Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Schedule for Wednesday's FESCo Meeting (2020-07-08)

    F33 System-Wide Change: Make nano the default editor https://pagure.io/fesco/issue/2426 APPROVED (+8, 0, -0)

  • Fedora Approves Of Making Nano The Default Terminal Text Editor, Other Features Accepted

    At this week's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) meeting, more features were approved for the Fedora 33 release due out this fall.

    Most notable is the change of the default terminal text editor with Fedora 33 but other changes were also accepted. Highlights of this week's FESCo decisions include:

    - The change to make nano the default text editor was approved. Nano will be the new default over Vi.

  • Ingenic X2000 IoT Application Processor Combines 32-bit MIPS Xburst 2 Cores with Xburst 0 Real-time Core

    The company can provide a complete software and hardware development kit with a Linux 4.4 BSP and Halley5 development board with an X2000 SoM with a wireless module fitted to a largish carrier board with Ethernet, USB, microphone, MicroSD card slot, I/O header, buttons and so on. The other side of the board is equipped with a dual-camera board and a Full HD AMOLED display.

  •        

  • Linux 5.9 Will Finally Offer Proper Support For The ThinkPad 10 Ultrabook Keyboard

    While Lenovo recently committed to certifying more systems for Linux use and upstreaming drivers / hardware support for Linux moving forward, there remains a backlog of existing Lenovo devices that still have less than desire Linux support. But thanks to Red Hat and others, the hardware support does continue advancing. 

    The Lenovo ThinkPad 10 Ultrabook initially debuted in 2014 and now with Linux 5.9 debuting in late 2020 there is proper keyboard support, thanks to Red Hat's Hans de Goede who has frequently provided similar driver improvements for a range of hardware over the years. 

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #177

    Ubuntu 20.04 Released
    https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2020/04/download-ubuntu-20-04
    Ubuntu Survey Results
    https://ubuntu.com/blog/ubuntu-20-04-survey-results
    Fedora 32 Released
    https://fedoramagazine.org/announcing-fedora-32/
    Lenovo Now Shipping Fedora on Thinkpads
    https://fedoramagazine.org/coming-soon-fedora-on-lenovo-laptops/
    Manjaro 20 Released
    https://forum.manjaro.org/t/manjaro-20-0-lysia-released/138633
    Bug In Git May Leak Credentials
    https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=news_item&px=Git-Newline-Leak-Vulnerability
    Linux Kernel 5.7 rc4 Out
    https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/5/3/306
    Linux Kernel 5.5 Is Now End of Life
    http://lkml.iu.edu/hypermail/linux/kernel/2004.2/07196.html

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.2 Out
    https://www.redhat.com/archives/rhelv6-list/2020-April/msg00000.html

    Parrot 4.9 Out
    https://parrotsec.org/blog/parrot-4.9-release-notes/

    IPFire 2.25 Core Update 143 Out
    https://blog.ipfire.org/post/ipfire-2-25-core-update-143-released

    Oracle Virtualbox 6.1.6 Out
    https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Changelog-6.1

    LibreOffice 6.4.3 Out
    https://blog.documentfoundation.org/blog/2020/04/16/libreoffice-6-4-3/

    Proton 5.0-6 Out
    https://www.gamingonlinux.com/articles/steam-play-proton-50-6-is-out-to-help-doom-eternal-rockstar-launcher-and-more-on-linux.16442

    VLC 3.0.10 Out
    https://www.videolan.org/vlc/releases/3.0.10.html

    Darktable 3.0.2 Out
    https://www.darktable.org/2020/04/darktable-302-released/

    OpenSUSE Tumbleweed for AWS Marketplace Out
    https://9to5linux.com/opensuse-tumbleweed-is-now-available-on-aws-marketplace

    KDE 20.04 Applications Out
    https://9to5linux.com/kde-applications-20-04-officially-released-this-is-whats-new

    Credits:
    Ubuntu “Complete” sound: Canonical
    Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Adventures in Writing

    The Linux community is a fascinating and powerful space.

    When I joined the Ubuntu project approximately five years ago, I (vaguely at the time) understood that there was a profound sense of community and passion everywhere that is difficult to find in other spaces. My involvement has increased, and so has my understanding. I had thought of starting a blog as a means of conveying the information that I stumbled across, but my writing skills were very crude and regrettable, being in my early teenage years.

  • The ACM Digital Library Should Remain Open

    On March 30, 2020, the ACM announced that its digital library would be open access for three months. During that time, every conference paper, journal article and book chapter published by the ACM was free to the general public. They didn’t even require a login. The reason to open the digital library was a good one: most people who use it get access through where they work, either in industry or academia. Because of the global pandemic, most people who use it are now working at home, outside of the network which allows them access.

    I hoped it would remain open. I shared URLs to papers on the Digital Library on forums, in emails and even in source repos knowing everyone could access the papers at the moment, and hoping that would continue. I even let myself think it was likely that those making the decisions at the ACM would see that this free access had become a public good. I was wrong. On schedule, the ACM Digital Library closed again on June 30, 2020.

    It should have remained open. First, because the global pandemic is not over, and few people who read computer science research papers are back at work. Most people who work in the software industry are still at home, and there is still uncertainty about what will happen in American colleges and universities in the next school year.

    But more importantly, the ACM Digital Library should have remained open because the most comprehensive repository of computer science research should be freely available to all.

  • Project-Open: An Open-source Enterprise Project Management Solution [Ed: Seems to be more like openwashing]

    Project-Open or ]project-open[ is a free open source Enterprise Project Management solution. It's designed and developed by a Frank Bragmann who studied business management and complex project management.

