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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Btrfs Gets Cleaned Up & Code Refactoring For Linux 5.3

    David Sterba sent in the Btrfs file-system updates on Monday for the Linux 5.3 kernel.

    Btrfs for Linux 5.3 doesn't present any shiny new features but is mostly focused on bug fixes and low-level code improvements.

    One of the internal changes worth pointing out for Btrfs is changing its CRC32C usage so that it can be hardware-assisted on more architectures where native instructions or optimized code paths are available. More Btrfs code has also been positioned for more checksum algorithms moving forward.

  • g_array_binary_search in GLib 2.61.2

    The final API so far in this mini-series on new APIs in the GLib 2.62 series is g_array_binary_search(), put together by Emmanuel Fleury and based on code by Christian Hergert. It’s due to be released in 2.61.2 soon. But first, a reminder about GLib version numbering.

    Like the rest of GNOME’s official module set, GLib follows an odd/even versioning scheme, where every odd minor version number, like 2.61.x, is an unstable release building up to an even minor version number, like 2.62.x, which is stable. APIs may be added in unstable releases. They may be modified or even removed (if they haven’t been in a stable release yet). So all of the APIs I’ve blogged about recently still have a chance to be tweaked or dropped if people find problems with them. So if you see a problem or think that one of these APIs would be awkward to use in some way, please say, sooner rather than later! They need fixing before they’re in a stable release.

  • Rabimba: ARCore and Arkit: What is under the hood : Anchors and World Mapping (Part 1)

    Some of you know I have been recently experimenting a bit more with WebXR than a WebVR and when we talk about mobile Mixed Reality, ARkit and ARCore is something which plays a pivotal role to map and understand the environment inside our applications.

    I am planning to write a series of blog posts on how you can start developing WebXR applications now and play with them starting with the basics and then going on to using different features of it. But before that, I planned to pen down this series of how actually the "world mapping" works in arcore and arkit. So that we have a better understanding of the Mixed Reality capabilities of the devices we will be working with.

  • 10 Best Automated Backup Plugins for WordPress in 2019

    As an online business owner and/or site administrator it is important that you are always ahead of probable data damage by having a data contingency plan. On WordPress, this process has been simplified for all levels of users in the form of backup plugins that can enable you to automate full or partial backups which you can easily restore from later on.

    Today, we bring you a list of the 10 best plugins for backing up your WordPress site. They all feature a clean modern UI, in active development with millions of downloads, and most of them are 100% free!

today's leftovers

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  • Lenovo Chromebook C330 2-in-1

    Today we are looking at the Lenovo Chromebook C330 (81HY0000US), it is a 2-1 device, a notebook but it can also be converted into a tablet.

    It comes with a fanless quad-core MediaTek MT8173C CPU, an 11.6 inch, 1366x768, IPS display, and touch screen. It has 4gb of RAM and 64GB eMMC SSD.

  • Foliate Ebook Reader Picks Up Mobi & Amazon Kindle Support

    The Foliate ebook reader app for Linux has added support for additional ebook formats, including those used by the Amazon Kindle.

    Now, I’m conscious that I’ve mentioned Foliate a lot recently. I generally don’t like to do that — anyone remember the omg! docky! days? — but some developers are so dang prolific, able to knock out notable update after notable update at a regular clip, that I have no choice!

    Foliate’s developer, John Factotum, is one such dev — nice work!

  • Install & Run Xampp on Ubuntu 19.04 using Terminal
  • How to scan your Docker installment with docker-bench-test
  • KDE Applications 19.08 branches created

    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 19.08 release to them

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Aiming To PGO More Packages, Use IWD For WiFi Connections

    While OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 was just released last month, we are already looking forward to OpenMandriva 4.1 for a number of improvements and some new features.

    OpenMandriva's developer board provides an interesting look at what's ahead for OpenMandriva Lx 4.1. Already completed for this next milestone include migrating to LLVM Clang 9, and using LD.lld and BFD as the default linkers.

  • Installing Debian 10

    Debian 10 Buster was released recently. It is the newest version on Debian operating system. Debian 10 comes with Linux Kernel 4.19. It also comes with latest Linux graphical desktop environment such as GNOME 3.30, KDE Plasma 5.14, Cinnamon 3.8, LXDE 0.99.2, LxQt 0.14, MATE 1.20, Xfce 4.12 and many more. Debian 10 also comes with awesome new artworks.
    In this article, I am going to show you how to install Debian 10 Buster on your computer.

  • Workload Consolidation: The Entire IoT in One Box

    To deliver the benefits of workload consolidation while ensuring robust partitioning, congatec has developed a proof of concept based on a six-core Core i7-based COM Express module, a type 1 hypervisor from Real-Time Systems, and Ubuntu Linux.

  • 100,985,047 have been invited to the Evite data breach “party”

    Did you get an invitation to the latest data breach? Over the weekend it was disclosed that Evite, the online invitation platform that has sent more than a few birthday and pizza party invitations over the years, suffered a data breach that included over 100 million accounts.

