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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What is Kubernetes-as-a-Service?

    According to wikis, hacker forum discussions and the team itself, Kubernetes is so-named because it translates from (κυβερνήτης in Greek) to governor, helmsman or captain — and further, ‘gubernare’ translates from Latin to government.

    Which all makes perfect sense.

    Because Kubernetes is an open source orchestration technology used to manage Linux containers across private, public and hybrid cloud environments.

    Or… in the words of the people behind the technology: Kubernetes is a portable, extensible, open source platform for managing containerised workloads and services, that facilitates both declarative configuration and automation.

  • Patreon account for Patrick Volkerding’s Slackware

    Everybody who wanted to support Slackware after it became clear that the Slackware Store had not been paying Patrick and family for a long time, but was not prepared to create a PayPal account in order to donate money: there is now an alternative.
    Patreon is a community site where “Patrons support the creators they love in exchange for exclusive membership benefits“.
    I don’t know whether Pat will do stuff like “exclusive benefits” considering the fact that he already gives away Slackware Linux for free since 26 years… anyway, he created a page there where you can setup a monthly recurring payment of one dollar or more – whatever you can spare. Payment methods are either PayPal or credit cards.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 590

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 590 for the week of July 28 – August 3, 2019.

  • Free software activities in May, June and July 2019

    Here is an update covering what I have been doing in my free software activities during May, June and July 2019.

  • RHEL / Centos 6 - Install Nginx Using Yum Command
  • How to Scan QR code without app on PC Windows 10, Linux & Web

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Raspberry Slideshow donation

    As a donor, you will have full access to the unrestricted versions of: Raspberry Digital Signage (web-based digital signaging), Raspberry Slideshow (image/video slideshow-based digital signaging) and Raspberry WebKiosk (cheap web kiosking), which can be deployed on how many devices you wish (no serials’ checks or similar sh*t)!

  • Mattermost makes case for open source as team messaging market booms

    The team collaboration market may be dominated by Slack, Microsoft and other large cloud vendors, but some believe that open-source messaging tools will also find a place among large organizations.

    Mattermost is one of a handful of vendors — along with Zulip, Rocket.Chat and others — taking an open-source approach to team chat. The company has been attracting attention from investors following deployments at organizations as diverse as Uber, Airbus and the Department of Defense. “People want an open-source alternative because they need the trust, the flexibility and the innovation that only open source is able to deliver,” said Ian Tien, co-founder and CEO of Mattermost, an open-source team messaging tool that launched in 2015.

  • The fastest open source CPU ever, Facebook shares AI algorithms fighting harmful content, and more news

    Pingtouge Semiconductor - an Alibaba subsidiary - announced its Xuantie 91 processor last month. It's equipped to manage infrastructure for AI, the IoT, 5G, and autonomous vehicles, among other projects. It boasts a a 7.1 Coremark/MHz, making it the fastest open source CPU on the market.

    Pintogue announced plans to make its polished code available on GitHub this September. Analysts view this release as a power move to help China hit its goal of using local suppliers to meet 40 percent of processor demand by 2021. Recent tariffs on behalf of the U.S. threaten to derail this goal, creating the need for open source computer components.

  • Open source made me a better marketer: says Daniel Ng, ExCo at Smart Cities Network

    Daniel Ng: I joined Red Hat, a purely open source software company in 2007 which were still the early days of open source. Before that I was with Microsoft where I developed a good understanding of proprietary software distribution channels. I struggled for the first three weeks at Red Hat to understand why someone would let go off their software for free when the most precious thing at Microsoft was the software. I have my personal objective to always join a company that creates a market and not just addresses a market. I rehashed the marketing function at Red Hat in my 6 years there and in process have seen how ‘open source’ can change cultural mindsets and bring in change.

    6. What is the outlook for open source in India?

    Daniel Ng: Open source is all about how people work together. More eyes and less bugs make open source good. Open source is all about sharing and sharing is an integral part of India. We in the Asia Pacific region share a common culture of sharing and are taught about it from a young age. That is also what open source software is.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What is open source software? Open source and FOSS explained [Ed: IDG repeats Microsoft lies towards the end (as expected)]

    The “free” in free software is meant to denote users’ freedom to alter and distribute code as they like; there’s no rule against charging money for free software in this sense.

