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today's leftovers

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  • Linux Kernel 4.4.21 LTS Is a Big Update with Over 200 Changes, Update Now

    Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 4.7.4 as the latest stable and most advanced kernel version, Greg Kroah-Hartman published details about the twenty-first maintenance update to the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

  • Linux Kernel 4.7.4 Updates GPU Drivers, Adds OverlayFS and EXT4 Improvements

    Today, September 15, 2016, renowned kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman informed the Linux community about the availability of the fourth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series.

    Linux kernel 4.7.4 is now the most advanced stable kernel that exists for GNU/Linux operating systems. However, looking at its appended shortlog and the diff from the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.3, we can't help but notice that the changes implemented in today's release are pretty small in number. Only 59 files were changed, with 614 insertions and 282 deletions.

  • Got the writing bug? An introduction to bibisco

    The writing bug bit me again recently, so I started seeking alternatives and came across bibisco. The application is a personal project of Andrea Feccomandi, who is its sole author. It's licensed under the GPLv2, and freely downloadable from the website, with builds for Windows and 32- or 64-bit Linux. The source code is available on GitHub.

  • [Older] The Top 10 Linux Distributions Of All Time

    Distrowatch started their much discussed ranking system in 2002.

    Whilst only a guide to the success of a distribution it provides an interesting historical view over how the Linuxsphere has changed in the past 14 years.

    Each distribution has a page counter which counts the hits it receives each day and these are counted up and used as a hits per day count for the Distrowatch rankings. To prevent abuse only 1 page count is registered from each IP address per day.

    Now the merits of the numbers and how accurate they are may be up for debate but hopefully the following list will be an interesting insite into the history of Linux.

    This list looks at the rankings since 2002 and highlights the distributions that have hit the top ten in any given year.

    There are some interesting facts to accompany this list. For instance there is only 1 distribution that has been in the top 10 throughout all 14 years although if you count Red Hat and Fedora as one distribution then you could say 2.

    Another interesting fact is that only 3 Linux distributions have ever held the top spot at the end of any given year. You can get one point for each distribution you name.

    28 distributions have appeared in the top 10 in the past 14 years proving that whilst it maybe easy to rise to success it is just as easy to fall out of favour.

    This list is in alphabetical order because it would be hard to do it on rankings as they fluctuate so much per distribution.

  • Rugged, fanless Skylake box-PC has triple GbE and dual HDMI

    Aaeon’s rugged, fanless “Boxer-6639” industrial box-PC features 6th Gen Intel (Skylake) processors plus triple GbE, dual HDMI, and six RS-232/422/485 ports.

  • Open Files Faster With Bookmarks Indicator for Ubuntu
  • Avoid ACCIDENTAL ALL CAPS With This Nifty Indicator Applet
  • [How To] Get Android Notifications on the Ubuntu Desktop

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • OpenStack API Benchmarking and Scaling — 3 Test Cases
  • Red Hat and Veritas Team to Support Applications on OpenStack

    Now that so many enterprises have moved from the evaluation stage to deployment of OpenStack, they are in need of ways to organize and protect the applications they run in the cloud. That calls for storage, application management and security solutions--a space where Veritas has traditionally been prominent.

    Now, Red Hat, which has been accelerating its OpenStack efforts, has announced a collaboration with Veritas aimed at supporting business critical enterprise applications on OpenStack. The two companies have already teamed on business continuity, storage management and data protection solutions for Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Virtualization. Now they plan to work together "to offer predictable quality of service to OpenStack applications and workloads, regardless of scale."

  • KDE at FISL 2016

    The 17th edition of the International Free Software Forum (FISL) took place, as usual, at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul's Convention Center, city of Porto Alegre, from 13th to 16th July. FISL is the largest FOSS conference in Latin America and a quite traditional venue to get a comprehensive panorama of all sorts of FOSS-related new topics: technical advances, adoption cases, FOSS and education, hacker culture, just to mention a few.

    This year, FISL started an effort which aims at strengthening the respect for diversity in FOSS communities. Many activities were led by and/or had the participation of minority groups, emphasizing the need for respect and diversity regarding gender identity, special needs, sexual orientation, physical appearance, race, ethnicity, religion and socioeconomic status.