  • The Gecko Hacker's Guide to Taskcluster

    I spent a good chunk of this year fiddling with taskcluster configurations in order to get various bits of continuous integration stood up for WebRender. Taskcluster configuration is very flexible and powerful, but can also be daunting at first. This guide is intended to give you a mental model of how it works, and how to add new jobs and modify existing ones. I'll try and cover things in detail where I believe the detail would be helpful, but in the interest of brevity I'll skip over things that should be mostly obvious by inspection or experimentation if you actually start digging around in the configurations. I also try and walk through examples and provide links to code as much as possible.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • A Modern Open Source Project Management Platform

    Project management is a discipline that has been through many incarnations, spawning an entire industry of businesses and tools. The challenge is to build a platform that is sufficiently powerful and adaptable to fit the workflow of your teams, while remaining opinionated enough to be useful. It also helps to have an open and extensible platform that can be customized as needed. In this episode Pablo Ruiz Múzquiz explains the motivation for creating the open source tool Taiga, how it compares to the other options in the market, and how you can use it for your own projects. He also discusses the challenges inherent to project management tools, his philosophies on what makes a project successful, and how to manage your team workflows to be most effective. It was helpful learning from Pablo's long experience in the software industry and managing teams of various sizes.

  • GNU World Order 13x29
  • RetroArch Emulation Platform Is Coming To Steam On July 30

    There will be no difference in the functionality of the RetroArch when it launches on Steam in two weeks from now. The Steam version will not have Steamworks SDK functionality or additional Steam features at the time of the launch.

    After the launch, the company will explore options to incorporate Steam’s functionality into the emulator platform.

    Moreover, the open source company has said that it will initially launch the Windows version. macOS and Linux versions will be released later.

  • Linux Weekly Roundup #34

    Hello and welcome to this week's Linux Roundup.  Thank you so much for your time.

    We had another good week of Linux Releases.

    Sparky Linux 4.11, Linux Mint 19.2 Beta (well kind of, please read below how their release process works), Feren OS 19.07 and Feren OS Next Beta has been released.

    Other distros I have been looking at this week is Clear Linux with Gnome 3.32 and Artix Linux 20190609.

    About the Linux Mint release method, when all the development is done, the ISO is being tested by a Linux Mint team and Clem, the main guy of Linux Mint will approve all the ISOs when he feels they are ready, when all of the ISOs are approved, the ISOs are being pushed into all the Linux Mint Download Mirrors, after all the mirrors are being updated, Linux Mint writes their release notes.  
    We are currently at the point where all the ISOs has been approved and already being pushed into the Download Mirrors.

  • Porfirio A. Páiz - porfiriopaiz: repos

    Rawhide is the name given to the current development version of Fedora. It consists of a package repository called "rawhide" and contains the latest build of all Fedora packages updated on a daily basis. Each day, an attempt is made to create a full set of 'deliverables' (installation images and so on), and all that compose successfully are included in the Rawhide tree for that day.

    It is possible to install its repository files and just temporarily enable it for just a single transaction, let us say, to simple install or upgrade a single package and its dependencies, maybe, to give a try to its new version that is not currently available on any of the stable and maintained versions of Fedora.

    This is useful when a bug was fixed on Rawhide but it has not landed yet on the stable branch of Fedora and the urge for it cannot wait.

Leftovers: Podcasts, Fedora to Stop Providing i686 Kernels, Debian Video and Talk, Open Data and More

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  • Tim Falls on Developer Relations, Open Source, Free Education and Ethics

    In this podcast, Shane Hastie, Lead Editor for Culture & Methods, spoke to Tim Falls of Digital Ocean about developer relations, the importance of embracing and providing open-source software, the need to offer free education in software development and the importance of ethics in education.

  • Linux Action News 114

    Another project breach raises significant questions, Fedora considers dropping Snaps in Gnome Software, and has the ISPA let Mozilla off the hook?

    Plus Microsoft makes it into linux-distros, the Raspberry Pi 4 charger issue, and more.

  • Fedora To Stop Providing i686 Kernels, Might Also Drop 32-Bit Modular/Everything Repos

    The proposed change to no longer build i686 Linux kernel packages beginning with the Fedora 31 release later this year has been approved. Additionally, they might also begin removing some 32-bit repositories.

    The F31 change proposal to stop building 32-bit x86 (i686) kernels was approved at Friday's Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) meeting. So that's the end of the road for 32-bit x86 kernels on Fedora and any installation media.

  • Debian 10 "Buster" Full Review and My Thoughts
  • Talk: What goes into a Debian package?

    No, I'm not in Chicago. This was a trial run of giving a talk remotely, which I'll also be doing for DebConf this year. I set up an RTMP server in the cloud (nginx) and ran OBS Studio on my laptop to capture and transmit video and audio. I'm generally very impressed with OBS Studio, although the X window capture source could do with improvement. I used the built-in camera and mic, but the mic picked up a fair amount of background noise (including fan noise, since the video encoding keeps the CPU fairly busy). I should probably switch to a wearable mic in future.

  • How I put order in my bookmarks and found a better way to organise them

    I currently have still a few dozen bookmarks that I need to tag in Memex and delete from my Firefox bookmarks. And a further several dozen in OneTab.

    The most viewed websites, I have in the “Top Sites” in Firefox.

