Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • ISO Refresh: antergos 17.2
  • Hindi phonetic keyboard layout in openSUSE Tumbleweed

    I installed openSUSE Tumbleweed from snapshot 20170203. Surprisingly I could not find the Hindi/Bolnagri layout as I use to in previous installations of openSUSE. I’m using GNOME and getting a Hindi phonetic keyboard layout is usually not much a hassle.

  • The Fairfield Bush & CO. Maintains Position in Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Tails Linux farewells 32-bit processors with imminent version 3.0

    The privacy-paranoid Linux distribution Tails has decided it's time to send 32-bit distributions the way of the 8086, from the planned June release of version 3.0.

    Tails' developers offer two reasons in their announcement: make the distro safer and save previous developer resources.

  • Smartphone App: New battery saver app added to Tizen Store

    Modern smartphones have many different important components and the battery is one critical part, as without it your smartphone really loses all its appeal. So, there are lots of services that can decrease our smartphone’s battery life. A new Battery Saver app has been added to the Tizen Store by developer Mauro Ibba.

  • Smartphone Game: Zombo Buster Rising & Bois D’Arc are available at Tizen Store

    Steven, who is from a team of Indie game devs based in Indonesia named FIREBEAST, would like to Introduce you to two games that they have recently added to the Tizen Store:

  • Raspberry Pi As An ARMed Commodity

    The 40-Rpi job costs $745.95 + 40X$35. This gives 10/100 Ethernet, 40gB RAM and 192 gHz-cores of computing power. That would be capable of a lot but would be a dog to configure in the usual way a desktop/server is configured. I would not be happy with the limited bandwidth of networking and storage bottle-neck (USB2). Most likely this would be useful for particularly narrowly defined computing tasks rather than general-purpose computing.

  • Olimex Announces Their Open Source Laptop

    The design of this laptop is completely Open Source. Usually when we hear this phrase, the Open Source part only means the electronics and firmware. Yes, there are exceptions, but the STL files for the PiTop, the ‘3D printable Raspberry Pi laptop’ are not available, rendering the ‘3D printable’ part of PiTop’s marketing splurge incongruent with reality. If you want to build a case for the Open Source laptop to date, [Bunnie]’s Novena, random GitHub repos are the best source. The Olimex TERES I is completely different; not only can you simply buy all the parts for the laptop, the hardware files are going up too. To be fair, this laptop is built with injection molded parts and will probably be extremely difficult to print on a standard desktop filament printer. The effort is there, though, and this laptop can truly be built from source.

  • ​Catalyst snaps up open source technology veteran

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • RADV Radeon Vulkan Driver Gets Support For Sparse Binding

    Bas Nieuwenhuizen's driver hacking this weekend has led to support of Vulkan's sparseBinding feature within this open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver.

  • Linux App Updates Round Up: Skype, Stacer, QupZilla, Wine

    With FOSDEM 2017 in session over the weekend you might have had better things to do than monitor the web for minor updates to popular Linux apps.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2017/05
  • The Ubuntu Tablet Was Announced One Year Ago Today

    The world’s first, official Ubuntu Tablet was announced to the world one year ago today.

  • The Ubuntu Tablet Was Announced One Year Ago Today

    The world’s first, official Ubuntu Tablet was announced to the world one year ago today.

  • 10 tips to free up storage space on your Android phone or tablet
  • Android Circuit: Galaxy S8 Launch Date, New Nokia Smartphone Leaks, Apple Beats Samsung
  • FOSDEM 2017 Day 1: Arrival

    Extra t-shirt, check! Toothbrush, check! 60 pairs of socks, check! Friday the 3rd february was day 1 of my trip to FOSDEM with Open Source Aalborg. We’ve booked flight tickets so we can go early in the morning just to make the best out of the 4 days we’ll be staying in Brussels. 10 minutes intensive situps + 10 kilometers bike trip to the airport at 5 AM and you feel like you can do anything afterwards. At the local airport in Aalborg I met Daniel and Anders. Much of the morning we spent just talking while flights, escalators and trains would take us to our destination. In all three years I have attended FOSDEM, it has had 500-600 events happening over the course of just one weekend. Finding and planning which talks to see and handling conflicting talks is enough of a hassle that it appears there is even an apps for it. I’m not that big of a talk goer though. I’m looking much more forward to helping in the GNOME booth, visiting booths and speaking with people I haven’t had a conversation with face-to-face for many months.

  • BSD @ FOSDEM 2017: Encrypted Disks, Go, CloudABI

    On Saturday at this year's FOSDEM conference there was a BSD developer room where various talks were had for European BSD fans.

