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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • DXVK 0.40 Brings Initial Direct3D 11.1 Bits, Other Improvements

    The DXVK project that is implementing Direct3D 11 atop of Vulkan for the benefit of Wine gamers is out this weekend with a new release.

    DXVK continues rapidly advancing in allowing more D3D11 games on Wine to run with better performance than Wine's stock D3D11-to-OpenGL translation layer. The latest release this Sunday is DXVK 0.40.

  • Advanced DRI Configurator Now Supports PRIME GPU Setups

    As a more modern and feature alternative to the DriConf configuration program for tweaking Mesa driver settings, a few months back we featured ADRICONF as the Advanced DRI Configuration. Recently this GUI program has picked up a few more features.

    The author of ADRICONF, Jean Hertel, wrote into Phoronix this weekend to share some of the recent development work. Most notably, there is now initial support for PRIME multi-GPU setups within the program. The basics should be in there but the developer is willing to receive bug reports about any missing features and is encouraging those with PRIME laptops/systems to give ADRICONF a whirl to see how it does.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 8.0 M2 Released With Continued Windows Improvements
  • Confessions of a Brogue junkie

    Roguelikes. The term is everywhere these days, and every bit as played-out as “zombies” or “the Dark Souls of…”. We see it so much on game descriptions that we’re sick of it.

  • LG Open Sources WebOS

    The new webOS Open Source Edition (OSE) GitHub account contains 85 different repositories that use the Apache 2.0 License to make code change and distribution easier. To build an image of webOS OSE, you can clone the build-webos repository, which is a top-level repo that aggregates the various layers of code required to build a complete image.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Sony May Owe You $65 for Your Old PS3

    If you own an old PlayStation 3, the original “fat” one before it slimmed down, then Sony could owe you up to $65. Unfortunately, there are a few hurdles to jump through, and you only have until April 15, 2018 to stake your claim for compensation.

  • Nouveau Is On The Verge Of Having Basic Compute Support

    Karol Herbst, who is a long-time Nouveau contributor who joined Red Hat at the end of last year, along with other hat-wearing Linux developers continue working on Nouveau compute support for this open-source NVIDIA driver.

    Karol has been ironing out the Nouveau NIR support that is a critical element to get SPIR-V support going for the Nouveau driver, which is the common IR to Vulkan and OpenCL. Meanwhile there is also the work to get SPIR-V support for Gallium3D's Clover state tracker.

  • Intel OpenGL Driver Performance On Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu vs. Clear Linux

    When having the Microsoft Windows 10 Professional x64 installation on the Core i7 8700K "Coffee Lake" system this week I also took the opportunity to run some fresh OpenGL benchmarks on Windows compared to Linux.

    Due to the UHD Graphics 630 not being too practical for Linux gamers, for this quick round of benchmarking were just some standard OpenGL games and tests across all supported platforms. The latest drivers were used on each platform, including a secondary run on Ubuntu when switching to the Linux 4.16 Git kernel.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux More Popular than Windows in Stack Overflow's 2018 Developer Survey

    Stack Overflow, the largest and most trusted online community for developers, published the results of their annual developer survey, held throughout January 2018.

    More than 100,000 developers participated in this year's Annual Developer Survey, which included several new topics ranging from ethics in coding to artificial intelligence (AI). The results are finally here and reveal the fact that some technologies and operating systems have become more popular than others in the past year.

  • History of containers

    I’ve researched these dates several times now over the years, in preparation for several talks. So I’m posting it here for my own future reference.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E03 – The Three Musketeers - Ubuntu Podcast
  • Best Desktop Environment

    Thanks to its stability, performance, feature set and a loyal following, the K Desktop Environment (KDE) won Best Desktop Environment in this year's Linux Journal Readers' Choice Awards.

