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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Get 13 Linux & Programming Stickers in $1 from Unixstickers (Includes Free Shipping World Wide)

    If you’ve been collecting stickers/goodies on UNIX & other programming languages that you love, Unixstickers should not require an introduction. Italy based e-commerce, Unixstickers has been the one-stop shop for getting Linux and programming stickers, magnets, mugs and other merchandises. Unixstickers has been the official merchandise vendor for a number of open source projects and it donated part of the profit to a number of open source projects.

  • Our Immodest Ambitions

    We should be for Linux what Make is for the maker movement.

  • Kubernetes at 4 Years Old Continues to Improve Cloud Native Technology

    On June 6, 2014, Joe Beda published the first code commit for the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration project. Four years later, Kubernetes has become a core enabler for cloud native technology and benefits from the support of all the major public cloud providers and many major enterprise IT vendors as well.

    When Beda made the first code commit, he was an engineer at Google. In 2018, Beda is now the co-founder and CTO of Heptio, which provides commercial support and services for Kubernetes. In a video interview with eWEEK, Beda discusses the scope of Kubernetes, what it is and what it isn't as well as providing some insight into what's coming next.

  • Tracking Mesa's VirGL OpenGL Features

    It's now much easier tracking the state of VirGL that allows for OpenGL acceleration within guest virtual machines by passing on the rendering calls to the system's host OpenGL driver via Mesa and the virglrenderer library.

    VirGL has come along a lot since its debut three years ago, but even with a host OpenGL driver having OpenGL 4.5, the VirGL code and renderer library aren't yet ready for those latest OpenGL 4.x capabilities.

  • Comparing files and directories with the diff and comm Linux commands
  • [Slackware] Security updates for Java and Flash
  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in May 2018
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E14 – The Fourteenth Goldfish - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we review the KDE Slimbook II, experiment with Linux on the Hades Canyon NUC and play some Track Mania Nations Forever. We also bring you some command line love and go over your feedback.

  •  

  • Google freezes Android P: Get your shoes on, tire-kicking devs

    With Google freezing the Android P APIs yesterday, both major mobile platforms have shown their hand for 2018. The freeze comes as Google released "Beta 2", which is really the third Developer Preview release of Android P issued so far.

    The API freeze means developers can now compile and submit apps compatible with Android P to the Google Play Store.

    This is the first year in which Google has really invited a range of enthusiasts to come in and kick the tires. Previous Android previews only ran on Google devices, but this year a number of other devices - from Nokia, Sony, Xiaomi, OnePlus, Essential and Vivo - can also get a glimpse of code before it is baked into manufacturers' ROMs. These images will be pushed out shortly.

  • BlackBerry Key2 Launches with Touch-Enabled QWERTY Keyboard, Dual Cameras

    BlackBerry unveiled on Thursday the BlackBerry Key2 smartphone during a live event hosted in New York City, the United States, which is currently live streamed on YouTube.

    Equipped with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 660 processor and 6GB of RAM, the BlackBerry Key2 smartphone is powered by Google's Android 8.1 Oreo mobile operating system, has a long-lasting 3,500 mAh Li-Ion battery with Quick Charge 3.0 support, and comes with either 64GB or 128GB internal storage that can be expanded to up to 256GB with a microSD memory card.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus Adds Linux App Support

    Sooner than I honestly expected, it seems that the Crostini Project has made its way to the Developer channel on the Samsung Chromebook Plus.

    As Robby reported in early May, the Crostini Reddit revealed a user who was already up and running with Crostini(sort of) on the ARM-powered Chromebook. Additionally, a number of commits in the Chromium repository gave us some pretty solid evidence that developers had shifted their efforts to making the container tech work outside of the Pixelbook.

    Thanks to a recent update to the Developer channel, we are now seeing reports that ‘Kevin‘ a.k.a the Samsung Chromebook Plus can now run the Linux terminal app just like the Pixelbook does.

  • Samsung Chromebook Plus Now Supports Linux apps

    The Chrome OS ecosystem is finally changing. This comes after Chromebooks, and the Chrome OS, in general, are now supporting Linux apps. This means that Chromebooks could now actually run more applications. By doing so, tech-savvy users claim that Chromebooks would become eventually a major competitor to both Mac and Windows laptops.

  • Call for distros: Patch cups for better internationalization

    If you're reading this and use cups to print (almost certainly you do if you're on Linux), you may want to contact your distribution and ask them to add this patch.

