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today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Introduction To Univention Corporate Server

    Today, I want to introduce Univention Corporate Server (UCS), an enterprise Linux distribution based on Debian GNU/Linux and built by Univention. Let me begin with Univention, the organization behind UCS. Univention builds Open Source software for organizations to make the access to applications and devices for their members as easy as possible. Basically, this involves three core topics:

  • Google Partners with Cisco for Hybrid Cloud Powered by Kubernetes

    Cisco and Google announced a new partnership on Oct. 24 in a bid to help enable a hybrid cloud solution that uses Cisco hardware on-premises and Google Cloud Platform.

  • Cisco and Google partner on new hybrid-cloud approach: Goodzilla

    On Oct. 25, Cisco and Google announced a new technology partnership, which went by the internal name Goodzilla. This will enable Cisco customers to run and move their applications between Cisco-powered data centers and the Google Cloud Platform in a new kind of hybrid cloud.

    The glue that will bind them together: Kubernetes and Istio.

    Kubernetes is an open-source container manager. Originally developed by Google as Borg, today, it's controlled by the The Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). It has quickly become the most popular container orchestration program. Except for Amazon Web Services (AWS), it's available on all major public clouds and works with all containers.

  • Many thanks to Linode

    Behind the scenes with Kubuntu, we build packages, then test and finally release to our users. We mostly rely on the building services provided by Canonical on Launchpad, but also are lucky enough to have services donated by some third parties. A lot of our developers are working on quite slow internet connections and when working with large source-code tarballs this takes a very long time, is painful and quite honestly leads to developers burning out.

  • Linux-based RFID portal designed for complex data fusion

    Italian RFID technology producer Datalogic has unveiled a high-end RFID portal reader designed for real-time inventory management in warehouse, automatic gate, and retail environments. The Linux-driven DLR-PR001 is essentially an IoT gateway for RFID and other inputs. It’s especially suited for “complex AutoID scenarios where data can be collected and fed directly to the reader from multiple sources such as smart card readers, bar code readers, GPS and other in-field sensors,” says the company.

  • Linux-friendly SBCs deliver Kaby Lake or Skylake on an ATX platter

    Both boards can run 64-bit Fedora Linux, as well as Windows builds up to 64-bit Windows 10. The boards are said to be suitable for embedded applications including digital signage, rolling stock, industrial robots, and aerospace.

  • Flash Drive-Sized VLC Adapter Plays Nice With Linux Laptops

    VLC pioneer PureLiFi has announced the LiFi XC, a USB stick-sized dongle that lets tablets and laptops connect to the internet via visible light.

    Teased earlier this year at Mobile World Congress, the LiFi XC is about three times smaller than the bulky LiFi X dongle and roughly 14 times smaller than the huge Li-Flame proof of concept product launched in 2014.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A REUSE compliant Curl

    The REUSE initiative is aiming to make free and open source software licenses computer readable. We do this by the introduction of our three REUSE best practices, all of which seek to make it possible for a computer program to read which licenses apply to a specific software package.

  • Cozy is a Promising New Audiobook Player for Linux Desktops

    A promising new audiobook player for Linux desktop has joined the shelves of open-source software. It’s called Cozy, uses GTK3, and is billed as providing a ‘modern’ front-end from which to browse your collection of talking books.

  • Calamares releases

    It’s been a quiet month for me for blogging, but one filled with unexpected and weird and not-really-bloggable things. There was a trip to Berlin, where I had the pleasure of meeing up with a bunch of KDE people whom I hadn’t seen for over a month. Long time. There was also an accident with maple syrup, I’m sure.

  • Some dreams about mageia 7

    As we released mageia 6 and we released Pulse 4.0 at work i had some time to think about what i would like to see, to do for mageia 7.

  • Red Hat honours IAG at its Innovation Awards for APAC

    Open source specialist Red Hat has announced that IAG has won the top honour at the 2017 Red Hat Innovation Awards for Australia and New Zealand.

    Red Hat says IAG has been chosen due to its outstanding and innovative usage of Red Hat solutions, and for the positive impact they have created in accelerating innovation through open source.

  • Updated Settings Application in Fedora 27 Workstation

    Fedora 27 Workstation is slated for release later in the year, and it ships with version 3.26 of GNOME. One of the awesome changes from upstream GNOME that is shipping in Fedora 27 is the re-designed Settings application. The new Settings has moved from a grid layout to a side panel, and several of the pages — like the display configuration — are also redesigned.

  • What I have found interesting in Fedora during the week 42 of 2017
  • The Official Ubuntu 17.10 ‘Artful Aardvark’ T-Shirt Is Here

    An official Ubuntu 17.10 t-shirt is now available to buy from Canonical’s online store.

