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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SELKS 3.0 Screenshot Tour
  • Live USB improvements

    live-grub-stick can now create bootable USB from openSUSE installation media isos (standard DVD or NET), difference from --isohybrid option is that the data already on the stick is not touched, the whole iso is available on the stick so you can use the stick to copy it around apart from being able to install from it.

  • Ubuntu Fan Launches Bid To Get ZTE to Make an Ubuntu Phone

    An Ubuntu Phone fan is attempting to get ZTE to make an Ubuntu-powered device, using the smartphone maker's new crowdsourced ideas platform.

  • Really Small Cheap Computers

    She runs FireFox, Chromium, LibreOffice and Gimp without issue. Browsing the web is much faster on her new PC even if it is small and cheap.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A Proper Linux Workstation

    The software I rely on daily includes LibreOffice Writer, Thunderbird, Audacity, SimpleScreenRecorder and Kdenlive. Accessibility applications I rely on include redshift-gtk and Workrave.

  • Download Linux Voice issue 21

    Issue 21 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • 5 Best Modern Linux ‘init’ Systems (1992-2015)

    Over the years, many init systems have emerged in major Linux distributions and in this guide, we shall take a look at some of the best init systems you can work with on the Linux operating system.

  • git-pbuilder 1.42

    A minor update to my glue script for building software with pdebuild and git-buildpackage. (Yes, still needs to get rewritten in Python.)

    This release stops using the old backport location for oldstable builds since oldstable is now wheezy, which merged the backports archive into the regular archive location. The old location is still there for squeeze just in case anyone needs it.

  • Atmospheric, Limbo-esque platformer 'Selma and the Wisp' is released for Linux on Steam

    Honestly, I've never heard of this game before, so I can't give an opinion about it, but I do think that its aesthetics and background score look pretty interesting. The creators clearly state they took inspiration from Limbo, but also some comparisons with Fran Bow can be made: besides the obvious fact that one of the lead characters is a little girl, the story is put in motion by an horrendous event in her house, as it's told in the following link (check second paragraph).

  • Multilib updates: gcc and glibc for slackware-current
  • The Onion Omega2 lets you add Linux to your hardware projects

    Need a tiny, $5 computer to build a robot that will bring you your slippers, initiate a massage chair session, and pour out your daily dose of bourbon?
    The Onion Omega2 can do all that and more.

    This tiny board is Arduino-compatible but also runs Linux natively. This means you can plug it in and get a command line or access the system via a desktop-like web interface. It has Wi-Fi built in and can be expanded to support cellular, Bluebooth, and GPS connections.

  • DataWind Launches Linux based PocketSurfer GZ Smartphone For Rs. 1499 With Free Internet For 1 Year

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Vivaldi 1.3 Released, This Is What’s New

    A new version of the power-user web-browser Vivaldi has been released and is now available for download.

  • Anatine (Pristine Twitter App) – Mobile web version of Twitter App for Linux Desktop

    Anatine is a Brand New Free, open-source Desktop Twitter App for Linux, Windows, and OS X. Anatine describes as a pristine Twitter app, which build with Electron framework and emulating mobile Twitter website on your desktop.

    App is Simple and straightforward, It emulating mobile.twitter.com on desktop and included all the features which are available on it, such as share, replay, re tweet & manage account.

  • Bleed 2, a very action-packed platformer is coming to Linux

    Bleed 2 is a new very action-packed platformer that is being ported to Linux by Ethan Lee, he's even noted directly in the trailer!

  • Linux Top 3: Apricity, Tails 2.5 and Guix

    Among the new release in the last week is the first stable release of Apricity OS, tagged officially as 07.2016. Apricity is an Arch Linux based distro with a unique system configuration tool called Freezedry.

  • Tumbleweed gets three snapshots, Leap deadline approaches

    Since the release of Linux Kernel 4.7 in the 20160730 snapshot, which brought lengthy email discussions about out-of-tree and third-party drivers on the Factory mailing list, openSUSE Tumbleweed produced three snapshots.

