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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Have You Ever Considered Replacing Windows with Linux? [Ed: Microsoft propagandist (for over a decade) Bogdan Popa continues to provoke GNU/Linux users]
  • Windows file sharing comes to Chromebooks

    You can run Android apps on Chromebooks. You can run Linux programs on Chromebooks. Heck, you can even run Windows programs on Chromebooks. But one thing you couldn't do natively on a Chromebook is read and write files on a Windows PCs or Windows and Samba servers. Things change. With the forthcoming release of Chrome OS 70, you can access network file shares from Chromebooks.

    To do this, once Chrome OS 70 is available to all users, open Settings, look for "Network File Shares", click the "Add File Share" button, and enter your user name and password. Then, click "Add" button and open the Files app to browse your newly mounted shared folder. That's all there is to it.

  • 5 examples of Prometheus monitoring success

    Prometheus is an open source monitoring and alerting toolkit for containers and microservices. The project is a hit with lots of different organizations regardless of their size or industrial sector. The toolkit is highly customizable and designed to deliver rich metrics without creating a drag on system performance. Based on the organizations that have adopted it, Prometheus has become the mainstream, open source monitoring tool of choice for those that lean heavily on containers and microservices.

    Conceived at SoundCloud in 2012, Prometheus became part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in 2016 and in August 2018, CNCF announced Prometheus was the second "graduated" project in the organization's history.

    Prometheus provides a key component for a modern DevOps workflow: keeping watch over cloud-native applications and infrastructure, including another popular CNCF project, Kubernetes.

  • Unique RTS game 'Circle Empires' to get Linux support later this month

    Publisher Iceberg Interactive sent word today that the unique RTS game Circle Empires from developer Luminous is heading to Linux. They didn't give an exact date other than "Later this month Circle Empires will also receive full Linux support.".

    Since I'm a big fan of RTS games, I was instantly quite surprised with how Circle Empires works. The map is literally split into circles, with you battling for control of each one of them.

  • Timespinner, a metroidvania featuring time travel, is set to be released September 25th

    Fans of metroidvanias will be getting a new game to sink their teeth into soon enough. A new trailer shows off what you can expect from the story and gameplay.

  • TensorFlow on Debian/sid (including Keras via R)

    I have been struggling with getting TensorFlow running on Debian/sid for quite some time. The main problem is that the CUDA libraries installed by Debian are CUDA 9.1 based, and the precompiled pip installable TensorFlow packages require CUDA 9.0 which resulted in an unusable installation. But finally I got around and found all the pieces.

  • Skylake mini-PC has dual M.2 slots and up to 32GB DDR4

    Aaeon has launched a Linux-ready “Nano-002N” mini-PC with a 6th Gen Core CPU, up to 32GB DDR4, 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and 4x USB 3.0 ports, plus dual M.2 slots.

    Aaeon’s Nano-002N upgrades its Intel 5th Gen Nano-001N from 2015 with a dual-core, 6th Gen “Skylake” U-series CPU and additional new features. These include a serial port and twice the maximum memory for up to 32GB DDR4, among other enhancements. The mini-PC is well suited for media player, digital signage and POS, as well as other “tough applications in the factory, office, and off-site locations.”

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Chromebooks Are Getting Local File Sharing Support

    An upcoming Chrome OS update will add support for SMB shares, meaning Chromebooks will have access to files shared from Windows, macOS, and Linux computers.

    The feature is part of Chrome OS Canary right now, and will come to most Chromebooks with Chrome OS 70 on October 23. A screenshot of the feature in action, seen above, was posted by Google Employee François Beaufort on Google+ yesterday.

  • 5 Ridiculous Windows 10 Headlines That Will Have You Running To Linux
  • An interview with the developer of DXVK, part of what makes Valve's Steam Play tick

    What started as a large article talking to developers about Steam Play required splitting off before it became too big. For now, I give you a chat with the developer of DXVK, Philip Rebohle.

    For those that aren't quite up to speed, DXVK is a project that provides a Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation for Wine. It's part of what makes Valve's Steam Play "Proton" work. In simple terms, games built to run on Windows via DirectX can be run with DXVK/Proton, so that they can be played on Linux.

  • Game store itch releases a brand new client, plus a small interview

    Game store itch.io are doing some fantastic things and so it's time to highlight it a bit. They just released a massive overhaul to their open source client!