    Canonical has produced mascot t-shirts for each release since Ubuntu 8.04 LTS ‘Hardy Heron’.

    The latest design is a dark blueish¹ color and boasts a bright orange aardvark mascot in the centre. The reverse of the shirt reads “Artful Aardvark 17.10” in orange text.

  • The Essential Phone gets a $200 price drop, now $499
  •   

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Users Discuss DRM 1 on 1 – Unleaded Hangout

    Linux Users Discuss DRM. Today my Brandon and I discuss encrypted media extensions, digital rights management and our freedom on the Linux desktop. So join Brandon and I as we as Linux Users Discuss DRM.

  • i965 Shader Cache Revised As It Still Might Squeeze Into Mesa 17.3

    Intel's Jordan Justen has sent out his third revision to the recently renewed patches for allowing an OpenGL on-disk shader cache for the "i965" Mesa driver.

    Just a few days back Jordan sent out a revised Intel shader cache implementation for this code that's long been baking on the Intel side but yet to be merged for mainline Mesa while the RadeonSI shader cache and co has been present now for many months.

  • Sunday Linux Gaming Wrap-up
  • retro-gtk: The Future, Marty!

    Let's come back to retro-gtk. In the previous articles I explained how bad retro-gtk was, what I did to start improving it and more importantly what I did to prepare the terrain for further development. This article will detail the aforementioned planed improvements!

  • Ikea’s Open-Source Showrooms

    Ikea Group will also roll out a new digital platform called 'Co-Create Ikea' which mimics its IT division's open-source software development, where customers have the chance help develop and test new products.

  • Glibc Picks Up Some More FMA Performance Optimizations

    The GNU C Library, glibc, has picked up support for some additional functions as FMA-optimized versions.

    The newest functions now getting the fused multiply-add (FMA) support are powf(), logf(), exp2f(), and log2f(). The FMA instruction set is present since Intel Haswell and AMD Piledriver generations and like past FMA optimizations, the benefits can be quite noticeable.

  • Landmark release of Termination of Transfer tool from Creative Commons and Authors Alliance

    For more than a decade, Creative Commons has developed and stewarded legal tools that give creators the opportunity to share their work on open terms. We have focused on tools that empower sharing at the moment of publication, leaving out an important group of creators: what about those who previously signed away their rights to their works long ago, but who now want to share on open terms under a CC license or renegotiate unfavorable publishing terms?

  • The recent catastrophic Wi-Fi vulnerability was in plain sight for 13 years behind a corporate paywall

    The recent Wi-Fi “KRACK” vulnerability, which allowed anyone to get onto a secure network (and which was quickly patched by reputable vendors), had been in plain sight behind a corporate-level paywall for 13 years. This raises a number of relevant, interesting, and uncomfortable questions.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Another Million Learn About GNU/Linux

    Ordinarily, I would not notice or even recommend a brief article in a magazine but this is Popular Science, the Bible of DIY types especially the young and restless who might actually take the plunge into FLOSS (Free/Libre Open Source Software). It’s a general magazine with a million subscribers.

  • Chromium 62 ready for download

    chromium_iconEarlier this week, Google released a security update for its chrome/chromium browser. The new version 62.0.3202.62 plugs the holes of 35 more or less serious issues, several of them have a CVE rating.

    When the topic of Chromium 62 came up in the comments section of a previous post, I mentioned that I was unable to compile it on Slackware 14.2. Errors like “error: static assertion failed: Bound argument |i| of type |Arg| cannot be converted and bound as |Storage|” yield some results when looked up on the Internet, and they indicate that Slackware’s own gcc-5.3.0 package is too old to compile chromium 62.

  • Playing with the pine64

     

    So I went for OpenBSD because I know the stuff and who to har^Wkindly ask for help. Spoiler alert, it's boring because it just works.

  • PrismTech Moves Market-Leading Proven DDS Solution to Open Source as Eclipse Cyclone
  • Nana Oforiatta Ayim’s Open-Source Encyclopedia of African History Starts With Ghana

    It is a rare kind of woman who enjoys a project so vast that it’s practically unfinishable, but Nana Oforiatta Ayim, a Ghanaian gallerist, writer, and historian, never quits what she has started. She’s discussing her work on the "Cultural Encyclopaedia", an attempt to “facilitate the re/ordering of knowledge, narratives, and representations from and about the African continent” through an online resource that includes an A-to-Z index and vertices of clickable images for entries. Eventually, a 54-volume book series—one for each country on the continent—will be published with selections from the encyclopedia's long, long list. Oforiatta Ayim is working with a small team of editors, and, starting with her native country, she has taken on the task of documenting all significant cultural touchstones in the thousands of years of African history. Plus, it will be open source to prevent it from having a top-down logic. “I’m a little bit crazy to take it on,” she says. “But if I’m not going to do it, who is going to be as crazy as me?”