    For Phoronix BSD readers who weren't in attendance at this year's Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting, many of the PDF slides and videos have already been uploaded. When it comes to the BSD talks this year there was work presented on packaging Golang for pkgsrc, GELIBoot for booting FreeBSD from an encrypted disk, evolution on top of the BSD's, and CloudABI for FreeBSD.

  • Global Positioning System (GPS) Energetic Particle Data

    Energetic particle data from the CXD and BDD instrument on the GPS constellation are available to the space weather research community. The release of these data supports the National Space Weather Action Plan which was recently published by the Executive Office of the President's National Science and Technology Council (NSTC).

  • Corrode Is Still Advancing For Auto-Translating C Code To Rust

    Free software developer Jamey Sharp continues working on his "Corrode" project for being able to automatically convert C code into Rust.

    Corrode is all about converting C code to Rust, largely to migrate large, legacy code-bases over to Rust, which is known for its memory safety features and other benefits of a modern programming language. But Jamey Sharp does agree that not all C projects should turn to Rust but in cases like the CVS code-base, he continues to believe it's much better off (and safer) in Rust.

  • Metasploit Targets Hardware for IoT Security Penetration Testing

    Open-source Metasploit penetration testing framework adds new hardware support, enabling researchers to target IoT devices, starting with automotive.

    Security vendor Rapid7 has been helping to lead the open-source Metasploit penetration testing framework project since October 2009, largely focused on software. On Feb. 2, Rapid7 announced a new expansion of Metasploit's capabilities to enable security researchers to directly link to hardware for vulnerability testing.

    The new hardware enablement is currently in the open-source Metasploit framework and is available via GitHub. Additionally, Rapid7 plans on packaging the capability in the standard open-source Metasploit community edition.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Librem 13 coreboot report – February 3rd, 2017: It’s Alive!

    It’s been 3 weeks since I wrote my last blog post but this is going to be a short update, in big part because I’ve spent the first two weeks sick in bed and thus wasn’t able to do much at all. However, in the last week I did manage to make some big progress, and the result represents such a great milestone that it warrants a blog post of its own. And, well, I doubt many will complain about not having to read through a wall of text for today’s blog post

    So the good news is: coreboot is working on the Librem 13. The laptop boots into Linux and most things are working! The only issue I have found so far is that the M.2 SATA port doesn’t seem to work properly yet (see below for more info).

  • Obsidian-1 Icon Theme Based On Faenza And It Revives Desktop

    Obsidian-1 icons are based on Faenza icon theme which is around from some years but the development of Faenza is almost stopped, hope creator again give some time to his popular icons. Obisidian-1 icon theme offers icons for panels, toolbars and buttons and colourful squared icons for devices, applications, folder, files and menu items, there are two version included to fit with light or dark themes. It is in active development which means if you find any missing icon or problem with this icon set then you can report it via linked page and hopefully it will be fixed in the next update. Arc theme suite used in the following screenshots and you can use Unity Tweak Tool, Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes/icons.

  • Enlightenment Wires In Wayland's Pointer Constraints & Relative Pointer Support

    It's been a while since we last had anything to report on Enlightenment's Wayland compositor work, but that changed as we begin February.

    Landing on Friday in Enlightenment Git is support for pointer constraints within their Wayland compositor. This protocol support is about adding constraints to the motion of pointer, such as limiting it to a given region or to its current position.

  • Take Your Writing To The Next Level With Writefull (Cross-Platform)

    Writefull is a tool that helps improve your writing by comparing your text against databases of correct language like Google Books, Web, Scholar and News.

    The application is free to use but not open source software, and is available for Linux, Windows, Mac, as well as a Chrome extension.

  • Plotinus and the quest for searchable menus

    For something that dramatically alters the UX, Plotinus is technically very clean. There is no fork of Gtk+ (the gui toolkit on GNU/Linux) or similarly hacky techniques. It uses the built-in GTK3_MODULES system to extend Gtk+.

    But this brings a downside - compatibility. Plotinus only supports Gtk+ 3 applications. While some in the GNU/Linux community would like to see all applications use Gtk+ 3, this is not the case. Some of the apps with the worst menus, like Inkscape or the GIMP, are written in the older Gtk 2 library.

  • [Video] Spring-loading functionality in Plasma 5.10's Folder View

    Folder View in Plasma 5.10 allows you to navigate folders by hovering above them during drag and drop.