    The project has been around for long time and it is widely used by hundreds or enterprises around the world in different sectors.

    Project-Open has a lot of features in the form of modules, which give you the ability to customize the system by choosing the modules that you need only, and doesn't force you to install the whole system. You can add modules later as your business grows. It also has a comprehensive online Documentation.

  • Introducing Teleport 4.3 - Modern Replacement for OpenSSH

    Teleport is an open source, modern drop-in replacement for OpenSSH, which supports Kubernetes in addition to SSH. Teleport removes the need for VPNs, comes with a beautiful new Web UI, and provides seamless access to all cloud environments and edge devices. Teleport is incredibly easy to set up and use.

  • Where's Toolbox? - 0.0.9x update

    Shortly after the move of Toolbox to the containers organization on GitHub I started working on rewriting Toolbox from Shell to Go (one of goals of my Internship at the Desktop Team at Red Hat).

    [...]

    You may ask: “Why didn’t you use Python? It’s used a lot in Fedora”. The answer is: “We can’t really.” We want Toolbox to be used in Fedora CoreOS which doesn’t ship Python.

  • A 7-foot-tall 7-segment display

    Seven-segment displays are normally diminutive items, able to show info from a clock or other device, in a size that’s easily tucked away when not needed. Jegatheesan Soundarapandian’s single-digit display, however, is just the opposite standing at nearly seven feet tall.

    The project is constructed out of cardboard, with a PVC spine for extra strength. Inside, addressable LED lighting illuminates each segment under Arduino control, with an HC-05 module used to interface with an Android app. Two 18550 batteries provide power for the unit, along with a DC-DC voltage regulator to supply the strip with 5V.

  • GSoC 2020 Project Update(UFS2): First Evaluation

    This is my second post related to my project, Adding UFS2 file system in Haiku.

  • Apple advises against MacBook camera covers due to display cracking
  • Apple Warns Against Closing MacBooks With a Cover Over the Camera
  •  

  • Nokia makes step in data center networking

                     

                       

    Apple is an early adopter of the innovative technology, deploying the solution within its cloud operations in its data centers · Nokia redefines openness, application development flexibility, robustness and operational tools for rapidly building and confidently operating data center networks at scale Nokia has redefined data center fabrics with the launch of a new and modern Network Operating System (NOS) and a declarative, intent-based automation and operations toolkit.

                       

    This will allow cloud and data center builders to scale and adapt operations in the face of year-over-year exponential traffic growth and constant change brought on from technology shifts like 5G and Industry 4.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fedora program update: 2020-28

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. The Nest With Fedora Call for Participation is now open.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/28

    This week I have been fighting a bit with the size of the DVD. Due to some mistake in the pattern definition, it was for a good chunk ignored. Serves me right for fixing the error and then getting an ISO file that would not ever fit on a DVD, eh? Well, long story short: I needed to save some space, so looked at what the ‘fix’ newly brought on the DVD and aligned to what the DVD looked like before.

  • Nour E-Din ElNhass: An Appointment Up the Hill

    In my last post I showed screenshots for contacts appearing in Evolution, and explained that the .source file was created manually and that the credentials were hard coded for retrieving a specific journal form a specific EteSync account.

    After finishing this, I extended so that I can also retrieve calenders and tasks in the same manner which was quite easy as I already understood what should be done. Then I created an etesync-backend file, which generally handles the user’s collection account in evolution (retrieving/ creating /deleting) journals which are address-book or calenders .source files.

    The next step was then to make a user enter his credentials, So it isn’t hard coded. In this stage I had faced some issues regarding the implementation, I asked for my mentors help. Some of the problems that I faced were I needed to create a new dialog that will appear ask the user for his credentials and retrieve the data from EteSync, this had some implementation problems for me at first. Other issues appeared while integrating had to change some pieces.

  • Kiwi TCMS 8.5

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 8.5!

    [...]

    Our website has been nominated in the 2020 .eu Web Awards and we've promised to do everything in our power to greet future FOSDEM visitors with an open source billboard advertising at BRU airport.

  • What is Application Definition?

    Application definition is the process of creating a codified operational runbook. It formalizes the process of describing in code everything an application needs to be built, run, and managed.

  • Open source contributions face friction over company IP

    Now, the overwhelming majority -- more than 90% -- of proposed open source contributions are approved by the council, said Nithya Ruff, the head of the Comcast open source program office. Under the current advisory council process, once engineers are approved to contribute to existing projects, they can make further contributions without having to go through the process all over again, according to Ruff. The process typically takes a few days at most. And since 2016, Comcast has donated several entire projects to open source, such as its Traffic Control CDN and Web PA client-server interface.

  • Virtualization Is Key to the Future of IT. Therefore ... What?

    If you look at commercial servers around the world, including those that provide the cloud in all its many forms to consumers of cloud-based infrastructures, platforms, services, and applications, you’ll soon learn that the vast majority of them run some version of Linux on the hardware, and consume a great many more Linux-based VMs than Windows-based ones.

    Even Microsoft has had to become more catholic in its approach: Today, its Azure cloud environment spawns Linux and Windows VMs with equal facility. Windows 10 has also become ever more accommodating of Linux, thanks to the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) support for Linux within the Windows OS, along with Hyper-V’s ability to accommodate both Linux and Windows VMs.