  • The Only Person I’ll Pair Program with is my Cat

     

    I could argue (to varying degrees of success) that pair programming isn’t productive. Productivity of a practice is an easy thing to attack because, in our capitalist dystopia, it’s the end-all-be-all metric. But I hate pair programming, and it’s not just because I don’t feel productive. It’s a lot more than that.

  • Reaper: IoT botnet 'worse than Mirai' infects one million organisations worldwide

     

    Check Point first unearthed the botnet, codenamed 'IoT_reaper', at the beginning of September and claims that, since, it's already enslaved millions of IoT devices including routers and IP cameras from firms including GoAhead, D-Link, TP-Link, Avtech, Netgear, MikroTik, Linksys and Synology.

  • Google will pay out bounties for bad Android app flaws

     

    "Google Play is working with the independent bug bounty platform, HackerOne, and the developers of popular Android apps to implement the Google Play Security Reward Program. Developers of popular Android apps are invited to opt-in to the program, which will incentivize security research in a bug bounty model," says HackerOne.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Search for a way to get home in 'Estranged: Act II' now on Linux

    Continuing on from the first part, Estranged: Act II [Steam, Official Site] is now available on Linux. The developer switched from Source to Unreal Engine for the second part as well.

  • Strategy game 'Mushroom Wars 2' arrives on Linux
  • Meson-ized Mesa Now Supports More Drivers

    At the end of September initial Meson support landed in Mesa while hitting 17.3-devel Git now is support for more of the Mesa drivers under this new build system.

    As of Monday in Mesa Git, the Meson build system now supports building LLVMpipe, Softpipe, Nouveau, RadeonSI, Gallium3D winsys, Gallium3D state trackers and other components, and a variety of other changes. In other words, it's now much more practical using Meson in Mesa now that it's beginning to support almost all of the Mesa3D drivers/components.

  • Private Internet Access becomes a KDE Patron

    "We are very happy to have the Private Internet Access/London Trust Media as a KDE Patron and KDE e.V. Advisory Board member. The values of Internet openness are deeply rooted in both organisations, as well as those of privacy and security. Working together will allow us to build better systems and a better Internet for everyone", said Aleix Pol Gonzalez, Vice-President of the KDE e.V.

    "Private Internet Access is highly committed to giving back to those communities that have helped the brand and its parent company get to where it is today, and we are very much aware that vast proportions of the infrastructure we use on a daily basis, in the office and at home, is powered by Free and Open Source Software. We have made a pledge to show our gratitude by supporting FOSS projects to help encourage development and growth. We are proud to be supporting KDE and the crucial work that the project does for the Linux Desktop" said Christel Dahlskjear, Director of Sponsorships and Events at Private Internet Access.

  • Indian enterprise suffers from the innovator's dilemma: Benjamin Henshall, Red Hat

    "Open source projects are like children; no two projects are exactly the same, with different communities, structures, governance and contributors," says Benjamin Henshall, Director, AppDev Solutions, APAC at Red Hat.

    According to Henshall, open source, which is now the preferred model for consuming software will build the next generation IT systems. Speaking with Computerworld India, Henshall talks about how open source is the foundation for successful IoT deployment and how Red Hat is still the leader in this space.

  • What I have found interesting in Fedora during the week 41 of 2017

today's howtos and leftovers

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Misc
HowTos
  • 26 DNF Command Examples for Package Management (rpm) on Fedora Linux
  • Fixing vim in Debian
  • OxygenOS Android 8.0 Oreo Open Beta Available For OnePlus 3/3T, Here’s How To Set It Up
  • How to Create Hard and Symbolic Links in Linux
  • KDE Plasma 5.11, Humble Bundle Acquisition, elementary OS & Snappy | This Week in Linux Ep.9

    Coming up on This Week in Linux. We take a look at some browser releases and a new crowdfunding project for socializing the command line.

  • Red Hat software and services land on Alibaba Cloud

    With that in mind, Alibaba Cloud, which is the cloud computing arm of eCommerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd., said today that it’s partnering with the open-source software company Red Hat Inc. The alliance sees Alibaba Cloud join the Red Hat Certified Cloud and Service Provider program, which makes it possible for it to offer a range of popular Red Hat products to its customers. These will include the company’s flagship Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform, which will soon be made available via a pay-as-you-go pricing model in the Alibaba Cloud Marketplace.