    Snapshot 20160803 made a small update to the repositories for Mozilla Thunderbird and k3b. The snapshot updated libzypp to version 16.2.1, gnome-online-accounts to 3.20.3 and obs-service-source_validator. In 20160803, virt-viewer had the most changes.

  • Looking for a replacement Homeserver

    Almost exactly six years ago I bought one of these Fuloong 6064 mini PCs. The machine has been working great ever since both collecting my mail and acting as an IMAP server as well as providing public services -- it's also keyserver.siccegge.de. However jessie is supposed to be the last Debian release supporting the hardware and the system's rather slow and lacks memory. This is especially noticeable with IMAP spam filter training and mail indexing. Therefore I'm looking for some nice replacement -- preferably non-x86 again (no technical reasons).

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: An Open Source Retina Scanner

    The Open Indirect Ophthalmoscope gets around these problems by using a digital camera in the form of a Raspberry Pi camera module. This camera, with the help of a 3 W LED, is able to image the back of the eye, snap a picture, and send that image anywhere in the world. It’s a simple device that can be constructed from a few mirrors, a cheap lens, and a few 3D-printed parts, but is still very valuable for the detection of ophthalmological disorders.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • How the CORD Project Will Change the Economics of Broadband

    On July 29 at the Sunnyvale Tech Corner Campus in Calif., Google hosted the open source community for the inaugural CORD Summit. CORD, or Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter, launched last week as an independently funded On.Lab software project hosted by The Linux Foundation. The sold-out event featured interactive talks from partners and leading stakeholders of the newly formed CORD Project, including AT&T, China Unicom, Ciena, Google, NEC, ON.Lab, ONF, The Linux Foundation, University of Arizona, and Verizon.

    CORD is the biggest innovation in the access market since ADSL and the cable modem. Considering the broad scope of the access network, and the technical roadmap the growing open source CORD community laid out at the Summit, CORD has the potential to redefine the economics of access.

  • Midokura Embraces Kubernetes Container Networking

    Midokura CTO Pino de Candia explained that the new Midokura Enterprise MidoNet (MEM) 6.2 update is based on Open Source MidoNet 5.0. Midokura first open-sourced its MidoNet platform in November 2014 at the OpenStack Summit in Paris.

  • webica

    I've just pushed the first version of my new Clojure wrapper for Selenium called webica.

    The reason I need webica is that I want to do automated browser testing for ClojureScript based web applications. Certainly NodeJS, PhantomJS, Nashorn and the like are useful... but these can't quite emulate the full browser experience. We want to test our ClojureScript web apps in browsers -- ideally via our favorite automated continuous integration tools.

  • varnish-4.1.3 and varnish-modules-0.9.1 for fedora and epel
  • Time for an Alternative

    I've been doing kernel development or maintenance for a large portion of my professional career. It started at my previous employer and continued for the past 5 years at Red Hat on the Fedora kernel team, the last 3 as the defacto team lead. It has been a fantastic experience, from both technical and people perspectives. I consider myself extremely lucky to have been a part of the Fedora kernel team, both past and present incarnations of it. Which is why when career discussions came up recently, it wasn't the easiest thing to think about.

  • Porting APT to CMake

    I have not yet tested building on exotic platforms like macOS, or even a BSD. Please do and report back. In Debian, CMake is not up-to.date enough on the non-Linux platforms to build APT due to test suite failures, I hope those can be fixed/disabled soon (it appears to be a timing issue AFAICT).

  • Tough, expandable Bay Trail SBC measures just 95 x 55mm

    Versalogic’s sandwich-style “Osprey” SBC offers Atom E3800 SoCs, dual GbE ports, dual mini-PCIe slots, MIL-STD-202G ruggedization, and -40 to 85°C support.