  • Renata D'Avila: Pushing a commit to a different repo

    My Outreachy internship with Debian is over. I'm still going to write an article about it, to let everyone know what I worked on towards the ending, but I simply didn't have the time yet to sit down and compile all the information.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Locking down Data with Open Source Code

    The single most noteworthy quality of Linux is that it is one of the few open source working frameworks, and among the most broadly created. Confining open source programming as secure justifiably befuddles individuals, however, a closer look discloses why that is valid. At the point when source code is distributed on the web, it could enable an aggressor to find shortcomings. In any case, by and by it enables numerous more eyewitnesses to distinguish and uncover bugs to the engineers for fixing. Since Linux is an entirely open source OS, for all intents and purposes each scrap of code running on your equipment is subjected to this crowdsourced examination.

  • Best open source network monitoring tools
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  • PostgreSQL Begins Landing LLVM JIT Support For Faster Performance

    The widely-used PostgreSQL database software may soon become much faster thanks to a work-in-progress LLVM JIT back-end that has begun to land.

    A long-running project has been JIT-compiling SQL queries in PostgreSQL by making use of LLVM's just-in-time compilation support, rather than passing SQL queries through Postgres' interpreter. With the LLVM JIT'ed queries, more efficient code is generated by being able to make more use of run-time information and can especially help in increasing the performance of complex SQL queries.

  • GNU Parallel 20180322 ('Hawking') released

    GNU Parallel 20180322 ('Hawking') has been released.

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Last update!

    Advance registration is now closed, but you can register on-site at LibrePlanet 2018, starting at 09:00 on the ground floor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA. Admission is gratis for FSF Associate Members and students, and for all others costs $60 for one day or $90 for both days.

    If you are unable to attend, or know people who cannot attend LibrePlanet 2018 but want to participate, watch the livestream, which you can do using exclusively free software (an unfortunate rarity!)

    We want to alert you to a schedule change: unfortunately, keynote speaker Gabriella Coleman had to cancel her LibrePlanet talk. She will be sorely missed, but we are glad to announce that free software technologist, social scientist, and FSF board member Benjamin Mako Hill will fill in. Check out the full schedule here -- to read full descriptions of each talk, click "Expand all" at the top of the page.

  • AMD Confirms Newly-Found Security Flaws in Some of Its Chips, Fixes Coming Soon
  • This App Lets You Generate Two-Factor Authentication Codes on Linux

    Looking for a two factor authentication code generator for Linux? Well, you use the past tense, as we’ve gone and found you one.

    ‘Authenticator‘ is an aptly-named, native, and easy to use two-factor authentication app for the Linux desktop.

today's leftovers

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Misc

  • Google Patches All Intel Chromebooks Against Spectre Variant 2 with Chrome OS 65

    Google released a new stable version of its Linux-based Chrome OS operating system for Chromebooks, build 65.0.3325.167 (Platform version: 10323.58.0/1) bringing the Meltdown and Spectre mitigations to more devices and a bunch of other improvements.

  • VIDEO: Cooking With Linux: Lots and Lots of Word Processors! The Tuesday Linux Journal Show
  • How to use netstat in GNU/Linux
  • Cutelyst 2 released with HTTP/2 support

    Cutelyst the Qt/C++ web framework just got a major release update, around one and half year ago Cutelyst v1 got the first release with a stable API/ABI, many improvements where made during this period but now it was time to clean up the mistakes and give room for new features.

  • Fedora 28 and GNOME 3.28: New Features for Eastern Europe

    This time this is not fake, edited, patched, nor a custom build from COPR but the real screenshots of the unmodified downstream Fedora 28 planned to be released on May 1 this year. Here is how the default calendar widget in GNOME Shell looks in Greek, Polish, and Ukrainian:

  • Stephen Smoogen: /usr/bin/whoami
  • Debian CEF packages

    I've created some Debian CEF packages—CEF isn't the easiest thing to package (and it takes an hour to build even on my 20-core server, since it needs to build basically all of Chromium), but it's fairly rewarding to see everything fall into place. It should benefit not only Nageru, but also OBS and potentially CasparCG if anyone wants to package that.