    Here's how the new and improved client looks, pretty slick right? It's blazingly fast too, from clicking the itch application button to actually logging in took around 2-3 seconds. When you want to just play your game, that's the kind of speed you want to enable you to quickly get going.

  • Last week’s [Slackware] updates: Chromium and VLC

    Last week the Chrome (and Chromium) update to release 69 was in the news. The UI changed significantly, sporting more of Google’s material design elements. Also the password manager has been improved: it will suggest random passwords in cases where you have to create a Web account and will offer to remember the random password in its vault so you don’t have to write it down or remember it (you’ll have to be signed into your Google account to be able to use this feature though).
    The ‘omnibox‘ (the area where you type your URLS and search queries) is more powerful now, showing many more related results while you are typing.
    My package for Chromium supports direct playback of H.265/HEVC video by the way, and has done so for the past releases. Check it out for instance on https://www.h265files.com/embed-h265-video.php . Not many other browsers (even other distros’ Chromium browsers) will do that.

  • Cloudera Launches an End-to-End, Open, Modular IoT Architecture with Red Hat and Eurotech to Accelerate IoT Deployments

    Architecture enables end-to-end analytics pushing machine learning and intelligence to the ‘edge’ to support real-time decision-making

    Cloudera, Inc. (NYSE : CLDR ), the modern platform for machine learning and analytics optimized for the cloud, today announced the launch of an end-to-end, open source Internet of Things (IoT) architecture in collaboration with Red Hat and Eurotech. Enterprises now have a modern IoT architecture that is scalable, secure, and technologically advanced without vendor lock-in.

  • ‘Open Hybrid’ Initiative Targets Big Data Workloads

    ortonworks, IBM and Red Hat today announced they’re banding together to build a consistent hybrid computing architecture for big data workloads. Dubbed the Open Hybrid Architecture Initiative, the program pledges simplicity of deployment and freedom of movement for data apps.

    The rapid ascent of cloud computing platforms like AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud has given enterprises abundant new options for storing data and deploying processing-intensive applications, such as deep learning and real-time stream processing. Throw in the progress being made at the edge, with sensors and speedy ARM chips collecting and processing massive amounts of data, and you have the makings of a computing revolution.

    While the computing possibilities in the cloud and on the edge may appear bountiful, the reality is that the underlying architectures for building apps that can span these three modes are just starting to come together. Enterprises today face a dearth of repeatable patterns to guide their developers, administrators, and architects, who are tasked with building, deploying and maintaining hybrid that span not just the cloud and the edge, but traditional on-prem data centers too.

  • How to overcome two major challenges with digital transformation

    Business leaders of all stripes, not only CIOs, are talking about Digital Transformation these days. Even the World Economic Forum is publishing White Papers on the Digital Transformation of Industries. Even still, whether it’s Netflix passing over the 120 Million Monthly Subscribers mark while still managing 25% Year-on-Year growth, or Peloton stealing gym memberships with over a 100% year-on-year growth rate, it’s clear that businesses need to deliver better and more holistic experiences to customers through digital channels in order to succeed.

    However, organizations often struggle on their digital transformation journey in two fundamental areas. First, in the ability to fund transformational projects. Second, defining and implementing a strategy that ensures their organizations have the skills necessary for the transformational projects.

  • Observe the Analyst’s Thoughts: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Fedora at FrOSCon 2018 – Event report
  • Bring back the headphone jack: Why USB-C audio still doesn't work

     

    Smartphone makers, it’s time to have that come-to-Apple moment, where we tell you that it’s time to put the 3.5mm analog headset jack back on the phone—at least until you get your USB-C audio act in order. After plugging in a fistful of USB-C dongles and USB-C headsets into a stack of USB-C phones, I’ve discovered that it’s a mess, especially for third-party headsets. Here's why.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux LDAP Server

    Since the development of this traditional IT realm, the world shifted to the cloud, bringing with it a variety of solutions such as AWS® and other SaaS tools (e.g. GitHub, Jira, Slack, and others). With the advent of DevOps tools, such as Docker, Kubernetes, OpenVPN, and more, LDAP remained a popular choice for authentication services. However, now the challenge was that IT admins had to manage the Linux LDAP server, rather than purchase the capability as a service, much like the rest of their cloud-based infrastructure.