  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 62

    In Nightly (and targeted for Firefox 70) we now have color-contrast checks in the color-picker tooltip thanks to Maliha, our Accessibility intern!

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Lessons from Hacking Glitch

    When we first started building MrEd we imagined it would be done as a traditional web service. A potential user goes to a website, creates an account, then can build experiences on the site and save them to the server. We’ve all written software like this before and had a good idea of the requirements. However, as we started actually building MrEd we realized there were additional challenges.

    First, MrEd is targeted at students, many of them young. My experience with teaching kids during previous summers let me know that they often don’t have email addresses, and even if they do there are privacy and legal issues around tracking what the students do. Also, we knew that this was an experiment which would end one day, but we didn’t want the students to lose access to this tool they just had just learned.

    After pondering these problems we thought Glitch might be an answer. It supports anonymous use out of the box and allows easy remixing. It also has a nice CDN built in; great for hosting models and 360 images. If it would be possible to host the editor as well as the documents then Glitch would be the perfect platform for a self contained tool that lives on after the experiment was done.

  • Started wanting to move stuff to docker.

    Started wanting to move stuff to docker. Especially around build systems. If things are mutable they will go bad and fixing them is annoying.

  • Episode 24: A Chat About Redis Labs

    Doc Searls and Katherine Druckman talk to Yiftach Shoolman of Redis Labs about Redis, Open Source licenses, company culture and more.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Control Screen Brightness from Ubuntu Terminal
  • How to use a Yubikey on Linux with an encrypted drive
  • The MATE Desktop Is Becoming Quite Usable On Wayland Via Mir

    The MATE desktop environment is becoming usable on Wayland thanks to its support being provided by the Mir display stack.

    The MATE desktop, which continues to be developed as an active fork of GNOME 2, is seeing Wayland support thanks to Mir doing the heavy lifting. This is also becoming one of the leading examples of Mir's use-case following Canonical engineers re-tooling their display server with Wayland support after pulling back from their original design goals around Ubuntu Touch and mobile/convergence.

  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS/ELTS (July 2019)

    In July 2019, I have worked on the Debian LTS project for 15.75 hours (of 18.5 hours planned) and on the Debian ELTS project for another 12 hours (as planned) as a paid contributor.

  • Now You Can Try Debian 10 on Distrotest!

    Debian Buster uses GNOME for default view of the desktop environment used. But you can change it to another desktop environment if you don't like the default display of this distribution. For those of you computer users with 32-bit architecture, you can install Debian Buster to your computer, because it still supports 32-bit computers.

  • [Canonical] Design and Web team summary – 2 August 2019

    This iteration was fairly light iteration for the Web & design team at Canonical as we had a fair few people on holidays as well as a group who has gone to Toronto for our mid-cycle roadmap sprint. Here are some of the highlights of our completed work.

  • Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Mozilla calls for transparency in compelled access case

    Sometime last year, Facebook challenged a law enforcement request for access to encrypted communications through Facebook Messenger, and a federal judge denied the government’s demand. At least, that is what has been reported by the press. Troublingly, the details of this case are still not available to the public, as the opinion was issued “under seal.” We are trying to change that.

    Mozilla, with Atlassian, has filed a friend of the court brief in a Ninth Circuit appeal arguing for unsealing portions of the opinion that don’t reveal sensitive or proprietary information or, alternatively, for releasing a summary of the court’s legal analysis. Our common law legal system is built on precedent, which depends on the public availability of court opinions for potential litigants and defendants to understand the direction of the law. This opinion would have been only the third since 2003 offering substantive precedent on compelled access—thus especially relevant input on an especially serious issue.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Hubs Summer Update

    We’ve introduced new features that make it easier to moderate and share your Hubs experience. July was a busy month for the team, and we’re excited to share some updates! As the community around Hubs has grown, we’ve had the chance to see different ways that groups meet in Hubs and are excited to explore new ways that groups can choose what types of experience they want to have. Different communities have different needs for how they’re meeting in Hubs, and we think that these features are a step towards helping people get co-present together in virtual spaces in the way that works best for them.