  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #151
  • Porting L4Re and Fiasco.OC to the Ben NanoNote (Part 1)

    For quite some time, I have been interested in alternative operating system technologies, particularly kernels beyond the likes of Linux. Things like the Hurd and technologies associated with it, such as Mach, seem like worthy initiatives, and contrary to largely ignorant and conveniently propagated myths, they are available and usable today for anyone bothered to take a look. Indeed, Mach has had quite an active life despite being denigrated for being an older-generation microkernel with questionable performance credentials.

    But one technological branch that has intrigued me for a while has been the L4 family of microkernels. Starting out with the motivation to improve microkernel performance, particularly with regard to interprocess communication, different “flavours” of L4 have seen widespread use and, like Mach, have been ported to different hardware architectures. One of these L4 implementations, Fiasco.OC, appeared particularly interesting in this latter regard, in addition to various other features it offers over earlier L4 implementations.

    Meanwhile, I have had some success with software and hardware experiments with the Ben NanoNote. As you may know or remember, the Ben NanoNote is a “palmtop” computer based on an existing design (apparently for a pocket dictionary product) that was intended to offer a portable computing experience supported entirely by Free Software, not needing any proprietary drivers or firmware whatsoever. Had the Free Software Foundation been certifying devices at the time of its introduction, I imagine that it would have received the “Respects Your Freedom” certification. So, it seems to me that it is a worthy candidate for a Free Software porting exercise.

  • Samsung Announces Galaxy Tab Active2, a Rugged Android Tablet for Mobile Workers

    Samsung announced today the Galaxy Tab Active2 rugged Android tablet designed for mobile workers conducting business outdoors in industrial locations, under harsh weather, and other difficult conditions.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Purchased a PlayStation 3 Between 2006 and 2010? You May Be Entitled to $65

    PS3 owners first qualified to receive compensation from Sony following the settlement of a lawsuit in 2016. That case dealt with the "OtherOS" feature that came with the console when it debuted. With OtherOS, Sony promised a new PlayStation that would operate like a computer, allowing users to partition their hard drive and install third-party operating systems like the open-source Linux software.

  • Moro – A Command Line Productivity Tool For Tracking Work Hours

    Keeping track of your work hours will give you an insight about the amount of work you get done in a specific time frame. There are plenty of GUI-based productivity tools available on the Internet for tracking work hours. However, I couldn’t find a good CLI-based tool. Today, I stumbled upon a a simple, yet useful tool named “Moro” for tracking work hours. Moro is a Finnish word which means “Hello”. Using Moro, you can find how much time you take to complete a specific task. It is free, open source and written using NodeJS.

  • Twenty years, 1998 – 2018

    curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.

  • What’s New in ArchLabs 2018.03

    ArchLabs 2018.03 is the latest release of Linux distribution based on Arch Linux featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. The project’s latest release ArchLabs 2018.03 brings a few fixes and improvements and improve the user.

    Powered by Linux kernel 4.15 series and based-on latest version of Arch Linux. LUKS and encryption is now working, for those security concious users out there you should be all go on the encryption side. There have been a few installer updates, base-devel is included at install time. Also the mirrorlist is optimised at the same time.

  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018: Call for Host

    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2018. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.

  • TidalScale Software-Defined Servers Now Support SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

    TidalScale, the leader in Software-Defined Servers, announced today that working in partnership with SUSE, the world’s first provider of Enterprise Linux, TidalScale has achieved SUSE Ready certification to ensure full compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. TidalScale’s breakthrough scaling platform allows multiple industry standard servers to be combined into a single Software-Defined Server running a single instance of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.

  • 8 Best Radio Apps For Android To Stream Online Music In 2018

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Zorin OS 12.3 Linux Distro Released: Download The Perfect Windows Replacement

    While listing out the best distros for a Linux beginner, the ease of use and installation are the most critical factors. Such qualities make distros like Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and Zorin OS the most recommended options. In case you’re also concerned about your privacy and security, a shift to the world of Linux becomes a more obvious option.

