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Misc

today's leftovers

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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Gnome-Pie: A Very Handy Launcher For Your Ubuntu/Linux Mint Desktop

    Indeed, the system you are running on your machine already have launcher or in other case you are using minimal desktop or you don't like to scroll through launcher to find an App you want to launch. It won't be wrong to say Gnome-Pie can be alternative option to your Current OS menu. Gnome-Pie is an awesome circular launcher designed to be fun, fast and visually appealing for Linux desktop. Basically it is made of several pies, each pie consist of multiple slices. The use can press a key stroke to open desired pie. By activating one of its slices, applications may be launched, key presses may be simulated or files can be opened.

  • Linux 4.11 released
  • AVR32 change for 4.12 - architecture removal

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Dawn of War III looks like it might come to Linux

    On SteamDB, Dawn of War III has two content depots named "feral_data_test" and "feral_mp_test". That's a pretty big indicator that something is happening, since Feral Interactive ported the previous Dawn of War II + the expansions to Linux it's also quite possible which gives this a fair bit of credit. Still, it is just speculation right now. Feral don't tend to talk about any of their work before release as well, so asking them would be pointless. Feral did do a teaser of a new port recently, so who knows, it could be.

  • Linux Mint 18.2 to Be Dubbed "Sonya," Will Come with Cinnamon 3.4, LightDM

    Today being the last day of April, Linux Mint leader Clement Lefebvre published the monthly newsletter of the project to inform the community about what's coming for the popular, Ubuntu-based distribution in May.

    The developer starts by warning those who still use the Linux Mint 13 "Maya" release that it reached end of life as it was based on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin), which also reached end of life on April 28, 2017. Therefore, Linux Mint 13 will no longer receive security updates so you must upgrade to a newer release.

  • USB – not all the same but it is hard to blow up your device

    There are now four USB charging and data standards – 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 3.1 and each means different things in terms of power delivery, data transfer speeds, fast charge support, and cable types.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Pinebook - 1st review

    So I got the Pinebook 11 inch with arm 64 bits.....

    And what can I say, I am amazed with the quality of the construction.

    Very good plastics, better than some chromebooks and cheap windows netbooks.

    The mousepad is outstanding and work really nice.

    The keyboard, only has one problem!! The right shift. Probably I will remap the shift to the "/" position. I use and abuse right shift (i rarely use the left one), so this is very important to me.

  • DevOps lab: Learn to use GitHub for infrastructure deployments

    This article is part of a series to help IT ops professionals learn DevOps by building a home lab. In the second step, Git version control allows ops to manage infrastructure as code.

  • IBM Advances OpenWhisk Serverless Vision

    The computing paradigm commonly known as 'serverless' computing isn't for everyone, but it does have a place and plenty of opportunities for those willing to explore. IBM has its own serverless platform called OpenWhisk which first became generally available in December 2016.

    In a video interview with ServerWatch, Jason McGee, VP and CTO for IBM Cloud platform discusses the opportunities for serverless, event-driven computing and where the technology intersects with Watson cognitive computing and the application container revolutions.

  • Linux Foundation Announces EdgeX Foundry To Drive Standardization Of Edge Computing
  • Awesomenauts, the side-scrolling MOBA is going free to play next month
  • Everything, a game about experiencing, well, everything and it's now on Linux

    I personally tested it out and it was an absolute joy. From the very first moment, to the moment I put it down to write some thoughts it was incredible. Especially fun when it says "Everything is loaded" at the start which made me chuckle. Simple things right?

  • [New but undated] Linux distros (Linux distribution)

    A Linux distribution -- often shortened to "Linux distro" -- is a version of the open source Linux operating system that is packaged with other components, such as an installation programs, management tools and additional software such as the KVM hypervisor.

  • [Tumbleweed] Review of the weeks 2017/13 – 17

    And all this happens in parallel to the openSUSE Conference being planned. You should think about participating! It is always informative, a lot of discussions happen in face-to-face meetings and, in openSUSE’s tradition, everybody is having a lot of fun. If you can plan a visit, you absolute should do so.

  • Red Hat Gives JBoss AMQ a Makeover

    Red Hat on Thursday announced JBoss AMQ 7, a messaging platform upgrade that enhances its overall performance and improves client availability for developers.

    JBoss AMQ is a lightweight, standards-based open source platform designed to enable real-time communication between applications, services, devices and the Internet of Things. It is based on the upstream Apache ActiveMQ and Apache Qpid community projects.

  • Fedora Atomic Host available in Digital Ocean
  • Automated *non*-critical path update functional testing for Fedora
  • Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Just Around the Corner, Live Images to Support UEFI

    Debian Project's Steve McIntyre and Jonathan Wiltshire just informed the Debian GNU/Linux community about some of the important aspects of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, whose launch is imminent.

    The first aspect, revealed by Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire, is that the final release of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" might not include Secure Boot support, which is no longer a blocker to launch the forthcoming OS. However, Secure Boot support could be implemented sometime during the lifetime of Debian 9.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Mesa's Shader Cache Will Now Occupy Less Disk Space

    Mesa previously had a hard-coded limit to not take up more than 10% of your HDD/SSD storage, but now that limit has been halved.