    Like Versalogic’s recent BayCat and earlier Bengal single-board computers, the Osprey is based on Intel’s “Bay Trail” Atom E38xx family of SoCs. Unlike those boards, which conform to 4.2 x 3.8-inch (107 x 97mm) PC/104 family specs, the Osprey has a considerably smaller, 95 x 55mm footprint and omits stackable PC/104-style expansion.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Kubuntu Podcast #15 – Yakkety and Kubuntu Ninjas
  • Pitivi 0.97 Released As The GNOME-Aligned Open-Source Video Editor

    Pitivi 0.97 was released today as the newest development release of this open-source non-linear video editing software followed quickly by a 0.97.1 point release just for a fix to show the correct version string.

  • The WineHQ Wine development release 1.9.16 is now available for Linux and Mac

    What's new in this release:

    Better 64-bit binary compatibility on macOS.
    Performance improvements in JavaScript.
    More progress towards the Direct3D command stream.
    More shader instructions in Direct3D.
    Performance improvements in GDI.
    Various bug fixes.

  • Apricity OS 07.2016 Screenshot Tour
  • openSUSE Asia Summit 2016 opens up event registration

    openSUSE.Asia Summit is a 2 day event hosted every year in different regions of Asia to promote openSUSE and open source. Hosting a variety of workshops, talks and a hackathon, openSUSE Asia summit is expecting over 400 participants. Attendees will learn how to use openSUSE and incorporate it in their personal as well as professional lives. They will also understand the dynamics of the openSUSE project and meet the openSUSE contributors and board.

    In addition, we have chance to learn free and open technologies, to share experiences with each other, and most of all, have fun at the Summit, and, in beautiful tropical scene of Yogyakarta region (a travel guide for you coming soon). In previous years openSUSE.Asia Summit has been held in Beijing, China in 2014 and National Taipei University of Education,Taipei / Taiwan, Republic Of China 2015.

  • Managers: Do you delegate or donate?
  • The Red Hat Paradox

    When one thinks of Red Hat, Linux emerges as the top of mind software application. The Red Hat Linux software solution paradigm represented, to many, a “crazy” business model in its early days. Prior to the emergence, the likes of Microsoft, IBM, HP, etc. had defined the software development, sales and support model narrative in a clear objectified manner. Organizations paid a monetized licencing fee, and monetized annual support. Modifications to core software were often reliant upon the vendor, based upon established pricing models. Also, core product upgrades were solely the responsibility of the provider.

  • Enea AB: Enea® Linux the first commercial Linux distribution with Yocto Project 2.1
  • Find This Secret Command In MS-DOS Code To Win $100,000 And “Embarrass” Microsoft

    If we start reading Microsoft’s history, the MS-DOS chapter comes very early. The operating system acts as a foundation of the Microsoft Empire. Bill Gates got his big break in 1980 when he licensed this OS to IBM.

    You might know that Microsoft didn’t develop this operating system in-house. Instead, it acquired another operating system named QDOS–Quick and Dirty Operating System. QDOS was developed by SCP’s Tim Paterson, who was later hired by Gates to modify QDOS into MS-DOS.

    If you turn more pages of the history, you’ll come across another technology pioneer named the late Gary Kildall. He was the founder of DRI (Digital Research Inc.) and creator of an early PC OS named CP/M.

  • Researchers crack open unusually advanced malware that hid for 5 years [Ed: Windows]

    Security experts have discovered a malware platform that's so advanced in its design and execution that it could probably have been developed only with the active support of a nation-state.

    The malware—known alternatively as "ProjectSauron" by researchers from Kaspersky Lab and "Remsec" by their counterparts from Symantec—has been active since at least 2011 and has been discovered on 30 or so targets. Its ability to operate undetected for five years is a testament to its creators, who clearly studied other state-sponsored hacking groups in an attempt to replicate their advances and avoid their mistakes. State-sponsored groups have been responsible for malware like the Stuxnet- or National Security Agency-linked Flame, Duqu, and Regin. Much of ProjectSauron resides solely in computer memory and was written in the form of Binary Large Objects, making it hard to detect using antivirus.