  • Reality 2.0 Episode 24: A Chat About Redis Labs (Podcast Transcript)

    Katherine Druckman: Hey, Linux Journal readers, I am Katherine Druckman, joining you again for our awesome, cool podcast. As always, joining us is Doc Searls, our editor-in-chief. Our special guest this time is Yiftach Shoolman of Redis Labs. He is the CTO and co-founder, and he was kind enough to join us. We’ve talked a bit, in preparation for the podcast, about Redis Labs, but I wondered if you could just give us sort of an overview for the tiny fraction of the people listening that don’t know all about Redis Labs and Redis. If you could just give us a little brief intro, that’d be great.

  • New research article type embeds live code and data

    While science is supposed to be about building on each other's findings to improve our understanding of the world around us, reproducing and reusing previously published results remains challenging, even in the age of the internet. The basic format of the scientific paper—the primary means through which scientists communicate their findings—has more or less remained the same since the first papers were published in the 18th century.

    This is particularly problematic because, thanks to the technological advancements in research over the last two decades, the richness and sophistication of the methods used by researchers have far outstripped the publishing industry's ability to publish them in full. Indeed, the Methods section in research articles remains primarily a huge section of text that does not reflect the complexity or facilitate the reuse of the methods used to obtain the published results.

  • LLVM Plans To Complete Transition To Git From SVN By October

    While GCC and Clang are now competing neck-and-neck on Linux x86_64 when it comes to the performance of generated binaries, when it comes to each of their initiatives to transition to Git it looks like LLVM will take the cake.

    Both LLVM (and its sub-projects) and GCC have been working on transitioning from Subversion (SVN) to Git. In the case of LLVM, they plan to centralize around GitHub for their Git hosting though not making use of any extra GitHub features at this stage. In the case of GCC, making use of GNU's Git hosting infrastructure.

  • 24U Software Updates fmRESTor for FileMaker Server 18

    [prMac.com] Prague, Czech Republic - 24U Software has released a new version of the popular open-source PHP library designed for PHP developers to easily integrate their code with the RESTful FileMaker Data API without having to learn the FileMaker Data API itself.

    The new version brings support for all new features added to the FileMaker Data API with the recent release of FileMaker Server 18, while maintaining full compatibility with the FileMaker Server 17 Data API as well.

  • MacOS terminal emulator, iTerm2 3.3.0 is here with new Python scripting API, a scriptable status bar, Minimal theme, and more

    Yesterday, the team behind iTerm2, the GPL-licensed terminal emulator for macOS, announced the release of iTerm2 3.3.0. It is a major release with many new features such as the new Python scripting API, a new scriptable status bar, two new themes, and more.

  • Microsoft confirms users unable to switch out of Windows 10 in S Mode

    Some flagship devices like Samsung Galaxy Book2 and Microsoft Surface Go come pre-installed with Windows 10 in S mode (formerly known as Windows 10 S). Windows 10 in S Mode locks installation of apps only from the Microsoft Store and users cannot download or install .exe apps.

    Fortunately, Microsoft allows users to switch out of Windows 10 in S mode from the Microsoft Store, but users are reporting that this Store feature is broken and they cannot switch out of Windows 10 in S Mode.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • 2018 Open Source Jobs Report

    Developed in partnership with Dice, we share the latest trends in open source careers, which skills are in demand, what motivates open source job seekers, and how employers can attract and retain top talent.

  • GitLab CI Is One Of My Favorite Tools – Chris Aniszczyk, CTO/COO – CNCF

    Recently GitLab forged a partnership with CNCF (Cloud Native Computing Foundation) to offer GitLab CI pipeline to CNCF projects. Chris Aniszczyk, CTO and COO of CNCF goes into detail talking about the impact of this partnership on CNCF projects and why GitLab CI is one of his favorite tools. The interview was recorded at KubeCon, Barcelona.

  • He Built A $1 Billion Open Source Company With No Headquarter: Sid Sijbrandij of GitLab
  • Industrial temp 3.5-inch SBC has Apollo Lake and ZIO expansion

    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch “CAPA310” SBC runs on an Apollo Lake SoC and offers dual display and -40 to 85°C support, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, SATA and mSATA, up to 2x mini-PCIe, and a ZIO expansion connector.