  • [Video] Plasma 5.9
  • [Older] [Video] MX Linux 16 - Linux Distribution, First Impressions Review
  • Calculate Linux 17 Cinnamon released

    Calculate Linux Calculate Linux 17 was launched back at the very end of last year in KDE and MATE editions, You can check Calculate Linux 17 Released.Now it is time to taste the new flavour, Cinnamon.
    Calculate Linux Team has announced the release of Calculate Linux 17 Cinnamon.

    Well, Calculate Linux Desktop Cinnamon(CLDC) must be having key and basic features and packages just like other DE flavoured Calculate Linux variants.Apart from that CLDC is released with Cinnamon 3.2.7.Other than that Firefox, RythomBox, Gimp, Pidgin, Totem and many more packages are updated and pre-installed in CLDC.

  • [Slackware] Chromium 56, LibreOffice 5.2.5

    I had rebuilt the libreoffice-5.2.4 packages for Slackware -current last week, because library updates in Slackware had broken the spreadsheet application ‘localc‘. And voila… not long afterwards the Document Foundation blog announced 5.2.5: “all users are invited to update to LibreOffice 5.2.5 from LibreOffice 5.1.6 or previous versions“. Today on the first of february, we can even witness the 5.3 release.

  • Fedora 25 Using GLVND For Mesa Has Been Causing Headaches

    The decision to switch Mesa to enabling GLVND support in Fedora 25 as a post-release change has been causing headaches for some users.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • CoreOS Drives Container Management Forward with Tectonic 1.5

    CoreOS is updating its flagship Tectonic platform with the new Tectonic 1.5 release, officially announced on Jan. 31. The new platform benefits from improvements in Kubernetes as well as innovations purpose-built by CoreOS.

  • Mesa 13.0.4 Released with RadeonSI and Intel ANV Vulkan Driver Improvements

    Collabora's Emil Velikov is announcing today the immediate availability of the fourth maintenance update to the latest Mesa 13 stable series of the open-source graphics driver stack for Linux-based operating systems.

  • openSUSE Cloud Images are Ripe for Users

    Cloud images for openSUSE Leap 42.2 are now available for Amazon Web Services (AWS EC2), Azure, Google Compute Engine and more cloud providers.

    Last week, openSUSE Leap 42.2 cloud image became available in the AWS Marketplace and within the past few weeks cloud images for Azure, Google Compute Engine and OpenStack also became available.

  • My free software activities, January 2017

    The debmans package I had so lovingly worked on last month is now officially abandoned. It turns out that another developer, Michael Stapelberg wrote his own implementation from scratch, called debiman.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Vulkan Slides Now Available From Khronos' Vancouver Event

    Yesterday The Khronos Group hosted a one-day workshop in Vancouver, Canada with all things Vulkan.

  • Handling all those mail notifications from the bug tracker
  • OPNsense 17.1 Released, Based On FreeBSD 11

    OPNsense 17.1 is now available as the newest release of this network-focused FreeBSD-based operating system forked from pfSense.

    It's now been two years since the first official release of OPNsense and to celebrate they have out a big update. OPNsense 17.1 re-bases to using FreeBSD 11.0, there's now a SSH remote installer, new language support, more hardening features used from HardenedBSD, new plugins, integrated authentication via PAM, and many other improvements. Some of the new plug-ins include FTP Proxy, Tinc VPN, and Let's Encrypt support.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Finding an Alternative to Mac OS X — Part 2 - Adventures with Linux

    This is the second in my series on finding an alternative to Mac OS X. Part 1 was about evaluating 13 alternative operating systems and then choosing one to use full time. The selected OS was elementary OS. The motivation for this change is to get access to better hardware since Apple is neglecting the Mac lineup.

    If video is more your style I gave a short (10 min) talk at work on my adventures with Linux that covers the core content of this post.

  • New Office 365 subscriptions for consumers plunged 62% in 2016

    Four years after the introduction of Office 365 for consumers, Microsoft last week said subscriptions to the productivity software had reached nearly 25 million.

    Subscribers, however, were harder to find last year than in 2015, according to the numbers Microsoft reported: Additions to Office 365's rolls were down 62% in 2016 compared to the year before.

    During an earnings call with Wall Street analysts last week, CEO Satya Nadella touted revenue increases for the Office products aimed at consumers -- which include Office 365 -- and of the latter said that the company had, "continued to see an increase in ... subscriber base."

    That it did.

  • Oracle effectively doubles licence fees to run its stuff in AWS

    That's changed: Oracle's new cloud licensing policy [PDF] says an AWS vCPU is now treated as a full core if hyperthreading is not enabled. A user renting two AWS vCPUS therefore needs to pay full freight for both, effectively doubling the number of Oracle licences required to run Big Red inside AWS. And therefore doubling the cost as well.