    Most of the “tabs” in OneTab, I have already migrated to Memex and I am looking very much forward to trying to use it instead of OneTab. So far it seems a bit more work, as I need to 1) open all tabs into a tab tree (same as in OneTab), 2) open that tab tree in a separate window (extra step), and then 3) use the “Tag all tabs in window” or “Add all tabs in window” option from the extension button (similar as in OneTab), and finally 4) close the tabs by closing the window (extra step). What I usually do is to change a Tab Group from OneTab to a Collection in Memex and then take some extra time to add tags or notes, if appropriate.

    So, I am quite confident Memex will be able to replace OneTab for me and most likely also (most) normal bookmarks. I may keep some bookmarks of things that I want to always keep track of, like my online bank’s URL, but I am not sure yet.

    The annotations are a god-send as well, which will be very hard to get rid of, as I already got used to them.

    Now, if I could only send stuff to my eInk reader (or phone), annotate it there and have those annotations auto-magically show up in the browser and therefore stored locally on my laptop … Big Grin

    Oh, oh, and if I could search through Memex from my KDE Plasma desktop and add/view annotations from other documents (e.g. ePub, ODF, PDF) and other applicatios (e.g. Okular, Calibre, LibreOffice). One may dream …

  • Beth Israel Deaconess' open-source patient database enabled a decade of AI research

    Since Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston launched the MIMIC compendium of de-identified medical records in 2009, the database has proved essential to the advancement of artificial intelligence research in medicine, STAT reports.

    MIMIC is free to use, with more than 12,000 researchers from around the world granted access to it in the last decade. The database is estimated to have been used in more than 500 research papers and presentations, and is widely considered to be the only open-source dataset comprehensive enough to aid in such advanced research, despite unavoidable flaws such as occasionally incomplete data and the inherent bias due to its being sourced from just one hospital.

  • How To Tell Stories: A Beginner’s Guide For Open Source Researchers

    Many open source researchers rely on journalists to turn data into a narrative that will then reach a wider audience. Yet journalism today is in a crisis! You can trust me as a person who comes from a traditional journalism background — oh, the sheer amount of horror stories I can tell over whiskey.

    In the U.S., for example, the media is facing its worst layoffs since the Great Recession. This is just one of the reasons why it is important for open source researchers to fill in the gaps traditional media outlets are leaving in their wake.

  • Vintage Style Astronomy Maps Made from Open Source Data of the Universe

    Biology graduate student Eleanor Lutz uses her spare time working on Tabletop Whale. This science illustration blog is an outlet for her creativity, allowing her to publish drawings, infographics, and data visualizations relating to science. Her latest project, Atlas of Space, is an exciting set of astronomy maps. Using open source datasets, she’s designed incredibly artistic visualizations that have a vintage feel to them.

    Attracted to the large quantities of data available within the astronomy community, Lutz mined organizations like NASA and the United States Geological Survey to pull together the maps. The graduate student benefitted from her knowledge of Python, a high-level programming language she uses for her Ph.D. research. Using the program, she was able to crunch the incredible quantities of open source data and transform it into something you’d want to hang on your wall.

    Lutz has been working on the project for the past year and a half, just announcing it to the public in June 2019. Since then, she’s been releasing a map each week. Every map is accompanied by an interesting explanation of how she achieved her results, as well as the sources used in the work.

today's leftovers

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  • London Launches Open Source App for Homebuilding

    Bryden Wood, Cast, and the Mayor of London have launched a new app to speed up the capital’s home building. The freely-available app, titled PRISM, is aimed at the design and construction of high-quality, factory-built homes to address the current demand of 50,000+ houses per year.

  • Facebook just released this new open source JavaScript engine
  • Amazon, Microsoft Wage War Over the Pentagon’s ‘War Cloud’

    Amazon and Microsoft are battling it out over a $10 billion opportunity to build the U.S. military its first “war cloud” computing system. But Amazon’s early hopes of a shock-and-awe victory may be slipping away.

    Formally called the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure plan, or JEDI, the military’s computing project would store and process vast amounts of classified data, allowing the Pentagon to use artificial intelligence to speed up its war planning and fighting capabilities. The Defense Department hopes to award the winner-take-all contract as soon as August. Oracle and IBM were eliminated at an earlier round of the contract competition.

    But that’s only if the project isn’t derailed first. It faces a legal challenge by Oracle and growing congressional concerns about alleged Pentagon favoritism toward Amazon. Military officials hope to get started soon on what will be a decade-long business partnership they describe as vital to national security.

    “This is not your grandfather’s internet,” said Daniel Goure, vice president of the Lexington Institute, a defense-oriented think tank. “You’re talking about a cloud where you can go from the Pentagon literally to the soldier on the battlefield carrying classified information.”

    Amazon was considered an early favorite when the Pentagon began detailing its cloud needs in 2017, but its candidacy has been marred by an Oracle allegation that Amazon executives and the Pentagon have been overly cozy. Oracle has a final chance to make its case against Amazon — and the integrity of the government’s bidding process — in a court hearing Wednesday.

    “This is really the cloud sweepstakes, which is why there are such fierce lawsuits,” said Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives.

  • Fernando Corbató, a Father of Your Computer (and Your Password), Dies at 93

    Fernando Corbató, whose work on computer time-sharing in the 1960s helped pave the way for the personal computer, as well as the computer password, died on Friday at a nursing home in Newburyport, Mass. He was 93.