  • Free software log (September 2017)

    I said that I was going to start writing these regularly, so I'm going to stick to it, even when the results are rather underwhelming. One of the goals is to make the time for more free software work, and I do better at doing things that I record.

    The only piece of free software work for September was that I made rra-c-util compile cleanly with the Clang static analyzer. This was fairly tedious work that mostly involved unconfusing the compiler or converting (semi-intentional) crashes into explicit asserts, but it unblocks using the Clang static analyzer as part of the automated test suite of my other projects that are downstream of rra-c-util.

    One of the semantic changes I made was that the vector utilities in rra-c-util (which maintain a resizable array of strings) now always allocate room for at least one string pointer. This wastes a small amount of memory for empty vectors that are never used, but ensures that the strings struct member is always valid. This isn't, strictly speaking, a correctness fix, since all the checks were correct, but after some thought, I decided that humans might have the same problem that the static analyzer had. It's a lot easier to reason about a field that's never NULL. Similarly, the replacement function for a missing reallocarray now does an allocation of size 1 if given a size of 0, just to avoid edge case behavior. (I'm sure the behavior of a realloc with size 0 is defined somewhere in the C standard, but if I have to look it up, I'd rather not make a human reason about it.)

  • Free Software Efforts (2017W41)

    The issue that was preventing the migration of the Tasktools Packaging Team’s mailing list from Alioth to Savannah has now been resolved.

    Ana’s chkservice package that I sponsored last week has been ACCEPTED into unstable and since MIGRATED to testing.

  • How to define a metrics strategy for your community

    Data sets are everywhere, and because open source communities produce plenty of information in addition to source code, most community infrastructures require tools to support the software development process. Examples include bug-reporting systems such as Jira and Bugzilla, versioning systems such as Git, and code review tools like Gerrit. Although communication also takes place through these tools, most is done through mailing lists, IRC, supporting systems like Discourse, and even Twitter and other social channels (especially for marketing and announcements). In fact, most open source communities utilize at least five or ten tools, if not more.

  • Opensource.com Lightning Talks at All Things Open 2017

    Join the Opensource.com community for a set of amazing lightning talks you won't want to miss during the All Things Open conference in Raleigh, NC. Speakers have five minutes to enlighten the audience about an open source topic they are passionate about. We've got everything from DevOps and Kubernetes, to wearables, cloud, and more. Grab your lunch, find a seat, warm up your Twitter fingers, and get ready for the fastest hour at All Things Open 2017. Share your favorite thoughts using hashtage #ATO2017.

  • LibreOffice: SharePoint integration. A year of progress
  • 4 website maintenance mistakes to avoid

    Maintenance is a good idea for every website, but it's a requirement for websites using open source code. The upside of open source is that everyone can participate. The downside is that means keeping up with everyone's changes. Code gets patched, which causes other code to stop working and need patches in turn. Exploits are found and then blocked. Fancy new features are developed, and your users want them. All of this means you need to keep up! The most important weapon to combat these forces is maintenance. Maintenance is a simple process, but there are basic mistakes that many people make at least once. Avoid these and you'll be well on your way to a safer, cleaner website that isn't a huge pain to keep running.

    [...]

    Even if you could do better, are you being paid to rewrite something that's already mostly working? If you're frustrated enough to take it on as a hobby project, is that what you want to spend your weekend on? GitHub is chock full of not-all-that-unique content management systems (CMSes) and static site builders. Most of them are abandoned, clones of more popular systems, or both. Don't be yet another one.

  • ​Windows Subsystem for Linux graduates in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update
  • Open-source mapping being used to help first responders in Puerto Rico

    Satellite images of rural towns, sprawling woodlands and grooved mountainsides fill the computer screens as homeowners and students scroll across digital maps.

    This group of a few dozen people gathered on Friday at the Perry Castenada Library on the University of Texas at Austin campus for a four-hour disaster relief mapathon to bolster humanitarian efforts in Puerto Rico, where 91 percent of the island is still without electricity, and Mexico, which was ravaged by a 6.1 earthquake.

  • Kotlin Programming Language Will Surpass Java On Android Next Year

    At Google I/O 2017, Google announced the newly added support for Kotlin programming language in Android, along with the existing languages Java and C++. As per the experts, Kotlin came as a breath of fresh air in Android development ecosystem to make “Android development faster and more fun. But, what about the numbers? How many developers are making a shift to Kotlin? Let’s find out.

  • Progress Being Made On New "WebGPU" Web Graphics API

    There continues to be progress made on the new Apple/W3C backed web graphics API dubbed "WebGPU" that has the backing of major stakeholders.