  • To EGLStream or not

    The announcement of KDE Neon dev/unstable switching to Wayland by default raised quite a few worried comments as NVIDIA’s proprietary driver is not supported. One thing should be clear: we won’t break any setups. We will make sure that X11 is selected by default if the given hardware setup does not support Wayland. Nevertheless I think that the amount of questions show that I should discuss this in more detail.

  • LVFS and ODRS are down
  • Updates Enhance Audio, Graphics, Telepathy

    Snapshots this week added new sensations for Tumbleweed users, but there were plenty of other updates in the repositories to get people excited.

    While snapshot 20160907 added some subpackages to enhance PulseAudio and updated telepathy-qt5 to version 0.9.7, GStreamer fixed quite a few bugs in its update to version 1.8.3 to improve media processing. Wine’s 32-bit subpackage update in the snapshot, bringing it to version 1.9.18, added support for multiple kernel drivers in a single process.

  • Samsung’s Gear 360 Now Works with other smartphones, See how

    Samsung’s Gear 360 camera works with just a few high-end Samsung smartphones like the Galaxy S7 and S7 Edge, the same way the Gear VR headset only supports select Samsung smartphones. Seems Samsung placed some sort of restriction of all other smartphone brands, allowing the app to support only some mostly high-end Samsung smartphones. The Korean giant also disabled 4K video filming in the Gear 360 on all devices except the Galaxy S7. But all these are now past, as a new modified version of the Samsung Gear 360 Manager has emerged which opens up the Gear 360 to work with other smartphones.

today's leftovers

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  • Rocket League for Linux: The Definitive Video Review

    Rocket League blasted on to Linux at the end of last week and we were ridiculously about it — but perhaps you're not caught up in the excitement.

  • Last Minute Wayland Fixes For GNOME 3.22

    It looks like running the GNOME desktop environment natively on Wayland should be in pretty good shape after a round of last-minute improvements.

    GNOME 3.22 package updates this week provided a number of important Wayland fixes:

    Mutter 3.21.92 fixes for Wayland: absolute pointer motion events, animated cursors, various crashes, XWayland pointer warp emulation, and other non-Wayland improvements.

  • elementary OS 0.4 Loki Screencast and Screenshots
  • Who Needs the Internet of Things?

    This week, the Raspberry Pi Foundation announced it has sold more than 10 million Raspberry Pi boards and celebrated the milestone by releasing a new Raspberry Pi Starter Kit. While many of these Linux-driven hacker boards were used for the foundation’s original purpose -- creating a low-cost computer for computer education -- a large percentage have been sold to hobbyists and commercial developers working on Internet of Things (IoT) projects ranging from home automation to industrial sensor networks.

    Linux-driven open source and commercial single board computers and modules sit at the heart of the IoT phenomenon. They are usually found in the form of gateways or hubs that aggregate sensor data from typically wirelessly enabled, sensor-equipped endpoints. Sometimes these endpoints run Linux as well, but these are more often simpler, lower-power MCU-driven devices such as Arduino-based devices. Linux and Windows run the show in the newly IoT-savvy cloud platforms that are emerging to monitor systems and analyze data fed from the gateways in so-called fog ecosystems.

    Over the next few weeks, I’ll be analyzing the IoT universe, with a special focus on Linux and other open source technologies used in home and industrial automation. I’ll look at major open source products and projects, IoT-oriented hacker boards, security and privacy issues, and future trends.

  • Taunton’s open source success: a new era for electronic patient records

    Almost one year ago our organisation, Taunton and Somerset NHS FT, achieved an important milestone in delivering transformational change in our digital programme: we became the first NHS trust to go live with an open source electronic patient record (EPR).

    Some may have perceived this as a risky choice. An open source EPR was untested within the NHS, and NHS organisations can tend to do what everyone else has already tried. Yet we saw that, by having a flexible system that had no licence fees, we would be able to tailor the system as we went along, to suit the needs of our clinicians, patients and our healthcare partners in Somerset.