    His wife, Emily Corbató, said the cause was complications of diabetes. At his death he was a professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Dr. Corbató, who spent his entire career at M.I.T., oversaw a project in the early 1960s called the Compatible Time-Sharing System, or C.T.S.S., which allowed multiple users in different locations to access a single computer simultaneously through telephone lines.

  • Do you need a workstation? Do you care?

    Once upon a time — a long time ago — if you needed a workstation, you knew who you were and you knew how to get it: ask IT. Alternatively: whine, bully, and demand it from IT. And the machine you got would have a RISC-based processor, a customized UNIX operating system, and would likely be a branded model and possibly customized for your job and applications.

    [...]

    Microsoft allied with Intel to destroy the specialized workstation market, and thus began the long confusing story of Windows workstations.

today's leftovers

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  • Installing normal (non-ESR) Firefox on Debian 10 Buster (works on other distributions too)

    If you enjoyed this video, please click the like button, and share it on your favorite social networking platform (Facebook, Twitter, etc)

  • Add-Ons Outage Post-Mortem Result

    The first question that everyone asks is “how did you let this happen?” At a high level, the story seems simple: we let the certificate expire. This seems like a simple failure of planning, but upon further investigation it turns out to be more complicated: the team responsible for the system which generated the signatures knew that the certificate was expiring but thought (incorrectly) that Firefox ignored the expiration dates. Part of the reason for this misunderstanding was that in a previous incident we had disabled end-entity certificate checking, and this led to confusion about the status of intermediate certificate checking. Moreover, the Firefox QA plan didn’t incorporate testing for certificate expiration (or generalized testing of how the browser will behave at future dates) and therefore the problem wasn’t detected. This seems to have been a fundamental oversight in our test plan.

  • SUSECON 2020 is coming to the Emerald Isle!

    Get ready! SUSECON 2020 is coming to Dublin, Ireland, March 23-27, 2020 at the Convention Centre Dublin!

  • We can make it better than it was. Better...stronger...faster.

    It is not a novel observation that computers have become so powerful that a reasonably recent system has a relatively long life before obsolescence. This is in stark contrast to the period between the nineties and the teens where it was not uncommon for users with even moderate needs from their computers to upgrade every few years.

    This upgrade cycle was mainly driven by huge advances in processing power, memory capacity and ballooning data storage capability. Of course the software engineers used up more and more of the available resources and with each new release ensured users needed to update to have a reasonable experience.

    And then sometime in the early teens this cycle slowed almost as quickly as it had begun as systems had become "good enough". I experienced this at a time I was relocating for a new job and had moved most of my computer use to my laptop which was just as powerful as my desktop but was far more flexible.

    As a software engineer I used to have a pretty good computer for myself but I was never prepared to spend the money on "top of the range" equipment because it would always be obsolete and generally I had access to much more powerful servers if I needed more resources for a specific task.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (dbus), Debian (firefox-esr, python3.4, and redis), Mageia (ffmpeg), Oracle (firefox, libvirt, and qemu), Red Hat (firefox and virt:8.0.0), Scientific Linux (firefox), and SUSE (kernel).

  • Canonical’s GitHub account hacked [Ed: A Microsoft GitHub account hacked; how conveniently they attribute breaches of Microsoft things to others]
  • Paragon Software Group Releases Free Paragon APFS SDK [Ed: Just openwashing patent traps using Microsoft GitHub]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Chrome OS launcher function to search for Linux app installs postponed

    A bug for this functionality was opened back in January, with this description: “Add APT search into Chrome OS App Launcher, so that not installed Linux packages and Apps can be searched for and installed via the App launcher.”

    Essentially if you want to search for a Linux app that you didn’t have installed on your Chromebook, you would be able to do that directly in the Chrome OS launcher.

    Clicking on the appropriate result would then download the Linux app package and presumably start the installation process in a best-case scenario. A worst-case option would be to have the package downloaded and then use the Chrome OS Files app to install it, which is the current process.

  • Cloud-Native CI/CD with OpenShift Pipelines

    With Red Hat OpenShift 4.1, we are proud to release the developer preview of OpenShift Pipelines to enable creation of cloud-native Kubernetes-style continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipelines based on the Tekton project.

    [...]

    OpenShift Pipelines allows teams to build, test and deploy their applications using cloud-native pipelines and take control of their application lifecycle.

    Kubernetes style pipelines: Create pipelines using standard Kubernetes CRDs that are portable across Kubernetes distributions.

    Runs serverless: Create and run pipelines, period. No CI/CD server to manage and maintain.

    Deploy to multiple platforms: Your pipelines run on Kubernetes, but you can deploy to many Kubernetes, VMs and serverless platforms from the pipeline.

    Build images with Kubernetes tools: You can use the build tool of your choice for building images. Source-to-Image (S2I), Buildah and Dockerfiles, Jib, Kaniko and more.

    Developer tools: Command-line tool to interact with the pipelines in addition to integrations with OpenShift developer console and IDE plugins.

  • Will rolling into IBM be the end of Red Hat?

    IBM's acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion is now a done deal, and statements from the leadership of both companies sound extremely promising. But some in the Linux users have expressed concern.

  • Foliate ePub Reader Now Available Outside of Flathub

    I bring a welcome word to the bookworms amongst you wanting to try the Foliate eBook reader on Linux: it’s now available outside of Flathub.