    The good news is that a modern approach to directory services has emerged with an LDAP-as-a-Service offering. This cloud LDAP solution is available from JumpCloud® Directory-as-a-Service and enables IT organizations to simply point their IT resources to a multi-tenant cloud Linux LDAP server environment managed by a third party. In addition, IT admins get the benefit of pay as you go, with high availability, security, and scalability.

  • ZFS On Linux 0.7.10 Released With Linux 4.18 Support, Debian DKMS

    For those making use of ZFS On Linux to utilize ZFS file-system support on Linux systems, a new ZOL 0.7.10 release along with its SPL layer have been released.

    Most notable to ZFS/SPL 0.7.10 is the latest Linux 4.18 stable kernel series now being supported, but support is retained for going back to the Linux 2.6.32 kernel.

  • Linux Announces New Course and Certs for Hyperledger Fabric and Sawtooth

    On Thursday, the Linux Foundation announced yet another resource to help leaners grow more familiar with blockchain technology. The new LFD271 – Hyperledger Fabric Fundamentals is currently open for enrollment. The course is intended to onboard learners into the world of the blockchain and introduce people to current uses and practices.

    Later this year, successful students will be able to take the Certified Hyperledger Fabric Administrator and Certified Hyperledger Sawtooth Administrator exams to prove their merit.

  • First-person adventure game 'The Norwood Suite' should get a Linux build on Steam in future

    I spoke to the developer of the first-person adventure game The Norwood Suite about their plans for Linux.

    As it turns out, they already have a Linux build people can directly request but the developer doesn't currently have Linux setup so they've been gathering reports from the community. They said later that it's "only a matter of time" before the Linux build goes live on Steam.

  • Humble adds more games to their Summer Sale, only a few days left
  • GStreamer Rust bindings 0.12 and GStreamer Plugin 0.3 release

    After almost 6 months, a new release of the GStreamer Rust bindings and the GStreamer plugin writing infrastructure for Rust is out. As usual this was coinciding with the release of all the gtk-rs crates to make use of all the new features they contain.

    Thanks to all the contributors of both gtk-rs and the GStreamer bindings for all the nice changes that happened over the last 6 months!

    And as usual, if you find any bugs please report them and if you have any questions let me know.

  • liveslak-1.3.0 with speed improvements

    There was no August release of a Plasma5 Live ISO as you will probably have noticed. The reason was that around the time when I released the August update of Plasma5 for Slackware, I was working on new liveslak functionality and wanted to finish that before releasing new ISOs. The testing took some more time than I anticipated due to increased work load in my day job. But I finished what I wanted to have in a new liveslak release, and today I want to write a post about the new stuff.

    To accompany the new liveslak-1.3.0 I have uploaded fresh ISO images for the Slackware Live Edition. They are based on the latest Slackware-current dated “Fri Sep 7 23:00:06 UTC 2018″.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (July and August 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

        William Blough (bblough)
        Shengjing Zhu (zhsj)
        Boyuan Yang (byang)
        Thomas Koch (thk)
        Xavier Guimard (yadd)
        Valentin Vidic (vvidic)
        Mo Zhou (lumin)
        Ruben Undheim (rubund)
        Damiel Baumann (daniel)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

        Phil Morrell
        Raúl Benencia
        Brian T. Smith
        Iñaki Martin Malerba
        Hayashi Kentaro
        Arnaud Rebillout

    Congratulations!

  • Elementary OS First Impressions: A Great Linux Doorway For MacOS Users
  • Haiku, the open source BeOS clone, to release in beta after 17 years of development

    The Haiku OS project initially launched in August 2001, then named as “OpenBeOS”, is nearing a beta release expected later this month. It’s been over 17 years since the project launched, and more than 18 years since the last release of the operating system- BeOS that inspired it.

    BeOs launched in 1995 by Be Inc, almost became the operating system for Apple’s hardware. However, the negotiations between Be Inc and Apple turned into nothing and the iPhone giant decided in favour of NeXT. Used primarily in the area of multimedia by software developers and users, BeOS had an impressive user interface, pre-emptive multitasking, symmetric multiprocessing and a 64-bit journaling file system. Cloning BeOS, Haiku’s boot performance is very good. The Haiku user interface is modeled entirely after BeOS, acquiring its signature variable-width title bars and spatial file management.