    Axiomtek announced a 3.5-inch SBC for industrial IoT and intelligent systems such as automation, self-service terminals, digital signage, POS/kiosk displays, and medical devices. Like the CAPA312, the CAPA310 runs on an Intel Apollo Lake SoC, in this case the quad-core, 1.6GHz Atom x5-E3940 instead of Pentium or Celeron models. As with the CAPA312, no OS support was listed, but either board should easily run Linux or Windows.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Pet Peeves: 5 Things That Really Grind my Gears
  • LHS Episode #293: Have Lawn Chair Will Broadcast

    Welcome to the 293rd installment of Linux in the Ham Shack! In the episode, the hosts tackle topics from upcoming RSGB contests on the new, hot FT-4 mode, the origin of "Mayday" as a distress call, magloop antennas, CoreCtrl, the vanishing floppy disk, DMR (Digital Mobile Radio) and much more. Thank you for tuning in and have a wonderful week.

  • DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) Update – Detecting Managed Networks and User Choice

    At Mozilla, we are continuing to experiment with DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH), a new network protocol that encrypts Domain Name System (DNS) requests and responses. This post outlines a new study we will be conducting to gauge how many Firefox users in the United States are using parental controls or enterprise DNS configurations.

    With previous studies, we have tried to understand the performance impacts of DoH, and the results have been very promising. We found that DoH queries are typically the same speed or slightly slower than DNS queries, and in some cases can be significantly faster. Furthermore, we found that web pages that are hosted by Akamai–a content distribution network, or “CDN”–have similar performance when DoH is enabled. As such, DoH has the potential to improve user privacy on the internet without impeding user experience.

    Now that we’re satisfied with the performance of DoH, we are shifting our attention to how we will interact with existing DNS configurations that users have chosen.  For example, network operators often want to filter out various kinds of content. Parents and schools in particular may use “parental controls”, which block access to websites that are considered unsuitable for children. These controls may also block access to malware and phishing websites. DNS is commonly used to implement this kind of content filtering.

  • New CSS Features in Firefox 68

    Firefox 68 landed earlier this month with a bunch of CSS additions and changes. In this blog post we will take a look at some of the things you can expect to find, that might have been missed in earlier announcements.

  • How to Build a Career in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning?

    Math is just one of the skillsets that aspiring AI and ML professionals are expected to have. This is only one half the requirement, the other half is one’s expertise in programming languages, such as Java, C++, Python, and R.

    While C++ helps engineers increase the speed of their coding process, Python will help them understand and create complex algorithms. Python is also the go-to choice for ML developers, and also offers various libraries and frameworks to ease the process of creating an AI model. Similarly, R and Java help professionals understand stats and implement mappers, respectively. They are important considering the role of visualization in explaining AI.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Open firmware and more news from July

    System76 has been granted a Thunderbolt license, meaning that we can now integrate Thunderbolt compatibility into our open firmware. This is a huge development in the open firmware project, as we can now achieve full functionality of Thunderbolt in our machines once the firmware is implemented.
    The open firmware is now functional on the Gazelle when running on Intel graphics. This will not yet be integrated, however, as more work is necessary to get the NVIDIA graphics up and running.

  • System76 Granted A Thunderbolt License To Integrate Into Their Open Firmware

    Linux laptop/PC vendor System76 has become a Thunderbolt licensee so that they can officially offer support for it in the Coreboot-based open-source system firmware initiative they are pursuing.

  • Chromebook Linux bug causing reboots when resuming from sleep, though a fix is coming

    Being able to run Linux applications on Chromebooks isn't just useful for developers, it can help plug what little remaining app or feature gap prevents you from using the platform. Unfortunately for those that do use it, some folks have been experiencing a problem where their devices spontaneously reboot during sleep if Linux containers are running, and it isn't clear if it will be fixed in time for the next Chrome OS release.

    Reports for the issue on the Chromium bug tracker's relevant thread go back as early as Chrome OS 74, though others claim they didn't experience it until 75, with yet more not having any problem until the current Chrome OS 76 betas. Those comments also vary wildly when it comes to which release channel and version combination triggered the behavior first. Many reports of similar issues elsewhere are likely related, though the specifics make it hard to draw a connection. Still, it's a straightforward problem: If a Linux application has been run on the device in the current session, once it goes to sleep, it will reboot upon waking rather than resuming as expected. Battery life during sleep also allegedly takes a nosedive as a result of it silently crashing.