    Foliate is a terrifically well-designed, well-built and well-featured GTK eBook reader for Linux desktop. The app supports the .epub format exclusively, a focus that enables it to deliver some first-rate user experience.

    But short of building it from source, the only way to install Foliate on Ubuntu has been via the Flatpak build on Flathub. While it’s relatively easy to set-up and install Flatpak on Ubuntu, some folks flatly don’t want to.

  • Samba 4.11.0rc1 Released, Firefox 68.0esr Now Available, SPI Board Elections, Microsoft Admitted to linux-distro List and SoftMaker FreeOffice Now Includes Anniversary Update

    SoftMaker FreeOffice now includes the Anniversary update. This new version has many new features for the TextMaker word processor and spreadsheets, and improved user-friendliness. See the press release for details on the office suite's update, and go here to download.

  • Cloudera Bucks an Industry Trend, Doubles Down on Open Source

    Hadoop wrangler Cloudera has bucked a trend to tighten control of open source code by protecting it under ever more restrictive licences, today announcing plans to go all-in on AGPL and Apache 2.0 licences, make closed licence components of its products open source, and double-down on its Apache Software Foundation (ASF) activity.

    The commitment by the US-based enterprise data specialist will extend to its forthcoming Cloudera Data Platform (CDP); the company’s much-awaited joint product with Hortonworks following last year’s $5.2 billion merger (which closed in January this year). Cloudera hopes to emulate Red Hat’s support-based commercial success it said.

  • The SUSE Academic Program attracts new partners at the UCISA SSG Conference

    UCISA is the member-led professional body for digital practitioners within higher education in the UK. An open and inclusive network, UCISA uses their collective knowledge and expertise to help transform teaching, learning and research to ensure both operational efficiency and an excellent student experience (https://www.ucisa.ac.uk/about ). Most importantly, UCISA fosters an open community that collaborates and shares thinking, best practices and procedures that everyone in education can learn from.

    Hosted by the Support Services Group, the conference attracted IT support managers, service administrators, support analysts and many others. It was a good place to be for the SUSE Academic Program as the training offered is very interesting to IT staff and students. As a result, the technical training, curriculum and educational materials available through SUSE’ Academic Program were on display and over 20 new institutions enrolled as an academic partner. Our hope, is they will find our program useful in training their IT staff and equip the next generation of professionals with the skills to be highly employable.

today's leftovers

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  • Sparky 4.11

    New live/install iso/img images of Sparky 4.11 are out.

    Sparky 4.11 “Tyche” is the last release of the 4 line which moves the base system from Debian stable “Stretch” to Debian oldstable “Stretch”.

    Make sure that Sparky 4 will be supported next 2 years about, so if you keep running your machine with Sparky 4, do regular system upgrade.

  • Free Software Foundation Bulletin, Issue 34 - Spring 2019
  • That Windows 1.0 promo we though might be something to do with Stranger Things, was [iophk: see also Today in Apple history: Microsoft gets sued for ripping off Mac OS]

    The idea, a few years ago that a streaming tv show would garner enough hype to warrant this level of promotional involvement from Microsoft would have seemed like utter madness. Today, it feels fairly normal.

  • [Old] The Apple vs. Microsoft GUI Lawsuit

    When Gassée saw Windows 1.0, he dismissed the software as no threat.

    But when Sculley saw the software, he was enraged. Microsoft had been provided early prototypes of the Macintosh and some source code to help optimize Word and MultiPlan. Now Windows had a menu bar almost identical to Apple’s. Windows even had a Special menu, containing disk operations. Other elements were strikingly similar. Windows came bundled with Write and Paint, both mimicking Apple’s MacPaint and MacWrite.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • IBM Completes The $34 Billion Red Hat Acquisition

    International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) has completed its acquisition of Red Hat for $34 billion, thus making it the world’s second-biggest technology acquisition ever. IBM has been struggling to adopt cloud-related technologies. With this deal, IBM will try to go after the market leaders like Amazon, Microsoft, and Google.

  • Radeon ROCm 2.6 Released - Without Navi Support But Adds BFloat16 & Other Features

    ROCm 2.6 was released overnight and when initially seeing this new Radeon Open Compute support come right after the Radeon RX 5700/5700XT launch, I was hopeful it would bring Navi support but sadly there are no signs of it in this release. But at least ROCm 2.6 is bringing other features.

    Radeon ROCm 2.6 brings various information reporting improvements, the first official release of rocThrust and hipCUB, MIGraphX 0.3 for reading models frozen from Tensorflow, MIOpen 2.0 with Bfloat16 support and other features, BFloat 16 for rocBLAS/Tensible, AMD Infinity Fabric Link support, RCCL2 support, rocFFT improvements, ROCm SMI fixes, and other enhancements.

  • Seems that the Linux version of Supraland will not be heading to GOG

    Supraland released for Linux on Steam on July 2nd and it just released on GOG today but it seems the Linux version will not be heading to GOG.

    What is Supraland? It's a very highly rated first-person action and puzzle game, inspired by the likes of Zelda, Metroid and Portal. It's popular, with an "Overwhelmingly Positive" rating on Steam from over two thousands user reviews and from my time spent in the demo, I can see why as it was pretty sweet.