    Specific versions of Linux have been developed as “network operating systems” that run on switches, and provide fully virtualized complex, networking environments. Thus, for example, Nvidia subsidiary Cumulus Networks offers a free virtual appliance called Cumulus VX that runs on KVM (a Linux-based or bare-metal hypervisor), Virtualbox (from a provider or as a local hypervisor), and Vagrant (from a libvirt provider).

    Cumulus Networks’ offering is based around Cumulus Linux, which adds a Network Command Line Utility (NCLU) to the basic Linux environment. This supports configuration, provisioning, and virtualization of network switches to support fully virtualized network infrastructures and let people learn about complex routing protocols such as BGP, XBGP, OSPF, and so forth.

    Other network players also offer virtualized toolsets and learning environments for their networking products and services as well, so they’re worth looking into as well, if networking is your thing.

  • Docker partners with AWS to smooth container deployments

    Docker containers, of course, can be used anywhere. But while developers may use Docker Desktop and the Docker CLI for building applications on their desktop, they may also have used Docker Compose to define and run multi-container applications via a YAML file. So far, so good.

    The problem is that there hasn't been a simple seamless way to use Docker and deploy to AWS from their desktop. That's because essential Amazon ECS constructs were not part of the Docker Compose specification. For instance, to run even a simple Compose file and deploy to ECS, developers are required to leave Docker tools and configure an Amazon VPC, Amazon ECS Cluster, and Amazon ECS Task Definition.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Chromebook that acts like a computer (but isn't quite)

    Chrome OS, you see, was originally little more than the Google Chrome browser, with a minimal operating system wrapped around it to make the browser go.

    [...]

    (I should add here that, at the time of writing, the Linux feature was still in "beta", and exhibited a couple of bugs. Though, as I will get into in a moment, those bugs may well be hardware-related, rather than a problem with Chrome OS itself.)

  • Best Business Intelligence Software and Business Operating System Options for 2020

    2020 is not just the year of further technical advancement if anything, 2020 seems to be more business-centric than anything else regardless of the subject area or nature. The technological progress of businesses can only be ensured if the in-house IT infrastructures are up to date. For cloud computing though, Linux is proving to be an unparalleled fit and rather an inexpensive fit for businesses.

    You will also find that the integration of Linux systems is quite simple depending on the specific Linux distribution – distro – you select in coordination with your computing requirement.

    The best still is the fact that you don’t have to discard your standing infrastructure to appropriate the flexibility that open-source software and cost-effective functionality of Linux provides. It is literally a free replacement for other OSs, which businesses find more than a little hard to comprehend.

    Linux does not require purchase prizes even for the applications unless you are a kind of business that needs expert help from paid tech support. Even that can be worked away, given the variety of Linux system administrator training programs available today which effectively ticks an overhead off the list of businesses’ overall cost.

  • Adding EteSync calendars and tasks to Kontact - GSoC 2020 with KDE and EteSync [Part 4]

    Last month, I wrote about adding EteSync address books to Kontact. Since then, I have been working on extending this functionality to calendars and tasks as well. I am happy to report that fetching and modifying EteSync contacts, calendars and tasks is now possible in Kontact. If you want to test it out, skip to ”Testing the resource” section below.

  • Mobile App Stores and the Power of Incentives

    If you want to understand how a system works and especially if you want to change how a system works, look to the incentives. Human behavior is driven by a series of rewards and punishments, carrots and sticks, and the same holds true for business. While you can certainly look to regulations or user education to change behavior, ultimately those measures just factor in to the risk/reward calculations a business or user takes.

    For instance, delivery drivers in big cities routinely flout parking regulations. Why would they do that when it’s against the law and can cause a fine? Enforcement isn’t guaranteed (you only get fined if you get caught) and the added cost of complying with the law is much greater than the cost of the occasional ticket.

    This means if you want to change how businesses treat privacy, you have to change the incentives that drive them. Applied to the mobile app ecosystem, even with privacy regulation, privacy settings, and user prompts, companies will weigh the risks and costs of getting caught against the reward of capturing and selling user data and as long as the reward is enough, many will take the risk.

    [...]

    Of course these SDKs also make spying on users the path of least resistance, as it’s much easier to just request full permissions for your app on a user’s phone than it is to start with no permissions and figure out which ones you truly need. Why does a flashlight app need access to your location and contact list? Since so many applications are designed with selling user data in mind, even a well-meaning, ethical, privacy-conscious developer might find it hard to identify and remove all third party tracking if they base their application on existing examples and popular SDKs.

    Users also find laziness to be a powerful incentive. Many application developers take advantage of this by requiring users to opt-out of tracking, often via hard-to-find settings buried deep within the application. Many if not most users don’t bother to tweak their privacy settings, and many companies share your data without your consent.

  • Maia ESP32-S2 Development Board Features Micro USB OTG Port, Prototyping Area

    One of the advantages of the new ESP32-S2 processor is that it offers a USB OTG interface. So far few boards took advantage of the extra interface, and one of the rare ones is Cucumber ESP32-S2 board with a USB-C OTG port.

    There’s another option with a slightly unusual form factor thanks to Stetel Things’ Maia ESP32-S2 development board with the typical USB-C port for power and debugging, plus a micro USB OTG port, and a small prototyping area.

  • Distributing Raspberry Pi computers to help families access education
  • New releases: Tor 0.3.5.11, 0.4.2.8, and 0.4.3.6 (with security fixes)

    We have new stable releases today. If you build Tor from source, you can download the source code for 0.4.3.6 on the website. Packages should be available within the next several weeks, with a new Tor Browser by the end of the month.