  • Proton Re-Based To Wine 4.11, Adds D9VK Direct3D 9, Better CPU Utilization & DXVK 1.3

    Valve's Linux developers today released Proton 4.11 as the newest release of their Wine-based software that powers Steam Play for running Windows games on Linux under the Steam client.

    Proton 4.11 is a big one with the key change being a re-base from Wine 4.2 to Wine 4.11. This big Wine upgrade brings "more than 3,300 improvements" with now being close to the upstream state of Wine.

  • Valve Sponsored Xrdesktop Lets You View Linux Desktop Environments In VR

    There are a number of ways you can view your desktop PC in virtual reality (VR), with apps like Bigscreen Beta or Virtual Desktop. But what if you run Linux software? Today, global consultancy Collabora which specialises in delivering the benefits of Open Source software for commercial use has announced xrdesktop, a project enabling interaction with popular Linux desktop environments, such as GNOME and KDE, in VR.

  • Why leave Wordpress behind for Nikola ?

    In my previous post I announced my website's migration from Wordpress to Nikola.

    Still, with Wordpress having been my site's engine for so many years, I feel that I owe a few explanations to the community.

    In this post I'll enumerate what stands out in my (very good !) experience with Wordpress, plus a few words about zenPhoto and what makes the difference between those two and Nikola.

  • Migrating to a Static Site

    I've been writing really nothing on my previous blog, and the whole Wordpress install was too much overkill, besides doing a static website in python sounds way better to a programmer Wink

    So, i'm using Pelican and plan to revert back all my customizations that make sense.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux's KVM Sees Patches For RISC-V Support

    In continuation of the article last week how the RISC-V Linux kernel support has been maturing and various missing gaps filled in, another feature just arrived in patch form: support for KVM virtualization.

    Western Digital while associated with hard drives has been working big on RISC-V and already contributed Linux patches in the past. One of their engineers is the one to send out the RISC-V KVM support on Monday.

  • Keynote Speakers Announced for the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe

    The Linux Foundation today announced the keynote speakers for its Open Source Summit Europe (OSSEU), the leading conference for open source developers, architects and other technologists and a hotbed for emerging technologies, and Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The event takes place October 28-30 in Lyon, France.

    Open source software and technologies are a leading indicator of where companies are investing resources for technology development. By bringing the latest open source projects and leading technologists together in one place, the event becomes a forum for defining and advancing technology development in the years ahead.

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #141
  • Episode 76 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, the Pinebook Pro is now available for Pre-Orders and a Critical Security Bug reported for VLC but that was quickly debunked so we’ll talk about the details for that. In App News, we got a couple new apps to check out. A command-line cheatsheet app called Cheat.sh and a live video mixer tool called Nageru. We’ve got a lot of Distro News this week from Fedora, SUSE, Mageia and we also got news from ArcoLinux, Sparky and Slackel. Later in the show, we’ll take a look at the new version of Coreboot and some Linux Gaming News with RetroArch and a new Humble Bundle that gave me some interesting perspective regarding various bundles. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Joining Purism!

    Personal news time! Starting in August I’m going to be joining the team at Purism working on the design of PureOS and related software products, but what I’m very excited about is that I get to continue to work on GNOME design!

  • The Hidden Costs of Automated Thinking

    The growing pervasiveness of machine-learning models, and the fact that anyone can create one, promise to make this process of accounting difficult. But it’s vital. Taken in isolation, oracular answers can generate consistently helpful results. But these systems won’t stay in isolation: as A.I.s gather and ingest the world’s data, they’ll produce data of their own—much of which will be taken up by still other systems. Just as drugs with unknown mechanisms of action sometimes interact, so, too, will debt-laden algorithms.

  • Are We Really Making Much Progress? A Worrying Analysis of Recent Neural Recommendation Approaches

    [...] we report the results of a systematic analysis of algorithmic proposals for top-n recommendation tasks. Specifically, we considered 18 algorithms that were presented at top-level research conferences in the last years. Only 7 of them could be reproduced with reasonable effort. For these methods, it however turned out that 6 of them can often be outperformed with comparably simple heuristic methods, e.g., based on nearest-neighbor or graph-based techniques. The remaining one clearly outperformed the baselines but did not consistently outperform a well-tuned non-neural linear ranking method. [...]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • NVIDIA have three new Linux driver releases out today

    Today, NVIDIA have released a new stable driver update in addition to an updated Vulkan beta driver and a new OpenGL beta driver.