  • Beware of some of the Qt 5.13 deprecation porting hints

    QComboBox::currentIndexChanged(QString) used to have (i.e. in Qt 5.13.0) a deprecation warning that said "Use currentTextChanged() instead".

    That has recently been reverted since both are not totally equivalent, sure, you can probably "port" from one to the other, but the "use" wording to me seems like a "this is the same" and they are not.

  • Sprint 3: Calendar management dialog, cleanups and bugfixes

    The calendar is a fresh new take on the previous one; the individual online accounts rows were removed in favor of delegating it all to GNOME Settings’ Online Accounts panel, navigation is easier and simpler, adding new calendars is a more intuitive operation, and it’s possible to toggle calendars right from the first page.

    I’m pretty happy with the rework itself, and splitting it in pages and a controller was definitely the right choice. It allowed implementing the same functionality in a much more well organized way.

  • Refreshed BL Helium ISOs with installation-time bugfix available

    After a non-security-critical installation-time bug was found due to expired repository signing keys in the old BL Helium installation ISOs, we just published a new set of Helium install ISOs that have been fixed. The ISO image files are available for direct download or via BitTorrent at the usual place.

    This issue only affected brand-new installations. If you already worked around the issue as suggested in our previous announcement, you don't have to do anything. Existing users of BL also do not need to do anything.

    Thanks to all users who reported the issue.

  • Android Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Android Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Android has a long history at Linux Plumbers and has continually made progress as a direct result of these meetings. This year’s focus will be a fairly ambitious goal to create a Generic Kernel Image (GKI) (or one kernel to rule them all!). Having a GKI will allow silicon vendors to be independent of the Linux kernel running on the device. As such, kernels could be easily upgraded without requiring any rework of the initial hardware porting efforts. This microconference will also address areas that have been discussed in the past.

  • GNR 85 – Twenty Minutes Boat Ride on a Paddle Steamer

    Dave kicks things off with a report from FOSS Talk Live 2019. Fab couldn’t make it but says he’s planning to go to this year’s OggCamp. We than discuss the news that Larian is doing Baldur’s Gate III.

    Naturally, we must also talk about Magic The Gathering, because it is the best game ever made. The new Core Set comes out this week!

  • Thank you for advancing free software: Read FSF spring news in the latest Bulletin

    Thirty-five volunteers joined FSF staff over the course of three days to get all the Bulletins stuffed in envelopes and mailed out. This was a great opportunity to catch up on free software issues with some of our most dedicated free software enthusiasts here in Boston. We are grateful to have such a strong core of supporters that keep the movement growing, and thanks to your generous contribution, we will be even stronger.

    Please be vocal about your support for free software. Read and share the Bulletin articles online using the #ISupportFreeSoftware hashtag, use our fundraiser support images, and talk to your community about why you support the FSF. It makes a difference.

    Throughout our spring fundraiser, we have been enjoying both the public posts from supporters using the hashtag on social media, as well as answers to the "What inspired you to join today?" question we ask new members. Here are some of our favorites.

  • June 2019: Photos from Brno

    Free Software Foundation president Richard Stallman (RMS) was in Brno, Czech Republic on June 6, 2019, to give two speeches.

    In the morning, he took part in the URBIS Smart City Fair, at the Brno Fair Grounds, giving his speech "Computing, freedom, and privacy."1

  • You can tinker with this conference badge

    The SMD Challenge was born from an insight into the human condition, as its creators explain:

    "Making LEDs blink is what people think make Makers happy, but they are wrong. Makers want to be miserable. They like to make mistakes and to have to try things over and over again. That which does not kill us, makes us stronger. This project will make you strong!"

    The SMD challenge is a badge you make yourself. This project starts with a relatively easy to solder resistor and LED. It then moves into increasingly tiny resistors and LEDs. Coming in both "Regular Edition" and "Misery Edition," the SMD challenge is designed to challenge—and break—all but the most determined solderers.

    If you do manage to make it all the way to the end (and can document your success), you can enter the prestigious 0201 Club. If you prefer to experience the misery (and success) secondhand, the club also features links showing many of the successful attempts.

  • UK ISPs Vilify Mozilla For Trying To Secure The Internet

    Over the years, UK ISPs have been forced by the government to censor an increasing array of "controversial" content, including copyrighted material and "terrorist content." In fits and spurts, the UK has also increasingly tried to censor pornography, despite that being a decidedly impossible affair. Like most global censorship efforts, these information blockades often rely on Domain Name Server (DNS) level blacklists by UK ISPs.

    Historically, like much of the internet, DNS hasn't been all that secure. That's why Mozilla recently announced it would begin testing something called "DNS over HTTPS," a significant security upgrade to DNS that encrypts and obscures your domain requests, making it difficult to see which websites a user is visiting. Obviously, this puts a bit of a wrinkle in the government, ISP, or other organizational efforts to use DNS records to block and filter content or track user activity.

  • [Microsoft] GitHub Bans Open Source DeepNude App And Other Projects Based On It

    GitHub has removed code that is based on DeepNude — an app that uses AI to digitally undress pictures of women and create fake nudes.

    While the maker of DeepNude has already shut down the project and made it illegal to use or possess copies of the app, multiple repositories based on the DeepNude algorithm have cropped up on GitHub and also on other platforms.