  • Google Chrome Kills Off WWW In URLs — Here’s Why People Think It’s A Dumb Move

    While Google thinks www. or m. were “trivial subdomain,” people have strongly criticized Google over the Chromium blog thread. Some calling it a “dumb move,” others stating it another case of “stating opinion as a fact.”

    Apart from that, people have also pointed out several instances where two sites with similar URL scheme can cause confusion as well as open door to phishing attacks

  • BYD launches open-source platform, ‘developer version’ of AV model

    BYD has launched an open-source platform it calls ‘D++’ and a ‘developer version’ of its Qin Pro, claimed to be the world’s first autonomous car open to third-party developers. It announced these at its worldwide developer conference in Shenzhen, China, attended by representatives from companies including Baidu, Horizon and Roadstar.ai.

    Wang Chuanfu, BYD president and chairman, said at the conference: “Like the development of smartphones, which shifted from closed to open systems, this is also the only way for the car to become ‘smarter’. As we are embracing this new wave of intelligence, I’m proud to announce BYD’s strategy is now ‘open’.

    “In the future, travel will only comprise 1pc of smart cars, and the remaining 99pc is open to the human imagination,” Wang added. “BYD will fully open 341 sensors and 66 controls on the car for developers, providing a much broader creative platform, which is bound to produce an immeasurable application ecology. We are doing for the car what Android did for the mobile phone.”

  •  

  • The Revel framework with golang.
  • Boston supporters! Join us against DRM

    International Day Against DRM (IDAD) is coming up on Tuesday, September 18th. This is our twelfth year gathering together to say in one voice that we oppose Digital Restrictions Management (DRM). If you live in the Boston area, we hope you'll join us for some in-person events! We're excited to spread the word about the injustice of DRM face-to-face, and we hope to see you there.

  • The Sci-Hub Effect? Prominent Research Councils Push Open Access

     

    This week several prestigious European research councils announced a major push for Open Access publishing. This will limit the influence of major copyright holders and could eventually help to 'tear down academia's paywalls.' The latter is exactly what Sci-Hub, the "Pirate Bay of Science," has been advocating for years.  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Autobeat – One App for SoundCloud, YouTube, and Local Music

    Autobeat is an Electron-based music player that combines YouTube, SoundCloud, and tracks from your local music library into a simple user Interface.

    Like many apps that combine multiple services into a single app e.g. Rambox and Manageyum, Autobeat eliminates the need to chase (in this case,) music across multiple services because it houses the most popular ones in a single User Interface.

    It features a clutter-free and intuitive app window. Its channels, favorites, and library functions are located in the left panel while the player controls are positioned at the bottom of the page.

  • Equality Constraints for Cubic B-Splines
  • How to Powerwash Your Chromebook if You Get Locked Out
  • How to change the default sudo timeout
  • Quest For The Perfect Linux Distro – Unleaded Hangouts

    Quest For The Perfect Linux Distro. Today the gang and I discuss what we’d like to see in the perfect Linux distro or any OS for that matter. Additionally, we also discuss what we really would love to see improved and can’t believe in 2018 remains a problem even to this day.

  •  

  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) Holdings Lowered by IBM Retirement Fund
  • Xiaomi Poco F1 and Mi 8 Receive Unofficial TWRP Builds
  • The Long-Awaited Haiku Operating System Beta Should Be Days Away

    The Haiku operating system has been in development since 2002 as an open-source BeOS-inspired platform and nearly a decade since they reached the alpha stage for their first release, they are nearly ready to deliver the beta.

    While they have delivered a few Haiku R1 alpha releases since 2009, the beta release has remained elusive but over the next week that should finally materialize. Last month we were elated to hear the beta should come in September with their release schedule putting that R1 Beta 1 milestone between 10 and 18 September. That appears to remain on track for likely seeing the official beta release over roughly the next week.

  • libcurl gets a URL API

    libcurl has done internet transfers specified as URLs for a long time, but the URLs you'd tell libcurl to use would always just get parsed and used internally.

    Applications that pass in URLs to libcurl would of course still very often need to parse URLs, create URLs or otherwise handle them, but libcurl has not been helping with that.