  • NVIDIA 430.40 Linux Driver Released With RTX 2080 SUPER Support, RTX 3000 Max-Q

    NVIDIA's Unix/Linux graphics driver team has kicked off a new week by introducing the 430.40 long-lived driver release.

    New GPU support with this NVIDIA 430.40 Linux update is handling of the GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER and Quadro RTX 3000 Max-Q graphics. Sadly no RTX SUPER Linux tests still as NVIDIA seems uninterested in Linux tests with these recent SUPER models.

    The NVIDIA 430.40 Linux driver also fixes a kernel issue when built with CONFIG_HOTPLUG_CPU and support in the NVIDIA installer for systems that provide their ncurses library with the wide character ABI only.

  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux Announce New StorageDirector Q-Series Storage Appliance for Multimedia Streaming and Active Archive of Media Content

    OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux will demonstrate the new solution alongside syGlass, a scientific VR software provider, at SIGGRAPH 2019 happening July 30th to August 1st at the Los Angeles Convention Center at booth number 720.

    The StorageDirector Q-Series combines the QuantaStor software-defined storage platform with Pogo-certified hardware to provide enhanced streaming and active archiving of digital content with enterprise-class availability and data services in a fully-integrated, high-capacity storage system. Additionally, the StorageDirector Q-Series storage solution provides industry-leading media processing capabilities while affording the operational agility and flexibility to handle unexpected media workflow demands.

  • Introduction Fedora CoreOS (FCOS) with Benjamin Gilbert and Ben Breard (Red Hat) – OpenShift Commons Briefing

    Fedora CoreOS is the new container-centric operating system from the Fedora community and Red Hat.

    In this briefing, Benjamin Gilbert, Fedora CoreOS technical lead, and Ben Breard, product manager, describe how Fedora CoreOS supports immutable infrastructure to make clusters easier to manage and also discuss future development plans, including integration with OKD.

    Fedora CoreOS is an automatically updating, minimal, monolithic, container-focused operating system, designed for clusters but also operable standalone, optimized for Kubernetes, but also great without it. It aims to combine the best of both CoreOS Container Linux and Fedora Atomic Host, integrating technology like Ignition from Container Linux with rpm-ostree and SELinux hardening from Project Atomic. Its goal is to provide the best container host to run containerized workloads securely and at scale.

  • Candy Tsai: Outreachy Week 8 – Week 9: Remote or In-Office Working

    The Week 9 blog prompt recommended by Outreachy was to write about my career goals. To be honest, this is a really hard topic for me. As long as a career path involves some form of coding, creating and learning new things, I’m willing to take it on. The best situation could be that it is also doing something good for the society. This might be because that “something that I am too passionate for” doesn’t yet exist in my life. For now, I wish I’d still be coding 5 years from now. It’s just that simple. The only thing that I would like to see improvement upon is gender balance for this industry.

  • linux.conf.au proposal deadline extended

    For those didn't quite get around to putting in a proposal for linux.conf.au 2020 (Gold Coast, January 13 to 17), there's another chance: the proposal deadline has been extended to August 11. "We have heard that some of you would like a bit more time to submit your proposals for linux.conf.au 2020. So, we have decided to extend the due date by two weeks to help everyone have a chance to submit."

  • Mozilla WebThings Gateway open source router firmware now available

    Mozilla has this week announced the release of version 0.9 of its WebThings Gateway firmware for wireless routers, making the first experimental builds for the companies first target router hardware, the Turris Omnia.

    Based on the open source OpenWrt operating system Mozilla explains that the firmware features a “new first-time setup experience which enables you to configure the gateway as a router and Wi-Fi access point itself, rather than connecting to an existing Wi-Fi network.”

    Mozilla is also planning to add support for other wireless routers and router developer boards in the near future. As well as these new OpenWrt builds for routers, Mozilla will also continue to support the existing Raspbian-based builds for the Raspberry Pi range of mini PC systems.

