16 hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on GNOME's path forward, various ports progress

    First task of this hackathon was for Jasper and I to upgrade to GNOME 3.22.1 (version 3.22.2 hit the ports tree since). As usual I already updated the core libraries a few days before so that we could start with a nice set of fully updated packages. It ended up being the fastest GNOME update ever, it all went very smoothly. We're still debating the future of GNOME on OpenBSD though. More and more features require systemd interfaces and without a replacement it may not make sense to keep it around. Implementing these interfaces requires time which Jasper and I don't really have these days... Anyway, we'll see.

  • Tea Time is a Simple Timer App for Ubuntu Desktops

    On the hunt for a simple timer app for Ubuntu? Look no further than this cute little tool, called Tea Time.

    Whether you’ve a pizza in the oven, want to set aside a specific study period, or are letting some posh tea steep in water, Tea Time will be right on time.

Xfce 4.14 and Fedora

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Misc
  • Many Xfce Package Updates Bring Stable GTK3 Support, Notifyd Gets Do-Not-Disturb

    While it's likely a long time before Xfce 4.14 gets released with full GTK3 tool-kit integration, there are some new Xfce4 package updates available this week.

    Xfce4-settings 4.13 is out and is a development release for the 4.13 series. This initial release marks Xfce Settings being fully-ported to GTK+ 3.x. That's the main change with this release is the port from GTK2 to GTK3 but some bugs do remain. There are some screenshots via this blog post.

  • Fedora Looks At Changing The Default Hostname For F26 & Beyond

    One of the most discussed items this week on the Fedora developers' mailing list is in regards to changing the hostname on Fedora 26 and future versions.

    Fedora has defaulted to localhost.localdomain but this is becoming a problem for systems acting as a client to FreeIPA and Active Directory domain controllers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
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