    Calling itself a replacement for Windows and macOS, Zorin OS has been established as a beginner-friendly option that offers a smooth ride while making the transition. The latest Zorin OS 12.3 release works to strengthen the basics of the operating system and polishes the whole experience.

  • Ramblings about long ago and far away

    I had originally run MCC (Manchester Computer Center Interim Linux) in college but when I moved it was easier to find a box of floppies with SLS so I had installed that on the 486. I would then download software source code from the internet and rebuild it for my own use using all the extra flags I could find in GCC to make my 20Mhz system seem faster. I instead learned that most of the options didn't do anything on i386 Linux at the time and most of my reports about it were probably met by eye-rolls with the people at Cygnus. My supposed goal was to try and set up a MUD so I could code up a text based virtual reality. Or to get a war game called Conquer working on Linux. Or maybe get xTrek working on my system. [I think I mostly was trying to become a game developer by just building stuff versus actually coding stuff. I cave-man debugged a lot of things using stuff I had learned in FORTRAN but it wasn't actually making new things.]

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.13 | Running Linux On Junk

    A talk about the advantages of running Linux on junk hardware.

  • Best 50 HD Wallpapers for Ubuntu

    Wallpapers are useful in many ways depending on the visual it contains for example if there is a motivational quote on it, it helps to motivate you. The images are the best type of wallpaper because they have an impact on the mind of a human being. So if you are a working professional and have to work continuously on a computer then your desktop cab be a source of inspiration and happiness.

    So today we are going to share 50 best HD Wallpapers for your Ubuntu which will keep your desktop fresh.

  • Ubuntu Tried Adding Synaptics Support Back To GNOME's Mutter

    GNOME developers previously dropped support for Synaptics and other input drivers from Mutter in favor of the universal libinput stack that is also Wayland-friendly. Canonical developers tried to get Synaptics support on X11 added back into Mutter but it looks clear now that was rejected.

    Canonical's Will Cooke reported in this week's Ubuntu happenings that they were trying to add upstream support for Synaptics to Mutter, complementing the libinput support. While it's great Canonical trying to contribute upstream to GNOME, Synaptics support was previously dropped as being a maintenance burden and with libinput support getting into rather good shape.

  • Long live Release Engineering

    y involvement in Fedora goes back to late 2003 early 2004 somewhere as a packager for fedora.us. I started by getting a few packages in to scratch some of my itches and I saw it as a way to give back to the greater open source community. Around FC3 somewhere I stepped up to help in infrastructure to rebuild the builders in plague, the build system we used before koji and that we used for EPEL(Something that I helped form) for awhile until we got external repo support in koji.

    I was involved in the implementation of koji in Fedora, I joined OLPC as a build and release engineer, where I oversaw a move of the OS they shipped from FC6 to F8, and laid a foundation for the move to F9. I left OLPC when Red Hat opensourced RHN Satellite as “spacewalk project” I joined Red Hat as the release engineer for both, after a brief period there was some reorganisation in engineering that resulted in me handing off the release engineering tasks to someone closer the the engineers working on the code. As a result I worked on Fedora full time helping Jesse Keating. When he decided to work on the internal migration from CVS to git I took over as the lead.

    [...]

    Recently I have accepted a Job offer to become the manager of a different team inside of Red Hat.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linus Bashes CTS Labs, GNOME 3.28 Released, Project ACRN and More

    GNOME 3.28 "Chongqing" is here, with many new features and fixes. According to the release notes, "the release incorporates 25832 changes, made by approximately 838 contributors." The new version includes personal organization improvements, new Boxes features, such as automatic downloading of operating systems, and much more.

  • pkg-config and paths

    This is something of a frequently asked question, as it comes up every once in a while. The pkg-config documentation is fairly terse, and even pkgconf hasn’t improved on that.