  • SoftMaker's FlexiPDF
  • Calamares 3.0 Gets First Point Release to Improve SDDM Autologin Config Handling
  • Best Linux Distro: Final Round of Voting Has Begun

    Arch Linux wins the qualifying round for the second year, followed by Linux Mint. In addition, eight distros qualified by write-in votes to be included in our final round. Now it’s time to get out the vote in the all-important final round to determine the Best Linux Distro according to our readers.

Linux Foundation Executive Director's Statement on Immigration Ban

Filed under
Misc

The Linux operating system underlies nearly every piece of technology in modern life, from phones to satellites to web searches to your car. For the Linux Foundation, openness is both a part of our core principles and also a matter of practicality. Linux, the largest cooperatively developed software project in history, is created by thousands of people from around the world and made available to anyone to use for free. The Linux Foundation also hosts dozens of other open source projects covering security, networking, cloud, automotive, blockchain and other areas. Last year, the Linux Foundation hosted over 20,000 people from 85 countries at more than 150 events. Open source is a fundamentally global activity but America has always served as the hub for innovation and collaboration. Linux’s creator, Linux Foundation Fellow Linus Torvalds, immigrated to America from Finland and became a citizen. The Administration's policy on immigration restrictions is antithetical to the values of openness and community that have enabled open source to succeed. I oppose the immigration ban.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • BlackArch 2017.01.28 released with new tools

    In the end of last year, BlackArch team is tremendously working to bring new tool set and updates to their distro.Like recently the release of BlackArch Linux 2016.12.29 and 2016.12.20 brought hundreds of new tools, new installer and updated list of packages and features.

  • MyGica T230C hacking

    As DVB-T(1) is phased out in Germany soon, I got me a new DVB-T2 stick. The MyGica T230 is supported under Linux, and has a quite low price (~20€).

  • The Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Rating Lowered to Buy at Vetr Inc.
  • Almost a month with Fedora...

    I installed Fedora 25 Workstation (KDE spin) almost a month ago, as a desperate attempt to get my all-in-one Epson XP 231 printer working.

    The experiment ended with the printer/scanner working on OpenMandriva Lx 3.1, PCLinuxOS and, later, on Mageia 5.1. Oddly, although I could scan without any problems on Fedora, the printer was not operational.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites
    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites. This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.
  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers
    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.
  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks
    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week. The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.
  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions
    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news. Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below: (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git. (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation. (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.
  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review
    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!
  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches
    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information. The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches. "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.
  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things
    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available. But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC
    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:
  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great
    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45. Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.
  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win
    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded. Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."

Linux and Graphics

  • OpenRISC For Linux 4.11 Gets Some Optimizations, Prepares For SMP
    OpenRISC continues advancing with its sights on being a free and open processor for embedded systems using the RISC instruction set architecture. Last year the Linux kernel got a new OpenRISC maintainer and for Linux 4.11 there is a fair amount of interesting changes for the OpenRISC code within the mainline tree.
  • drm for v4.11 - main pull request
    The tinydrm code seems like absolute pure shit that has never seen a compiler. I'm upset, because I expect better quality control. In fact, I expect *some* qualitty control, and this piece-of-shit driver has clearly seen none at all. And those patches were apparently committed yesterday. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK?
  • [Old] A Guide Through The Linux Sound API Jungle
    At the Audio MC at the Linux Plumbers Conference one thing became very clear: it is very difficult for programmers to figure out which audio API to use for which purpose and which API not to use when doing audio programming on Linux.
  • Mesa, Vulkan & Other Driver Talks From 2017 Embedded Linux Conference
  • Fuzzing Mesa Drivers Begin To Uncover Bugs
    Last December we wrote about work being done on fuzzing OpenGL shaders leading to wild differences with the work being done at the Imperial College London. While they were testing other drivers on different operating systems, they have now fired up tests of Mesa.
  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Compositor Released
    Wayland 1.13 was released earlier this week but the adjoining Weston compositor update didn't happen at the same time due to some last minute changes needing more time to test, but this Friday, Weston 2.0 is now shipping. But before getting too excited, Weston 2.0 doesn't represent some break-through changes but rather was bumped away from the Wayland versioning rhythm due to its new output configuration API breaking Weston's ABI. Thus the major version bump.
  • weston 2.0.0
    Welcome to the official release of Weston 2.0. There are no changes since RC2.

today's howtos