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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Voice / Linux Magazine Merge

    Issue 32 is the last issue of Linux Voice as a stand-alone magazine as we have joined Linux Magazine. This newly merged magazine will bring the best bits of Linux Voice and Linux Magazine together into a single volume. All four of us Linux Voice founders will still be here contributing to the newly merged magazine – you’ll find us in the aptly named Linux Voice section. We’ll continue to write about the things that excite us in the world of open source software and we’ll continue making our popular podcast.

  • Linux Marketshare is Above 2-Percent For Third Month in a Row
  • Linux Marketshare Is Above 2-Percent For Third Month in a Row [Ed: Basing statistics about usage based on a Microsoft-connected firm. "Net Market Share" is like a rename of Net Applications. Evading negative publicity like Apple and Microsoft ties?]
  • BFQ I/O Scheduler Patches Revised, Aiming To Be Extra Scheduler In The Kernel

    FQ developers had hoped to replace CFQ in the mainline Linux kernel with Budget Fair Queueing for a variety of reasons but it hadn't ended up making it mainline. Now the developers are hoping to introduce BFQ back to mainline as an extra available scheduler.

    Paolo Valente on Wednesday published the latest patches dubbed "BFQ-v0" for adding it as an extra scheduler. He began by saying, "this new patch series turns back to the initial approach, i.e., it adds BFQ as an extra scheduler, instead of replacing CFQ with BFQ. This patch series also contains all the improvements and bug fixes recommended by Tejun, plus new features of BFQ-v8r5...On average CPUs, the current version of BFQ can handle devices performing at most ~30K IOPS; at most ~50 KIOPS on faster CPUs. These are about the same limits as CFQ. There may be room for noticeable improvements regarding these limits, but, given the overall limitations of blk itself, I thought it was not the case to further delay this new submission."

  • X.Org To Begin Accepting Donations Again

    The X.Org merger with the SPI is almost complete and the X.Org Foundation is soon going to begin accepting donations.

    Years ago the X.Org Foundation relied upon donations from Sun Microsystems, Intel, and the other big names to assemble their war-chest, but in the past few years they haven't really been pursuing donations from these big companies while their expenditures have continued with the annual XDC conference, X.org EVoC, travel expenses, and other costs.

  • More Details On Enlightenment's Ecore_Drm2 Atomic Modesetting

    Back in September the Enlightenment project's EFL library added atomic mode-setting and nuclear page-flipping support to provide a "perfect rendering" and a "buttery smooth" experience. Earlier this month was then an update on the Ecore_Drm2 state while coming out this week is a Samsung OSG blog post explaining more about the atomic mode-setting details.

  • Ecore_Drm2: How to Use Atomic Modesetting

    In a previous article, I briefly discussed how the Ecore_Drm2 library came into being. This article will expand on that article and provide a brief introduction to the Atomic Modesetting and Nuclear Pageflip features inside the new Ecore_Drm2 library.

  • Papirus Icon Theme Scores Big October Update
  • Network shutdown

    From our part we will try our best to make the migrating process as smooth and seamless as possible for our partners.
    Note that the most possible period for unavailability of our resources is this weekend, but there is some probability it may also occur on Friday 10/28/16.
    In the first place, this process is aimed to improve the quality of our services, so please be patient and cooperative.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/43

    The magic number this week is 6: that’s how many snapshots have been published since the last weekly review (1020, 1022, 1023, 1024, 1025 and 1026). Some of them were a bit larger than average (1026 – a big rebuild due to bash 4.4).

  • Identify constraint problems

    Until now it was not possible to easily identify if the constraints are the reaseon for your job to hang in state scheduled and not switching to building. That caused a lot of confusion for it was not clear what the problem is and if the state would change.

  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Substantially Lowered Level
  • KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Public Release
  • Linux Mint 18.1 codenamed “Serena”
  • Linux Mint 18.1 Slated For Release In November/December

    Clement Lefebvre has confirmed that Linux Mint 18.1 will still be shipping before the end of the year.