    At the same time, the under-specification of URLs has led to a situation where there's really no stable document anywhere describing how URLs are supposed to work and basically every implementer is left to handle the WHATWG URL spec, RFC 3986 and the world in between all by themselves. Understanding how their URL parsing libraries, libcurl, other tools and their favorite browsers differ is complicated.

  • Firefox Extensions and Other Tragedies

    Several months ago a Google employee told me not to panic about the removal of XUL because Firefox had probably mainlined the functionality I need from my ossified xul-ext packages. This appears to have been wildly inaccurate.

    [...]

    It appears that Waterfox is not in Debian so I cannot try that out.

  • Who are/were the FSFE Fellowship? Starting Fellowship 2.0?

    Since the FSFE Fellowship elected me as representative in April 2017, I've received a lot of questions from fellows and the wider community about what the Fellowship actually is. As representative, it is part of my role to help ensure that fellows are adequately informed and I hope to work towards that with this blog.

    The FSFE Fellowship was started in 2005 and has grown over the years.

  • N. Korean alleged to be behind WannaCry, no mention of NSA exploit

    The US Department of Justice has filed a criminal complaint against a North Korean cracker named Park Jin Hyok for allegedly being behind a 2104 hack of Sony Pictures and the May 2017 WannaCry ransomware attack.

    An affidavit filed by FBI special agent Nathan Shields also alleged that Park was behind the theft of $81 million from Bangladesh Bank, the central bank of that country, in February 2016. One glaring omission was the fact that an NSA exploit used to craft WannaCry had been leaked on the Web by a group known as the Shadow Brokers in April 2017.

    He was also accused of being behind numerous other unspecified break-ins at various private and government institutions.

    Park was alleged to have worked for a North Korean front company known as Chosun Expo; some of the employees in branches of the firm abroad also did private work for clients. Park was said to have worked with a group in Dalian, China.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux users: How long has it been since you last used Windows?

    Many of us hold day jobs where we're not lucky enough to be able to choose our own operating system and are stuck with whatever IT has gifted us. Or, perhaps, you still keep an old Windows PC around for running that one application that just isn't available on Linux.

    Whatever your reason, it's still a mixed computing world, and is likely to be for some time to come. Whatever system you're using, there's probably a strong selection of open source software available for it that we hope you take the time to investigate.

  • FUSE Picking Up Copy-File-Range Support For Efficient Copy Operations

    In addition to the recently covered work on making FUSE file-systems faster with eBPF, another separate optimization is on the way for the Linux kernel's FUSE bits that allow for file-systems to be implemented in user-space.

    Queued in fuse-for-next is adding support for the copy_file_range() function. This allows for FUSE file-systems to support server-side copy or efficient copy/duplication/clone support, based upon the Linux kernel's copy_file_range syscall. This work is coming thanks to Red Hat.

  • The Final Development Release Of Phoronix Test Suite 8.2 Now Available For Testing

    -
    The last planned development release ahead of the official Phoronix Test Suite 8.2.0 "Rakkestad" quarterly feature release is now available for testing with our open-source benchmarking framework for Linux, macOS, BSD, and Windows operating systems.

  • musikcube – free terminal-based audio player and streaming server

    I started to really appreciate the versatility and awesomeness of console-based software after repairing a broken system using the ubiquitous vi text editor. It was figuratively a life saver. I’m always keen on exploring other wonderful console-based software, particularly multimedia software. So here’s musikcube. It’s a free, open source, cross-platform terminal-based audio engine, library, player and server written in C++.

    musikcube has a streaming audio server enabled by default. The server runs a websocket server on port 7905, used for metadata retrieval, and an http server on port 7906 which serves (optionally transcoded) audio data to clients.

  • How to add API logging for Kiwi TCMS
  • Gentoo congratulates our GSoC participants

    Gentoo would like to congratulate Gibix and JSteward for finishing and passing Google Summer of Code 2018 mentored through Gentoo’s participation: Gibix contributed to the project’s full Rust support, aiming at improving Rust support in Gentoo. JSteward contributed to making a full Gentoo GNU/Linux distribution, managed by Portage, run on devices which use the original Android-customized kernel.

  • Hexchat, Duplicity Among Packages Updated in Tumbleweed

    Three openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots were released this week that updated versions of dbus, hexchat and more.