    There are also updated versions for older supported series. You can download 0.3.5.11 and 0.4.2.8 at https://dist.torproject.org/.

  • New alpha release: Tor 0.4.4.2-alpha

    There's a new alpha release available for download. If you build Tor from source, you can download the source code for 0.4.4.2-alpha from the download page on the website. Packages should be available over the coming weeks, with a new alpha Tor Browser release around the end of the month.

    Remember, this is an alpha release: you should only run this if you'd like to find and report more bugs than usual.

  •  

  • Hugo: a static-site generator

                 

                   

    Static web-site generators take page content written in a markup language and render it into fully baked HTML, making it easy for developers to upload the result and serve a web site simply and securely. This article looks at Hugo, a static-site generator written in Go and optimized for speed. It is a flexible tool that can be configured for a variety of use cases: simple blogs, project documentation, larger news sites, and even government services.

  • diffoscope 151 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 151.

  • New German law would force ISPs to allow secret service to install trojans on user devices

    A new law being proposed in Germany would see all 19 federal state intelligence agencies in Germany granted the power to spy on German citizens through the use of trojans. The new law would force internet service providers (ISPs) to install government hardware at their data centers which would reroute data to law enforcement, and then on to its intended destination so the target is blissfully unaware that their communications and even software updates are being proxied. Specifically, Netzpolitik pointed out that the law calls for the following:

  •                

  • Linus Torvalds longs for Apple’s ARM-based Mac

                     

                       

    Torvalds said he was more interested in an eventual Apple ARM desktop system over a laptop; he sees laptops as primarily something to use when travelling. The main selling point for ARM thus far has been low power, not performance, making the laptop space the more natural fit, Torvalds said. But ARM has the potential to grow beyond the low-power realm, a direction he expects Apple to take.

  •                

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 103

    Before introducing the recent changes in the YaST land, the team would like to congratulate the openSUSE community for the release of Leap 15.2. It looks like a pretty solid release, and we are proud of being part of this project.

    Having said that, let’s focus on what the team has achieved during the past sprint.

  • [syslog-ng] Insider 2020-07: TLS; capabilities; 3.27;

    This is the 83rd issue of syslog-ng Insider, a monthly newsletter that brings you syslog-ng-related news.

  •         

  • Top 6 Open Source Bitcoin Wallets, Rated and Reviewed for 2020

    The biggest appeal of open source wallets is that their code can be reviewed and publicly audited for potential security issues. As a result, open source software is often more robust than closed-source. The same goes for bitcoin wallets.

    [...]

    Whether you’re a beginner who needs a fantastic UI to help you navigate the intricacies of an open source wallet or you’re a developer who needs a platform that allows you to build on a secure base, these wallets will give you everything you’re looking for.

  •        

  • Android 10 has the fastest update rate ever, hits 16% of users in 10 months

    Google today dropped a blog post detailing its progress on improving the Android ecosystem's update speed. The company has been hard at work for the past few years modularizing Android, with the hope that making Android easier to update would result in device manufacturers pushing out updates faster. Google's efforts have been paying off, with the company announcing Android 10 has had the fastest rollout ever.

    The last few versions of Android have each brought a major improvement to Android's update system. Android 8 introduced Project Treble, which separated the OS from the hardware support, enabling easier porting of Android across devices. In Android 9 Pie, Google completed its work on Treble and started publishing Generic System Images (GSIs): drop-in versions of Android that work on any Project Treble-compatible device. Android 10 introduced Project Mainline and the new APEX file type designed for updatable lower-level system components, delivered through the Play Store.

    Google's stats show that all this work is actually improving the ecosystem. "Thanks to these efforts," Google writes, "the adoption of Android 10 has been faster than any previous versions of Android. Android 10 was running on 100 million devices 5 months post launch—28% faster than Android Pie."

  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: June 2020
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.8 Released For Open-Source Benchmarking, New Docker Benchmarking Image

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.8 is available today as the latest quarterly stable feature release to our open-source, cross-platform benchmarking software.

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.8 brings numerous improvements as our Q3'2020 update including:

    - Improved handling of test installation failures around failed download URLs and other cases where newer minor revisions of said test profiles have corrected them. The new behavior is to seamlessly use the new minor revisions of test profile updates to correct said failures rather than requiring manual intervention over the version specified.

  • How to convert an ISO to a Docker image
  • How To Set Up Nginx Server Blocks on Ubuntu 20.04
  • How to Install MariaDB on Ubuntu 16.04 Linux Operating System

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Misconceptions About Being A So Called "Linux Power User"
  • Releax OS 0.5 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Releax OS 0.5 Beta.

  • Create Music with LMMS music production suite

    LMMS was first introduced to the world as Linux MultiMedia Studio. Today, this digital audio workstation application program is available in 20 different languages, enabling musicians around the world to use this cross-platform tool to make music. What makes it unique is that it is a completely free, open-source, community-driven project, released under the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2). So, despite the many music-making software products available online, LMMS is worth a download.

  • Cockpit 223

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 223.

  • Virtqueues and virtio ring: How the data travels

    As stated earlier, a virtqueue is just a queue of guest’s buffers that the host consumes, either reading them or writing to them. A buffer can be read-only or write-only from the device point of view, but never both.

    The descriptors can be chained, and the framing of the message can be spread whatever way is more convenient. For example, to spread a 2000 byte message in one single buffer or to use two 1000 byte buffers should be the same.