  • Video: Introducing Samsung ARTIK Cloud with Samsung Gear S2

    Samsung Electronics have previously announced SAMSUNG ARTIK Cloud™, which is an open data exchange platform designed to connect devices and applications. One of the goals of the SAMSUNG ARTIK Cloud is to provide developers the tools they need to securely connect to Internet of Things (IoT) devices, collect data and react to it accordingly.

    Companies can benefit from using open APIs and tools in order to accelerate their “time to market” and ultimately start monetizing their Investment. SAMSUNG ARTIK Cloud has a tiered pricing model, but the great thing is that you can actually start using it for FREE.

  • Game: Group Play Drag Racing in Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3

    Remember the World Cricket Championship 2 game? The most rated cricket game in the Tizen Store by Nextwave Multimedia Pvt. Ltd. Today they have added a new game named “Group Play Drag Racing“. It’s a Racing game against 6 racers, and you have to use your gears to the best of your ability in order to be fast fast fast !

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Is The Penguin Tux Official Mascot of Linux? Because Torvalds Had Penguinitis!

    The official mascot of the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds is a penguin named Tux. You might have thought about the probable reasons why a penguin has been used as the face of the Linux kernel. Some people believe that Torvalds was bitten by a penguin that’s why he chose one to represent his kernel.

  • SafeEyes – An Useful Linux Utility That Prevents Eye Strain

    Working in Computer for long hours is pain, and it will definitely affect your eyes. You must take some breaks for your eyes at regular intervals. There are numerous utilities available out there to remind you to take breaks. The one we are going to discuss now is SafeEyes. It is a free and open Source Linux alternative for EyeLeo, a MS Windows-only app. As the name suggests, SafeEyes will protect you from Eye Strain by reminding or forcing you to take breaks after a particular period of time. During the break, it will suggest you some simple exercises like walking for a while, rolling your eyes etc., to relax yourself. If you are a hardcore user who work on computers for long hours, I recommended you to use SafeEyes in your system.

  • Awwh, This Linux Wallpaper Is Adorable

    I pimped some Fedora community wallpapers yesterday, there was that (rather gorgeous) Ubuntu Timeline wallpaper a few weeks back, and the steam from hype-train that brought the “new” Ubuntu default wallpaper still lingers in the air a bit.

    So — honestly — I wanted so bad not to write about yet another wallpaper.

  • IBM DB2 database gets ‘significant advances’ across Windows, Linux and z/ OSs

    IBM put ‘significant advances’ into its database software DB2, helping companies lower their operating costs while bringing together transactions and analytics in the same database to increase the speed of real-time data analysis.

    The new DB2 will incorporate hybrid transactional analytical processing (HTAP) available for Linux, Unix, Windows, and z/OS in December

  • Spotify for Linux – In the friendzone

    Spotify is arguably the most popular music streaming service out there. Apologies to any diehard fanboys who may have been offended by this statement. With 100 million users and tight social media integration, it sure plays in the big league. You can also go premium and this will render your interface ad-free and fidelity-high.

    But what about Linux? As it turns out, Linux has never been high on the list of priorities for the Spotify team, and at some point, the support was discontinued, then it was revived recently, which prompted me to give it a try. Seeking originality and uniqueness in my work, I opted for Fedora, only to learn that only builds for Debian-based distributions are available. In other words, Ubuntu and friends. Very similar to my experience with Sayonara. Anyhow, let’s see what gives.

  • Benefits Of Using Lightweight Linux Distributions

    There are quite a few lightweight linux distributions around but why should you care especially when most of our PCs that are on the market boast some very fast multi-core processors, large volumes of RAM and very fast Solid State Drives. Sure they can bring new life to old machines but there are many other reasons why they could be awesome for you.Let me give you a few reasons you would so much benefit from going with a Lightweight Linux distribution.

  • Alpine Linux 3.4.5 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.27 LTS, Latest Security Fixes

    A new maintenance update of the server-oriented Alpine Linux 3.4 operating system has been released, bringing a new Linux kernel version from the long-term supported 4.4 series and the latest security patches.

    According to the release notes, Alpine Linux 3.4.5 is now available as the most up-to-date version of the GNU/Linux distribution based on musl libc and BusyBox, it's powered by the Linux 4.4.27 LTS kernel, which was fully patched against the "Dirty COW" vulnerability, and includes numerous updated components and applications.