    It adds translation support for a few keyword found in some printers PPD files. The CUPS upstream project has rejected with not much reason other than "PPD is old", without really taking into account it's really the only way you can get access to some advanced printer features (see comments in the same thread)

  • Linux Lite 4.0 – New Features and Step by Step Installation Guide

    Linux lite is one of the top and one of the most downloaded Linux distros and recently it has released its latest version in Linux Lite 4.0. In this article, we are going to look into the new features and enhancements that is made available in Linux Lite 4.0 along with a step by step guide to install Linux Lite 4.0 in your system.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 4.17 Arrives with New Kernel Memory Consistency Module

    Linus Torvalds officially released the Linux 4.17 kernel on June 3, after seven release candidates. Linux 4.17 is the third major Linux kernel release of 2018 and follows the Linux 4.16 release, which was announced on April 1.

    Among the major new features that have landed in Linux 4.17 is the new Linux Kernel Memory Consistency Module (LKMM).

  • What’s New in macOS

    Apps built using OpenGL and OpenCL will continue to run in macOS 10.14, but these legacy technologies are deprecated in macOS 10.14. Games and graphics-intensive apps that use OpenGL should now adopt Metal. Similarly, apps that use OpenCL for computational tasks should now adopt Metal and Metal Performance Shaders.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 Debuts With Official Windows Support, Easier Benchmark Creation

    Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 has premiered today as the latest quarterly update to our open-source, cross-platform automated benchmarking software. This also happens to be our largest release ever and also commemorates ten years since the release of Phoronix Test Suite 1.0 and fourteen-years since the start of Phoronix. Here is a look at some of the many enhancements to find in this open-source benchmarking software.

  • [Richard W.M. Jones on] Half-baked ideas: Server remote management with an RPi Zero

    I guess like most people who work a lot with computers, I have a large number of computers in a “server room” (my loft). I’m too cheap to buy actual servers though, so most of these computers lack any sort of remote management / IPMI / BMC etc. I also just bought 6 Intel NUCs and these are also ideal as development servers, but unless you buy very specific (and unobtainium) versions they don’t come with remote management either.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 6 Best CCleaner Alternatives for Ubuntu

    A common category of software you will find on many Windows PCs are system optimizers and cleaners. One such application is CCleaner, a powerful and popular Windows PC cleaner which scans for and deletes unwanted files, private information such as browsing cache and history, freeing up space and guarding your privacy and more.

    Unfortunately, there is no CCleaner release for Linux systems, so if you were using it on Windows and made a switch to Ubuntu Linux (one of the recommended distros for Linux beginners), you are probably wondering which software to use for the same purpose on your new platform.

    Whether you have just made the switch or you have been using Ubuntu before, if you are looking for an alternative to CCleaner, you have landed in the right place. In this article, we will share 6 best CCleaner alternatives for Ubuntu Linux.

  • Mageia Weekly Roundup 2018 – Week 22

    It’s been a busy week, as usual! 378 packages came into Cauldron, 15 into Mga6 testing. Work is still going on to get the Mga5 -> Mga6 upgrade happening and then the Mga6.1 ISOs ready. There are some bugs, and here (already fixed), and here connected with the tray update in the pipeline, if you’re interested…

    Heaps of updates are coming in to the wiki, and there will soon be a look-and-feel update. Keep your eyes on the wiki, it will be worth it!

  • Linux Kernel 4.17, "Merciless Moray," Offers Improved Performance and Security

    Linus Torvalds released version 4.17 of the Linux Kernel on Sunday, nine weeks after the prior version. Although Linus says he is running out "of fingers and toes to keep track of minor releases," he has decided not to call this release "5.0" because he is saving that for 4.20.

    As with the 4.16 cycle, 4.17 has been a relatively smooth, save a few hiccups due to those pesky chip issues. It turns out the shadow of the Spectre vulnerability is still long, and the last two weeks before the release were a busy ones, with patches designed to counteract the effects of Spectre v4 making up a significant portion of all the code submitted. That said, and even though Linus does not like large amounts of changes so late in the release cycle, he skipped an rc8 and released the final version of 4.17 anyway.

  • Upstream Linux support for new NXP i.MX 8
  • Some webdev knowledge gained

    Easlier this year I had to split a Koa/SPA app into two separate apps. As part of that I switched from webpack to Neutrino.

    Through this work I learned a lot about full stack development (frontend, backend and deployments for both). I could write a blog post per item, however, listing it all in here is better than never getting to write a post for any of them.

