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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Intel Icelake Thunderbolt Support Still Being Squared Away For Linux - Hopefully For 5.4

    Intel Icelake laptops will soon be hitting store shelves and a vast majority of the Linux support has been squared away for many months. Unfortunately one bit still not mainlined is the Thunderbolt support.

    Back in July we wrote about the Icelake Thunderbolt support still not merged yet while Icelake's Gen11 graphics and other new processor features have all been squared away for several kernel releases in ensuring good launch-day support. With Icelake, the Thunderbolt functionality has moved onto the SoC itself (sans the Thunderbolt power delivery) and that's taken additional time for getting the Linux kernel support in order.

  • OBS Studio 24.0 Will Let You Pause While Recording, Other New Options

    For those using OBS Studio for cross-platform live-streaming and screen recording needs, OBS Studio 24.0 is on the way but out first is their release candidate to vet the new features coming into this big update.

  • Kontact and Google Integration Issues

    Lately there were some issues with the Google integration in Kontact which caused that it is no longer possible to add new Google Calendar or Gmail account in Kontact because the log in process will fail. This is due to an oversight on our side which lead to Google blocking Kontact as it did not comply with Google’s policies. We are working on resolving the situation, but it will take a little bit.

    Existing users should not be affected by this - if you already had Google Calendar or Gmail set up in Kontact, the sync should continue to work. It is only new accounts that cannot be created.

    In case of Gmail the problem can mostly be worked around when setting up the IMAP account in KMail by selecting PLAIN authentication1 method in the Advanced tab and using your email and password. You may need to enable Less Secure Applications in your Google account settings in order to be able to log in with regular email address and password.

  • rpminspect-0.3 released

    Released rpminspect-0.3 today with bugs reported and fixed during Flock Budapest 2019.

  • Kevin Fenzi: Flock 2019

    Flock time is upon is! This time in lovely Budapest. As always when flock is in europe, it’s a long flight for me, but otherwise travel was uneventfull: Drive 2 hours to PDX, then PDX to AMS, then a short layover for coffee and stoupwaffles and then AMS to BUD, and finally a taxi ride to the hotel.

    The hotel is quite lovely. It’s right next to the danube river and has a nice view. The AC is working nicely too (it’s quite hot outside here right now). After getting into the hotel yesterday and a quick dinner at a very nice place down the road, I managed to sleep for 10+ hours.

  • Design and Web team summary – 16 August 2019

    This iteration was the Web & design team’s first iteration of the second half of our roadmap cycle, after returning from the mid-cycle roadmap sprint in Toronto 2 weeks ago.

    Priorities have moved around a bit since before the cycle, and we made a good start on the new priorities for the next 3 months.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 592

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 592 for the week of August 11 – 17, 2019. The full version of this issue is available here.

  • KNOB attack: Is my Bluetooth device insecure?

    A recent attack against Bluetooth, called KNOB, has been making waves last week. In essence, it allows an attacker to downgrade the security of a Bluetooth so much that it's possible for the attacker to break the encryption key and spy on all the traffic. The attack is so devastating that some have described it as the "stop using bluetooth" flaw.

    This is my attempt at answering my own lingering questions about "can I still use Bluetooth now?" Disclaimer: I'm not an expert in Bluetooth at all, and just base this analysis on my own (limited) knowledge of the protocol, and some articles (including the paper) I read on the topic.

  • Dear sysadmins: Patch Webmin now – zero-day exploit emerges for potential hijack hole in server control panel

    The bug appears to have been revealed on Saturday, August 10, by Özkan Mustafa Akkuş at DEF CON and to have been made available as an exploit in a module for the Metasploit framework. The Webmin maintainers didn't hear about it until Saturday, August 17, when they noticed people discussing the issue on Twitter and Reddit. The CVE was created Thursday, August 15.

    Webmin has about 215,000 installations, according to a Shodan search (account required), and about 13,000 instances of the particularly vulnerable version 1.890.

    [...]