    Also, it provides driver to device notifications (doorbell) method, to signal that one or more buffers have been added to the queue, and vice-versa, devices can interrupt the driver to signal used buffers. It is up to the underlying driver to provide the right method to dispatch the actual notification, for example using PCI interruptions or memory writing: The virtqueue only standardizes the semantics of it.

    As stated before, the driver and the device can advise the other to not to emit notifications to reduce its dispatching overhead. Since this operation is asynchronous we will describe how to do so in further sections.

  • IBM Cloud Pak for Data in 2 minutes
  • Software Defined Radio Academy Goes Virtual

    There are some older videos on the channel, too, including some GNU Radio material. We hear some of the upcoming videos will have some new GNU Radio content, too, including some on the GNU Radio implementation for Android.

  • GSoC Week 5 - Qt3D based backend for KStars

    In the fifth week of GSoC, I worked on adding stars in the 3d Painter backend along with grids. Code for Qt3D is shifted to a new Skymap3D now.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Status Update

    I’ve been blogging pretty in-depth about Zink and related code for a while, so let’s do a quick roundup with some future blog post spoilers.

  • Help message for shell scripts

    Add your message with all the required information on top of your file, just right after the shebang.

    [...]

    Halfway done, now need to get this message in runtime with sed.

  • Timecounters available to userland in -current

    Among other programs, Office suites and browsers tend to hit the gettimeofday() very frequently, and this should lessen the CPU usage of those programs, and make things feel a bit snappier. Ted Unangst wrote about this in this post on running ktrace on a browser, and in this post about mplayer consuming lots of CPU while decoding MP3s.

  • Learn at home #4: All about Scratch
  • Developing the next version of HPN-SSH

    The developers of HPN-SSH at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) have recently received a grant from the National Science Foundation to develop and incorporate new features and optimizations. This grant will provide direct support to developers at PSC for two years. The goal of this grant (NSF Award#: 2004012) is to provide HPN-SSH with the level of performance required in modern high performance computing.

    What is HPN-SSH?

    HPN-SSH is a series of modifications to OpenSSH, the predominant implementation of the ssh protocol. It was originally developed to address performance issues when using ssh on high speed long distance networks (also known as Long Fat Networks: LFNs). By taking advantage of automatically optimized receive buffers HPN-SSH could improve performance dramatically on these paths. Later advances include; disabling encryption after authentication to transport non-sensitive bulk data, modifying the AES-CTR cipher to use multiple CPU cores, more detailed connection logging, and peak throughput values in the scp progress bar. More information can be found on HPN-SSH page on the PSC website.

    What are you working on?

    We’ve identified six different areas where we would like to focus our efforts. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list but is more of a starting point for our deliverables. Depending on community input this list may change to develop advances of highest interest. The six initial proposed areas of work are: [...]

  • DIY SSH Bastion Host

    Bastion is a military term meaning “a projecting part of a fortification.”

    In the same way that a home WiFi router sits between the vast and perilous internet and the often insecure devices on a local network, a bastion host sits between the public internet and an internal network (a VPC, for example), acting as a gateway to reach the internal hosts while protecting them from direct exposure to the wilds of the public internet. Bastion hosts often run OpenSSH or a remote desktop server.

    A bastion host serves as an important choke point in a network. Given its position, it can take on a lot of responsibilities: auditing and session logging, user authentication for internal hosts, and advanced threat detection. But it doesn't need to do all that. We're going to keep things simple here and build a bastion from scratch that supports the proxying of SSH connections. Then we'll talk about some fancier stuff we could do.

  • Intel Details Thunderbolt 4 With More Capabilities, USB4 Compatibility
  • Intel Introduces Thunderbolt 4, Showcases MultiPort Thunderbolt 4 Docks
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (roundcube), Fedora (chromium, firefox, and ngircd), Oracle (firefox and thunderbird), Scientific Linux (firefox), Slackware (seamonkey), SUSE (djvulibre, ffmpeg, firefox, freetds, gd, gstreamer-plugins-base, icu, java-11-openjdk, libEMF, libexif, librsvg, LibVNCServer, libvpx, Mesa, nasm, nmap, opencv, osc, perl, php7, python-ecdsa, SDL2, texlive-filesystem, and thunderbird), and Ubuntu (cinder, python-os-brick).

  • Exploiting F5 Big IP Vulnerability | CVE-2020-5902

    CVE-2020-5902 is a critical remote code execution vulnerability in the configuration interface (aka Traffic Management User Interface – TMUI) of BIG-IP devices used by some of the world’s biggest companies.

    So today we are going to demonstrate how it is being used.

    To exploit CVE-2020-5902, an attacker needs to send a specifically crafted HTTP request to the server hosting the Traffic Management User Interface (TMUI) utility for BIG-IP configuration.

  • Arm to spin off its two IoT businesses to SoftBank

    Arm said it will hand over its IoT Platform and Treasure Data businesses to SoftBank in order to focus exclusively on the semiconductor intellectual property business that has helped it become ubiquitous in mobile devices.

    The transfer of the IoT Services Group businesses is still pending review from the company’s board, and will also have to face standard regulatory reviews. However, Arm said it’s confident the transfers will be completed by about September.

    The move would effectively remove ISG from Arm’s brand, but the businesses will still collaborate with one another, Arm said. However, the spinoff plan doesn’t involve Arm’s IP for IoT chips.

  • My Take on Email

    Email has been discussed a lot lately. Perhaps it's because we all rely on it more during this period of lockdown. Maybe it's due to Hey being released? Or are we all realising that email is an old technology and we need to move on? Whatever the reason may be, people are talking about email; heres my take on it.