  • Navigating the challenges of international teamwork

    OpenEMR, OpenMRS, and VisTA are three of the most well-known open source applications in the health IT genre. OpenEMR has worldwide acceptance as a complete and flexible electronic healthcare records (EHR) system that can be tweaked with relative ease to work anywhere. That is evident in its adoption by the International Planned Parenthood Foundation, the Peace Corps, and most recently by the Health Services Dept of Israel. OpenMRS is a respected tool set and API that has been predominantly used in Africa, and has been adopted for targeted healthcare needs all over the world. Despite being a US-based project, its adoption in the US is minimal. VisTA is the US Veteran's Administration EHR and it is now, due mainly to the formation of OSEHRA.org, beginning to get traction in other countries as a solution to the high cost of proprietary EHR systems for hospitals. New on the horizon are projects like FHIR, started in Australia, and adopted by hl7.org.

  • Infostretch Adds New Open Source Test Automation Framework to QMetry Suite
  • Udacity plans to build its own open-source self-driving car

    Sebastian Thrun’s online education startup Udacity recently created a self-driving car engineering nanodegree, and on stage at Disrupt today Thrun revealed that the company intends to build its own self-driving car as part of the program, and that it also intends to open source the technology that results, so that “anyone” can try to build their own self-driving vehicle, according to Thrun.

    The crowdsourced vehicle plans will ultimately be created in service of the school, rather than a product in and of itself. The open-sourcing of the data should help other projects ramp up, and will include driving data and more to contribute to other people’s projects.

  • Q&A: SFU alumna launching new "open source" food co-op

    SFU alumna Jennifer Zickerman is making it easier to access locally grown, high quality herbs through her venture, the Lower Mainland Herb Growers Co-op.

    The co-operative offers economy of scale to local small growers growing culinary herbs. It will buy fresh herbs from local growers, then dry and package them as culinary herb blends and distribute them to retail stores.

    Zickerman first developed this business idea as a student in SFU's Community Economic Development (CED) program. She pitched it as part of the program's annual Social Innovation Challenge, winning $12,000 to implement her idea.

    The co-op's high quality products aim to replace the poor quality dried herbs found in most retail stores that are imported from countries with poor environmental and labour standards.

    Local farmers will also have a new market for a crop that grows well in this climate and requires few artificial supports such as fertilizer, pesticides and greenhouses.

  • Chile's green energy future is powered by open data analysis

    Open source software and open data play key roles in implementing Chile's long-term energy planning, identifying ways to get the maximum value from development, minimizing its impact, and requiring less development overall.

    Over the past two years, our company—in partnership with the Centro UC Cambio Global of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile—has been designing, building, and testing a framework to support Chile's Ministry of Energy in policy evaluation and regional hydroelectric power planning activities. Open source software and open data play a key role in this framework, but before I explain how, I need to summarize the context.

  • DYNAcity project starts mobility pilot in Flemish City of Ghent

    The mobility service is based on information published on the open data portal of the City of Ghent. It also incorporates data from innovative sources like thermal cameras and a carpool system. Participants in the pilot will receive travel advice each morning through a pop-up on their mobile phones.

  • Just Because It Says ‘Open Source Hardware’ Doesn’t Mean It Really Is

    David L. Jones, an electronics design engineer based in Sydney Australia, explains his pragmatic solution to the use of the open source hardware logo — inspired by the varying gradations of the Creative Commons licenses.

  • How to help developers help themselves

    Developers need help. It comes with the territory for software companies employing thousands of developers, many who live and work in remote locations all over the world. At Red Hat, Rafael Benevides doles out lots of help. He teaches developers about tools and practices so they can be more productive, and he'll be taking the show on the road for the tech conference All Things Open this year where he'll share his specfic thoughts on cloud development.

  • Adblock Plus finds the end-game of its business model: Selling ads

    Eyeo GmbH, the company that makes the popular Adblock Plus software, will today start selling the very thing many of its users hate—advertisements. Today, the company is launching a self-service platform to sell "pre-whitelisted" ads that meet its "acceptable ads" criteria. The new system will let online publishers drag and drop advertisements that meet Eyeo's expectations for size and labeling.

