Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • LFNW 2016 - Docker Must Die
  • The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin To Keynote ITS America 2016 San Jose Day Two “Infrastructure of Things”
  • OBS Studio 0.14 Adds NVIDIA NVENC Video Encoding Support
  • The ‘Year of the Linux desktop’ never came, and it never will [Ed: Ignoring Chromebooks for self-fulfilling prophecies and FUD]

    Every culture has its myths and prophecies. For Linux users, it was “The Year Of The Linux Desktop.” The idea: someday in the future, likely soon, everyone is going to notice how great Linux is and just switch over, en masse.

  • RcppMgsPack 0.1.0

    Over the last few months, I have been working casually on a new package to integrate MessagePack with R. What is MessagePack, you ask? To quote its website, "It's like JSON, but fast and small."

  • Shotwell 0.23.0 Is the First Major Release in a Year, Comes with a Warning

    After informing the community two weeks ago that he picked up the maintenance of the well-known Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer software, developer Jens Georg now released the first major version since Shotwell 0.22.0.

    It has been more than a year since Shotwell 0.22.0 was released, back on March 24, 2015, and on April 16, 2016, the new maintainer pushed a very small point release, version 0.22.1, updating some translations and making sure everything is OK for him to continue the development of the acclaimed software.

  • QRegion will be iterable in Qt 5.8

    Apart from providing a non-allocating, non-throwing way to inspect a region, there are other positive effects. Because no QVector is returned that needs to be destroyed by the caller, even in projects (such as QtGui) that are compiled with exceptions disabled, porting even a few loops to the new construct saves more than 1KiB in text size on optimized GCC 5.3 Linux AMD64 builds, not to mention countless memory allocations at runtime.

  • Starting KWin/Wayland on another virtual terminal

    So far when one started KWin/Wayland on a virtual terminal it took over this virtual terminal. This made it difficult to read the debug output and even more difficult to run the complete session through gdb.

    The reason for this behavior is that KWin interacts with logind and needs to take session control on the current logind session. This is needed to have logind open the restricted device files like /dev/dri/card0 or the /dev/input/event* files.

  • Google Summer of Code 2016

    Hello everyone! I am participating in the Google Summer of Code program for the second time with GNOME, this year working on Epiphany. I am one of the two students working on this product, the other person being a friend of mine. We are both excited to leave our mark with some serious contributions.

  • Black Lab Linux 7.6 Released

    Today we are releasing Black Lab Linux 7.6. Black Lab Linux 7.6 is the latest release of our stable 7.x series of OS's. Black Lab Linux 7.6 is supported long term until April 2019.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5

    After the last Pisi-Linux-Alpha 7 Release, the Team has work on a lot of bug fixes, to give you a good stable beta Pisi Linux.

  • openSUSE to Mentor Six Google Summer of Code Students

    Google made an announcement April 22 that 1,206 students were selected for the Google Summer of Code and six of those students will be mentored through the openSUSE Project, which is one of 178 mentoring organizations in this year’s GSoC.

  • Global Big Data Infrastructure Market 2016-2020 - Increasing Presence of Open Source Big Data Technology Platforms - Research and Markets
  • Which field of research would you like to see more collaboration in?
  • 10 SQL Tricks That You Didn’t Think Were Possible

    But once your database and your application matures, you will have put all the important meta data in place and you can focus on your business logic only. The following 10 tricks show amazing functionality written in only a few lines of declarative SQL, producing simple and also complex output.

  • ‘New’ Windows Security Flaw Runs Apps Without Admin Rights

    Newly discovered Windows security hole bypasses AppLocker and lets apps run without admin rights. Proof-of-concept code published.

  • HTTPS is Hard

    This blog post is the first in a regular tech series from the Yell engineering team looking at challenges they face and problems they solve across Yell’s various digital solutions.

    Here, Yell’s Head of Web Engineering, Steve Workman, looks back over Yell.com‘s seven-month transition to HTTPS, (a secure version of the HTTP protocol – which sends data between a browser and a website) to raise awareness of the issues with the move in the industry and to make the adoption process easier for other engineering teams.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Running Windows on System76

    By tonight, this laptop’s time as a Windows only machine will be over. As soon as I finish writing this, I plan to print a file copy of my return, which got mailed before last Monday’s deadline by the way, and also save a copy of the file that Tax Act created to a USB drive so I can move it to our desktop for safekeeping. Then I’ll be downloading the recently released Xubuntu 16.04 for a review, partitioning the hard drive to save Windows for next year’s taxes and then seeing what our new laptop can do running a real operating system.