    [...]

    While some providers allow you to sign up anonymously on Tor, email will never be private. It will also never be as secure as platforms like Signal or Briar. You can improve the privacy of emails by encrypting their contents or using a provider that encrypts account data at rest. Email is not private and shouldn't be treated as such. Instant messaging is more secure and private than email, but email still has many benefits.

  • Why Windows Phone Is Dead, But Not Completely Gone

    The second trend that has caught my attention lately is the development of Linux phones. In some ways, this trend is nothing new. Hobbyists and Linux enthusiasts have been experimenting with running lightweight Linux distributions on smartphones for years.

    The thing that has changed is that those who wish to run Linux on a smartphone no longer have to take the do-it-yourself approach. A company named Pine64 is now selling the PinePhone, a fully functional Linux phone that you can buy today. This $149.99 phone is being marketed toward Linux enthusiasts, those for whom security is an absolute must, and people who simply have had enough of iOS and Android.

    I haven't yet had the opportunity to try out the PinePhone for myself (although I plan to), so I can't tell you how well it works. Regardless, I think it's great that someone has taken the initiative to bring a Linux phone to market.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • mintCast 338.5 – The Ripple Effect

    In our Innards section, we ask Owen how Linux is improving the lives around him.

    And finally, some feedback and a few suggestions

  • Buttery Smooth Fedora | LINUX Unplugged 361

    Fedora's getting to work and reconsidering some long held-assumptions.

    Plus the best tool for getting things done on Linux, we take a look at openSUSE Leap 15.2, and breathe new life into an old Pebble.

  • Intel Architectural LBR Support Going Into Linux 5.9

    Intel CPUs have long supported LBR for last branch records as a means of recording the branches to which software has taken along with exposing other control flow information. This has relied upon model-specific registers while with future Intel CPUs this is being folded into a more universal CPU architectural feature. Support for Intel "Arch LBR" is set to come later this year with the Linux 5.9 kernel.

    The Linux kernel has been working with the existing MSR-based LBR functionality where with the likes of the perf subsystem can be used for recording the branches taken and other control flow information exposed for analysis and profiling. Intel recently has been working on added this Architectural LBR support to the Linux kernel.

  • First powerpc64 snapshots available

    Since we reported the first bits of powerpc64 support going into the tree on 16 May, work has progressed at a steady pace, resulting in snapshots now being available for this platform.

  • Website hosting on Raspberry Pi 4 with Mythic Beasts
  • [Old] Produce your own physical chips. For free. In the Open.

    Today, in a FOSSi Dial-Up talk, Tim Ansell of Google announced SkyWater PDK, the first manufacturable, open source process design kit. What differentiates this PDK from previous attempts is the fact that it is manufacturable: with this PDK, you can actually produce chips with the SkyWater foundry in the 130nm node.

    That leaves you as chip designer only with one road block: money. Manufacturing chips is expensive – even for more than a decade old nodes like the 130nm node, you need to spend at least a couple thousand dollars.

    You know what? Don’t worry – Google and efabless have got you covered! They are providing completely free of cost chip manufacturing runs: one in November this year, and multiple more in 2021. All open source chip designs qualify, no further strings attached!

  • New Release: Tor Browser 9.5.2

    Tor Browser 9.5.2 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory. This is an Android-only release.

    This release updates Firefox to 68.10.1esr.

  • against testing

    I really dislike writing tests. There's some amount of discomfort I'd be willing to sustain if I felt it they were beneficial, but I also find they're rarely worth the bother.

    In order to be effective, a test needs to exist for some condition not handled by the code. However, typically when the same mind writes the code and the tests, the coverage overlaps. Errors arise from unexpected conditions, but due to their unexpected nature, these are the conditions which also go untested.

  • I now think that blog 'per day' pages with articles are a mistake

    There's a bit of me that's sad about this shift in blog design and web usage; the per-day, per-month, and per-year organization had a pleasant regularity and intuitive appeal. But I think its time has passed. More and more, we're all tending toward the kind of minimal URL structure typical of static sites, even when we have dynamic sites and so could have all the different URL structures and ways of accessing our pages that we could ask for.

today's leftovers (Red Hat Picks and Security Mostly)

Filed under
Misc

           

  • WordPress 5.5 Beta 1

    WordPress 5.5 Beta 1 is now available for testing!

    This software is still in development, so it’s not recommended to run this version on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

    [...]

    Keep your eyes on the Make WordPress Core blog for 5.5-related developer notes in the coming weeks, breaking down these and other changes in greater detail.

    So far, contributors have fixed more than 350 tickets in WordPress 5.5, including 155 new features and enhancements, and more bug fixes are on the way.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (php7.3), Fedora (gst), Mageia (libvirt, mariadb, pdns-recursor, and ruby), openSUSE (chocolate-doom, coturn, kernel, live555, ntp, python3, and rust, rust-cbindgen), Oracle (virt:ol), Red Hat (file, firefox, gettext, kdelibs, kernel, kernel-alt, microcode_ctl, nghttp2, nodejs:10, nodejs:12, php, qemu-kvm, ruby, and tomcat), SUSE (libjpeg-turbo, mozilla-nspr, mozilla-nss, mozilla-nss, nasm, openldap2, and permissions), and Ubuntu (coturn, glibc, nss, and openexr).