    "The Acceptable Ads Platform helps publishers who want to show an alternative, nonintrusive ad experience to users with ad blockers by providing them with a tool that lets them implement Acceptable Ads themselves,” said Till Faida, co-founder of Adblock Plus.

    Publishers who place the ads will do so knowing that they won't be blocked by most of the 100 million Adblock Plus users. The software extension's default setting allows for "acceptable ads" to be shown, and more than 90 percent of its users don't change that default setting.

    Eyeo started its "acceptable ads" program in 2011. With the new platform, it hopes to automate and scale up a process that until now has been a cumbersome negotiation. What once could take weeks, the company boasts in today's statement, now "takes only seconds."

  • 5 Ways The Modern World Is Shockingly Ready To Collapse

    As technology embraces the digital, abandoning the crude and primitive notion of "physical existence" entirely, the idea that you actually own the media you buy is vanishing faster than that goddamn Walkman you swore was in the closet. And it's more than inconvenient for consumers; it may be apocalyptic for our society.

    [...]

    If you tried to purchase an Adobe product recently, you're already aware of this trend. As of 2013, you can no longer buy programs such as Photoshop, Flash, or Dreamweaver. You can only "subscribe" to them for a monthly fee. Yes, now you have the privilege of paying for your software forever. Isn't the future wonderful?

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Canonical Shaky On Sharing

    Remember Canonical, the company that produces the distribution Ubuntu GNU/Linux? They have a hard time even mentioning “Linux” on their website yet they manage to customize the Linux kernel for their distro without actively contributing the modifications to kernel.org.

  • AMD's GPUOpen HIP Project Made Progress Over The Summer

    The HIP project has made good progress over the summer. HIP from AMD's GPUOpen project is part of the puzzle for converting CUDA to portable C++ code. That source code can then run on AMD GPUs while having little to no performance impact, at least according to AMD.

  • A Unity developer is teasing the Vulkan API in the Unity engine [Ed: but it brings in Microsoft Mono]
  • 4 Weeks Left to Gentoo Miniconf

    4 weeks are left until LinuxDays and Gentoo Miniconf 2016 in Prague.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2016
  • New Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk Drone Development Kit Makes Use of Ubuntu Snappy and ROS

    Dubbed Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk, the new development kit is here to help developers create obstacle avoidance and autonomous robots and drones that use the slimmed-down version of the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution designed for embedded and IoT (Internet of Things) devices, Ubuntu Snappy Core, as well as ROS (Robot Operating System).

    "Parrot developed S.L.A.M.dunk to be as easy and user-friendly as possible for developers, researchers, integrators, and academics," reads the press release. "All Ubuntu functionalities and benefits from ROS (Robot Operating System) framework are embedded in the Parrot S.L.A.M.dunk making it user-friendly. The HDMI port makes it possible to develop directly on the product."

  • Enabling Geocode API for Tizen apps with Tizen studio and Here Maps

    If you’re a deveoper working on the Tizen platform with apps that require location access, then the new Tizen Studio’s Native Geocode API is just what you should be looking for. The API provides coordinates data to your app which can be achieved by following a fairly simple process.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Allwinner A33 DRM Support Coming In Linux 4.9

    Maxime Ripard of Free Electrons has sent in the Allwinner DRM driver pull request that will ultimately land for the Linux 4.9 kernel merge window.

    New to report on for the young Allwinner DRM driver is support in the sub4i-drm code for the Allwinner A33 SoC. Aside from the Allwinner A33 SoC, there are various other bug fixes and updates.

  • ZeMarmot monthly report for August 2016

    We went to the GUADEC conference, which was our first time there. Have a look to our reports in English and in Korean.

  • Bodhi 4.0 Linux OS Gets a Second Alpha Build, Remains Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

    Bodhi Linux developer Jeff Hoogland is pleased to announce on September 11, 2016, the release and immediate availability of the second Alpha development snapshot of his upcoming Bodhi 4.0.0 GNU/Linux distribution.