  • 5 Best Hacks From The Black Hat 2016

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This Week in Solus – Install #33

    Our development and bug tracking oriented infrastructure moved from Bugzilla to Phabricator a few days ago. Bugzilla simply didn’t offer us the flexibility we needed and has long been a bit of a sore tooth for us.

  • Apricity OS Gets First Stable Release — A Beautiful And Simple Arch Linux-based Distro
  • Linux Arc Theme Now Available for Windows 10 Anniversary Update [Ed: More Linuxwashing]
  • Debian Code Search: improving client-side latency (2016-08-08)
  • Here Are the 9 Open Source Projects Recently Funded by Mozilla
  • How to add freely licensed animated GIFs to Facebook and Twitter using Riffsy
  • 4 talks from leaders in higher ed on the future of open education

    Openness has become the new standard for content and software across a variety of initiatives in higher education. Open source software, open education, open educational resources, open access publishing, open analytics, open data, open science, and open humanities have matured to challenge, even dominate, the global educational landscape.

    Those of us working with open projects know how important it is to contribute experiences of best practice, develop common understanding, and share strategic direction, in order to better facilitate communication and synchronization across the emerging open landscape. To that end, the Apereo Foundation—an open source software community of over 100 institutions of higher education—along with the Open Source Initiative and Red Hat organized the first Open Summit.

    The Summit was held at New York University in late May and included speakers from across a variety of open initiatives and communities: faculty teaching open source principles and practices; researchers creating open data and techniques to promote collaboration; campus staff developing open source projects in support of teaching and learning; librarians curating open educational resources; university administrators cultivating open governance models.

  • Innuendo, From Me, Just Like Trump

    Come on, Delta. If what you’ve been doing doesn’t work, stop beating your head against the wall. Switch to GNU/Linux like the stock-exchanges. They wanted stock-trades to take flight smoothly and reliably. GNU/Linux helps them do that. I wanted PCs to run reliably in schools. GNU/Linux helped that happen. PCs in my home have been running pretty well since we went completely GNU/Linux several years ago. This year we plan to get rid of Intel too for complete independence from Wintel. Try it. Make Delta great again by migrating to GNU/Linux. You and your passengers will like it.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows 10 Anniversary Update is borking boxen everywhere

    Users are reporting that upgrading to the Windows 10 Anniversary Update renders their PCs unusable.

    A lengthy Reddit thread explains the problem: the Anniversary Update installs just fine, but when users re-start their PCs after the upgrade … nothing happens.

    Users report that their PCs simply hang on restart, sometimes losing even the ability to accept input from mice and keyboards and sometimes frustrating users by allowing input but not responding.

    Some in the thread report that disabling Secure Boot removes the problem, others describe more elaborate workarounds.

    Microsoft, for its part, has advised those in the thread to do a clean install of Windows and pointed those afflicted to USB media creation tools in order to facilitate that action.

  • RFC #1: Karl Fogel – Open Source, Then and Now (Part 1)

    Karl served on the board of the Open Source Initiative, which coined the term “open source”, and helped write Subversion, a popular version control system that predates Git. Karl also wrote a popular book on managing open source projects called Producing Open Source Software. He’s currently a partner at Open Tech Strategies, a firm that helps major organizations use open source to achieve their goals.

  • Marek Continues Baking More Mesa Optimizations

    AMD developer Marek Olšák continues leading their recent charge on looking to boost the performance potential out of Mesa / Gallium3D.

    Aside from working on the remaining OGL4 extensions, longtime Mesa contributor Marek Olšák has been seeking to boost the performance of the open-source AMD OpenGL driver. He's published a number of optimizations with the most impressive improvements being for a 23%+ performance improvement for RadeonSI with the BioShock Infinite game.

  • littler 0.3.1

    The second release of littler as a CRAN package is now available, following in the now more than ten-year history as a package started by Jeff in the summer of 2006, and joined by me a few weeks later.

    littler is the first command-line interface for R and predates Rscript. It is still faster, and in my very biased eyes better as it allows for piping as well shebang scripting via #!, uses command-line arguments more consistently and still starts faster. It prefers to live on Linux and Unix, has its difficulties on the OS X due yet-another-braindeadedness there (who ever thought case-insensitive filesystems where a good idea?) and simply does not exist on Windows (yet -- the build system could be extended -- see RInside for an existence proof, and volunteers welcome!).