  • Upgrade OpenSUSE Leap to OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Rolling Release
  • ArchBang – Best Arch based distro for old or low-end hardware with high performance and low resource utilization

    Arch Linux is very unique, compare with other Linux distributions because it doesn’t comes with live ISO & Desktop Environment. Arch gives you the full freedom to customize the installation as you wish, When you boot up, you’ll be end up with a terminal and most of the people panic here because they don’t want to build from scratch.

    There are many, Actively developed Arch derived Linux distributions are available with pre-installed Desktop environment. I would advise you to go with any one distribution as you wish.

  • Red Hat Stock Sees Short Interest Make 21% Move
  • New Video Shows Changes Headed to Unity 8

    A new YouTube video claims to show an ‘quick overview of what’s to come to Unity 8’ in a future update.

    Uploaded by Kugi Javacookies (not sure if that’s his real name), the clip is described as offering a “quick overview of what’s to come soon to Unity 8. Since the silo has now been signed-off by QA, so it will probably land really soon.”

    Kugi adds that he finds it “awesome to actually follow projects even up to the small details. Codes in launchpad, actual projects in bileto and queued silos for QA testing in Trello. Really cool! :D”.

  • [Bodhi Linux] Modules and Themes in 4.0.0 Repos

    We will be stamping the 4.0.0 release as stable fairly soon and one the last pieces of that puzzle is getting all the “extras” for moksha into the repos. Users can now find the following modules and themes in the Bodhi 4.0.0 main repository for usage / testing:

  • Congatec’s first Apollo Lake COMs include SMARC 2.0 model

    Congatec announced three Linux-friendly COMs based on Intel’s new Atom E3900 SoC: a Qseven, a COM Express Compact, and one of the first SMARC 2.0 modules.

    Congatec is one of the first vendors to announce a major product lineup based on Intel’s newly announced, 14nm-fabricated Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs. In addition to the Qseven form-factor Conga-QA5 and the COM Express Compact Type 6 CongaTCA5 modules, the company unveiled the Conga-SA5, which is billed as Congatec’s first SMARC 2.0 module. In fact, the Conga-SA5 appears to be the company’s first SMARC COM ever, and one of the first SMARC 2.0 models to be fully announced. (See more on SMARC 2.0 below.)

  • Intel launches 14nm Atom E3900 and spins an automotive version

    The Linux-ready Atom E3900 series, which was formally announced at the IoT Solutions World Congress in Barcelona on the same day as the start of ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, has already started rolling out to some 30 OEM customers, some of which have already announced products (see below). The first Apollo Lake based products will ship 2Q 2017, says Intel.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows Btrfs Driver Updated With New Capabilities (WinBtrfs)
  • Install Laravel on Ubuntu 16.04
  • 'Tether' a very promising UE4 first-person adventure game will be coming to Linux

    It's not often a trailer leaves me begging for more, but 'Tether' [Steam Greenlight, Official Site] ticked all my boxes. The developer is using UE4 and claims the Linux builds are working as expected.

  • If you're in the mood for a decent Zombie survival game, don't pass up on Project Zomboid

    Project Zomboid [Steam, GOG, Official Site] is the rather good sandbox Zombie survival game from The Indie Stone, and it has come a long way!

    It doesn't have a SteamOS icon on Steam, as Valve removed it a long time ago as it (and a bunch of other games) wouldn't launch correctly on SteamOS. It works perfectly fine on a normal Linux distribution and I assure you the Linux version is still on Steam and perfectly up to date.

  • GTK+ 3.22.2 Deprecates APIs That Will Be Removed in GTK+ 4, Improves Win32 Theme

    Today, October 24, 2016, the GTK+ development team released the second stable maintenance update to the GTK+ 3.22 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit for GNOME-based desktop environments.

    GTK+ 3.22.2 comes just two weeks after the release of GNOME 3.22.1 and in time for the upcoming GNOME 3.22.2 milestone, which will also be the last one pushed for the GNOME 3.22 series. GTK+ 3.22.2 is mostly a bugfix release, but also adds various improvements to the win32 theme and deprecates APIs (Application Programming Interface) that'll be removed in the next major branch, GTK+ 4.