    Note, I’m pointing to commits that I believe have enough information to understand what I learned.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #38 – A Beginner’s Guide to Kubernetes

    Kubernetes community now has 10 releases (2.5yrs) of software and experience. We just finished KubeCon Copenhagen, OpenShift Commons Gathering and Red Hat Summit and we heard lots of companies talk about their deployments and journeys. But many of them took a while (12-18) months to get to where they are today. This feels like the “early adopters” and we’re beginning to get to the “crossing the chasm” part of the market. So thought we’d discuss some of the basics, lessons learned and other things people could use to “fast-track” what they need to be successful with Kubernetes.

  • How Alibaba Cloud plans to disrupt AWS, Microsoft and Google in EMEA

     

    Alibaba Cloud has seven availability zones in China alone, seven more across Asia Pacific and Hong Kong, two in the US, one in Dubai, and one in Frankfurt for Europe. It also now has local teams in four EMEA locations: the UK, Germany, France and Dubai.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The World and Calamares

    The timezone-selection widget in Calamares was borrowed from some distro installer a long time ago, and at some point the images were resized, and some math corrected to map image points to latitude and longitude on the map. The resizing introduced some aliasing artifacts, and then the math moved locations far north — where a typical map projection is “stretched out” to the wrong spot. Some time ago I fixed up things above 65 degrees north or so. Reykjavik is at 64-and-a-bit north, so wasn’t handled then. And it was a bodge anyway.

  • Upstream release notification for package maintainers

    Repology is monitoring package repositories across Linux distributions. By now, Atom feeds of per-maintainer outdated packages that I was waiting for have been implemented.

    So I subscribed to my own Gentoo feed using net-mail/rss2email and now Repology notifies me via e-mail of new upstream releases that other Linux distros have packaged that I still need to bump in Gentoo. In my case, it brought an update of dev-vcs/svn2git to my attention that I would have missed (or heard about later), otherwise.

  • Free software log (May 2018)

    The wonders of a week of vacation that was spent mostly working on free software! The headline releases were remctl 3.15, which fixes a long-standing correctness bug on the server and adds more protocol validation and far better valgrind support, and podlators 4.11, which fixes a buncho f long-standing bugs in Pod::Text and its subclasses.

  • Ted Dabney, a Founder of Atari and a Creator of Pong, Dies at 81

    Samuel F. Dabney, an electrical engineer who laid the groundwork for the modern video game industry as a co-founder of Atari and helped create the hit console game Pong, died on May 26 at his home in Clearlake, Calif. He was 81.

  • ​Security alert: Watch out for password-stealing malware says FBI

    The Department of Homeland Security and the FBI said that North Korean hackers have been using both Joanap, a remote access tool (RAT), and Brambul, a Server Message Blockworm, since at least 2009 to target companies working in the media, aerospace, financial, and critical infrastructure sectors.

    [...]

    The malware gives North Korea's hackers -- which the agencies refer to by the code-name 'Hidden Cobra' -- the ability to steal data, run further malware and initialise proxy communications on a compromised Windows device. Other functions include file management, process management, creation and deletion of directories and node management.

  • Lynis – Automated Security Auditing tool for Linux Servers

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Huawei announces the EROFS Linux file system intended for Android devices

    A file system is a technology that outlines how data is stored and retrieved. There are many different kinds of file systems, each with their own benefits, to pick from. You’ve probably heard of file systems like exFAT, F2FS, ext4. Choosing one file system over another can have profound impacts on storage performance and stability, so the decision isn’t taken lightly by device makers. Most device makers settle with the popular, well-tested file systems like ext4, but that doesn’t mean companies aren’t willing to experiment with alternatives. That’s exactly what Huawei is doing with an open-source Linux file-system called EROFS, which is intended to be used on Android devices at some point.

  • Microsoft’s Windows shakeup continues internally

     

    The organizational changes mean that Joe Belfiore, who has been the face of Windows Phone in the past, is taking on more of the important consumer-facing parts of Windows. Rajesh Jha, previously an Office executive, will be leading the overall experiences and devices team, and in a memo to employees he says the changes will “bring end to end accountability for Edge, Windows experience, and partners together.”

  • Help Celebrate The 14th Birthday Of Phoronix Next Week

    Now at nearly 14 years old, Phoronix.com has provided more than 25,200 original news articles and more than 3,800 featured articles / Linux hardware reviews.