    Bodhi 4.0.0 Alpha 2 remains based on the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, and it looks like it brings an up-to-date Bodhi Builder tool that the developer uses to build his Ubuntu derivative. Moreover, the latest security and software versions pushed upstream in the Xenial repos have also been imported in the Bodhi 4.0.0 distribution, which uses the most stable release of the Moksha desktop environment.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Zombie Processes [comic]
  • Identity: Our Last Stand

    By that I mean every corporate cathedral you can shake a mouse at is full of Linux, yet Linux has not yet enabled a free and open marketplace for every business and every customer. Instead, every human being on the commercial net remains trapped in corporate cathedrals, many of which are ravenous for the blood of personal data, most of which is acquired by surveillance. In fact, nearly our entire existence in the commercial world is inside cathedrals where we have near-zero autonomy and great exposure to whatever those running the cathedrals wish to know about us.

    The wide-open bazaar—the open public marketplace—where we can roam free, as anonymous or selectively know-able as we please, still doesn't exist online. And it should, because the internet protocol was built to support it. Just because it isn't there yet doesn't mean we shouldn't build it. Hell, commercial activity has existed on the internet only for 21 years so far. (Starting on April 30, 1995—that's when the NSFnet, the last of the internet backbones that forbade commercial traffic, stood down.)

  • Bundling Redux

    What is it with courts to accept the status quo instead of recognizing fundamental principles of law and justice? Are they on the payroll of monopolists? What’s wrong with giving consumers choice? Nothing. This court has blundered like so many others.

  • Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Beta 2 Has Full exFAT Support, Based on Ubuntu 14.04.5

    Black Lab Software's CEO Robert J. Dohnert informs Softpedia today about the availability of the second Beta development milestone of the upcoming Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" operating systems.

    Black Lab Linux 8 "Onyx" Beta 2 is here approximately three weeks after the launch of the first Beta build and it adds a few local applications, among which we can mention the Abiword word processor, Gnumeric spreadsheet editor, Rhythmbox music player, Totem video player, GIMP image editor, Chromium web browser, and Thunderbird e-mail and news client. OpenJDK 8 (Java support) is available as well.

  • Sweet SUSE! HPE snags itself a Linux distro

    Before HPE spun out its software assets in a deal with Micro Focus, the UK-based business was best known for its soup-to-nuts support of COBOL. What most people missed is the deal also made HPE the first major, old-school technology company to give preference to Linux distributor SUSE.

today's leftovers

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  • ext4 encryption incompatible with grub
  • I can’t stop thinking big. In a world where I feel so small.

    Returned from GUADEC and again it was a wonderful time. Big kudos to the organizing team putting together a great conference! For me to meet everyone is such a adrenaline rush, and I always feel so pumped when I come back.

    Speaking of conferences, I spent a lot of time volunteering to understand the mechanics of running a local conference since you know, I have one of my own that is coming up in a few short weeks. Libre Application Summit presented by GNOME or LAS GNOME conference.

  • Frugalware Linux 2.1 KDE Screenshot Tour
  • Stock-research Ratings: Liberty Broadband Corporation (NASDAQ:LBRDK), Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Analyze the Analyst’s Considerable Ratings: Nokia Corporation (NYSE:NOK) , Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Heroes of Fedora (HoF) – F24 Alpha

    As is usual with the release of a new version of Fedora, it’s time to reflect on the stats revolving around what it took to get the latest-and-greatest out the door. With the recent push of F24, the numbers are in, so without further delay, let’s check ’em out!

  • Debian CI updates for September 2016

    That is it for now. If you want to contribute to the Debian CI project and want to get in touch, you can pop up on the #debci channel on the OFTC IRC network, or mail the autopkgtest-devel mailing list.

  • Porn Sites Feel Exposed by Flash, Get It on With HTML5

    Soon, Google Chrome will phase out full support for Flash, meaning that, on most sites, users will have to manually activate the aging software if necessary. The move is largely for security reasons: Researchers regularly find dangerous vulnerabilities in Flash.

