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today's leftovers

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  • Linux Journal August 2017
  • Tacoma, the sci-fi narrative adventure has released with day-1 Linux support, some thoughts

    Tacoma [GOG, Steam, Official Site], the sci-fi narrative adventure from the developer of Gone Home has officially launched. It includes day-1 Linux support so I took a look.

  • Super NES Classic pre-orders start later this month

    Nintendo's announcement follows a retail fiasco last week in which Walmart mistakenly offered Super NES Classic systems for pre-order then was forced to cancel those pre-orders. "We know this is incredibly disappointing to those customers and we apologize for the mistake," the retailer said in a statement. The mistaken listing sold out within minutes late on a Friday night.

  • The State Of KDE Plasma For Summer 2017

    Last week was KDE's annual Akademy conference where developers and enthusiasts came together to recap the past year of KDE software development as well as some of what's ahead.

    Longtime KDE developer Sebastian Kügler has provided a recap of the KDE Plasma activities from Akademy 2017. Those interested in the state of Plasma can read Sebastian's post at dot.kde.org. Below are some of the highlights.

  • OSMC's July update is here

    We hope you're having a great Summer break. OSMC's July update is ready with a few improvements to keep your device running in tip-top shape. The Vero 4K also sees a large number of improvements, particularly with regards to HDR and 10-bit content. We would like to thank everyone who tested these improvements in our forums and ensured they got included in OSMC quickly.

  • Samsung’s 88-inch Ultra-Large QLED TV, the Q9, launched in North America and Korea
  • DragonFly 4.8.1 released

    DragonFly version 4.8.1 is a bugfix release for 4.8, and also includes improved Intel video support and support for the virtio_scsi driver.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • XWayland Grabs Onto Keyboard Grab Support

    Adding to the list of changes for X.Org Server 1.20 that will be released in the future is grab protocol support for XWayland.

    Last year is when the keyboard grabbing protocol for Wayland was proposed and made it into Wayland-Protocols 1.9. This is about allowing virtual machines, VNC viewers, or XWayland to be able to "grab" all input from a device and send to a particular surface, modeled like a keyboard locking mechanism.

  • Supercomputing by API: Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC

    In this video from OpenStack Australia, David Perry from the University of Melbourne presents: Supercomputing by API – Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC.

  • [Video] What’s New in Mageia 6
  • Geeko in the Wild
  • Technical Standards: The Hard Part of Making Everyone Happy

    A recent controversy involving the group that sets the rules of the road for the web is a great reminder of how challenging standards-making really is, even if your standards are the ones everyone is using.

    Standards have a way of bleeding into parts of life that you might not give a second thought to, as a consumer.

    Case in point: Watching a show on Netflix is a pretty satisfying ritual, isn’t it? Lots of people do it. Tens of millions in fact, many of them on their computers, in their web browsers.

  • Apple can’t end lawsuit over “breaking” FaceTime on iPhone 4, judge rules

    Back in February 2017, two Californians sued Apple in a proposed class-action lawsuit over the fact that the company disabled an older version of iOS. Disabling the outdated iOS had the effect of making FaceTime stop working on the customers' iPhone 4 devices.

    [...]

    "Apple broke FaceTime in order to gain a financial advantage and reduce relay fees," Judge Koh also wrote. "Further, although Apple knew that it had intentionally disabled FaceTime, Apple told consumers that FaceTime had stopped working because of a 'bug resulting from a device certificate that expired.' Apple did not tell users that Apple had intentionally caused the digital certificate to expire prematurely."

  • The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes

    The ethicality or lack thereof of what Paterson did has been debated for years. Gary Kildall stridently claimed many times that he ripped off the actual CP/M source code, but this is a very problematic assertion. There is no evidence that he even had access to the source, which Digital, like most companies then and now, guarded carefully.

    [...]

    The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS.

Leftovers: Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review; upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre

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Misc
  • Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review

    I ordered a litebook after emailing back and forth questions about Linux and the product. They replied super fast and everything sounded great.

    In reality, if I had to guess what is happening, it's a couple teenagers working out of their moms basement, ordering laptops from aliexpress in bulk, installing Linux and then selling them for a profit.

  • Coming Soon | For The Record

    Are we too dependent our Internet connectivity? Should we instead, explore creating our own Linux media servers in place of common streaming services? I’ll give you a preview of my effort to reduce my reliance with common streaming services. I’ll talk about upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre and more!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Google Grabs Nielsen as Business Apps User From Microsoft

    For word processing and spreadsheets, Nielsen staff now uses Google Docs and Sheets instead of Microsoft’s Word and Excel applications from its familiar Office suite of software. For video conferencing and messaging, Nielsen dropped Microsoft’s Skype in favor of Google equivalents.