  • Linux Journal June Issue: Do-It-Yourself
  • Free Resources for Open Source Leadership, AI, Networking, and More

    May was the month for learning at Linux.com and The Linux Foundation, and we covered a range of topics and offered an array of free resources to help you expand your knowledge of Linux and open source. Let’s take a look at some of the month’s most popular content.

  • Here’s What You Missed at openSUSE Conference 2018

    The annual openSUSE Conference is always an exciting event for the SUSE Linux community. This year the event took place in Prague from the 25th to the 27th of May. It’s FOSS was the official media partner of the event and I attended the event on behalf of the It’s FOSS team.

    If you did not follow my daily debriefing on Facebook or LinkedIn, here is a summary of the three-day event as I lived it, all condensed in a single article.

  • Debian 7 Long Term Support reaching end-of-life

    The Debian Long Term Support (LTS) Team hereby announces that Debian 7 "Wheezy" support has reached its end-of-life on May 31, 2018, five years after its initial release on May 4, 2013.

    Debian will not provide further security updates for Debian 7. A subset of Wheezy packages will be supported by external parties. Detailed information can be found at Extended LTS.

    The LTS Team will prepare the transition to Debian 8 "Jessie", which is the current oldstable release. The LTS team will take over support from the Security Team on June 17, 2018.

  • Atari VCS Finally on Indiegogo, Free Software Directory Meet-up Tomorrow, Minifree Libreboot X200 Tablet Has Been FSF-Certified and More

    Redis 5.0 RC1 is out for testing this week, Phoronix reports. The biggest new feature is the Streams data type implementation, but 5.0 also offers new APIs, better memory reporting and more. See the Redis 5.0 RC1 announcement for all the details.

  • Microsoft Plans To Buy GitHub, Valued At $2 Billion: Report

    If the rumors turn out to be true, web-based code hosting service GitHub could become a part of Microsoft. Business Insider, citing sources, reports that Microsoft is reportedly in talks to buy GitHub.

  • FundRequest launches a marketplace that rewards developers for Open Source contributions

    FundRequest, a new platform for incentivizing open-source development, has officially launched their first product: a blockchain powered integration with GitHub that allows developers to directly solve open source project issues and be rewarded. The platform integrates directly with GitHub, allowing projects to fund ‘issues’ that developers can solve and be rewarded in cryptocurrency.

  • Intel Has Another Developer Working Now Working On FreeBSD Support

    Ben Widawsky, one of the Linux graphics architects at Intel where he has been working on the Mesa driver stack for the past eight years, is now re-tasking to FreeBSD.

  • Photo FOMO: $5 photography insurance, a sleek, open-source 3D-printed camera

    Afraid of missing out on the latest photo industry news while you’re out, well, actually taking pictures? Photo FOMO (you know, Fear Of Missing Out) is all the news you might have missed this week, published on the weekends. Alongside the biggest stories of the week, like the end of Canon’s film camera era, PicsArt’s custom stickers and the availability of DJI’s latest stabilizer, find briefs on the latest in accessories and photo industry news from this week with Photo FOMO.

  • Summer of Code: Command Line OX Client!

    As I stated earlier, I am working on a small XMPP command line test client, which is capable of sending and receiving OpenPGP encrypted messages. I just published a first version Smile

    Creating command line clients with Smack is super easy. You basically just create a connection, instantiate the manager classes of features you want to use and create some kind of read-execute-print-loop.
    Last year I demonstrated how to create an OMEMO-capable client in 200 lines of code. The new client follows pretty much the same scheme.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Compete in the ACUMOS AI Challenge for a Chance to Win $50,000

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) has quickly evolved over the past few years and is changing the way we interact with the world around us. From digital assistants, to AI apps interpreting MRIs and operating self-driving cars, there has been significant momentum and interest in the potential for machine learning technologies applied to AI.

  • AMDGPU On Linux 4.18 To Offer Greater Vega Power Savings, DisplayPort 1.4 Fixes

    There are more AMDGPU improvements just sent in to DRM-Next for landing in the Linux 4.18 kernel.

    On top of the already queued Vega 20 GPU support, VCN clock/power gating support, Raden Ridge GFXOFF support to turn off the graphics engine when not needed, Vega M GPU support for the Intel Kabylake G hardware, scan-out buffer handling improvements, SR-IOV fixes, and power-related improvements to Vega 10, yet another batch of changes were submitted on Thursday for this next kernel cycle.