  • No One Is Buying Smartwatches Anymore

    Remember how smartwatches were supposed to be the next big thing? About that...

    The market intelligence firm IDC reported on Monday that smartwatch shipments are down 51.6 percent year-over-year for the third quarter of 2016. This is bad news for all smartwatch vendors (except maybe Garmin), but it’s especially bad for Apple, which saw shipments drop 71.6 percent, according to the IDC report

    Apple is still the overall smartwatch market leader, with an estimated 41.3-percent of the market, but IDC estimates it shipped only 1.1 million Apple Watches in Q3 2016, compared with 3.9 million in 2015. To a degree, that’s to be expected, since the new Apple Watch Series 2 came out at the tail-end of the quarter. But the news is still a blow, when you consider how huge the Apple Watch hype was just 18 months ago.

  • 10 must-have Android apps for Halloween
  • What’s wrong with Git? A conceptual design analysis

    We finished up last week talking about the how to find good concepts / abstractions in a software design and what good modularization looks like. Today’s paper jumps 40+ years to look at some of those issues in a modern context and a tool that many readers of this blog will be very familiar with: Git. With many thanks to Glyn Normington for the recommendation.

    [...]

    The results of the reworking are made available in a tool called gitless, which I’ve installed on my system to try out for a few days. (Note: if you use oh-my-zsh with the git plugin then this defines an alias for gl which you’ll need to unalias). As of this paper (2013), Gitless was only just beginning as a project, but it continues to this day and tomorrow we’ll look at the 2016 paper that brings the story up to date.

    The kinds of concepts the authors are interested in are those which are essential to the design, to an understanding of the workings of the system, and hence will be apparent in the external interface of the system, as well as in the implementation.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Acer updates Chromebook 15 with 12-hour battery life -- $199 exclusively at Walmart

    Chromebooks are not for everyone, but for many home users, it is absolute perfection. If you live in the web browser -- as many people do nowadays -- laptops running Google's Linux-based Chrome OS are a godsend because they are maintenance free. No need for confusing OS upgrades or anti-virus software. It just works, and it works well. Since they can now run Android apps too, they could become a serious threat to Microsoft and Windows 10.

    One of the most attractive aspects of Chromebooks is price -- they are often quite affordable. Today, Acer refreshes its 15.6 inch Chromebook 15 with a mind-boggling 12 hours of battery life. Best of all? It starts at $199. Yes, this model will get Android app support in a future update too.

  • Of Life, Linux and Karma Angels

    Angel filed appeal after appeal only to be denied on every attempt. Texas is an "at will" employment state so being terminated for cause can mean anything. Over the next few weeks, Angel became more and more fearful of losing her house, as she had just purchased it a year before. On top of that, her HP desktop had taken a nose dive into severe brokeness and that made it extra difficult for her to look for work. I put together a decent desktop for her and installed it that day, and yes...it was a Linux computer.

    Angel didn't have even the slightest problem with the new machine, and she wasn't particularly good at using one. So, let's put another slash in the falsehood that Linux is too hard for the everyday user. Most of them anyway. YMMV.

    To her glee, the OS picked up and configured her Epson all in one without her lifting a finger to do so. She almost clapped for happiness, stating that in Windows, installing that printer had been a nightmare, even with the included driver CD. And just to pinpoint the time frame for you, it was the summer of 2006.

  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided to launch on Linux in November, Mac version delayed

    Feral Entertainment has announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided will be launching on Linux in November. Feral Interactive is currently working on the Linux port of the game.

    In September the game development studio announced that Deus Ex: Mankind Divided would make its way to two additional platforms: Linux and Mac. The Linux version of the game will most likely make use of OpenGL or Vulkan to power its graphics engine.

  • Mad Max: It Came From The Desert to Linux

    First of all, let me get one thing straight out of the way, so you know where I come from. I did not like the recent Mad Max movie. Like, not at all. Not that I mind the post apocalyptic theme. I used to like the older Mad Max’s just fine (probably the first one the best). The new one…meh. The Max character had virtually no back story (as thin as a sheet of paper) and he was just acting like a crazy person from beginning to end. The story’s premise was boring and just an excuse for endless and not so impressive action scenes. So there was nothing redeeming it. I know this is not the mainstream opinion of the movie (everyone apparently thought it was the best thing ever since sliced bread) so I can only attribute this phenomenon to either mass hysteria or simply a clear decrease in movie expectations. The Force Awakens‘ success, despite being a mediocre movie and certainly underwhelming compared to the original trilogy, certainly echoes the same trend. I guess you cannot beat nostalgia. Just tag a Millennium Falcon on and you get a free ride no matter how incoherent the story or the characters are.

  • Budgie Remix 16.10 Overview
  • I Switched To OpenSuse Tumbleweed Smile
  • 50-day Moving Average Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At $76.67
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT) – Is this large market cap stock undervalued?
  • Fedora 25 new features, Perl removed from Build Root

    Fedora is the fast-paced bleeding-edge distribution of Red Hat. Fedora 25 is the second release of 2016 the other being Fedora 24. Let’s discover what lies in the future of this popular Linux distribution especially among developers.

  • "dnf update" considered harmful

    Updating a Linux distribution has historically been done from the command line (using tools like Debian's apt-get, openSUSE's zypper, or Fedora's yum—or its successor dnf). A series of crashes during system updates on Fedora 24 led Adam Williamson to post a note to fedora-devel and other mailing lists warning people away from running "dnf update" within desktop environments. It turns out that doing so has never truly been supported—though it works the vast majority of the time. The discussion around Williamson's note, however, makes it clear that the command is commonly run that way and that at least some users are quite surprised (and unhappy) that it isn't a supported option.

  • Supporting UEFI secure boot in Debian

    The Debian project can be accused of many things, but jumping too quickly on leading-edge technology is not one of them. That can be seen in, among other things, the fact that there is still not a version of the distribution that supports the UEFI secure boot mechanism. But, as Ben Hutchings explained during his 2016 Kernel Recipes talk, such support is in the works, and it will be implemented in a uniquely Debian-like manner.

  • The Lenovo Yoga Book Is the Future of Laptops, But It's Missing an Operating System

    For this review I spent a week with the Android version of Lenovo’s slick new backflipping laptop. Guts-wise it’s identical to the Windows 10 variant. They both feature Intel Atom x5-Z8550 processors, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of on-device storage, and 1920 x 1200 resolution displays. The Android version starts at $500 and the Windows version starts at $550.

  • Another Broken Nexus 5

    In late 2013 I bought a Nexus 5 for my wife [1]. It’s a good phone and I generally have no complaints about the way it works. In the middle of 2016 I had to make a warranty claim when the original Nexus 5 stopped working [2]. Google’s warranty support was ok, the call-back was good but unfortunately there was some confusion which delayed replacement.

    Once the confusion about the IMEI was resolved the warranty replacement method was to bill my credit card for a replacement phone and reverse the charge if/when they got the original phone back and found it to have a defect covered by warranty. This policy meant that I got a new phone sooner as they didn’t need to get the old phone first. This is a huge benefit for defects that don’t make the phone unusable as you will never be without a phone. Also if the user determines that the breakage was their fault they can just refrain from sending in the old phone.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Puppet Rolls Out New Docker Image Builds

    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008.

    Earlier this year, Puppet Labs rebranded as simply Puppet, and also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who came to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president. Now, at PuppetConf, the company has announced the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build, which "automates the container build process to help organizations as they define, build and deploy containers into production environments." This new set of capabilities adds to existing Puppet functionality for installing and managing container infrastructure, including Docker, Kubernetes and Mesos, among others.

  • Five Cool Alternative Open Source Linux Shells

    We are going to look at some of the available Linux shells out there that users have access to free of charge since they are open source, they come in a number of different licenses and this mainly depends on the software creator but in essence one doesn’t have to pay to use the system; so that a major plus in whichever way we look at it.
    We find that there are different kinds of users when it comes to Linux, the ones who tread carefully preferring to stick to tried and tested software, the other kinds are the ones who dive into the deep end of cutting edge software; head first.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/42

    This was week 42 – The openSUSE LEAP week of the Year. It can’t be a co-incidence that the Release Candidate 1 was announced in Week 42, on the 2nd day (42.2 – European counting, we start our week on Monday, not on Sunday).

    But also in Tumbleweed things are not standing still: of course many of the things are well in line with what Leap received (like for example Plasma updates), but Tumbleweed rolls at a different pace ahead of the game.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Docker: Making the Internet Programmable

    Docker, and containers in general, are hot technologies that have been getting quite a bit of attention over the past few years. Even Solomon Hykes, Founder, CTO, and Chief Product Officer at Docker started his keynote with the assumption that people attending LinuxCon Europe know that Docker does containers, so instead of focusing on what Docker does, Hykes used his time to talk about Docker’s purpose saying, “It really boils down to one small sentence. We're trying to make the Internet programmable.”

    Hykes described this idea of making the Internet programmable with three key points. First, they are focused on building “tools of mass innovation” designed to allow people to create and innovate on a very large scale. Second, applications and cloud services are allowing the idea of the Internet as a programmable platform to be realized, and they want to make this accessible to more people. Third, they are accomplishing all of this by building the Docker stack with open standards, open infrastructure, and a development platform with commercial products on top of the stack.

  • How to benchmark your Linux system

    The Software Center list will also include individual tests. These can be fine to use, but they can be tedious to open and configure manually. Keep your eye out for an entry called Phoronix Test Suite, or PTS for short. The Phoronix Test Suite is a powerful program that can run a single test, or an entire battery. PTS offers some built-in suites (collection of tests), or you can design your own suite. When tests are completed, you can choose to upload the test results to openbenchmarking.org, where other users can see your results and even run the exact same tests on their PC.

  • Wunderlist Electron App for Linux

    Missing Wunderlist on Linux? You don’t need to thanks to Wunderlistux, an Electron-based desktop app. It doesn’t claim to be anything more than a wrapper around the official Wunderlist web app (which, yes, you could just open in a new browser tab).

  • Enter the Wasteland: Mad Max now available for Mac and Linux
  • What a lovely day! Mad Max releases for Mac and Linux
  • Mad Max Comes to Linux and Mac
  • GNOME at Linux Install Fest

    It’s an event organized in order to help first year students install a Linux distro on their laptops (here at our uni, we work almost entirely on Linux, so we need to help those that have never used it and set up their distros

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-Based Photographic Workflow on Android with Termux

    The title is a bit of a mouthful, but the basic idea is pretty simple; Instead of schlepping around a Linux machine, you can transform an Android device into a lightweight Linux-based platform for organizing, processing, and backing up photos and RAW files when you are on the move. The key ingredient of this solution is the Termux, a small open source app that combines a terminal emulator and a lightweight Linux environment. The app comes with its own software repository that has all the tools you need to set up a simplified photographic workflow. The Linux Photography book explains exactly how to can go about it, but here are a few pointers to get started.

  • NVIDIA Announces The GeForce GTX 1050 Series

    NVIDIA this morning is expanding the Pascal family with the announcement of the GeForce GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti lower-cost graphics cards.

  • GStreamer Conference 2016 Videos, Vulkan Support Was Among The Talks

    The annual GStreamer Conference took place last week in Berlin alongside the Linux Foundation's Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The videos from this multimedia open-source conference are now available.

    The folks from Ubicast have once again done a nice job recording all of the presentations from this GStreamer event. Conference talks ranged from the "stage of the union" to the state of VA-API with GStreamer, GStreamer Video Editing, dynamic pipelines, Vulkan, and more.

    When it comes to Vulkan support in GStreamer, there is work underway on vulkansink and vulkanupload elements, basic Vulkan support modeled on GStreamer's libgstgl API, and more, but much more work is needed before it will be at the level of OpenGL support.

  • Solus 1.2.1 Released With Budgie Desktop Updates, Ships RADV Driver

    Version 1.2.1 of the promising Solus Linux distribution is now available and also premieres a MATE edition ISO to complement its original Budgie desktop.

  • Bill Belichick rants against NFL tablets: 'I'm done'

    After the image of the New England Patriots coach slamming a Microsoft Surface tablet on the sideline in a Week 4 game against the Buffalo Bills went viral, Belichick explained Tuesday why he is fed up with the product.

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