  • Interview with Tomáš Marek

    I’m a GNU/Linux user and when I wanted to paint I always had to reboot to Windows to use Photoshop for painting, so with Krita I don’t have to use Windows at all.

  • Cinnamon 3.0 Desktop Environment Tagged for Linux Mint 18, Here's What's New

    Linux Mint project leader and Cinnamon lead developer Clement Lefebvre has tagged the Cinnamon 3.0.0 desktop environment as ready for release on the project's GitHub page.

    Therefore, we're happy to inform you today, April 25, 2016, that the development cycle of the Cinnamon 3.0.0 desktop environment has ended, and it should hit the stable repositories of various GNU/Linux operating systems, such as Arch Linux, in the coming days.

    Cinnamon 3.0 has been tagged as ready for deployment in the upcoming Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" distribution, which should hit the streets this summer, sometimes around June or July, but we should be able to get an early taste in the coming weeks as the developers will announce the RC (Release Candidate) version.

  • This Week In Solus – Install #27

    Welcome to the 27th installation of This Week in Solus and one I’m happy to say is actually being written and published on schedule.

  • Kali Sana New Look & Features - Cyber Security OS
  • Debunked! The CIA-Docker connection

    Some readers may have been alarmed to also learn that one of the companies that presented at a summit sponsored by In-Q-Tel was Docker. But Docker's involvement with In-Q-Tel appears limited to a government support contract for its software -- a wholly uncontroversial connection between Docker and the spy agency.

  • Preview of Stock’s Movement: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) , Workday, Inc. (NYSE:WDAY)
  • Delisa Alexander Sells 1,503 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT) Stock
  • Other Linux Distributions Begin Analyzing Clear Linux's Performance Optimizations

    Fedora developers appear to be among those analyzing Intel's Clear Linux distribution for the performance optimizations made.

    In case you haven't been following our many original performance tests in the past months, Intel's Clear Linux is surprisingly fast. Clear Linux just isn't fast for server/workstation/enterprise workloads but even for Intel graphics performance and other general workloads.

  • Bulldog: A surprisingly fast GPIO library

    One of the most interesting features of computers like the Raspberry Pi is the ability to interact with the physical world via GPIO (general purpose input/output) pins.

    GPIO pins can capture inputs from multiple sources—including data from temperature, humidity, or one-axis sensors—and write output, which can anything from turning on an LED to controlling DC motors, LCD displays, or D/A converters.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • This is why we can't have safe cancellation points
  • Gentoo on my Tesla
  • Lessons learned: Five years of colocation

    Back in 2011, I decided to try out a new method for hosting my websites and other applications: colocation. Before that, I used shared hosting, VPS providers (“cloud” wasn’t a popular thing back then), and dedicated servers. Each had their drawbacks in different areas. Some didn’t perform well, some couldn’t recover from failure well, and some were terribly time consuming to maintain.

    This post will explain why I decided to try colocation and will hopefully help you avoid some of my mistakes.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/16

    Tumbleweed seems to have found its rhythm at around 4 snapshots per week. I will cover the snapshots 0414, 0415, 0416 and 0417. After that, it took unfortunately a bit of effort to get more stagings ready. This then lead now to the fact that the next snapshot (0422) will be rather large. I will mention more about this further down.

  • Kubuntu 16.04 LTS Arrives with New Plasma Discover Software Center, KDE Plasma 5

    The Kubuntu team was proud to announce the official release and general availability of the Kubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, which has been unveiled yesterday as part of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS launch.

    Just like its bigger brother, Kubuntu 16.04 is an LTS (Long Term Support) version that will receive critical security patches and software updates for a few more years than regular releases, such as Kubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) whose end-of-life support will be reached around July 2016.

  • Xubuntu 16.04 Screenshot Tour
  • This Teddy Bear Steals Your Ubuntu Secrets

    Ubuntu just came out with the new long-term support version of their desktop Linux operating system. It’s got a few newish features, including incorporating the “snap” package management format. One of the claims about “snaps” is that they’re more secure — being installed read-only and essentially self-contained makes them harder to hack across applications. In principle.