  • Lawsuit & Bi-Partisan Group Of Senators Seek To Push Back On Trump Administration's Attempt To Corrupt The Open Technology Fund

    Last month we wrote about how the newly appointed head of the US Agency for Global Media (USAGM) had cleaned house, getting rid of the heads of the various organizations under the USAGM umbrella. That included Voice of America, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia, Middle East Broadcasting... and the Open Technology Fund. The general story making the rounds is that Pack, a Steve Bannon acolyte, planned to turn the famously independent media operations into a propaganda arm for the Trump administration. Leaving side the concerns about why this is so dangerous and problematic on the media side, we focused mostly on the one "different" organization under the USAGM banner: the Open Technology Fund.

  • EFF Joins Coalition Calling On the EU to Introduce Interoperability Rules

    Today, EFF sent a joint letter to European Commission Executive Vice President Margrethe Vestager, highlighting the enormous potential of interoperability to help achieve the EU’s goals for Europe’s digital future. EFF joins a strong coalition of organizations representing European civil society organizations, entrepreneurs, and SMEs. We are calling on the European Commission to consider the role interoperability can play in ensuring that technology creates a fair and competitive economy and strengthens an open, democratic, and sustainable society. Specifically, we urge the Commission to include specific measures requiring interoperability of large Internet platforms in the forthcoming Digital Services Act package. This will strengthen user empowerment and competition in the European digital single market.

    Interoperability mandates will enable users to exercise greater control over their online experiences. No longer confronted with the binary choice of either staying on dominant platforms that do not serve their needs or losing access to their social network, users will be able to choose freely the tools that best respect their privacy, security, or accessibility preferences. Interoperability rules will also be crucial to ensure a dynamic market in which new entrants and innovative business models will have a fair shot to convince users of their value.

  • How not to treat a customer

    First, my complaint to Simply NUC about the recent comedy of errors around my attempt to order a replacement fan for Cathy’s NUC. 

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – May 2020
  • Kafka Monthly Digest – June 2020

    In this 29th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in June 2020.

  • Introduction to Watson AutoAI

    AutoML is a current buzzword that appears in a lot in tech industry articles and research, and is a product offering in many vendor product catalogs. It’s also one of the topics that I get asked about, such as “How to approach AutoML products”, “Will these products perform all of the steps of the machine learning lifecycle while giving me as a data scientist some control over the parameters?”

  • Red Hat Learning Subscription News Flash 5: First look at Red Hat Remote Certification Exams
  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Testing Accidents

    Armed with a colossal set of patches in my zink-wip branch and feeling again like maybe it was time to be a team player instead of charging off down the field on my own, I decided yesterday morning to check out Erik’s MR to enable ARB_depth_clamp that’s been blocked on a failing piglit test for several weeks. The extension was working, supposedly, and all this MR does is enable it for use, so how hard could this be?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Late Night Linux – Episode 93

    Great mobile Linux news, dispelling myths about desktop market share, the beginning of the end for BIOS booting, KDE Korner, and some more of your ask us anything questions.

  • Sysctl Command in Linux
  • GSoC 2020 with KDE

    Much to my delight, the first phase of my project for GSoC has completed successully. All the goals according to my proposal timeline for the first month have been met and I’m pleased to say that I have passed my first evaluation.

  • LibreOffice GSoC Week 5 Report

    Hello, Last week I finished this academic year. Finally, I don’t have any exam that I have to study. So, I can spare more time to my project.
    Unfortunately, I just sent a little patch. For now, this patch has some parts that need to be fixed. I will finish the solving problems on this patch.

  • Melissa Wen: GSoC First Phase - Achievements

    Outside the context of exploring and becoming acquainted with the case, examining the anatomy of the kms_cursor_crc I caught useless parameters in a general IGT function, i.e., it requires two parameters, but never uses them within its code. I checked the author (git blame) and asked him on IRC about the need for these additional parameters, but I didn’t get a response (or maybe I missed the reply due to disconnection). Then, I sent an RFC patch to the mailing list and also nothing. Finally, my mentor took a look, and he agreed that the parameters seem useless and can be removed. He asked me to resend as a normal patch.

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Fragcolors

    SPIR-V has no builtin for a color decoration on variables, which means that gl_FragColor goes through as a regular variable with no special handling. As such, there’s similarly no special handling in the underlying Vulkan driver to split the output of this variable out to the various color attachments, which means that only the first color attachment will have the expected result when multiple color attachments are present.

  • USB-C Hubs and Ethernet

    USB-C continues to be an exciting mess. And by exciting I mean frustrating and by mess I mean omnishambles. I already cycled through many, many USB-C hubs with various different degrees of success but the latest iteration of failure I think is pretty interesting that it's worth sharing.

    For the most part my USB-C hub pains have been isolated to them just breaking eventually, overheating, not delivering the necessary power or just plain not working. The most recent breakage is that I have three hubs where if I connect an ethernet cable to it and a USB-C charger but disconnect my laptop, after about 30 seconds the network goes haywire and eventually more and more devices in it become unavailable.

    The curious bit here is debugging this mess and why it happens. Initially I thought it was a faulty switch because only devices behind a certain switch (A Netgear one) cut out, so I got it replaced but that did nothing. It's also weird that this behavior did not immediately surface. I have been using these USB-C hubs for an extended period of time but only lately did it cause my network to completely go haywire. My hunch is that it has something to do with generally having an additional two switches on the network and changed the overall topology slightly.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Upcoming SAVVY-V Open Source RISC-V Cluster Board Supports 10GbE via Microsemi PolarFire 64-bit RISC-V SoC

    RISC-V based PolarFire SoC FPGA by Microsemi may be coming up in the third quarter of this year, but Ali Uzel has been sharing a few details about SAVVY-V advanced open-source RISC-V cluster board made by FOSOH-V (Flexible Open SOurce Hardware for RISC-V) community of developers.