    On Tuesday, porn site Pornhub said it would be ditching all Flash content from its site, opting instead for HTML5, the most recent version of the web language that offers more support for multimedia content. Since hackers have had a number of successes at compromising porn sites, it’s notable that one of the largest is taking this step, albeit when Flash is already on its last legs.

    “It was just a matter of time until we switched, as HTML5 is becoming the standard across platforms. Now makes the most sense as Google and Firefox are slowly pushing Flash support out of their browsers. Plus HTML5 has improved security, better power consumption and it’s faster to load,” Corey Price, vice president of Pornhub, told Motherboard in an email.

  • Free Isn't Freedom: How Silicon Valley Tricks Us

    Small business owners have long complained of the Google's frequent and mysterious adjustments to its search algorithm, which effectively punishes them for violating one of the search engine’s mostly obscure criteria.

    Even some of the world's largest companies live in constant "fear of Google"; sudden banishment from search results, YouTube, AdWords, Adsense, or a dozen other Alphabet-owned platforms can be devastating.

  • Google given more time to reply to EU antitrust charge on Android [Ed: Microsoft started this attack. This is well documented.]

    Alphabet's Google has been given two more weeks to counter EU antitrust charges that it uses its dominant Android mobile operating system to block competitors, the European Commission said on Thursday.

    The EU competition enforcer in April accused the U.S. technology giant of harming consumers because of its demand that mobile phone makers pre-install Google Search and the Google Chrome browser on their smartphones to access other Google apps.

    Google was initially given until July 27 to respond to the charges but asked for an extension to Sept. 7.

  • Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4 Gets Android Marshmallow
  • Google squashes another Mediaserver bug in Android

today's leftovers

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  • Sony wins battle over preinstalled Windows in Europe’s top court [more comments]

    The sale of a computer equipped with pre-installed software isn't an unfair commercial practice because most customers prefer to buy a laptop they can use straight away, Europe’s top court has ruled in a victory for Sony.

    "Failure to indicate the price of each item of pre-installed software" isn't misleading, the Court of Justice of the European Union added in its ruling (PDF) on Wednesday.

  • Writing GStreamer Elements in Rust (Part 2): Don’t panic, we have better assertions now – and other updates
  • Linux Top 3: Porteus Kiosk 4.1, 4MLinux 19 and TrueOS
  • feren OS 2016.2 Screenshot Tour
  • SwagArch 16.09.1 Alpha 4 Screenshot Tour
  • Mozilla, systemd, compiler update in Tumbleweed

    QtCon, Akademy and VideoLAN Dev Days in Berlin this past week kept many developers busy, but openSUSE’s rolling release kept going forward.

    Tumbleweed had one new snapshot since that last article was published and more is expected this week.

    Snapshot 20160901 provided Mozilla updates for both Firefox and Thunderbird in the repositories. Firefox updated to version 48.0.2 and Thunderbird to version 45.3.0.

  • Spark Comparison: AWS vs. GCP [Ed: False dichotomy, as if giving all your processing, bandwidth data etc. to the US government is inevitable]

    There’s little doubt that cloud computing will play an important role in data science for the foreseeable future. The flexible, scalable, on-demand computing power available is an important resource, and as a result, there’s a lot of competition between the providers of this service. Two of the biggest players in the space are Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud Platform (GCP).

  • Arduino Open Source Platform Fuels IoT and Farming’s Future

    Arduino, the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem, is being used to power Farmbot, the revolutionary farming robot that is built fully on open source. Farmbot is a computer numerical control (CNC) farming machine and software package for small scale, hyper local, DIY food production. It is controlled by and Arduino RAMPS stack and connected to the Internet using Raspberry Pi 2. The platform is designed to be simple, scalable, hackable, and easily made.

    “The applications that are fueling the IoT market are astonishing, and open source technology is playing a big role in it,” said Federico Musto, CEO of Arduino S.r.L. “Predicted to become a $6 trillion market by 2021, the IoT market is starting to take shape with advancements in wearables, healthcare, smart homes and cities, law enforcement, automotive, and, of course agriculture. We are proud to be a part of Farmbot, and look forward to continuing to fuel IoT deployments.”

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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Misc
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