  • Just After EU Goes After Google For Antitrust, Microsoft Agrees To Drop All Antitrust Complaints About Google [Ed: Ballmer’s “F*ing kill Google!” mission accomplished, now trying to pretend to have nothing to do with the outcome]

    Back in 2011, Microsoft officially filed an antitrust complaint against Google in the EU. At the time, we noted how silly this was, given that the company itself had spent years battling EU antitrust regulations. It almost felt like a "well, if we had to go through that hellish process, let's put it on Google too..." kind of thing. Within less than a year, Google filed its own antitrust complaint back against Microsoft. As we noted at the time, both claims seemed kind of ridiculous and overblown -- and it bothered us greatly that these companies were resorting to stupid political games, rather than just competing in the market.

    So, now, just days after the EU officially took that ball and ran with it, Microsoft and Google have announced that they've buried the hatchet and agreed to drop all antitrust complaints against each other around the globe. They insist this has nothing to do with the EU's move earlier this week. In fact, the writing has been on the wall for some time here. The two companies had ended the patent battle last fall, with everyone dropping all complaints and lawsuits. And, just a couple of months ago there were reports that Microsoft was cutting back on supporting the very coalitions that it had put together and funded: ICOMP and FairSearch.

    It had always been obvious and well-known that both groups were Microsoft front groups, and now it's official... and over.

  • Bash on Windows: What Does It Mean?

    One discussion that I see a lot on the social network is whether “Ubuntu for Windows” is going to hurt desktop Linux in the long run. Currently, many Windows users need to dual boot with Linux or run it in VM to be able to use such tools. That need created a user base; it created a mind share.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Top 3: KaOS 2016.04, TurnKey 14.1 and pfSense 2.3

    KaOS is a KDE optimized Linux distribution that is now being updated, with the new Plasma 5.6.2 desktop environment. Additionally the distro benefits from the new Calamares installer framework which has been updated to version 2.2.1.

  • Simple Control Interface for Linux Computers: pyLCI

    It’s becoming increasingly clear to makers that single board computers and the DIY devices based on them need control interfaces that are simpler and faster to use than desktop peripherals or even full-on PCs. Pičugins Arsenijs believes he’s come up with a much simpler alternative.

  • Forking impressive, devs go nuts for Hazelcast

    Operational in-memory computing company Hazelcast -- known for its open source In-Memory Data Grid (IMDG) -- has shared its community growth numbers from the Github repository.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Emacs vs VI: Which is better

    Vi(m) proponents complain about Emacs’s startup time. Yes, Emacs is slow to start up, but this is not a big deal: you start Emacs once per session, then connect to the running process with emacsclient. So Emacs’s slow startup is mostly a myth.

    There’s one exception, which is when you log in to a remote machine and want to edit a file there. Starting a remote Emacs is (usually) slower than starting a remote Vim. In some situations you can keep an Emacs running inside Screen. You can also edit remote files from within Emacs, but it does break the flow if you’re in an ssh 0session in a terminal. (Since XEmacs 21 or GNU Emacs 23, you can open an Emacs window from a running X instance inside a terminal.)

  • LEAD Technologies Advances Document, OCR and Medical SDK Technology for Windows and Linux
  • Steam Beta Client Adds New Steam Controller Abilities, SteamVR Refinements
  • Xfce 4.12 mega update coming to EL-7
  • KDE at Augsburger Linux-Tag

    On Saturday, 16 April I had the honor of representing KDE at the 15. Augsburger Linux-Tag, one of the oldest and largest Linux gatherings in southern Germany.

  • Escuelas ‘School’ Linux 4.4 Released

    The Mexican distro Escuelas, or ‘School,’ Linux was designed to give extended life to aging hardware in financially strapped school districts in Latin America and is based on Bodhi Linux.

    On Monday, a GNU/Linux distro designed to be used in schools, Escuelas Linux, released version 4.4. Just how dedicated to education are the developers of this distro? Plenty. In case your Spanish is as rusty as ours, the Spanish name Escuelas translates to “school” in English.

  • Has Ubuntu become a boring distribution?