  • 'Deep Fake' Legislation Is On The Way, Threatening Free Speech Protections

    The proliferation of deep fake videos is going to start having an effect on First Amendment protections. Hint: it's not going to make these protections any stronger.

    "Deep fake" may be easier to define than "fake news," but that doesn't mean there won't be collateral damage. The issue isn't a new one. Faking reality has been around nearly as long as reality itself. Cheap tools that make this anyone's game is the only thing new. Before we had deep fakes, we had Photoshop and its imitators.

    Video used to be the last bulwark of truth. It couldn't be faked easily. But this too has been abused for years. Editing video to make it show what the editor wants it to show is a tactic that has been used for years. Now, however, tools make it possible to put new words in peoples' mouths, as was demonstrated to devastating satirical effect when a video of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg was tricked out to make it appear as though Zuckerberg was promising to swallow every user's data and privacy.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Vs Windows: Which Is The Best OS For Data Scientists? [Ed: Technically weak article with glaring factual errors]

    Linux has many software choices when it comes to doing a specific task compared to Windows. One could search for a text editor on Freshmeat and get a number of results. Software on Linux comes with more features and greater usability than software on Windows.

  • Vulkan 1.1.114 Released With Image-Less Framebuffer Support

    Vulkan 1.1.114 is another weekly update to the Vulkan graphics API specification... With this update does come a new extension of some interest.

  • SkateBIRD entering the final day of funding, getting a little Them's Fightin' Herds crossover

    SkateBIRD, a game about birds on skateboards (that's actually pretty sweet) is closing in on the last day of funding. They've also announced some more fun stuff coming to it and the demo will vanish after the Kickstarter, so be quick.

  • GOG are having a big sale for French developers, plus recent releases of Eternam and Leo the Lion

    Three bits of GOG news in one for you DRM-free shopping fans today, as not only are they doing a big sale they also recently revived two more classic games.

    First up, the classic 1992 comedy adventure Eternam was released on GOG earlier this month. Little late on picking it up since the Linux build wasn't actually available right away but now it is. Next up is Leo the Lion (original Polish name: Lew Leon), another retro classic action-platformer from 1996. GOG just released it today!

  • Apollo Lake SMARC module has dual GbE and soldered LPDDR4

    Kontron’s Linux-friendly “SMARC-sXAL4” module is equipped with an Apollo Lake SoC, up to 8GB soldered LPDDR4, 2x GbE controllers, triple display support, and an optional industrial range.

    Kontron has announced a SMARC 2.0 module with a choice of all five of Intel’s Apollo Lake SoCs. The SMARC-sXAL4 updates Kontron’s similarly Apollo Lake based SMARC-sXAL module with faster soldered RAM, a second GbE controller, and more.

  • ESP32 Gets Advance Windowed Apps Using This VGA GUI Library

    We featured [Fabrizio Di Vittorio]’s FabGL library for the ESP32 back in April of this year. This library allows VGA output using a simple resistor based DAC (3 resistors for 8 colors; 6 resistors for 64 colors), and includes functions for PS/2 mouse and keyboard input, a graphics library, and many of the miscellaneous functions you might need to develop games on the ESP32. Now, a GUI interface library has been added to ease application development.

    The GUI, of course, runs on the VGA output. The library includes what you’d expect from a minimal windowing GUI, like keyboard and mouse support, windows with the usual minimize/maximize/close controls, and modal and message dialog boxes. For input controls, there are labels, text boxes, buttons, radio buttons, checkboxes, normal and editable combo boxes, and listboxes — you know, pretty much everything you need to develop a modern GUI application. All the code is open-source (GPL 3.0) and in the GitHub repo.

  • LibreOffice Community Member Monday: Jun Nogata

    So, I live in Himeji, Japan where UNESCO World Heritage site Himeji Castle is. I work a part-time lecturer at a local university.

    I am a big fan of free and open source software (FOSS). I started to use Linux from Slackware 95, and I’m using Debian Sid at the moment. I am active in the Debian community in Japan and I’m also an OpenStreetMap mapper.

    I like listening to indie rock music, playing guitar and DJing sometimes. Also, I’m learning Korean – I want to talk to my friend DaeHyun Sung from the Korean LibreOffice community!

  • OpenBSD Community goes Platinum for 2019!

    The OpenBSD Foundation is happy to announce that individual contributions from the OpenBSD community have again exceeded CDN$50,000, making the community the 1st Platinum level donor for 2019!

  • A Complete History of Computers: From the 1800s to Now

    Can you imagine your life without a computer?

    Think about all of the things you wouldn’t be able to do. Send an email, online shop, find an answer to a question instantly.

    And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. We’ve come a long way from the very first computer, and even the first smartphone. But how much do you really know about their history and evolution? From floppy discs to cloud security, the Acorn to the Macintosh, let’s explore how far we’ve come.

  • Professor faces 219-year prison sentence for sending missile chip tech to China

    Yi-Chi Shih, an electrical engineer and adjunct professor at UCLA, was found guilty last month by a Los Angeles jury, officials said in a statement this week. He was convicted on 18 counts, including making an illegal export and multiple fraud charges.