    Snapshot 20180903 updated extended attributes extensions with the attr 2.4.48 package, which removed various deprecated sections like attr/attr.h and added a patch to have tests working with newer perls. The bash-completion 2.8 package fixed getting username in non-login shells. The dbus-1 1.12.10 and dbus-1-x11 1.12.10 both fixed builds with GNU Compiler Collection 8 -Werror=cast-function-type and a minor memory leak when a DBusServer listens on a new address. IRC Client hexchat 2.14.2 added appstream metainfo for plugins and removed shift+click binding to close tabs. The USB Wifi driver package rtl8812au 5.2.20.2 added new hardware support and the Schily Tool Box, schily version 2018.08.24, added support for SELinux. C library libHX updated to version 3.23 and python-kiwi to 9.16.12.

    The end of month snapshot, 20180831, had a version bump with GNOME’s goffice to 0.10.43.

  • No, You Can’t Download a 32GB SD Card From Google Play

    Someone is claiming to sell a 32GB SD card on Google Play. Seriously.

    It’s a mobile variation of the “Download More RAM!” scheme common in the early 2000s, but the surprising thing here is that Google ever allowed it on the Play store in the first place. I hope it’s taken down soon.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • MoltenVK 1.0.20 Released To Continue Advancing Vulkan On macOS

    MoltenVK continues getting better for offering Vulkan graphics/compute support on macOS by leveraging it on top of Apple's Metal drivers.

    MoltenVK 1.0.20 is out as the latest feature update to this Vulkan-over-Metal layer. MoltenVK is notably used by Valve's Dota 2 on macOS, is becoming used by Wine, presumably will also be picked up for Windows Steam Play on macOS in the future, and so far also seems to being used by at least a few different indie game studios on macOS or iOS. This is good news for Linux users with ensuring Vulkan is a common denominator across platforms, avoiding fragmentation if VKD3D/DXVK had to be rewritten for Mac, etc.

  • Book review Mastering Vim Quickly From WTF to OMG in no time

    The vim editor is a free and open source text editor. It is a clone of vi text editor. Vim is extremely popular among the Linux, macOS and Unix-like system users. Vim has many commands. It comes with a pretty extensive built-in manual too. One might get lost in the built-in manual. Let us see if “Mastering Vim Quickly From WTF to OMG in no time” can help a new or experienced vim user to increase productivity.

  • Matlab Alternatives on Linux

    The well-known standard for mathematical research on computers is Matlab but except for being costly, it is not always the best alternative. To solve mathematical problems and vizualise different mathematical concepts you can use many other alternatives. The ones listed below are common in both academia and industry for a wide variety of reasons. This article compares the different packages and shows how easy it is to use for projects with the GUI and with other methods.

  • Krita’s 2018 Google Summer of Code

    This year, we participated in Google Summer of Code with three students: Ivan, Andrey and Michael. Some of the code these awesome students produced is already in Krita 4.1.1, and most of the rest has been merged already, so you can give it a whirl in the latest nightly builds for Windows or Linux. So, let’s go through what’s been achieved this year!

    Ivan’s project was all about making brushes faster using vectorization. If that sounds technical, it’s because it is! Basically, your CPU is powerful enough to do a lot of calculations at the same time, as long as it’s the same calculation, but with different numbers. You could feed more than 200 numbers to the CPU, tell it to multiply them all, and it would do that just as fast as multiplying one number. And it just happens that calculating the way a brush looks is more or less just that sort of thing. Of course, there are complications, and Ivan is still busy figuring out how to apply the same logic to the predefined brushes. But here’s a nice image from his blog:

  • Recent Cachix downtime

        

    On the 22nd there was no action from my side; the service recovered itself. I did have monitoring configured and I received email alerts, but I have not noticed them.

    [...]

    On 23rd I have immediately seen the service was down and I've rebooted the machine.

    I have spent a significant amount of time trying to determine if a specific request caused this, but it seems likely that it was just an overload, although I have not proved this theory.

  • wiki.debian.org: The Java Packaging Guide

    Good things come to those who wait. I always wanted to improve our Java Packaging documentation a little. When I started to contribute to Debian Java in 2012, I often struggled to find the right information and examples that would explain how I could package my own libraries or applications for Debian. After six years of trial and error and helpful advice on the debian-java mailing list, I figured it would be time to document this journey.