  • 3DR Solo Back as Open Source Platform

    Don’t play Taps for 3DR‘s Solo yet. 3DR’s CEO Chris Anderson tweeted today that the Solo is getting a second life.

    In an article title “The Solo Lives On,” on the ArduPilot Blog – ArduPilot is an opensource autopilot system – the team explains how a community of developers worked to give the Solo a “heart transplant.” The developer of the now-obselete Pixhawk 2.0 hardware flight system, the Solo’s stock system, has developed a bolt-on replacement which will allow for new ArduCopter firmware changes.

  • Bluetooth Mesh networks: Is a standards body right for IoT innovation?

        

    Mesh networks are not new. It is a network topology in which each node relays data for the network. All mesh nodes cooperate in the distribution of data in the network. The IoT-purpose-built Zigbee—a low-power, low-bandwidth ad hoc network—is a mesh network. Dating to 2002, Aruba Networks was founded to build Wi-Fi mesh networks. In 2014, student protesters in Hong Kong used mobile app FireChat to turn the crowd’s smartphones into a Wi-Fi and Bluetooth mesh network so authorities could not interrupt protester’s coordinating conversations by blocking 3G and 4G network access.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Arch Linux host cites freedom of speech defense, after using offensive domain name

    According to a user on Reddit by the name of 'fameistheproduct', this isn't the first time something in the community has offended some users. At one point, the system automatically generated license codes that could be regarded as offensive by some. The offending content has since been removed by the organization.

  • Ubuntu Still Working On Unity 7 Low Graphics Mode Improvements

    While Ubuntu's desktop future now rests with GNOME Shell for Ubuntu 17.10 and beyond, developers are still working on some Unity 7 refinements for existing Ubuntu desktop users.

    With Ubuntu 16.04 LTS still to be supported for years to come, Unity 7 is seeing a bit more than just maintenance take place. One of the areas of Unity 7 still being worked on is improving its low graphics mode for helping users on low-end/older systems as well as running within VMs where there may not be 3D acceleration available.

  • Intel kills Curie module and Arduino 101 SBC

    Intel is discontinuing its Curie wearables module and its Curie-enabled Arduino 101 SBC. Last month, Intel shut down the Joule, Edison, and Galileo.

    A month after Intel discontinued its Linux-ready, Atom-based Intel Joule and Intel Edison COMs, as well as its Quark-based Galileo Gen 2 SBC and its Recon Jet sports eyewear, the chipmaker announced the “end-of-life timeline” for its Quark-based Intel Curie module and the discontinuation of its Curie-based Arduino 101 SBC.

  • Chinese smartphone brands captured 87% of home market

     

    These top four Chinese brands now capture 69% of the market and have raced ahead of international and other local brands with expansive distribution reach and exciting portfolio.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Weather Forecast

    This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

  • Linux guru Linus Torvalds is reviewing gadgets on Google+

    Now it appears the godfather of Linux has started to put all that bile to good use by reviewing products on Google+.

  • Learning to love Ansible

    I’ve been convinced about the merits of configuration management for machines for a while now; I remember conversations about producing an appropriate set of recipes to reproduce our haphazard development environment reliably over 4 years ago. That never really got dealt with before I left, and as managing systems hasn’t been part of my day job since then I never got around to doing more than working my way through the Puppet Learning VM. I do, however, continue to run a number of different Linux machines - a few VMs, a hosted dedicated server and a few physical machines at home and my parents’. In particular I have a VM which handles my parents’ email, and I thought that was a good candidate for trying to properly manage. It’s backed up, but it would be nice to be able to redeploy that setup easily if I wanted to move provider, or do hosting for other domains in their own VMs.

  • GSoC: Improvements in kiskadee architecture

    Today I have released kiskadee 0.2.2. This minor release brings some architecture improvements, fix some bugs in the plugins and improve the log messages format. Initially, lets take a look in the kiskadee architecture implemented on the 0.2 release.

  • How UndoDB works

    In the previous post I described what UndoDB is, now I will describe how the technology works.

    The naïve approach to record the execution of a program is to record everything that happens, that is the effects of every single machine instruction. This is what gdb does to offer reversible debugging.

  • Wild West RPG West of Loathing Launches for PC/Mac/Linux on August 10th

    Today, developer Asymmetric announced that its comedy, wild west RPG, West of Loathing, is poised to launch for PC, Mac, and Linux on August 10th.

  • Canonical asks users' help in deciding Ubuntu Linux desktop apps

    Canonical Ubuntu Linux has long been one of the most popular Linux desktop distributions. Now, its leadership is looking to its users for help to decide the default desktop applications in the next long-term support version of the operating system: Ubuntu 18.04.

    This release, scheduled for April 2018, follows October's Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark. Ubuntu 18.04 will already include several major changes. The biggest of these is Ubuntu is abandoning its Unity 8 interface to go back to the GNOME 3.x desktop.