  • OSMC's March update is here with Pi 3 B+ support

    OSMC's March update is ready with a wide range of improvements and fixes to keep your OSMC device running in tip-top shape. We've released this update slightly earlier in the month than usual to add support for the new Raspberry Pi 3 B+.

  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Ruling the commandline
  • Fedora 27 release party: Managua, Nicaragua

    On February 27th, the Fedora Community in Nicaragua ran a Release Party for the F27 Release. The activity took place in a salon of Hotel Mansión Teodolinda in Managua. This is our first activity of the year. This event was late in the Fedora Development Schedule because the Fedora 28 release is coming soon this year, but we need to keep the community active and keep promoting the Fedora Four Foundations in Nicaragua. The event schedule was…

  • Stop streaming music from YouTube with this one weird trick

    Having grown up on the internet long before the average connection speed made music streaming services viable, streaming has always struck me as wasteful. And I know that doesn't make much sense—it's not like there's a limited amount of bandwidth to go around! But if I'm going to listen to the same audio file five times, why not just download it once and listen to it forever? Particularly if I want to listen to it while airborne and avoid the horrors of plane wifi. Or if I want to remove NSFW graphics that seem to frequently accompany mixes I enjoy.

  • dput usability changes

    With these changes, after building a package, you just need to type dput (in the correct directory of course) to sign and upload it.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, February 2018
  • Mentorship within software development teams

    In my journey to find an internship opportunity through Google Summer of Code, I wanted to give input about the relationship between a mentor and an intern/apprentice. My time as a service manager in the automotive repair industry gave me insight into the design of these relationships.

  • Faster Window/Application Launching Is Coming For Cinnamon

    Linux Mint's GNOME/GTK-derived Cinnamon Desktop Environment will soon be able to launch applications faster.

    Developers of Linux Mint were recently investigating why application launching on Cinnamon felt slower than with desktops / window managers on MATE and Xfce. With a basic test they were able to confirm their feelings and went to work on figuring out the slowdowns.

  • Rugged, Kaby Lake based NVR system offers up to eight PoE ports

    Aaeon’s automotive-focused “VPC-5600S” networked video recorder PC runs Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Core chips and offers dual hot-swappable SATA trays and 6x to 10x GbE ports, with 4x to 8x of those supporting PoE.

    Aaeon has launched a rugged VPC-5600S network video recorder (NVR) embedded computer with up to 10x Gigabit Ethernet ports, of which up to 8x support Power-over-Ethernet (PoE). Together with the Linux and Windows supported Intel 7th Gen “Kaby Lake” CPUs, the capability enables users to “receive the highest quality images from multiple sources without any danger of data loss,” says Aaeon. With the additional four USB 3.0 ports, the VPC-5600S can support up to 14x high-grade surveillance cameras, says the Asus-owned company.

  • Fanless system has four PoE and two standard GbE ports

    FCO’s Linux-ready “SmartMod” box PC offers a 7th Gen Intel Core CPU, SATA and mSATA, 5x USB, 6x serial, 3x mini-PCIe, dual display support, and 6x GbE ports, four of which have PoE.

  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps in the Tizen Store for February 2018

    Whats happening in the world of Tizen Smartphones? Well, not really that much of late, but that’s probably another post for another time.

    For the last year we have kept a close eye on the Tizen App ecosystem and today we bring you the Top 20 Apps downloaded from the Tizen Store during February 2018 for the Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3, and Z4 mobiles. New entries in the Top 20 are 99 Apps, Hill Driver, Balloon shoot, Music Press MX Music Player, and Jio TV. The rest are the usual suspects. Anyone that has been following this list knows not much really changes from month to month at the moment on the store.

  • 10 Best Android Download Manager Apps For 2018

    Download managers are designed to give users great control over their downloads. Some manager apps can accelerate download speeds by downloading from multiple sources at a time. A stock Android download manager usually comes pre-installed on devices by default. But, these default download managers might provide slow downloading speeds and, generally, do not have advanced features like queuing or resuming paused downloads.