    At DebConf 2018 in Hsinchu I began to work on updating the wiki documentation. The current status of this work will always be visible at:

    [...]

    Despite the fact that some upstream projects come without a proper build system, they are often very simple to compile. Instead of one or two source files, you just have to compile dozens in one single directory. We have a Java helper tool called….Javahelper that does exactly that for you. A good start is to read the docs at /usr/share/doc/javahelper/tutorial.txt.gz also replicated here.

    Of course the Java world has invented the most powerful build systems in existence that are even able to bend light and can throw galaxies around. Let’s welcome Ant, Maven and Gradle. Everything else is irrelevant but don’t trust me.

  • August 2018 report: LTS, Debian, Upgrades

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Release Roundup: VLC, Wireshark, Geary + More

    The Linux landscape exists in a state of constant flux, with new distro releases, kernels, apps and other updates appearing all the time. In our Linux Release Roundup series we try to collate the notable new app, software and distro releases and other key software updates released during the past 7 days

  • GNOME Tweaks 3.30

    GNOME 3.30 will be released within a few days. That makes this a good time to showcase the improvements in GNOME Tweaks 3.30.

    One problem with moving power settings from Tweaks into Settings a year ago was that the Power panel only had one setting. GNOME Designer Allan Day suggested we use a new General panel to include the remaining power switch, the sound Over-Amplification switch, and the Animations switch.

  • Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in August 2018
  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities August 2018
  • Who’s Using Ubuntu

    A look at who’s using Ubuntu and their hardware.

  • Joe’s thoughts on Linux Mint 19, Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Ubuntu MATE 18.04

    Linux Mint 19 is just about put but it may not be as polished as we’re used to. I also ramble on about my experiences with some Ubuntu flavors.

  • Magisk 17.1 Introduces Tons of Fixes Including OTA Updates With A/B Partition Devices

    For quite a while now, Magisk has been the top rooting method (or at least the most preferred method) in the Android rooting community, due to the advantages of having a systemless root versus a system root. Magisk Modules have also helped bridge the gap of pros vs cons, by allowing users to install apps that typically require a system root into a systemlessly rooted device, and replacing files on the Android’s /system partition without actually touching the /system partition – which means Magisk doesn’t (usually) trip SafetyNet and other root-detection methods.

  • First Ever Crash Of Apple’s Self-driving Car Confirmed In Silicon Valley

    According to a report filed with the California DMV, it has been confirmed that one of Apple’s self-driving cars recently met with an accident in Silicon Valley.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open source hypervisor technical support, update considerations

    Even though open source software itself is completely free to obtain and use, effective hypervisor technical support options for production environments might cost money.

    [...]

    Ultimately, an open source hypervisor might lack a meaningful development roadmap. Features, compatibilities and optimizations might take years to arrive, if ever, depending on the skills and objectives of the developer community. And effective technical support options might cost money, even though the open source software itself is completely free to obtain and use. This means it's extremely important for potential adopters to perform extensive due diligence testing before adopting an open source hypervisor.

  • pvmove speed

    The left part is with pvmove. The right part, two and a half times as fast, is with… tar piping to tar.

    Oh well, I remember the days when pvmove was 1–2 MB/sec. But it's still not very impressive Smile

  • Valve’s Steam for Linux compatibility tool already has 1,000 perfectly playable games

    Last week, Valve brought Windows game compatibility to Linux in the form of an official tool for Steam. The team had been working on this new compatibility tool for around two years and now that it is in public beta, the community has been quick to test it. While Valve’s initial wave of officially approved games was fairly small, community testers have figured out that close to 1,000 games are already perfectly playable on Linux now.

  • SUSE builds momentum with innovative open source offerings

    Jay Lyman, principal analyst for 451 Research, said, “Over the past few years, SUSE has expanded its portfolio into new areas, such as storage, cloud, containers and application delivery. With new independence and backing from Swedish private equity (PE) firm EQT Partners, SUSE is answering market demand for a neutral, yet comprehensive hybrid cloud platform that supports multiple public and private clouds as well as on-premises infrastructure integration with software such as its SUSE Linux Enterprise 15.”