  • Choqok Lives — Qt Twitter App Sees First Update in Over a Year

    Feed me cereal and call me a-maized: there’s a brand new version of Qt Twitter app Choqok on the way.

    Choqok 1.6 Beta is the first update to the app in over a year and a half since the previous, and only the second, major update to the app in almost three years!

    “We want to make this release more stable than ever and then we are going to release a beta today and the final version next month,” Choqok’s developers write in a recent blog post update.

    Stability is going to be key for the app as the incumbent stable release is full of bugs caused, in part, by changes to the Twitter infrastructure that it hasn’t kept pace with.

    As such the bulk of this beta update is made up of bug fixes, polish and updates to work with new Twitter functionality, like sending unlimited direct messages and quoting tweets.

    Choqok 1.6 is also based on KDE Frameworks 5 and supports for the GNU Social network.

  • wtf is PAM?
  • GSoC Updates: Plugging in the grilo owncloud plugin

    My GSoC Project has materialized quite a bit since the last blog post. In the previous blog post I discussed implementing a cache for persisting the query results from the owncloud grilo plugin. However, after some discussions with Felipe, we decided it’s better to proceed without the cache for now.

  • Wifislax 4.12 Screenshot Tour
  • Next Weeks Broker Price Targets For Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • How Analysts Feel About Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)?
  • Flock to Fedora - Day #2 with focus on Modularity
  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20160805-1

    TUG 2016 is over, and I have returned from a wonderful trip to Toronto and Maine. High time to release a new checkout of the TeX Live packages. After that I will probably need some time for another checkout, as there are a lot of plans on the table: upstream created a new collection, which means new package in Debian, which needs to go through NEW, and I am also planning to integrate tex4ht to give it an update. Help greatly appreciated here.

  • Sketching using MyPaint on the BQ M10 Ubuntu Edition tablet
  • Samsung Z2 Coming to India 11 August Priced at Rs 4,499 ?

    We are super excited (American term) for the launch of the Samsung Z2. This upcoming Tizen tech has had lots of information pointing to its release such as Wifi and Bluetooth certification as well as news that Samsung has already begun assembly of the device. The Z2 is also slated to be distributed in 8 countries that include: India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Nocturn Is a Cross Platform Twitter App With a Clean Design

    Nocturn is a simple desktop Twitter app for Mac and Linux built using React, Electron and JavaScript.

    I know what you’re thinking: “Not another electron app!?” but this one is at least a bit different to the usual web wrapping schtick.

    For, unlike Anatine which we wrote about at the end of July, Nocturn is not a frame around the regular Twitter web interface.

    Instead, it uses web technologies to create a new, native interface.

    Albeit a rather simple one.

  • Brand New Skype `Alpha` Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.16 Is Now Available
  • Tip of the iceberg !
  • Vice-President’s Report — The State of the GNOME Foundation

    Hi! Long time no see. My blog has been pretty quiet in recent months, in the big part due to my extended commitment on the GNOME Foundation‘s Board of Directors (for a second year without an executive director present to take some of the load) and the various business engagements I’ve had.

  • New packages for LibreOffice and Chromium

    There’s a new LibreOffice release with a lot of improvements: 5.2.0. The announcement on the Document Foundation blog shows quite a lot of extensive information this time because of the version number jump and the changes implied by it. I’ll mention just a couple of semi-random facts here:
    Document classification has been added as a major feature. Two-factor authentication for Google Docs storage finally works in Writer. Interoperability (with the MS Office file formats of course) has been improved and an import filter for Word for DOS was added. In Calc, new functions were added along with tooltips showing context information about functions. Source code quality has been measurably improved again.

  • Chase Claims Android Pay Support Planned for “This Year”
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5 Best Linux Distros for Security

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Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.