  • Enhanced Open Source Framework Available for Parallel Programming on Embedded Multicore Devices
  • Studiolada used all wood materials to create this affordable open-source home anyone can build

    Using wood panels as the principal building material reduced the project’s overall cost and footprint because the wooden beams and wall panels were cut and varnished in a nearby workshop. Prefabricated concrete was used to embed the support beams, which were then clad in wooden panels. In fact, wood covers just about everything in the home, from the walls and flooring to the ceiling and partitions. Sustainable materials such as cellulose wadding and wood fibers were even used to insulate the home.

Leftovers: Software from the Source, Electron, Debian, Wine, and KDE

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Misc
  • Software from the Source

    In this article, I am outlining an idea for an improved process of deploying software to Linux systems. It combined advantages of traditional, package mangement based systems with containerized software through systems such as Flatpak, Snap, or AppImage. An improved process allows us to make software deployment more efficient across the whole Free software community, have better supported software on users systems and allow for better quality at the same time.

  • Kernel 4.13 RC1 Has Been Released

    The final version of Kernel 4.13 RC1 has been finally released, bringing various changes and tweaks.

  • A look at I-Nex – a CPU-Z like Application for GNU/Linux

    When I was running Windows one of the first pieces of software I'd install after I'd grabbed all my necessities, was CPU-Z.

    It was useful for looking at temperatures, specs, generating reports, and just overall gathering of information. In GNU/Linux we can do all of this via the terminal, but not everyone likes to use consoles, and some may not even know how to. Thankfully, I-Nex exists, and it serves many of the same purposes.

  • Seriously Folks, Electron Apps Aren’t That Bad…

    Do you like Electron apps? Chances are you don't. In this post I list reasons why I don't think Electron apps are bad, and why haters should chill.

  • I'm going to DebCamp17, Montréal, Canada
  • Improving bulk performance in debhelper

    Since debhelper/10.3, there has been a number of performance related changes. The vast majority primarily improves bulk performance or only have visible effects at larger “input” sizes.

  • Wine 2.13 Has Improvements for Grand Theft Auto V, The Witcher 3, and Eve Online

    The Wine development team announced the release and immediate availability for download of the Wine 2.13 development release, which brings some new features and improves support for various Windows apps and games.

    Coming only one day after the Wine 2.0.2 stable release, which only brought a bunch of bug fixes, the Wine 2.13 development release is here to introduce support for Unicode 10.0.0, revamp the default mouse cursors, improve anti-aliasing in DirectWrite, and add Message Framing protocol support in WebServices.

  • KDE Ships Beta of KDE Applications 17.08

    Today KDE released the beta of the new versions of KDE Applications. With dependency and feature freezes in place, the KDE team's focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • SparkyLinux 5.0 'Nibiru' Debian-based rolling release open source distro is here

    There are a lot of Linux-based operating systems in the wild, and I suggest trying as many as you can. Think of it like fruit -- apples are great, but you shouldn't stop after just tasting it. The world is full of different choices, such as mangoes, bananas, and oranges. The more you try, the more your knowledge expands. The same can be said of Linux -- even if you really like, say, Ubuntu, you should also test Fedora, Mageia, and more. Expand your mind!

    Today, yet another distro hits a major milestone; SparkyLinux achieves version 5.0. Called "Nibiru," it is a rolling release operating system that is based on the popular Debian (using modern testing repos). It aims to be lightweight, with choices of three desktop environments that are easy on resources -- LXQt, MATE, and Xfce. In other words, Sparky can breathe new life into aging computers. If you have meager hardware, you should definitely give it a look.

  • New Zenwalk Current ISO for 15 July 2017
  • Mageia 6 Enhances Linux Desktop Experience With Better Tools, New Look
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP now on Google Cloud

    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications is now available as the operating system for SAP solutions on Google Cloud Platform (GCP).

  • Quantum Computing in the Enterprise: Not So Wild a Dream

    We won’t belabor an attempt at explaining how quantum computing works (if you want to dig into this, see detailed discussions in Schatsky’s content on the Deloitte University site). Schatsky calls it “a fantastical” form of computing” that harnesses that “bizarre properties” of subatomic particles, as described by quantum mechanics, and in so doing “will be able to perform certain kinds of calculations exponentially faster than the fastest computers currently known.” At its core is the elimination of steps that a conventional computer goes through to complete a complex task.

  • Ballistic Overkill updated again to improve matchmaking and auto balance is back

    Ballistic Overkill [Steam], one of the best online shooters on Linux has updated again and it now has better matchmaking, if you don't want to manually pick a server.

  • Halcyon 6: Starbase Commander to get an enhanced “Lightspeed Edition”

    The strategy game in space with RPG elements will be getting a massively reworked edition that’ll be free for existing owners of the game.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%