    It’s powered by Microsemi Polarfire RISC-V SoC MPFS250T with four 64-bit RISC-V cores, a smaller RV64IMAC monitor core, and FPGA fabric that allows 10GbE via SFP+ cages, and exposes six USB Type-C ports. The solution is called a cluster board since up to six SAVVY-V boards can be stacked via a PC/104+ connector and interfaced via the USB-C ports.

  • Some PSAs for NUC owners

    I’ve written before, in Contemplating the Cute Brick, that I’m a big fan of Intel’s NUC line of small-form-factor computers. Over the last week I’ve been having some unpleasant learning experiences around them. I’m still a fan, but I’m shipping this post where the search engines can see it in support of future NUC owners in trouble.

    Two years ago I bought an NUC for my wife Cathy to replace her last tower-case PC – the NUC8i3BEH1. This model was semi-obsolete even then, but I didn’t want one of the newer i5 or i7 NUCs because I didn’t think it would fit my wife’s needs as well.

    What my wife does with her computer doesn’t tax it much. Web browsing, office work, a bit of gaming that does not extend to recent AAA titles demanding the latest whizzy graphics card. I thought her needs would be best served by a small, quiet, low-power-consumption machine that was cheap enough to be considered readily disposable at the end of its service life. The exact opposite of my Great Beast…

    The NUC was an experiment that made Cathy and me happy. She especially likes the fact that it’s small and light enough to be mounted on the back of her monitor, so it effectively takes up no desk space or floor area in her rather crowded office. I like the NUC’s industrial design and engineering – lots of nice little details like the four case screws being captive to the baseplate so you cannot lose them during disassembly.

    Also. Dammit, NUCs are pretty. I say dammit because I feel like this shouldn’t matter to me and am a bit embarrassed to discover that it does. I like the color and shape and feel of these devices. Someone did an amazing job of making them unobtrusively attractive.

    [...]

    When I asked if Simply NUC knew of a source for a fan that would fit my 8i3BEH1 – a reasonable question, I think, to ask a company that loudly claims to be a one-stop shop for all NUC needs – the reply email told me I’d have to do “personal research” on that.

    It turns out that if the useless drone who was Simply NUC “service” had cared about doing his actual job, he could have the read the fan’s model number off the image I had sent him into a search box and found multiple sources within seconds, because that’s what I then did. Of course this would have required caring that a customer was unhappy, which apparently they don’t do at Simply NUC.

    Third reason I know this: My request for a refund didn’t even get refused; it wasn’t even answered.

  • GNU Binutils 2.35 Preparing For Release

    Binutils 2.35 was branched this weekend as this important component to the open-source Linux ecosystem.

    Binutils 2.35 has been branched meaning feature development is over for this next version of this collection of GNU tools.

    GNU Binutils 2.356 drops x86 Native Client (NaCl) support with Google having deprecated it in favor of WebAssembly, new options added for the readelf tool, many bug fixes, and an assortment of other changes albeit mostly on the minor side.

  • Using CPU Subsets for Building Software

    NetBSD has a somewhat obscure tool named psrset that allows creating “sets” of cores and running tasks on one of those sets. Let’s try it: [...]

  • What a TLS self signed certificate is at a mechanical level

    To simplify a lot, a TLS certificate is a bundle of attributes wrapped around a public key. All TLS certificates are signed by someone; we call this the issuer. The issuer for a certificate is identified by their X.509 Subject Name, and also at least implicitly by the keypair used to sign the certificate (since only an issuer TLS certificate with the right public key can validate the signature).

  • Security Researchers Attacked Google’s Mysterious Fuchsia OS: Here’s What They Found

    A couple of things that Computer Business Review has widely covered are important context for the security probe. (These won’t be much surprise to Fuchsia’s followers of the past two years.)

    i.e. Fuschsia OS is based on a tiny custom kernel from Google called Zircon which has some elements written in C++, some in Rust. Device drivers run in what’s called “user mode” or “user land”, meaning they’re not given fully elevated privileges. This means they can be isolated better.

    In user land, everything that a driver does has to go via the kernel first before hitting the actually computer’s resources. As Quark Labs found, this is a tidy way of reducing attack surface. But with some sustained attention, its researchers managed to get what they wanted: “We are able to gain kernel code execution from a regular userland process.”

  • What have you been playing on Linux? Come and have a chat

    Ah Sunday, that special day that's a calm before the storm of another week and a time for a community chat here on GOL. Today, it's our birthday! If you didn't see the post earlier this week, GamingOnLinux as of today has hit the big 11 years old! Oh how time sure flies by.

    Onto the subject of gaming on Linux: honestly, the majority of my personal game time has been taken up by Into the Breach. It's so gorgeously streamlined, accessible, fun and it's also ridiculously complex at the same time. Tiny maps that require a huge amount of forward thinking, as you weigh up each movement decision against any possible downsides. It's like playing chess, only with big mecha fighting off aliens trying to take down buildings.

    [...]

    I've also been quite disappointed in Crayta on Stadia, as it so far hasn't lived up to even my smallest expectations for the game maker. It just seems so half-baked, with poor/stiff animations and a lack of any meaningful content to start with. I'll be checking back on it in a few months but for now it's just not fun.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines