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today's leftovers

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  • Nvidia Ends Driver Support For Devices Running 32-Bit Operating Systems
  • NVIDIA To Stop Offering 32-bit Driver Support
  • The Wayland Zombie Apocalypse is Near

    Quite some time ago I received a report of a nasty Wayland bug: under certain circumstances a Wayland event was being delivered with an incorrect file descriptor. The reporter dug deeper and determined the root cause of this; it wasn’t good.

    When a client deletes a Wayland object, there might still be protocol events coming from the compositor destined for it (as a contrived example, I delete my keyboard object because I’m done processing keys for the day, but the user is still typing…). Once the compositor receives the delete request it knows it can’t send any more events, but due to the asynchronous nature of Wayland, there could still be some unprocessed events in the buffer destined for the recently deleted object.

  • Samsung Dealing With Wayland "Zombie Apocalypse" Bug

    Samsung OSG developers have been investigating and dealing with a nasty Wayland bug whereby a Wayland event could be delivered to an incorrect file descriptor. This ends up being due to a shortcoming in the Wayland protocol, but as to not break all existing software out there built against the current Wayland protocol, a workaround has been devised.

    Longtime Wayland developer Derek Foreman has written a blog post about the "Wayland Zombie Apocalypse" and talks about this issue that comes up since file descriptors aren't part of the main data stream that in some cases they get leaked when deleting a Wayland object. The bug could lead to the file descriptor being leaked to the Wayland client and counting against the number of allowed open file descriptors, but worse could lead to unknown behavior due to events going to incorrect FDs.

  • Endless Computer Is Looking Forward To Using AMDGPU DC

    Endless Mobile, the company behind the Linux-based Flatpak-using Endless OS and that has sold several different low-cost computers around the world, is looking forward to AMDGPU DC.

    The Endless developers are interested in AMDGPU DC primarily now for allowing HDMI audio to work on some of their computers using this open-source driver. AMDGPU DC, of course, needs no introduction around Phoronix unless you are well behind on your reading.

  • Eelo: The Latest Linux Mobile Attempt, Led By Mandrake's Founder

    The latest project aiming for an open-source mobile Linux operating system that is privacy-minded is Eelo. This project does have some merit as it's being started by the original creator of Mandrake Linux.

    Gaël Duval founded Mandrake Linux in the late 90's when it was a RedHat/KDE distribution and prior to being acquired by Mandriva and then later on Gael Duval worked on Ulteo. Duval has been out of the Linux scene the past few years with being a macOS and iPhone user, but now he's decided to get back in the Linux distribution game with an attempt to create a new Linux mobile OS effort.

  • Mandrake Linux founder is developing eelo: an open source mobile OS (Android without the Google apps and services)

    Google’s Android operating system may be open source, but most of the phones and other devices that ship with Android also include a bunch of closed source apps and services including the Google Play Store, Gmail, YouTube, and Google Maps.

    Mandrake Linux founder Gaël Duval wasn’t satisfied with that, so he decided to create a new fork of Android called eelo that uses only free and open source software.

  • Attn: bear’s Slackware 14.2 mirror (32bit) will be removed due to space constraints

    Unfortunately this server runs off a SSD disk which is just 120 GB in size. It has its limits with regard to what I can store there. Lack of disk space is forcing me to remove this mirror copy of the 32bit Slackware 14.2 today. My own repositories are growing and are hungrily looking at that occupied space.

  • Updates for LibreOffice and multilib, more to come

    Because of recent updates in slackware-current (in this case, the boost package) the LibreOffice in my own repository stopped working. Library conflict. Don’t you love the life on the bleeding edge

  • Gear Sport – Making messaging easy on the go

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Empirix Joins European Telecommunications Standard Institute (ETSI) and Open Source MANO (OSM) Community

    Empirix, Inc. today announced its membership in the European Telecommunications Standard Institute (ETSI), an international organization that produces globally-applicable standards for information and communications technologies (ICT), including fixed, mobile, radio, broadcast and Internet technologies.

  • AMD Linux driver GPU is not Navi

    Remember, Raja Koduri, the ultimate leader of the now dissolved Radeon Technology Group (RTG) said Navi is a 7nm part. Fudzilla and a few industry sources we consulted are very confident that 7nm won't happen for GPUs in 2018.

  • Kontact on Debian

    Now after Debian has woken up again from its slumber, we first had to update Qt and KDE Frameworks. After the first attempt at packaging KDE Pim 17.08.0, that was released for experimental, we are now finally reaching the point where we can package and deliver KDE Pim 17.08.3 to Debian unstable. Because Pino Toscano and I had time we started packaging it and stumbled across the issue of having to package 58 source packages, all dependent on each other. Keep in mind all packaging work is not a oneman or twoman show, mostly all in the Qt/KDE Debian mantainers are involved somehow. Either by putting their name under a upload or by being available via IRC, mail and answering questions, making jokes or doing what so ever. Jonathan Riddell visualized the dependencies for KDE Pim 16.08 with graphviz. But KDE Pim is a fast moving target, and I wanted to make my own graphs and make them more useful for packaging.

  • Samsung’s Smart TV Will No Longer Support SmartThings
  • Video – Samsung Remote Management Solution
  • Reasonable Estimate of Scale of Nokia HMD Smartphone Unit Sales in Q3 is between 2.8M and 5.7M
  • Introduction To XBT 2.0 | External Backup Tool for USB Drives

    XBT is a program that makes keeping all of your user data safely backed up on a dedicated External USB drive easy. XBT works with Ubuntu 16.04 onward and the Linux Mint 18.x series.

  • Google Cloud backed Debian mirror

    So I'd like to proudly present a test setup of a Google Cloud backed Debian mirror. It provides access to the main and security archive. I would be glad to see a bit more traffic on it. I'd like to asses if there are problems, both with synchronicity and reacheability.

  • Why now is the time for multi-cloud

    Craig McLuckie isn’t a fan of every buzzword flitting across the tech landscape. He admits that multi-cloud wasn’t one of his favorites, but he’s changing his mind.

    “I’m starting to see a deep legitimacy to multi-cloud,”  says McLuckie,  co-founder of Kubernetes and now CEO of Heptio, “I used to nod and smile when people talked about it, but never really believed it. I’m starting to see it for reals now.”

  • The importance of the robot iCub as a standard robotic research platform for embodied AI

    Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia focused on the importance of iCub robot in the review paper 'iCub: the not-yet finished story of building a robot child' published on Science Robotics, special issue about humanoid robotics

  • Researchers are Using Open-Source Robotic Toddlers to Create a Perfect Humanoid

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • MX Linux 17, Mozilla's Mistake, AMD Open-Sourcing Driver, & Net Neutrality | This Week in Linux 18
  • KDE End-of-Year Fundraiser 2017 is Live!

    After an exciting and successful year, we give you all an opportunity to help us recharge our proverbial batteries.

    You've always wanted to contribute to a Free and open source project, right? Maybe you wondered how you could do that.
    Well, supporting our fundraiser is a perfect way to get started. Donations are also a great way to show gratitude to the developers of your favorite KDE applications, and to ensure the project will continue.

  • Why SUSE Is Using FBCON Rather Than DRM/KMS For Their In-Kernel Boot Splash

    As we've been covering since the original patches back in October, SUSE has been working on a very interesting in-kernel bootsplash system. It's growing into an interesting alternative to the user-space-based Plymouth, but one of the leading common criticism of it is the use of FBCON rather than interfacing with the DRM/KMS APIs.

  • Switching Distro’s

    Obviously I still use FreeBSD on the desktop; with the packages from area51 I have a full and modern KDE Plasma environment. We (as in, the KDE-FreeBSD team) are still wrestling with getting the full Plasma 5 into the official ports tree (stalled, as so often it has been, on concerns of backwards compatibility), but things like CMake 3.10.1 and Qt 5.9 are sliding into place. Slowly, like brontosauruses driving a ’57 Cadillac.

    In the meantime, I do most of my Calamares development work — it is a Linux installer, after all — in VMs with some Linux distro installed. Invariably — and especially when working on tools that do the most terrible things to the disks attached to a system — I totally break the system, the VM no longer starts at all, and my development environment is interrupted for a bit.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Schaller On Linux In 2018: Rust Rules, Apple Declines, Linux Graphics Compete

    Christian Schaller who has long been involved in GNOME/Fedora development while serving as a senior software engineering manager at Red Hat and formerly with Collabora has some bold predictions about 2018 for open-source software.

  • Fedora Classroom Session: Fedora QA 102

    Fedora Classroom sessions continue next week with a session on Fedora QA. The general schedule for sessions appears on the wiki. You can also find resources and recordings from previous sessions there. Here are details about this week’s session on Wednesday, December 22 at 16:00 UTC. That link allows you to convert the time to your timezone.

  • Cura, the nice 3D print slicer, is now in Debian Unstable

    After several months of working and waiting, I am happy to report that the nice and user friendly 3D printer slicer software Cura just entered Debian Unstable. It consist of five packages, cura, cura-engine, libarcus, fdm-materials, libsavitar and uranium. The last two, uranium and cura, entered Unstable yesterday. This should make it easier for Debian users to print on at least the Ultimaker class of 3D printers. My nearest 3D printer is an Ultimaker 2+, so it will make life easier for at least me. Smile

  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 5

    Today we have celebrated another session for the #PeruRumboGSoC2018 program at CCPP UNI. It was one of the longest sessions we have experienced.

  • Mozilla releases tools and data for speech recognition

    Voice computing has long been a staple of science fiction, but it has only relatively recently made its way into fairly common mainstream use. Gadgets like mobile phones and "smart" home assistant devices (e.g. Amazon Echo, Google Home) have brought voice-based user interfaces to the masses. The voice processing for those gadgets relies on various proprietary services "in the cloud", which generally leaves the free-software world out in the cold. There have been FOSS speech-recognition efforts over the years, but Mozilla's recent announcement of the release of its voice-recognition code and voice data set should help further the goal of FOSS voice interfaces.

    There are two parts to the release, DeepSpeech, which is a speech-to-text (STT) engine and model, and Common Voice, which is a set of voice data that can be used to train voice-recognition systems. While DeepSpeech is available for those who simply want to do some kind of STT task, Common Voice is meant for those who want to create their own voice-recognition system—potentially one that does even better (or better for certain types of applications) than DeepSpeech.

  • FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Focuses on Faster Boot, Bhyve and LibreSSL Support

    en Moore, the creator of the FreeBSD-based TrueOS computer operating system and Lumina desktop environment, released the TrueOS 17.12 update, which introduces multiple enhancements.

    Synced with the FreeBSD 12.0-CURRENT and FreeBSD ports tree software repositories as of December 4 and November 30, 2017, respectively, TrueOS 17.12 is an incremental update to the operating system adding improvements to the OpenRC-based boot process, removable-device management, LibreSSL and SysAdm API integrations, as well as Bhyve support for TrueOS Server Install.

    "We have also been working quite a bit on the server offering of TrueOS, and are pleased to provide new text-based server images with support for Virtualization systems such as bhyve," said Ken Moore in the release announcement. "This allows for simple server deployments which also take advantage of the TrueOS improvements to FreeBSD."

  • Will Your Taxes Go Up or Down? A Calculator for the New Tax Bill

    ...Tax-Calculator, an open-source tax-modeling program.

today's leftover

Filed under
Misc
  • DXVK Is Making Some Steadfast Progress In Running Direct3D 11 Over Vulkan

    Last month on Phoronix I featured the DXVK project that's working to implement Direct3D 11 over Vulkan (not to be confused with VK9 as the separate effort to get D3D9 over Vulkan). This project is making a surprising amount of progress in its early stages.

  • How to Search PDF Files from the Terminal with pdfgrep
  • Librsvg moves to Gitlab

    Librsvg now lives in GNOME's Gitlab instance. You can access it here.

    Gitlab allows workflows similar to Github: you can create an account there, fork the librsvg repository, file bug reports, create merge requests... Hopefully this will make it nicer for contributors.

  • Debsources now in sources.debian.org

    Debsources is a web application for publishing, browsing and searching an unpacked Debian source mirror on the Web. With Debsources, all the source code of every Debian release is available in https://sources.debian.org, both via an HTML user interface and a JSON API.

    This service was first offered in 2013 with the sources.debian.net instance, which was kindly hosted by IRILL, and is now becoming official under sources.debian.org, hosted on the Debian infrastructure.

  • Which one is for you? Compare Gear S3, Gear Sport or Gear Fit2 Pro
  • Ubucon Europe 2018 Ubuntu Conference Announced for 27-29 April in Xixón, Spain

    The organizers of the Ubucon Europe conference for Ubuntu Linux users, contributors and developers announced the official dates next year's Ubucon Europe 2018 event.

    Don't pack your bags just yet for the next Ubuntu conference, but at least you should mark your calendars for April 27, 28, and 29 of 2018, when the Ubucon Europe 2018 conference will take place. Where? The event will be held in Spain this time, in the city of Xixón, at the municipal facilities of Centro de Cultura Antiguo Instituto.

    "Ubucon Europe 2018 will be held this year in Xixón, Spain on 27, 28 and 29 April 2018 in the Spanish city of Xixón at the municipal facilities of the Antiguo Instituto. For further information please write to ubuconeurope2018 AT gmail.com," wrote the organizers in a tweet earlier this morning.

  • #13: (Much) Faster Package (Re-)Installation via Binaries
  • RVowpalWabbit 0.0.10

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Personal Backups with Duplicati on Linux
  • Flatpak'ed Epiphany Browser Becomes More Useful

    Epiphany 3.27.3 was released this morning as the newest release of GNOME's web browser in the road to the GNOME 3.28 stable desktop debut next March.

  • BlackArch 2017.12.11

    Today we released new BlackArch Linux ISOs. For details see the ChangeLog below.

    Here's the ChangeLog:

    update blackarch-installer to version 0.6.2 (most important change)
    included kernel 4.14.4
    updated lot's of blackarch tools and packages
    updated all blackarch tools and packages
    updated all system packages
    bugfix release! (see blackarch-installer)

  • Latest Linux Distribution Releases (The Always Up-to-date List)
  • Mining cryptocurrency with Raspberry Pi and Storj

    I'm always looking for ways to map hot technologies to fun, educational classroom use. One of the most interesting, and potentially disruptive, technologies over the past few years is cryptocurrencies. In the early days, one could profitably mine some of the most popular cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, using a home PC. But as cryptocurrency mining has become more popular, thanks in part to dedicated mining hardware, the algorithms governing it have boosted computational complexity, making home PC mining often impractical, unprofitable, and environmentally unwise.

  • Huawei Collaborated with the Developers of Phoenix OS for the Mate 10’s Easy Projection Feature

    Though the company has virtually no presence in the United States, Huawei is a top 3 smartphone manufacturer in the world. Its subsidiary, Honor, aims to penetrate the Indian market with budget smartphones. Elsewhere, Huawei recently launched the Huawei Mate 10 and Mate 10 Pro in several markets around the world, and rumors have it the device will launch in the United States as well. Apart from the AI features powered by the company’s HiSilicon Kirin 970 SoC, one of the company’s most publicized features is Easy Projection. While not as powerful as Samsung DeX, it brings a desktop OS-like experience without needing to purchase an expensive accessory. Huawei is pushing the feature on its flagship devices, though there’s something about Easy Projection that hasn’t really been mentioned in the press yet. Behind Huawei’s Easy Projection feature is a relatively unheard of player—Beijing Chaozhuo Technology, developers of Phoenix OS.

  • Namaste ! (on the road to Swatantra 2017)

    I’ll have the pleasure to give a talk about GCompris, and another one about Synfig studio. It’s been a long time since I didn’t talk about the latter, but since Konstantin Dmitriev and the Morevna team were not available, I’ll do my best to represent Synfig there.

  • #PeruRumboGSoC2018 – Session 4

    We celebrated yesterday another session of the local challenge 2017-2 “PeruRumboGSoC2018”. It was held at the Centro Cultural Pedro Paulet of FIEE UNI. GTK on C was explained during the fisrt two hours of the morning based on the window* exercises from my repo to handle some widgets such as windows, label and buttons.

  • Chrome 63 revamps Bookmark Manager w/ Material Design on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS

    Chrome 63 began rolling out to Android and desktop browsers last week with the usual security fixes and new developer features. On the latter platform, this update introduces Material Design to the Bookmark Manager.

    Several versions ago, Google began updating various aspects of the browser with Material Design, including History, Downloads, and Settings.

    Like the Flags page for enabling experiments and in-development features, which Google also revamped in version 63, the Bookmark Manager (Menu > Bookmarks > Bookmark Manager) adopts the standard Materials UI elements. This includes an app bar that houses a large search bar. It adopts the same dark blue theme and includes various Material animations and flourishes.

  • ExpressVPN Unveils Industry’s First Suite of Open-Source Tools to Test for Privacy and Security Leaks
  • New format in GIMP: HGT

    Lately a recurrent contributor to the GIMP project (Massimo Valentini) contributed a patch to support HGT files. From this initial commit, since I found this data quite cool, I improved the support a bit (auto-detection of the variants and special-casing in particular, as well as making an API for scripts).

    So what is HGT? That’s topography data basically just containing elevation in meters of various landscape (HGT stands for “height“), gathered by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) run by various space agencies (NASA, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, German and Italian space agencies…).

  • What You Need To Know About The Intel Management Engine

    Over the last decade, Intel has been including a tiny little microcontroller inside their CPUs. This microcontroller is connected to everything, and can shuttle data between your hard drive and your network adapter. It’s always on, even when the rest of your computer is off, and with the right software, you can wake it up over a network connection. Parts of this spy chip were included in the silicon at the behest of the NSA. In short, if you were designing a piece of hardware to spy on everyone using an Intel-branded computer, you would come up with something like the Intel Managment Engine.

    Last week, researchers [Mark Ermolov] and [Maxim Goryachy] presented an exploit at BlackHat Europe allowing for arbitrary code execution on the Intel ME platform. This is only a local attack, one that requires physical access to a machine. The cat is out of the bag, though, and this is the exploit we’ve all been expecting. This is the exploit that forces Intel and OEMs to consider the security implications of the Intel Management Engine. What does this actually mean?

today's leftovers

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GitLab Web IDE

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Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
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