    Many new Linux users start out with Ubuntu, and become enthralled with all of the new possibilities Linux has to offer. But has Ubuntu matured to the point where it has become boring? One Linux redditor shared his thoughts after transitioning from Windows to Ubuntu.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Man who allegedly deleted his startup with one line of code is a huge troll

    You might’ve heard the tragic-but-kind-of-funny story of Marco Marsala, who allegedly deleted his entire startup with a single line of code this past week. It was the ultimate case of IT bad luck – or carelessness, as some commenters suggested.

  • What to do with the “rm -rf” hoax question

    It turns out the the recent question regarding the misuse of rm -rf in Ansible was actually just a hoax in some kind of viral marketing effort. It become quite famous on various media and gathered a large number of views.

    Since I don't think we should allow ServerFault to be abused in such way, I deleted the question once I learned about the hoax. However, this will rob the kind people that took the time to answer him of the rep points they earned for this, in particular the Journeyman Geek with 185 upvotes.

  • Party 2 in Review

    Last night (Friday 15th April, 19:00 UTC) we held the second of our Kubuntu packaging parties. Using the new conference server provided by BigBlueButton (BBB), things worked like a dream.

  • This Week in Solus – Install #26

    We now ship locales for Firefox and Thunderbird. This makes it easier to switch to the language you desire / need without having to jump through the hoop of installing addons.

  • Slackware-Based Zenwalk 8.0 Is Coming Soon, First RC Build Released for Testing

    The developers of the Slackware-based Zenwalk GNU/Linux operating system announced this weekend the general availability of the first and probably the last RC (Release Candidate) build of the upcoming Zenwalk 8.0 distro.

    During the past four months, Zenwalk 8.0 has received a total of three Beta releases, and now it has finally reached the RC state, as most of the issues have been fixed by now. Moreover, the development cycle of the Slackware 14.2 operating system is nearing its final stages as the second Release Candidate was announced the other day.

  • Arch Linux Now Uses Kernel 4.5

    As you may know, Arch Linux is among the most popular rolling release Linux systems. On April 14, Arch has received a major kernel upgrade, replacing Kernel 4.4.5 with Kernel 4.5, which has been added to the Testing repositories some time ago.

    The Arch developers have skipped the Kernel 4.4.6 and Kernel 4.4.7 and adopted kernel 4.5 directly. Among others, Kernel 4.5 brings better support for AMD Radeon GPUs, comes with support for the AMD PowerPlay power management technology and brings enhancements to the AMDGPU open-source driver.

  • [OBS] Beta One of Version 2.7 Released

    We are happy to announce the first preview release of the upcoming Open Build Service (OBS) version 2.7. Two highlights that you should check out are the download on demand support which makes it possible to include external software repositories and the new git work flows.

  • UDOO X86 Is Your PC’s Replacement — The Most Powerful Hacker Board Ever Made

    DOO X86 single board computer combines the benefits of a PC and Arduino 101 to become one of the most appealing devices for a maker. This open source board is about 10 times faster than Raspberry Pi 3 and based on Quad-Core 64-bit generation x86 Intel processors.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Teaching New Linux on Old Hardware

    The decision I faced was life-changing either way I went. My inclination was to go back to school and get the certs I needed to work in the Linux administration field. I already had the base knowledge and experience; it was just a matter of jumping through the hoops to get a piece of paper saying I already knew what I was learning. Not that I wouldn’t learn a thing or two along the way.

  • Xfce 4.14 Development Is Focused Around GTK3 Porting

    It will likely be quite some time before the Xfce 4.14 desktop environment is released while the main focus this development cycle is on porting to the GTK+ 3.x tool-kit.

  • Linux Mint 18 will include Cinnamon 3.0 and Mate 1.14 versions

    The Linux Mint developers have been working hard on version 18 of the popular desktop distribution. Linux Mint 18 will offer Cinnamon 3.0 and Mate 1.14 versions when it is released. There are also be some other new goodies that will be included in Linux Mint 18.

  • Little-bitty Ubuntu mini-PC takes quad-core Atom to extremes

    Stealth.com has launched a tiny, Ubuntu-ready “LPC-175F” mini-PC with a quad-core Atom E3845, dual GbE ports, and -20 to 70°C support.

    The 145 x 84 x 35mm LPC-175F is one of the smallest mini-PCs ever built by Stealth.com. By comparison, its 250 x 146 x 42mm and up, Intel 3rd Gen. Core based LPC480x mini-PC series seems more like a maxi-PC series.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.