  • SUSE Builds Momentum with Innovative Open Source Offerings, Revenue Growth and Commitment to Enterprise Customers

    SUSE® is an open source pioneer that has provided enterprise-grade software to tens of thousands of organizations for more than 25 years. As SUSE prepares to embark upon its next phase of corporate development as a stand-alone company*, it continues to grow and build momentum with its core products, emerging solutions, communities and partners while expanding its presence in new market segments. SUSE is better positioned than ever before to shepherd enterprises through the demands of digital transformation with open source innovation and expertise in software-defined infrastructure, application delivery and cloud technologies.

  • Latest Oxygen OS Update Brings Front Portrait And Gaming Mode 3.0 To OnePlus 5/5T
  • Changing Our Approach to Anti-tracking

    Anyone who isn’t an expert on the internet would be hard-pressed to explain how tracking on the internet actually works. Some of the negative effects of unchecked tracking are easy to notice, namely eerily-specific targeted advertising and a loss of performance on the web. However, many of the harms of unchecked data collection are completely opaque to users and experts alike, only to be revealed piecemeal by major data breaches. In the near future, Firefox will — by default — protect users by blocking tracking while also offering a clear set of controls to give our users more choice over what information they share with sites.

  • Lunchtime brown bags

    Over the Summer I’ve come to organise quite a number of events in Mozilla’s London office. Early Summer we started doing lunchtime brown bags, where staff give a 10 ~ 15 minute informal talk about what they are currently working on or a topic of their interest.

  • The Commons Clause - For Good or Bad

    The current debate about the Commons Clause, and other attempts to place restrictions on open source licences, is dividing opinion. But before taking sides first we need to understand what the Commons Clause does and why it is necessary.

    According to the README.md on its GitHub repo the Commons Clause is a Licence Condition contributed by FOSSA, a company which offers open-source licence management and drafted by Heather Meeker, a lawyer specializing in open source software licensing, including IP strategy, compliance, transactions, and disputes.

    The Commons Clause can be added as a commercial restriction on top of an open source licence to transition an existing open source project to a source availability licensing scheme, which means that while the source can be viewed, and in some cases modified, it is no longer fully open source. The restriction it imposes is that it denies the right to sell the software.

  • California Bill Is a Win for Access to Scientific Research

    The California legislature just scored a huge win in the fight for open access to scientific research. Now it’s up to Governor Jerry Brown to sign it.

    Under A.B. 2192—which passed both houses unanimously—all peer-reviewed, scientific research funded by the state of California would be made available to the public no later than one year after publication. There’s a similar law on the books in California right now, but it only applies to research funded by the Department of Public Health, and it’s set to expire in 2020. A.B. 2192 would extend it indefinitely and expand it to cover research funded by any state agency. EFF applauds the legislature for passing the bill, and especially Assemblymember Mark Stone for introducing it and championing it at every step.

    A.B. 2192’s fate was much less certain a few weeks ago. Lawmakers briefly put the bill in the Suspense File, a docket of bills to be put on the back burner because of their potential impact on the California budget. Fortunately, the Senate Appropriations Committee removed A.B. 2192 from the file after EFF explained that its fiscal impact would be negligible.

  • Open source RISC-V implemented from scratch in one night

    Developed in a magic night of 19 Aug, 2018 between 2am and 8am, the darkriscv is a very experimental implementation of the opensource RISC-V instruction set.

  • Federated CI

    In the modern world, a lot of computing happens on other people's computers. We use a lot of services provided by various parties. This is a problem for user freedom and software freedom. For example, when I use Twitter, the software runs on Twitter's servers, and it's entirely proprietary. Even if it were free software, even if it were using the Affero GPL license (AGPL), my freedom would be limited by the fact that I can't change the software running on Twitter's servers.

    If I could, it would be a fairly large security problem. If I could, then anyone could, and they might not be good people like I am.

    If the software were free, instead of proprietary, I could run it on my own server, or find someone else to run the software for me. This would make me more free.

    That still leaves the data. My calendars would still be on Twitter's servers: all my tweets, direct messages, the lists of people I follow, or who follow me. Probably other things as well.

    For true freedom in this context, I would need to have a way to migrate my data from Twitter to another service. For practical freedom, the migration should not be excessively much work, or be excessively expensive, not just possible in principle.

    For Twitter specifically, there's free-er alternatives, such as Mastodon.

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