    According to Cooper, the malicious code was introduced into Webmin and Usermin through the project's build infrastructure. "We're still investigating how and when, but the exploitable code has never existed in our GitHub repositories, so we've rebuilt from git source on new infrastructure," he said.

    In an email to The Register, Cooper said the malicious code – which appeared in the Sourceforge repo but not the GitHub repo – was introduced to Webmin on local package build infrastructure before it reached Sourceforge.

  • Backdoor found in Webmin, a popular web-based utility for managing Unix servers [Ed: No, it is not a backdoor and it's not there by design]

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Warfork Letting Warsow Live On Under Steam

    Going back a decade one of the interesting open-source FPS games of its time was Warsow. Development on Warsow has seemingly been tremulous over the past few years (edit: though the core developer has recently released a new beta) for this Qfusion (Quake 2 code base) engine powered game that started in 2005, but now there is Warfork as a fork of Warsow that is being developed and also available via Steam. 

    Hitting Steam this past week was the release of Warfork for Windows, macOS, and Linux. The game is free to play and with it going up on Steam will hopefully attract new gamers to this shooter title who may not be otherwise following the open-source scene. 

  • KDE sprints in summer heat

    It was great to see many new faces at the Plasma sprint. Most of these new contributors were working on the Plasma and KDE Apps Ui and Ux and we definitely need some new blood in these areas. KDE's Visual Design Group, the VDG, thinned out over the last two years because some leading figures left. But now seeing new talented and motivated people joining as designers and Ux experts I am optimistic that there will be a revival of the golden time of the VDG that brought us Breeze and Plasma 5.

    In regards to technical topics there is always a wide field of different challenges and technologies to combine at a Plasma sprint. From my side I wanted to discuss current topics in KWin but of course not everyone at the sprint is directly working on KWin and some topics require deeper technical knowledge about it. Still there were some fruitful discussions, of course in particular with David, who was the second KWin core contributor present besides me.

    As a direct product of the sprint my work on dma-buf support in KWin and KWayland can be counted. I started work on that at the sprint mostly because it was a feature requested already for quite a long time by Plasma Mobile developers who need it on some of their devices to get them to work. But this should in general improve in our Wayland session the performance and energy consumption on many devices. Like always such larger features need time so I was not able to finish them at the sprint. But last week I landed them.

  • My Free Software Activities in July 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

today's leftovers

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  • Going Linux #375 · Listener Feedback

    In this episode, we have several questions about accessibility in Linux applications, we discuss a couple of cross-platform office suites that provide a bit better compatibility with Microsoft Office file formats, and we discuss problems and solutions for Ubuntu, Barrier, video and privacy and security. Lastly, we comment on Linux Journal's goodbye.

  • Install Java on Debian 9 Operating System
  • List of Inactive/Discontinued Linux Distributions

    This page provides information about the distributions that are no longer supported or developed starting from 2019 with details.

    This table contains the Linux Distribution Name, Distribution Initial Release Date, Distribution Latest Release Date, Reason for distribution inactive, and Distribution Age.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

    When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results.

    In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller.

    Watch Chris' Lightning Talk to learn more about managing etcd controllers and living to tell the tale.

  • VMware's proposed Pivotal acquisition shows Cloud Foundry's strength

    Abby Kearns, executive director of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, reports that in the soon-to-be-released Cloud Foundry end-user survey, "In just two years, broad deployment of Cloud Foundry has nearly doubled. With 45% of our users describing their Cloud Foundry use as 'broad' (compared to 30% in 2018 and 23% in 2017)."

  • Magnetic Lasso for Krita is here

    I won’t say that I am done with Magnetic Lasso now, but the results are a lot better now to be honest. Take a look at one of the tests that I did,

  • [antiX] swapgs mitigations kernels available

    Latest secure kernels available in the repos for 32 and 64 bit architecture (stretch, buster, testing and sid).

    5.2.8 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)
    4.19.66 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)
    4.9.189 (64 bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)

    Users are strongly advised to upgrade.

  • M5Stack M5StickV is a Tiny AI Camera for Maker Projects

today's leftovers: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Fedora Program Management, Security and More

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Misc
  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/33

    Week 2019/33 ‘only’ saw three snapshots being published (3 more were given to openQA but discarded).

  • FPgM report: 2019-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. (Just not this week because I will be traveling)

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (freetype, libreoffice, and openjdk-7), Fedora (edk2, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, mariadb-connector-odbc, python-django, and squirrelmail), Gentoo (chromium, cups, firefox, glibc, kconfig, libarchive, libreoffice, oracle-jdk-bin, polkit, proftpd, sqlite, wget, zeromq, and znc), openSUSE (bzip2, chromium, dosbox, evince, gpg2, icedtea-web, java-11-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kconfig, kdelibs4, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, nodejs8, pdns, polkit, python, subversion, and vlc), Oracle (ghostscript and kernel), Red Hat (mysql:8.0 and subversion:1.10), SUSE (389-ds, libvirt and libvirt-python, and openjpeg2), and Ubuntu (nginx).

  • A compendium of container escapes

    My name is Brandon Edwards, I’m Chief Scientist at Capsule8. Today we’ll be talking about a compendium of container escapes in the podcast. We’ve previously talked about escaping containers and the sorts of vulnerabilities people should be concerned with a while back. In particular we’re discussing how the RunC vulnerability had engendered all this interest, or concern, or almost shock, the trust the people are placing in containers was broken. Oh wow, an escape could happen!

    I think it’s really valuable to be able to communicate and show all the other ways that that sort of thing can happen, either from misconfiguration, or over granting privileges, or providing host mounts into the container, or having kernel vulnerabilities that could somehow compromise any of the elements of the security model of container, which is both fragile and complex.

  • Apollo data graph brings managed federation to enterprises

    Data graph vendor Apollo is aiming to help overcome several obstacles to enterprises using graph databases with its latest Apollo Data Graph Platform update, which became generally available on July 16.

    Among the key new features in the platform are federated management capabilities that enable more scalability across different GraphQL data graph instances. GraphQL is an open source query language for APIs, originally created by Facebook that is used to enable data graph capabilities.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • vBSDCon - Sept 5-7 Reston VA

    The schedule has been added to the website: https://www.vbsdcon.com/schedule/

  • Raspberry Digital Signage donation

    The build of Raspberry Digital Signage you can download from SourceForge is limited is some functionality: if you like this project please donate.

    As a donor, you will have full access to the unrestricted versions of: Raspberry Digital Signage (web-based digital signaging), Raspberry Slideshow (image/video slideshow-based digital signaging) and Raspberry WebKiosk (cheap web kiosking), which can be deployed on how many devices you wish!

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux-maker Red Hat Purchase Adds Risk to Owning IBM Stock

    Amid evolving technologies, IBM has to pivot again to remain relevant. It has attempted this feat by buying Red Hat. Investors are bailing out of the shares as integration of the Linux maker will take time. Given the time lag and the falling profits, owning the stock amounts to a gamble on whether management can successfully absorb Red Hat into the company.

  • FLOSS Weekly 542: Dancer

    Dancer is a web application framework for Perl. It was inspired by Sinatra and was written by Alexis Sukrieh originally.

    It has an intuitive, minimalist, and very expressive syntax: has PSGI support, plugins and its modular design allow for strong scalability: and Dancer depends on as few CPAN modules as possible, making it easy to install.

  • Biometrics of one million people discovered on publicly accessible database

    A biometrics database used by the police, banks and defence contractors has been discovered online unprotected, with the fingerprints and facial recognition scans unencrypted.

    Furthermore, the Biostar 2 database - used as part of security systems for warehouses and offices - also contained user names, passwords and other personal information. And the database was so exposed that data could easily be manipulated, and new accounts with corresponding biometrics added

  • Apple locked me out of its walled garden. It was a nightmare

    I started to realize just how far-reaching the effects of Apple disabling my account were. One of the things I love about Apple’s ecosystem is that I’ve built my media collection on iTunes, and can access it from any of my Apple devices. My partner and I have owned numerous iPods, iPhones, iPads, MacBooks, iMacs, Apple Watches, Apple TVs, and even a HomePod, over the years. Apple plays a big part in my professional life too: I’m the IT manager for Quartz, and we use Apple hardware and publish on Apple platforms.

    But when Apple locked my account, all of my devices became virtually unusable. At first, it seemed like a mild inconvenience, but I soon found out how many apps on my iOS and Mac devices couldn’t be updated, not to mention how I couldn’t download anything new. When I had to take a trip for a family emergency, the JetBlue app wouldn’t let me access my boarding pass, saying I had to update the app to use it. It was the first time I’d flown with a paper boarding pass in years. I couldn’t even pass time on the flight playing Animal Crossing on my phone, because I got a similar error message when I opened the game.

  • VMware says it’s looking to acquire Pivotal

    VMware today confirmed that it is in talks to acquire software development platform Pivotal Software, the service best known for commercializing the open-source Cloud Foundry platform. The proposed transaction would see VMware acquire all outstanding Pivotal Class A stock for $15 per share, a significant markup over Pivotal’s current share price (which unsurprisingly shot up right after the announcement).

  • VMware All Set To Acquire Pivotal
  • rideOS Launches New Devoted Platform to Power the Future of Ridehailing

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

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Development
Misc
  • Teaching People to Share Technology: Adafruit Founder Limor Fried

    When Adafruit founder Limor Fried was studying electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, she realized she was less interested in the electrical engineering part.

    “What I really liked to do was build stuff,” she said.

    Instead of working on her homework or thesis, Fried spent her time designing hardware projects in her dorm. She built an MP3 player way before Apple made iPods popular.

    “With electronics, you could build anything from an MP3 player to a GPS tracker,” she said.

    [...]

    “Open source hardware is a perfect middle ground. It’s inexpensive and allows you to customize the way you need it,” Fried said. “The code is there. Instructions are there. Anyone can do it. Since it’s open source, people can iterate, tweak, fine-tune to their needs. We are seeing a lot of interest in open source hardware for assistive technologies.”

    Adafruit’s hardware is working for everyone from creative hobbyists to people interested in building things for their smartphones to developers inventing products for the next industrial revolution. Adafruit also worked with computer game company Nvidia to help build its Jetson Nano Developer Kit, which lets users run multiple neural networks for artificial intelligence, machine learning and edge computing.

  • Gcc 4.2.1 to be removed before FreeBSD 13, a firm timeline
    Greetings,
    
    
    
    
    As promised for almost the past decade or so, gcc 4.2.1 will be removed
    from the tree before FreeBSD 13 is branched.
    
    
    
    
    I propose the following timeline for its removal:
    
    
    
    
    2019-08-31: disconnect gcc 4.2.1 from CI build
    
    
    
    
    Turn off -Werror on gcc 4.2.1 platforms
    
    
    
    
    Turn off all gcc 4.2.1 from universe by default (can be turned on)
    
    
    
    
    2019-12-31: Turn off gcc 4.2.1 build by default (can be turned on)
    
    
    
    
    2020-03-31: svn rm gcc 4.2.1 and friends
    
    
    
    
    2020-05-31: svn rm all non-clang platforms not supported by in-tree LLVM or
    converted to ext toolchain.
    
    
    
    
    2020-07-31: svn rm all ext toolchain platforms not supported by re@ release
    scripts
    
    
    
    
    The basic notion is that it’s long past time to have a firm plan for EOL
    gcc 4.2.1 in the tree. There is ample external toolchain support today for
    platforms that need it to build images, though that integration with
    buildworld could use some more polish. It’s now completely sufficient to
    move to the next phase of removing gcc 4.2.1 from the tree.
    
    
    
    
    We already have gcc 6.4 as an xtoolchain on amd64 in CI. This should
    somewhat mitigate the risk for cross-compiler portability. This is a
    long-established part of our CI. We want to retain gcc support for modern
    versions of gcc since its debuggability is higher. Notifications for this
    are currently turned off, but will be enabled soon. It’s expected that this
    always will be working later in the year. We’ll work to update the
    committers guide to reflect this, as well as give a recipe for testing.
    
    
    
    
    The first phase will be at the end of the month. We’ll turn off -Werror on
    gcc 4.2.1 (and MFC it to stable/11 and stable/12). We’ll then stop building
    all platforms that require it as part of CI. New warnings will come up, but
    will no longer waste developer time in trying to fix. Gcc 4.2.1 platforms
    will no longer be built as part of universe, unless you add
    -DMAKE_OBSOLETE_GCC is added to the command line. We plan on implementing
    this by 2019-08-31.
    
    
    
    
    An experimental branch will be created that will remove gcc related bits to
    expose gaps in planning and to come up with a list of action items needed
    to ensure Tier 1 platforms are unaffected by the gcc removal. The timeline
    for this is by the end of September.
    
    
    
    
    Next, we’ll turn off building gcc by default. This will effectively break
    all gcc platforms with in-tree compilers. The external toolchain support we
    have will suffice here, and patches will be accepted for whatever
    integration are needed for these platforms with our current ports /
    packages. The onus for these changes will be squarely on people that want
    the platforms to continue. However, as a stop-gap gcc building can be
    turned on for those people transitioning gcc-only platforms until gcc 4.2.1
    is removed. This will happen on or about 2019-12-31.
    
    
    
    
    After a 3 month transition period, gcc 4.2.1 will be removed from the tree.
    This will be done on or about 2020-03-31.
    
    
    
    
    After an additional 2 month transition period, all those platforms that
    have not integrated with the FreeBSD CI system, work in a make universe
    with the proper packages installed, and are shown to boot on real hardware
    will be removed from the tree. This will happen on or about 2020-05-31.
    
    
    
    
    After an additional 2 month grace period, those platforms that require
    external toolchain integration that aren’t supported by the release
    engineer’s release scripts will be removed. This  will happen on or about
    2020-07-31.
    
    
    
    
    The timeline gives powerpc, mips, mips64, and sparc64 9 months to integrate
    either into an in-tree compiler, or to have a proven external toolchain
    solution. This is on top of the many-years-long warnings about this being
    the end game of the clang integration.
    
    
    
    
    This is the proposed timeline, but should there be a significant issue
    that’s discovered, the timeline can be amended.
    
    
    
    
    Also note: the all toolchains in tree discussions are specifically out of
    bounds here. Let’s remove one compiler and get the infrastructure needed to
    make external toolchains robust before embarking on that discussion.
    
    
    
    
    Comments?
    
    
    
    
    Warner
    
  • FreeBSD 13 Is Preparing To Finally Retire GCC 4.2

    A firm timeline has been established for removing GCC 4.2.1 before next year's FreeBSD 13 release. This timeline includes dropping GCC 4.2.1 from continuous integration builds at the end of the month and turning off GCC 4.2.1 from universe by default. At the end of the calendar year they will turn off GCC 4.2.1 by default and at the end of March is when they will remove the compiler code entirely from their SVN. Next May they also intend to drop non-Clang platforms that are not supported by the in-tree LLVM or converted to an external toolchain. 

  • Designing Continuous Build Systems: Handling Webhooks with Sanic

    After covering how to design a build pipeline and define build directives in the continuous builds series, it’s time to look at handling events from a code repository.

    As internet standards evolved over the years, the HTTP protocol has become more prevalent. It’s easier to route, simpler to implement and even more reliable. This ubiquity makes it easier for applications that traverse or live on the public internet to communicate with each other. As a result of this, the idea of webhooks came to be as an “event-over-http” mechanism.

  • No, Zwift Racing Wasn’t Hacked. Yet. Sorta. Let Me Explain.

    One of the most well-known conferences from a lore standpoint is Def Con, but there are also many other huge ones such as BlackHat, SANS, and RSA, and other vendor-specific ones like BlueHat (run by Microsoft for Microsoft technologies) or government-specific ones. Again, in general the goal of these summits is to learn about security and improve security practices.

    This past Sunday at Def Con (considered one of the more rambunctious events on the circuit) a presentation was given around Zwift and ‘hacking’ it – titled “Cheating in eSports: How to Cheat at Virtual Cycling Using USB Hacks”. Now one has to understand that while in the ‘mainstream’ the term ‘hacking’ is usually akin to ‘breaking’, in the computer world, the term ‘hacking’ is often a bit more nebulous. Sometimes used interchangeably with ‘tweaking’ or ‘optimizing’, and sometimes used in the less ideal variant such as ‘credit cards were hacked’. So one has to take any usage of that term with a bit of sanity check to see what’s going on.

  • Protecting your organization against privileged identity theft

    What do the top data breaches of the 21st century have in common? Privileged identity abuse. In these breach instances, well-resourced, external actors were able to gain the credentials of users with access to privileged accounts – such as administrative, service or operational accounts – giving them the ability to collect and exfiltrate industrial-scale amounts of data.

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Mint 19.2 "Mate" overview | Stable, robust, traditional

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Mint 19.2 "Mate" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Abbey Games have released the Will Of The People update for Godhood

    After entering Early Access in July, Godhood from Abbey Games has received a bit of a mixed impression from users but they're moving quickly to improve it.

    I can understand where some of the negative reviews have currently come from, while a nice looking game and one I've enjoyed playing, it's currently pretty simple. To be expected from Early Access though, it's going to evolve over time. They've recently adjusted the way they describe it too, originally saying it was a "strategy god game" but they're now saying it's a "roster-management auto-battling god game"—okay then. Hoping to hook in some auto-battler fans I see!

  • SUSE Academic Program News: Working With Students Around The Globe

    The end of summer for many marks the start of a new semester or calendar school year. At SUSE, we have been working harder than ever to engage with more academic partners and customers, bringing the latest in Linux and Open Source training and education. To only name a few, here are some highlights of recent success within the academic community;

  • University Research Teams Open-Source Natural Adversarial Image DataSet for Computer-Vision AI

    In a paper published in July, researchers from UC Berkeley, the University of Washington, and the University of Chicago described their process for creating the dataset of 7,500 images, which were deliberately chosen to "fool" a pre-trained image recognition system. While there has been previous research on adversarial attacks on such systems, most of the work studies how to modify images in a way that causes the model to output the wrong answer. By contrast, the team used real-world, or "natural" images collected un-modified from the internet. The team used their images as a test-set on a pre-trained DenseNet-121 model, which has a top-1 error rate of 25% when tested on the popular ImageNet dataset. This same model, when tested with ImageNet-A, has a top-1 error rate of 98%. The team also used their dataset to measure the effectiveness of "defensive" training measures developed by the research community; they found that "these techniques hardly help."

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, postgresql, and postgresql-libs), Debian (atril, chromium, evince, ghostscript, jackson-databind, kernel, and php5), Fedora (kf5-kconfig, mingw-sqlite, pam-u2f, and poppler), Mageia (kernel), openSUSE (aubio, chromium, kconfig, kdelibs4, nodejs10, osc, and zstd), Red Hat (ghostscript), and Ubuntu (ghostscript and MariaDB). 

  • When your mail hub password is updated...
    don't
     forget
      to
       run
        postmap
         on
          your
           /etc/postfix/sasl_passwd
    
    
    
    
    
  • How to Install Telegram on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS & Up
  • how to upgrade Alpine Linux 3.6.2 to Alpine Linux 3.7
  • LiVES Video Editor 3.0 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu
  • For Linux, a brand-new companion package that supports all major Linux distros is now available.

    For Linux, a brand-new companion package that supports all major Linux distros is now available.

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Android Leftovers

Linux on the mainframe: Then and now

Last week, I introduced you to the origins of the mainframe's origins from a community perspective. Let's continue our journey, picking up at the end of 1999, which is when IBM got onboard with Linux on the mainframe (IBM Z). These patches weren't part of the mainline Linux kernel yet, but they did get Linux running on z/VM (Virtual Machine for IBM Z), for anyone who was interested. Several efforts followed, including the first Linux distro—put together out of Marist College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Think Blue Linux by Millenux in Germany. The first real commercial distribution came from SUSE on October 31, 2000; this is notable in SUSE history because the first edition of what is now known as SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) is that S/390 port. Drawing again from Wikipedia, the SUSE Enterprise Linux page explains: Read more

OSS: Cisco Openwashing, GitLab Funding, Amazon Openwashing, Chrome OS Talk and More Talks

  • Why Open Source continues to be the foundation for modern IT

    Open source technology is no longer an outlier in the modern world, it's the foundation for development and collaboration. Sitting at the base of the open source movement is the Linux Foundation, which despite having the name Linux in its title, is about much more than just Linux and today is comprised of multiple foundations, each seeking to advance open source technology and development processes. At the recent Open Source Summit North America event held in San Diego, the width and breadth of open source was discussed ranging from gaming to networking, to the movie business ,to initiatives that can literally help save humanity. "The cool thing is that no matter whether it's networking, Linux kernel projects, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects like Kubernetes, or the film industry with the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), you know open source is really pushing innovation beyond software and into all sorts of different areas," Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation said during his keynote address.

  • GitLab Inhales $268M Series E, Valuation Hits $2.75B

    GitLab raised a substantial $268 million in a Series E funding round that was more than doubled what the firm had raised across all of its previous funding rounds and pushed its valuation to $2.75 billion. It also bolsters the company’s coffers as it battles in an increasingly competitive DevOps space. GitLab CEO Sid Sijbrandij said in an email to SDxCentral that the new Series E funds will help the company continue to move on its goal of providing a single application to support quicker delivery of software. It claims more than 100,000 organizations use its platform. “These funds will help us to keep up with that pace and add to that with our company engineers,” Sijbrandij explained. “We need to make sure every part of GitLab is great and that CIOs and CTOs who supply the tools for their teams know that if they bet on GitLab that we’ll stand up to their expectations.”

  • Amazon open-sources its Topical Chat data set of over 4.7 million words [Ed: openwashing of listening devices without even releasing any code]
  • How Chrome OS works upstream

    Google has a long and interesting history contributing to the upstream Linux kernel. With Chrome OS, Google has tried to learn from some of the mistakes of its past and is now working with the upstream Linux kernel as much as it can. In a session at the 2019 Open Source Summit North America, Google software engineer Doug Anderson detailed how and why Chrome OS developers work upstream. It is an effort intended to help the Linux community as well as Google. The Chrome OS kernel is at the core of Google's Chromebook devices, and is based on a Linux long-term support (LTS) kernel. Anderson explained that Google picks an LTS kernel every year and all devices produced in that year will use the selected kernel. At least once during a device's lifetime, Google expects to be able to "uprev" (switch to a newer kernel version). Anderson emphasized that if Google didn't upstream its own patches from the Chrome OS kernel, it would make the uprev process substantially more difficult. Simply saying that you'll work upstream and actually working upstream can be two different things. The process by which Chrome OS developers get their patches upstream is similar to how any other patches land in the mainline Linux kernel. What is a bit interesting is the organizational structure and process of how Google has tasked Chrome OS developers to work with upstream. Anderson explained that developers need to submit patches to the kernel mailing list and then be a little patient, giving some time for upstream to respond. A key challenge, however, is when there is no response from upstream. "When developing an upstream-first culture, the biggest problem anyone can face is silence," Anderson said. Anderson emphasized that when submitting a patch to the mailing list, what a developer is looking for is some kind of feedback; whether it's good or bad doesn't matter, but it does matter that someone cares enough to review it. What the Chrome OS team does in the event that there is no community review is it will have other Chrome OS engineers publicly review the patch. The risk and worry of having Chrome OS engineers comment on Chrome OS patches is that the whole process might look a little scripted and there could be the perception of some bias as well. Anderson noted that it is important that only honest feedback and review is given for a patch.

  • Open Source Builds Trust & Credibility | Karyl Fowler

    Karyl Fowler is co-founder and CEO of Transmute, a company that’s building open source and decentralized identity management. We sat down with Fowler at the Oracle OpenWorld conference to talk about the work Transmute is doing.

  • What Is Infrastructure As Code?

    Rob Hirschfeld, Founder, and CEO of RackN breaks Infrastructure As Code (IaC) into six core concepts so users have a better understanding of it.

  • Everything You Need To Know About Redis Labs

    At the Oracle OpenWorld conference, we sat down with Kyle Davis – Head of Developer Advocacy at Redis Labs – to better understand what the company does.

Programming: Java, Python, and Perl

  • Oracle Releases Java 13 with Remarkable New Features

    Oracle – the software giant has released Java SE and JDK 13 along with the promise to introduce more new features in the future within the six-month cycle. The Java 13’s binaries are now available for download with improvements in security, performance, stability, and two new additional preview features ‘Switch Expressions’ and ‘Text Blocks’, specifically designed to boost developers’ productivity level. This gives the hope that the battle of Java vs Python will be won by the former. Remarking on the new release, Oracle said: “Oracle JDK 13 increases developer productivity by improving the performance, stability and security of the Java SE Platform and the JDK,”. [...] Speaking of the Java 13 release, it is licensed under the GNU General Public License v2 along with the Classpath Exception (GPLv2+CPE). The director of Oracle’s Java SE Product Management, Sharat Chander stated “Oracle offers Java 13 for enterprises and developers. JDK 13 will receive a minimum of two updates, per the Oracle CPU schedule, before being followed by Oracle JDK 14, which is due out in March 2020, with early access builds already available.” Let’s look into the new features that JDK 13 comes packed with.

  • 8 Python GUI Frameworks For Developers

    Graphical User Interfaces make human-machine interactions easier as well as intuitive. It plays a crucial role as the world is shifting.

  • What's In A Name? Tales Of Python, Perl, And The GIMP

    In the older days of open source software, major projects tended to have their Benevolent Dictators For Life who made all the final decisions, and some mature projects still operate that way. Guido van Rossum famously called his language “Python” because he liked the British comics of the same name. That’s the sort of thing that only a single developer can get away with. However, in these modern times of GitHub, GitLab, and other collaboration platforms, community-driven decision making has become a more and more common phenomenon, shifting software development towards democracy. People begin to think of themselves as “Python programmers” or “GIMP users” and the name of the project fuses irrevocably with their identity. What happens when software projects fork, develop apart, or otherwise change significantly? Obviously, to prevent confusion, they get a new name, and all of those “Perl Monks” need to become “Raku Monks”. Needless to say, what should be a trivial detail — what we’ve all decided to call this pile of ones and zeros or language constructs — can become a big deal. Don’t believe us? Here are the stories of renaming Python, Perl, and the GIMP.

  • How to teach (yourself) computer programming

    Many fellow students are likely in the same boat, the only difference being that the vast majority not only that don’t list computer science as one of their passions (but more as one of their reasons for not wanting to live anymore), but they get a very distorted view of what computer science and programming actually is.

    Said CS classes tend to be kind of a joke, not only because of the curriculum. The main reason why they are bad and boring is the way they are taught. I am going to address my main frustrations on this matter together with proposed solutions and a guide for those who want to start learning alone.

  • [Old] Perl Is Still The Goddess For Text Manipulation

    You heard me. Freedom is the word here with Perl.

    When I’m coding freely at home on my fun data science project, I rely on it to clean up my data.

    In the real world, data is often collected with loads of variations. Unless you are using someone’s “clean” dataset, you better learn to clean that data real fast.

    Yes, Perl is fast. It’s lightening fast.