    In a change to Mesa 17.2-dev Git and primed for back-porting to Mesa 17.1, Timothy Arceri has lowered the cache size limit to 5% of the disk space. He noted in the commit, "Modern disks are extremely large and are only going to get bigger. Usage has shown frequent Mesa upgrades can result in the cache growing very fast i.e. wasting a lot of disk space unnecessarily. 5% seems like a more reasonable default."

  • Amazon EC2 Cloud Benchmarks vs. AMD Ryzen, Various AMD/Intel Systems
  • Epiphany 3.25.1 Released, Ported To Meson

    Epiphany 3.25.1 has been released as the latest update for GNOME's Web Browser in what will be part of GNOME 3.26 this September.

    Epiphany 3.25.1 has continued the trend by other GNOME components in porting to the Meson build system. With Epiphany 3.25.1, Meson is present and its Autotools build system has been removed.

  • Tumbleweed Snapshots Update Fonts, Perl, Python Packages

    openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots this week gave many newer versions of Perl and Python packages, but several other packages were updated in the repositories including some open fonts.

    Google and Adobe fonts were updated in snapshots 20170424 and 20170420 with google-croscore-fonts and adobe-sourcehansans-fonts being added to the repositories respectively.

  • 3 cool features in Ubuntu 17.04

    April showers bring May flowers, and fresh versions of Ubuntu too. Canonical’s latest official Ubuntu release—17.04—arrived this month after news of the death of Unity 8 and the return to the GNOME desktop in 2018. For now, Ubuntu is still shipping with its Unity desktop.

    I wrote earlier that most users who need stability and support over new features will probably want to stick with Ubuntu 16.04, which was released last April, until Ubuntu 18.04 arrives a year from now. However, there are a few small things in Ubuntu 17.04 that will appeal to users who are keen to get all the newest updates.

  • Linux Security and Isolation APIs course in Munich (17-19 July 2017)

    I've scheduled the first public instance of my "Linux Security and Isolation APIs" course to take place in Munich, Germany on 17-19 July 2017. (I've already run the course a few times very successfully in non-public settings.) This three-day course provides a deep understanding of the low-level Linux features (set-UID/set-GID programs, capabilities, namespaces, cgroups, and seccomp) used to build container, virtualization, and sandboxing technologies. The course format is a mixture of theory and practical.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • MPV 0.25.0 Open-Source Video Player Supports DVB-T2, MacBook Pro's Touch Bar

    It's been more than two months since the MPlayer-based MPV open-source video player received an update, and the development team is proud to announce the immediate availability for download of MPV 0.25.0.

    MPV 0.25.0 is a major milestone and comes with significant changes, such as the fact that starting with this release, all future versions of the player will be tagged on the master branch. Also, this is the first release of MPV to drop support for Mac OS X 10.7 and earlier builds.

  • KDE Plasma 5.9.5 Is the Last in the Series, KDE Plasma 5.10 Is Coming End of May

    As expected, today KDE announced the availability of the fifth maintenance update to the current stable, yet short-lived KDE Plasma 5.9 desktop environment for GNU/Linux operating systems, versioned 5.9.5.

    KDE Plasma 5.9.5 is here more than a month after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.9.4 update, which most probably many of you use on your favorite GNU/Linux distributions. But the time has come to update your installations to KDE Plasma 5.9.5, the last point release in the series, adding more than 60 improvements across various components.

  • What was Linux like ten years ago?

    Linux has improved by leaps and bounds over the last decade, and more and more people have come to appreciate its power and flexibility. But a redditor recently wondered what it was like to run Linux ten years ago, and he got some very interesting responses from Linux veterans.

  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 33

    It has been a long time since our last status update! The reason is the end of the previous sprint caught quite some of the YaST Team members on vacations and, when the vacation period was over, we were so anxious to jump into development to make YaST another little bit better that the blog post somehow fell behind.

    But it’s time to pay our (reporting) debts. So these are some of the highlights of the 33th development sprint that finished on April 11th.

  • StackIQ announces support for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, Raspberry Pi and NetApp Storage Arrays in major new release, Stacki 4.0
  • Red Hat repackages its application management tech into software containers

    A year after buying application connectivity startup 3scale Inc., Red Hat Inc. is making the technology that it obtained through the deal available in a new form geared toward tech-savvy firms.

    Unveiled on Thursday, Red Hat 3scale API Management – On Premise runs on the company’s OpenShift Container Platform and is designed to be deployed inside Docker instances. It’s an alternative to the original cloud version of 3scale for organizations that wish to keep their operations behind the firewall. The software should be particularly appealing to government agencies and firms in regulated industries, which often can’t move certain workloads off-premises due to security obligations.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Daily Build Downloads Now Available

    Ubuntu 17.10 daily build images are available to download.