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  • Intel Says Its Next Chips Will Be Fully Protected Against Spectre Vulnerability
  • Hybrid cloud security: 5 key strategies
  • Triada Malware Preinstalled on Low-Cost Android Phones – Here’s How to Beat It

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E02 – A Tale of Two Cities - Ubuntu Podcast

    This week we interview Will Cooke, Manager of the Ubuntu Desktop team, about the changes we can expect to see in Ubuntu 18.04.

  • The Latest Winevulkan Patches Make It Usable For Doom, Wolfenstein & DXVK

    Roderick Colenbrander and those working with him on "Winevulkan" to provide a clean Vulkan implementation for Wine supporting the Vulkan ICD concept, etc, rather than the old hacked together code in Wine-Staging have done a great job. With Roderick's latest Winevulkan patches, this new implementation is considered usable.

    It was just at the start of March that the initial Winevulkan support merged and since then more patch series have landed for this implementation that allows Windows programs on Wine to tap Vulkan support, permitting the host system has working Vulkan API support.

  • Samsung/Enlightenment Developers Are Busy At Work On EFL 2.0

    Cedric Bail of Samsung's Open-Source Group presented today at the Embedded Linux Conference on EFL 2.0 as part of the Enlightenment project's long-standing goal to provide a new and unified API.

    While the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries 1.x (EFL1) continues to be maintained, the developers at Samsung OSG that are part of the Enlightenment team have been busy construction EFL 2.0 and hope to show off the first of their new wares in 2018.

  • Present your images from the couch with Gwenview, MPRIS & KDE Connect

    KDE Applications 18.04 Feature Freeze is setting in. Or: reminder to do finally that feature you always wanted to implement.

  • Reflections on the GNOME 3.28 Release Video

    I just flipped the switch for the 3.28 Release Video. I’m really excited for all the new awesome features the community has landed, but I am a bit sad that I don’t have time to put more effort into the video this time around. A busy time schedule collided with technical difficulties in recording some of the apps. When I was staring at my weekly schedule Monday there didn’t seem much chance for a release video to be published at all..

  • Slackware: What all happened in March so far

    I realize I have been a wee bit silent on the blog (not counting my replies in the comments section). This was due to private issues that drained the desire for social interactions. Nevertheless there was quite a bit of activity on the Slackware packaging front.

  • Development Versions of Oracle Linux UEK now available on GitHub

    The source for UEK has always been available at oss.oracle.com, as a git repository with full git history. Starting now, we'll also be posting the UEK source on github.com/oracle/linux-uek. By doing so, we intend to increase the visibility for our work and to make it even easier for people to access the source for UEK. We will also use this repository for working with developers at partner companies and in the Linux community. The repository contains the source for the Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel including a small number of Oracle additions which have not yet been accepted into the mainline Linux kernel source tree.

    The Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) is a Linux kernel built by Oracle and supported via Oracle Linux support. Its focus is performance, stability, and minimal backports by tracking the mainline source code as closely as is practical. UEK is well-tested and used to run Oracle's Engineered Systems, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, and large enterprise deployments for Oracle customers.

  • Defining the Spectrum of Cloud Deployment Technologies

    “Cloud computing” has been a catch-all phrase over the past decade to describe anything that’s a shift away from hardware servers. However, the term has become nebulous in recent times with the growing diversity in how many different ways you can leverage the cloud.

    We’ve come far from a simplistic separation between on-premises and cloud. Today, it’s about on-premises versus a range of different cloud options. Indeed, the cloud can be a confusing place for newcomers and veterans alike, with new options cropping up every few months, and the landscape always shifting towards the newer and better.

    But how do you choose between good, better and best? Let’s compare the various cloud deployment technologies available today and find the common ground and what separates them from each other.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more