    Shih and another defendant, Kiet Ahn Mai, were found to have worked together to defraud an American semiconductor chip manufacturer. According to prosecutors, Mai posed as a potential customer to obtain chip designs from the unnamed company, then illegally sent the products to China.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (firefox and kernel), Debian (thunderbird), Fedora (curl), openSUSE (curl and python-Werkzeug), Oracle (kernel and thunderbird), Red Hat (rh-nginx114-nginx), SUSE (curl, ibus, MozillaFirefox, firefox-glib2, firefox-gtk3, openldap2, openssl, openssl1, python-urllib3, and util-linux and shadow), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, and wpa).

  • SGX and security modules

    Software Guard Extensions (SGX) is a set of security-related instructions for Intel processors; it allows the creation of private regions of memory, called "enclaves". The aim of this feature is to work like an inverted sandbox: instead of protecting the system from malicious code, it protects an application from a compromised kernel hypervisor, or other application. Linux support for SGX has existed out-of-tree for years, and the effort of upstreaming it has reached an impressive version 22 of the patch set. During the upstreaming discussion, the kernel developers discovered that the proposed SGX API did not play nicely with existing security mechanisms, including Linux security modules (LSMs).

  • GitHub acquires Semmle to help developers spot security vulnerabilities [Ed: Company in NSA PRISM pretends to care about security (and also, Microsoft now uses GitHub to change people's code without asking the developers)]

    Software hosting service GitHub has acquired Semmle, a code analysis platform that helps developers discover security vulnerabilities in large codebases.

today's howtos

LWN Articles About Linux (Kernel): Linux Plumbers Conference, Staging, Linux Conference North America, Stable Statistics

  • Topics from the Open Printing microconference

    On day two of the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference, two of the principals behind the Open Printing project led the very first Open Printing microconference. Project leader Till Kamppeter and program manager Aveek Basu described the current state of printing on Linux and some of the plans for the future, including supporting scanning for multi-function devices. The picture they painted was rosy, at least for printing, which may not quite match the experience of many Linux users. As with many projects, though, Open Printing is starved for contributors—something that was reflected in the sparse attendance at the microconference. Basu began by pointing out that some attendees had likely printed their boarding passes from Linux, which highlights the importance of printing for Linux. People use it for bank documents, transport tickets, and more. He has been at Lexmark for 11 years, working on printing for Linux, macOS, and other Unix-based systems. Kamppeter said that he has been the Open Printing leader since 2001. The idea of the project is to do everything possible to make printing "just work" with Linux and other operating systems; the goal is "plug and print".

  • What happens to kernel staging-tree code

    The staging tree was added to the kernel in 2008 for the 2.6.28 development cycle as a way to ease the process of getting substandard device drivers into shape and merged into the mainline. It has been followed by controversy for just about as long. The recent disagreements over the EROFS and exFAT filesystems have reignited many of the arguments over whether the staging tree is beneficial to the kernel community or not. LWN cannot answer that question, but we can look into what has transpired in the staging tree in its first eleven years to see if there are any conclusions to be drawn there. The core idea behind the staging tree is that it is open to code that does not live up to the normal standards for inclusion into the kernel. Once a driver is added there, it is available to anybody who is brave enough to try to make use of it, but the real purpose is to allow developers to improve the code to the point that it is ready to go into the kernel proper. It serves as an easy place for new developers to try out simple changes and, when it works well, it helps the kernel to gain hardware support that might otherwise languish out-of-tree indefinitely.

  • The USB debugging arsenal

    At the 2019 Embedded Linux Conference North America, which was held in San Diego in August, Krzysztof Opasiak gave a presentation on demystifying the ways to monitor—and even change—USB traffic on a Linux system. He started with the basics of the USB protocol and worked up into software and hardware tools to observe, modify, and fuzz the messages that get sent. Those tools are part of the arsenal that is available to those interested in looking deeply into USB. Opasiak works in Poland for what he called a "small Korean company" (Samsung). He noted that it is not that easy to sniff USB traffic and that the ways to do so are not well known. But "there are no dragons"; nothing bad will happen if you do so. In some ways, USB is like the internet and some of the same tools can be used for both.

  • 5.3 Kernel development cycle statistics

    It's that time of the development cycle again: work on the 5.3 kernel is winding down with an expected final release date of September 15. Read on for LWN's traditional look at where the code in 5.3 came from in this relatively busy development cycle. As of this writing, 14,435 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for 5.3; these changes were contributed by 1,846 developers

Kmdr – Display CLI Commands Explanation In Terminal

A while ago, we wrote about ExplainShell, a web-based tool to learn what each part of a Linux command does. It divides the complex and lengthy Linux commands into multiple parts and gives explanation for each part. Using this tool, a Linux newbie can learn about various command line parameters and options without having to refer man pages. However, It will only help you to learn Linux commands. But what if you want to learn other CLI commands, for example Python? You won’t find explanation of Python commands in ExplainShell. No worries! Today, I stumbled upon a similar tool named Kmdr that provides CLI commands explanation for hundreds of programs. It helps you to easily learn CLI commands without leaving the terminal and without having to go through lengthy man pages. Not just Linux commands, Kmdr provides explanation for a lot of CLI commands including ansible, conda, docker, git, go, kubectl, mongo, mysql, npm, ruby gems, vagrant and hundreds of other programs such as those built into bash. Read more