  • This Script Can Make GNOME Shell Look like Windows, Mac, or Unity

    GNOME Shell’s stock experience is fairly vanilla, but with the right ingredients you can give it an entirely different flavour. GNOME Layout Manager is a new script in development that takes advantage of this malleability.

  • 96Boards Officially Launches The HiKey 960 ARM Board

    The 96Boards organization has announced the official launch and shipping of the HiKey 960.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • OpenRA C&C Reimplementation Gets New Stable Release, Here Is What's New

    Oliver Brakmann from the OpenRA project, an open-source and cross-platform initiative to offer a reimplementation of the popular Command & Conquer games, announced the availability of a new stable release.

  • Pisi-Linux-2.0-Beta-KDE5
  • Arch-Based arkOS Linux Being Discontinued

    arkOS, the Arch-based Linux distribution focused on "securely self-hosting your online life" with aims to make it easy to deploy servers for web-based services, is being discontinued.

    ArkOS since 2012 had been working to make it trivial to deploy your own Linux web server, your own personal cloud (ownCloud), and making it easy for other services to be deployed while being done so securely and easily. You probably haven't heard of arkOS making the news in a while and sadly now it's making news again, but only because it's being discontinued by its lead developer.

  • SUSE Hack Week 15

    Back in February the fifteenth SUSE Hack Week took place. As always this was a week of free hacking, to learn, to innovate, to collaborate, and to have a lot of fun. I didn't have the full time, so I worked on a couple of small things and a few projects I maintain. I did want to summarize that, so here you go.

  • How To Use SD Card As Internal Storage On Android | Adoptable Storage On Android
  • Anbox - Android in a Box
  • Your CEO’s Obliviousness about Open Source is Endangering Your Business [Ed: Jeff Luszcz says nothing about the risk of proprietary components with back doors etc. and instead 'pulls a Black Duck']

    But what caused these issues? Itis what happens when an open source component is integrated into a commercial software product and violates its open source license, or when it contains a vulnerability that was previously unknown. As technology evolves, open source security and compliance risk are reaching a critical apex that if not addressed, will threaten the entire software supply chain.

  • Mentor tips Azure IoT support and Linux-driven self-driving tech [Ed: Azure is a patent trap with back doors]

    Mentor announced Azure Certified for IoT compliance for Mentor Embedded Linux, and unveiled a Linux-based “DRS360” self-driving car platform.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report

    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far.

    Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.

  • Galago Pro: Look Inside

    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!

  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted
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Android Leftovers

Tidelift Backed by Former Red Hat Chairman and CEO Matthew Szulik

  • Open source startup Tidelift snags $15 mln Series A
    Boston-based Tidelift, an open source startup, has secured $15 million in Series A funding. General Catalyst, Foundry Group and former Red Hat Chairman and CEO Matthew Szulik led the round. In conjunction with the funding, Larry Bohn, managing director at General Catalyst, Ryan McIntyre, co-founder and managing director at Foundry Group and Szulik have all joined Tidelift’s board of directors.
  • Tidelift raises $15M to find paying gigs for open-source developers maintaining key projects
    Tidelift wants to give open-source developers a way to earn some money for contributing to important open-source projects and while helping the companies that are using those projects in key parts of their business, and it just raised $15 million to build those connections. General Catalyst, Foundry Group, and former Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik co-led the Series A founding round into the Boston-based startup, the first time the 17-person company has taken financing, said Donald Fischer, co-founder and CEO of Tidelift. The other co-founders — Havoc Pennington, Jeremy Katz, and Luis Villa — share a wealth of open-source experience across companies like Red Hat and organizations like The Wikimedia Foundation and the Mozilla Foundation.
  • Tidelift Raises $15M Series A To Make Open Source Work Better--For Everyone

today's howto

Linux and CPU Security

  • 22 essential security commands for Linux
    There are many aspects to security on Linux systems – from setting up accounts to ensuring that legitimate users have no more privilege than they need to do their jobs. This is look at some of the most essential security commands for day-to-day work on Linux systems.
  • CVE-2018-3639: Spectre Variant 4 Vulnerability Affects the Linux Kernel
    A Spectre variant 4 vulnerability has been identified in the Linux kernel and represents a very dangerous threat to all affected machines. All system administrators are urged to apply the latest updates as soon as possible to mitigate any possible impact.
  • Spectre Number 4, STEP RIGHT UP!
    In the continuing saga of Meltdown and Spectre (tl;dr: G4/7400, G3 and likely earlier 60x PowerPCs don't seem vulnerable at all; G4/7450 and G5 are so far affected by Spectre while Meltdown has not been confirmed, but IBM documentation implies "big" POWER4 and up are vulnerable to both) is now Spectre variant 4. In this variant, the fundamental issue of getting the CPU to speculatively execute code it mistakenly predicts will be executed and observing the effects on cache timing is still present, but here the trick has to do with executing a downstream memory load operation speculatively before other store operations that the load does not depend on. If the CPU is convinced to speculatively execute down this victim path incorrectly, it will revert the stores and the register load when the mispredict is discovered, but the loaded address will remain in the L1 cache and be observable through means similar to those in other Spectre-type attacks.