  • IRL (podcast): The Tech Worker Resistance

    There's a movement building within tech. Workers are demanding higher standards from their companies — and because of their unique skills and talent, they have the leverage to get attention. Walkouts and sit-ins. Picket protests and petitions. Shareholder resolutions, and open letters. These are the new tools of tech workers, increasingly emboldened to speak out. And, as they do that, they expose the underbellies of their companies' ethics and values or perceived lack of them.

    In this episode of IRL, host Manoush Zomorodi meets with Rebecca Stack-Martinez, an Uber driver fed up with being treated like an extension of the app; Jack Poulson, who left Google over ethical concerns with a secret search engine being built for China; and Rebecca Sheppard, who works at Amazon and pushes for innovation on climate change from within. EFF Executive Director Cindy Cohn explains why this movement is happening now, and why it matters for all of us.

  • How Ford Lost $181 Million Betting on a Technology Startup—Data Sheet

    In May, 2016, two months after former Steelcase CEO Jim Hackett left the board of automaker Ford to become head of its “mobility services” unit, Ford invested $182 million in a Silicon Valley company called Pivotal Software. “The investment is part of Ford’s expansion to be both an auto and a mobility company,” Ford said at the time. The emphasis was theirs. Hackett subsequently became CEO of Ford and has staked his tenure on Ford’s mobility future.

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Android Leftovers

Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z). These patches weren't part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains: Read more

OSS: Cisco Openwashing, GitLab Funding, Amazon Openwashing, Chrome OS Talk and More Talks

  • Why Open Source continues to be the foundation for modern IT

    Open source technology is no longer an outlier in the modern world, it's the foundation for development and collaboration. Sitting at the base of the open source movement is the Linux Foundation, which despite having the name Linux in its title, is about much more than just Linux and today is comprised of multiple foundations, each seeking to advance open source technology and development processes. At the recent Open Source Summit North America event held in San Diego, the width and breadth of open source was discussed ranging from gaming to networking, to the movie business ,to initiatives that can literally help save humanity. "The cool thing is that no matter whether it's networking, Linux kernel projects, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects like Kubernetes, or the film industry with the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), you know open source is really pushing innovation beyond software and into all sorts of different areas," Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation said during his keynote address.

  • GitLab Inhales $268M Series E, Valuation Hits $2.75B

    GitLab raised a substantial $268 million in a Series E funding round that was more than doubled what the firm had raised across all of its previous funding rounds and pushed its valuation to $2.75 billion. It also bolsters the company’s coffers as it battles in an increasingly competitive DevOps space. GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij said in an email to SDxCentral that the new Series E funds will help the company continue to move on its goal of providing a single application to support quicker delivery of software. It claims more than 100,000 organizations use its platform. “These funds will help us to keep up with that pace and add to that with our company engineers,” Sijbrandij explained. “We need to make sure every part of GitLab is great and that CIOs and CTOs who supply the tools for their teams know that if they bet on GitLab that we’ll stand up to their expectations.”

  • Amazon open-sources its Topical Chat data set of over 4.7 million words [Ed: openwashing of listening devices without even releasing any code]
  • How Chrome OS works upstream

    Google has a long and interesting history contributing to the upstream Linux kernel. With Chrome OS, Google has tried to learn from some of the mistakes of its past and is now working with the upstream Linux kernel as much as it can. In a session at the 2019 Open Source Summit North America, Google software engineer Doug Anderson detailed how and why Chrome OS developers work upstream. It is an effort intended to help the Linux community as well as Google. The Chrome OS kernel is at the core of Google's Chromebook devices, and is based on a Linux long-term support (LTS) kernel. Anderson explained that Google picks an LTS kernel every year and all devices produced in that year will use the selected kernel. At least once during a device's lifetime, Google expects to be able to "uprev" (switch to a newer kernel version). Anderson emphasized that if Google didn't upstream its own patches from the Chrome OS kernel, it would make the uprev process substantially more difficult. Simply saying that you'll work upstream and actually working upstream can be two different things. The process by which Chrome OS developers get their patches upstream is similar to how any other patches land in the mainline Linux kernel. What is a bit interesting is the organizational structure and process of how Google has tasked Chrome OS developers to work with upstream. Anderson explained that developers need to submit patches to the kernel mailing list and then be a little patient, giving some time for upstream to respond. A key challenge, however, is when there is no response from upstream. "When developing an upstream-first culture, the biggest problem anyone can face is silence," Anderson said. Anderson emphasized that when submitting a patch to the mailing list, what a developer is looking for is some kind of feedback; whether it's good or bad doesn't matter, but it does matter that someone cares enough to review it. What the Chrome OS team does in the event that there is no community review is it will have other Chrome OS engineers publicly review the patch. The risk and worry of having Chrome OS engineers comment on Chrome OS patches is that the whole process might look a little scripted and there could be the perception of some bias as well. Anderson noted that it is important that only honest feedback and review is given for a patch.