  • 15-Way Linux Distribution / Operating System Comparison, Including Windows 10 & WSL

    As part of the large Linux performance tests we have begun and continuing through June with Phoronix celebrating its 14th birthday next week along with the 10th anniversary of the Phoronix Test Suite 1.0 release, for your viewing pleasure today is a 15-way Linux distribution / operating system comparison testing not only the leading and latest Linux distributions but also Windows 10 April 2018 Update and Linux on Windows WSL.

  • Funding Krita: 2017

    We decided at the last sprint to publish a yearly report on Krita’s income and outlay. We did that in 2015 and 2016. 2017 has been over some time now, so let’s discuss last year’s finances a bit. Last year was weird, of course, and that’s clearly visible from the results: we ended the year € 9.211,84 poorer than we started.

    Because of the troubles, we had to split sales and commercial work off from the Krita Foundation. We did have a “company” ready — Boudewijn Rempt Software, which was created when our maintainer was trying to fund his work on Krita through doing totally unrelated freelance jobs, after KO GmbH went bust. That company is now handling sales of art books, dvd’s and so on, as well as doing commercial support for Krita. So the “Sales” number is only for the first quarter of 2017.

  • NetworkManager 1.11.4 Brings More Linux Networking Improvements

    NetworkManager 1.11.4 is out today as the newest development release for this widely-used Linux network management user-space utility.

  • GNOME 3 Might Be Too Resource Hungry To Ever Run Nicely On The Raspberry Pi

    If you try running the GNOME Shell today on the Raspberry Pi, it's a frustratingly slow experience. While some work is being done in addressing GNOME's GPU, CPU, and memory consumption, it might not ever be in a state to run smoothly on Raspberry Pi hardware.

    Earlier this month was the GNOME 2018 Performance Hackfest and one of those in attendance was Broadcom's Eric Anholt who maintains the VC4 and V3D graphics driver stacks. The former is most notable for being the fully open-source graphics driver solution for the VideoCore hardware found on Raspberry Pi single board computers up to this point.

  • Jolla's Sailfish 2.2 Rolls Out With Fingerprint Unlock, Emoji Keyboard Support

    For those still interested in Jolla's Sailfish OS Linux-based mobile device platform, version 2.2 has rolled out with a variety of enhancements.

    Sailfish OS 2.2 brings support for some long desired features like fingerprint unlock support, an emoji keyboard layout, better VPN support, updated Android support, improvements to the Email / Camera / Gallery applications, and more. Sailfish X also now supports the Xperia X dual-SIM smartphone.

  • Linux for Makers, by Aaron Newcomb

    I've had very little experience with Linux but now that I'm using Raspberry Pis (a cheap single board computer that runs Linux) I need to know how to use Linux. Online how-tos are good, but Linux for Makers, by Aaron Newcomb, is better. In fact, this book is pure gold. It assumes zero prior knowledge of Linux. Everything is clearly explained. I learned how to install Raspbian Linux on an SD Card (Raspberry Pis use SD cards as their hard drive), log the output of a script, schedule jobs with cron, use lots of different commands, write scripts, use PI with IFTTT, and lots more.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rocket.Chat, Nitrux Linux and More. It's Cooking with Linux (without a Net)

    Today on "Cooking with Linux without a Net", I cover (and install) @RocketChat , show you another Linux distribution you've never heard of (Nitrux Linux), and hunt rootkits and perform security audits. Oh, and I crash and burn too. Much fun was had, so watch and enjoy.

  • Tracking development of slackware in git

    Something had been nagging me for a long time, and I finally had enough of that itch and decided to deal with it.

    As you know, there’s a private and a public side to Slackware’s development. The discussions and decisions are handled internally among the members of ‘the team’ and are not shared with the public at large until an update is done to the ‘slackware-current’ tree which can be found on every Internet mirror.
    Thus you have access to the latest state of development always. But for some people it is a compelling idea to be able to access the development updates in a public repository like git – where you can track the changes over time.

  • Debian welcomes its GSoC 2018 and Outreachy interns

    We're excited to announce that Debian has selected twenty-six interns to work with us during the next months: one person for Outreachy, and twenty-five for the Google Summer of Code.

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More in Tux Machines

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

Peppermint OS Version 9 Released With New Features

Ubuntu-based lightweight distribution, Peppermint has just released its version 9. Here’s a quick look at the changes in the new release. Read more