    Separate from the work being done by The Khronos Group on "WebGL-Next" there is the "WebGPU" initiative being organized by the W3C.

today's leftovers

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More in Tux Machines

Events: OpenStack Summit Vancouver, IBM Index, Eclipse CheConf 2018

  • OpenStack Summit Vancouver '18: Vote for Speakers
    The next OpenStack Summit takes place again in Vancouver (BC, Canada), May 21-25, 2018. The "Vote for Presentations" period started. All proposals are up for community votes. The deadline for your vote is will end February 25 at 11:59pm PST (February 26th at 8:59am CET)
  • IBM Index: A Community Event for Open Source Developers
    The first-ever INDEX community event, happening now in San Francisco, is an open developer conference featuring sessions on topics including artificial intelligence, machine learning, analytics, cloud native, containers, APIs, languages, and more.
  • Eclipse CheConf 2018 – Join the live stream February 21st at 10 am EST
    2017 was a fantastic year for the Che project, with more contributors, more commits, and more usage – this solidified Che’s position as the leading developer workspace server and browser IDE. Eclipse Che users logged over 7 million hours of public Che usage (plus more in private installs). We’ll discuss the growing cloud development market, Che’s position in it, and the exciting changes we’re planning for 2018.

Kernel News and Linux Foundation

  • Linux Kernel Module Growth
    The Linux kernel grows at an amazing pace, each kernel release adds more functionality, more drivers and hence more kernel modules. I recently wondered what the trend was for kernel module growth per release, so I performed module builds on kernels v2.6.24 through to v4.16-rc2 for x86-64 to get a better idea of growth rates...
  • A Linux Kernel Driver Is Being Worked On For Valve's Steam Controller
    Right now to make most use of the Steam Controller on Linux you need to be using the Steam client while there have been independent user-space programs like SC-Controller to enable Steam Controller functionality without the Steam client running. A new and independent effort is a Linux kernel driver for the Steam Controller. Through reverse-engineering, Rodrigo Rivas Costa has been developing a kernel driver for the Valve Steam Controller. This driver supports both USB cable and USB wireless adapters for the Steam Controller. This driver is being developed as a proper HID kernel driver so it should work with all existing Linux programs and doesn't require the use of the proprietary Steam client.
  • AT&T Puts Smart City IoT 'Edge' Computing On Direct Dial
  • Linux Foundation, AT&T Launch Akraino

Red Hat News and New Fedora 27 Live ISOs

Software: funny-manpages, Nginx, Cockpit and More

  • Have a Laugh With Funny Linux Man Pages
    There is a package unsurprisingly called funny-manpages and it adds some witty entries to the man pages.
  • HTTP/2 Server Push Directives Land in Nginx 1.13.9
    The open source Nginx 1.13.9 web server debuted today, providing support for a new HTTP/2 standard feature known as Server Push. The HTTP/2 web standard was completed three years ago in February 2015, with Nginx ahead of the curve in terms of HTTP/2 standard adoption. The NGINX Plus R7 release in September 2015 featured the first commercially supported enterprise-grade support provided by Nginx for HTTP/2.
  • Cockpit 162
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 162.
  • 6 Best Linux Music Players That Every User Must Try — (2018 Edition)
    Watching movies and playing music is one of the primary entertainment purposes served by our computers. So, when you move to a new operating system, it makes perfect sense if you look for useful media players. In the past, we’ve already told you about the best video players for Linux and, in this article, we’ll be telling you about the best music players for Linux-based operating systems. Let’s take a look at them:
  • CPod (formerly Cumulonimbus) – A Beautiful Podcast App
    Today, we introduce a somewhat new podcast application that is simple and yet delivers efficiently across all 3 desktop platforms. CPod, (formerly known as Cumulonimbus), is an electron-based podcast app player for audiobook and podcast lovers.
  • Apper 1.0.0 is out!
    Apper the package/apps manager based on PackageKit has got it’s 1.0.0 version on it’s 10th birthday!
  • VidCutter – Quickly Trim and Join Video Clips
    VidCutter is an open-source cross-platform video editor with which you can quickly trim and join video clips. It is Python and Qt5-based, uses FFmpeg for its encoding and decoding operations, and it supports all the popular video formats not excluding FLV, MP4, AVI, and MOV. VidCutter boasts a customizable User Interface that you can personalize using themes and a plethora of settings that you can tweak to make your video editing environment more appealing.
  • Weblate 2.19.1
  • Tusk Evernote Client Updated, Is Now Available as a Snap
    The Tusk Evernote client is now available as a Snap. We spotlighted the unofficial Evernote app last year, finding that it added to and improved on the standard Evernote web app in a number of ways.