  • Open Source Builds Trust & Credibility | Karyl Fowler

    Karyl Fowler is co-founder and CEO of Transmute, a company that’s building open source and decentralized identity management. We sat down with Fowler at the Oracle OpenWorld conference to talk about the work Transmute is doing.

  • What Is Infrastructure As Code?

    Rob Hirschfeld, Founder, and CEO of RackN breaks Infrastructure As Code (IaC) into six core concepts so users have a better understanding of it.

  • Everything You Need To Know About Redis Labs

    At the Oracle OpenWorld conference, we sat down with Kyle Davis – Head of Developer Advocacy at Redis Labs – to better understand what the company does.

Programming: Java, Python, and Perl

  • Oracle Releases Java 13 with Remarkable New Features

    Oracle – the software giant has released Java SE and JDK 13 along with the promise to introduce more new features in the future within the six-month cycle. The Java 13’s binaries are now available for download with improvements in security, performance, stability, and two new additional preview features ‘Switch Expressions’ and ‘Text Blocks’, specifically designed to boost developers’ productivity level. This gives the hope that the battle of Java vs Python will be won by the former. Remarking on the new release, Oracle said: “Oracle JDK 13 increases developer productivity by improving the performance, stability and security of the Java SE Platform and the JDK,”. [...] Speaking of the Java 13 release, it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 along with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE). The director of Oracle’s Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander stated “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.” Let’s look into the new features that JDK 13 comes packed with.

  • 8 Python GUI Frameworks For Developers

    Graphical User Interfaces make human-machine interactions easier as well as intuitive. It plays a crucial role as the world is shifting.

  • What's In A Name? Tales Of Python, Perl, And The GIMP

    In the older days of open source software, major projects tended to have their Benevolent Dictators For Life who made all the final decisions, and some mature projects still operate that way. Guido van Rossum famously called his language “Python” because he liked the British comics of the same name. That’s the sort of thing that only a single developer can get away with. However, in these modern times of GitHub, GitLab, and other collaboration platforms, community-driven decision making has become a more and more common phenomenon, shifting software development towards democracy. People begin to think of themselves as “Python programmers” or “GIMP users” and the name of the project fuses irrevocably with their identity. What happens when software projects fork, develop apart, or otherwise change significantly? Obviously, to prevent confusion, they get a new name, and all of those “Perl Monks” need to become “Raku Monks”. Needless to say, what should be a trivial detail — what we’ve all decided to call this pile of ones and zeros or language constructs — can become a big deal. Don’t believe us? Here are the stories of renaming Python, Perl, and the GIMP.

  • How to teach (yourself) computer programming

    Many fellow students are likely in the same boat, the only difference being that the vast majority not only that don’t list computer science as one of their passions (but more as one of their reasons for not wanting to live anymore), but they get a very distorted view of what computer science and programming actually is.

    Said CS classes tend to be kind of a joke, not only because of the curriculum. The main reason why they are bad and boring is the way they are taught. I am going to address my main frustrations on this matter together with proposed solutions and a guide for those who want to start learning alone.

  • [Old] Perl Is Still The Goddess For Text Manipulation

    You heard me. Freedom is the word here with Perl.

    When I’m coding freely at home on my fun data science project, I rely on it to clean up my data.

    In the real world, data is often collected with loads of variations. Unless you are using someone’s “clean” dataset, you better learn to clean that data real fast.

    Yes, Perl is fast. It’s lightening fast.