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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Tresorit Offers Encrypted Cloud Storage for Linux Businesses

    Tresorit for Linux is an end-to-end encrypted file sharing service that allows teams to collaborate securely and easily.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.23 is now available.

  • A Number Of KDE Apps Will Be Dropped If They Don't Get Ported To KF5

    Around three dozen apps from the KDE Applications suite could be dropped if they don't see a port from kdelibs4 to KDE Frameworks 5 within the next year.

    A proposal laid out yesterday would make next summer's KDE Applications 17.08 release be the last to allow applications based on kdelibs4. After that, kdelibs4 applications would not be permitted given that KDE Frameworks 5 has already been around for a while and KDE4 is no longer maintained. In other words, there's just about one year to port the relevant applications to KF5 by interested developers otherwise they will not be present in KDE Applications 17.12.

  • November is Bugsquash month – Open Source Aalborg is joining

    Me and my friend Daniel from Open Source Aalborg will arrange that the local participants from the open source group in Aalborg will join in on the final bug squashing day, November the 30th. OS Aalborg has recently joined a lot of Capture the flag’s and I think we will try to put up some very basic infrastructure (read google forms + spreadsheet) to do something similar for the GNOME Bug Squashing initiative.

  • b2k16 hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on GNOME's path forward, various ports progress

    First task of this hackathon was for Jasper and I to upgrade to GNOME 3.22.1 (version 3.22.2 hit the ports tree since). As usual I already updated the core libraries a few days before so that we could start with a nice set of fully updated packages. It ended up being the fastest GNOME update ever, it all went very smoothly. We're still debating the future of GNOME on OpenBSD though. More and more features require systemd interfaces and without a replacement it may not make sense to keep it around. Implementing these interfaces requires time which Jasper and I don't really have these days... Anyway, we'll see.

  • Tea Time is a Simple Timer App for Ubuntu Desktops

    On the hunt for a simple timer app for Ubuntu? Look no further than this cute little tool, called Tea Time.

    Whether you’ve a pizza in the oven, want to set aside a specific study period, or are letting some posh tea steep in water, Tea Time will be right on time.

Xfce 4.14 and Fedora

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Misc
  • Many Xfce Package Updates Bring Stable GTK3 Support, Notifyd Gets Do-Not-Disturb

    While it's likely a long time before Xfce 4.14 gets released with full GTK3 tool-kit integration, there are some new Xfce4 package updates available this week.

    Xfce4-settings 4.13 is out and is a development release for the 4.13 series. This initial release marks Xfce Settings being fully-ported to GTK+ 3.x. That's the main change with this release is the port from GTK2 to GTK3 but some bugs do remain. There are some screenshots via this blog post.

  • Fedora Looks At Changing The Default Hostname For F26 & Beyond

    One of the most discussed items this week on the Fedora developers' mailing list is in regards to changing the hostname on Fedora 26 and future versions.

    Fedora has defaulted to localhost.localdomain but this is becoming a problem for systems acting as a client to FreeIPA and Active Directory domain controllers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Techrights Turns 10 Years Old

    The site Techrights is turning 10 years old. Though now called Techrights, it was best known as Boycott Novell until 2010. It has become an internationally recognized site whose aim has been advocacy of digital rights with the goal of maximizing freedom, reducing surveillance, and generally promoting the sharing of knowledge. This, in turn, requires transparent systems, open licensing terms, no censorship, and active collaboration among parties. Its focus has always included the fight against software patents and in recent years it pays special attention to the goings on and intrigues within the European Patent Office and their attempt to bring by hook or crook software patents into Europe.

  • Lenovo releases BIOS for loading Linux on Yoga 900, IdeaPad 710S BIOS

    Lenovo took some heat from Linux users a few months ago when it was discovered that some of the company’s recent Windows laptops were configured in a way that blocked them from running Linux or other operating systems.

    Some saw a conspiracy, while others pointed out that it had to do with the lack of Linux drivers for the storage configuration in those laptops. Either way, the end result was that it was difficult, if not impossible to install Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 900 or IdeaPad 710 notebook.

  • After protest, Lenovo brings Linux compatibility to Yoga 900 and 900S [Ed: Techrights started the protest]

    Lenovo created a stir when it said the Yoga 900 and 900S hybrids would work only with Windows, not Linux. The company has now changed its stance, bringing Linux support to those PCs.

    The PC maker earlier this month issued a BIOS update so Linux can be loaded on Yoga 900, 900S and IdeaPad 710 models.

    The BIOS update adds an AHCI (Advance Host Controller Interface) SATA controller mode so users can load Linux on the laptops.

    This is a Linux-only BIOS, meaning it should be used only by those who want to load the OS. If you want to continue with Windows, do not load the firmware.

  • New Laptop / Problems with Windows part 896,324

    I had mentioned previously that I had been forced to purchase a new laptop. I decided that I didn't want another Thinkpad. The Lenovo ones no longer have the high quality they had in the IBM days and while support is still pretty good by todays dismal standards it's not worth the premium price. (If I'm buying it with my own money that is.) I had heard good thing about Dells' Linux support so I looked into their offerings and ended up buying a Precision 7510. Mind you this model came with Windows 7 installed but I didn't mind. As I wanted to install Debian according to my own specs anyway, I was ok with just knowing that the hardware would be compatible. So I prepared a Jessie USB installation stick (This model doesn't have a CD/DVD drive.) and shrunk down the Windows installation (but not deleted it altogether for reasons to be explained below.)

  • Mitchell Hashimoto talks about new technologies and DevOp tools

    A few weeks earlier, when I'd talked with him to kick off IT Pro's coverage of ATO, I purposefully didn't ask him about his upcoming conference talks because I didn't want to spoil it for him or his audience. That he would talk about DevOps tools was a given. After all, HashiCorp, the company he co-founded and where he's CTO, is known for tools like Vagrant, Packer, Terraform, Consul and Vault, which are designed to help DevOps secure and operate distributed application infrastructures. In this keynote he would be talking about automation tools in general. Later in the day, he'd conduct a workshop that would focus specifically on his company's products.

  • anytime 0.1.0: New features, some fixes

    A new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the four releases in September and October.

    anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Agile, DevOps and the algorithmic enterprise [Ed: Buzzword, buzzword, and more buzzwords; what happened to technology journalism?]

    Mike Mason, technology activist and adviser to the CTO at ThoughtWorks, discusses the next big thing in technology, and how business and tech leaders should prepare

  • 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud
  • Linux Foundation Releases 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud
  • 'F*cking crap' aside, Linus Torvalds says Linux 4.9 is coming along nicely

    Linux 4.9 is coming along nicely, with Linus Torvalds emitting the fourth release candidate on Saturday evening.

    But before he got there, he offered a minor kernel mailing list explosion when developer Miklos Szeredi proposed “the concept of feature flags to allow backward incompatible changes to the overlay format” in overlayfs. Szeredi opined that the feature was long overdue.

    Torvalds disagreed that the feature was needed, never mind overdue. Another poster to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, Amir Goldstein, asked for clarification of Linus' thinking.

  • GXml: Objects and Collections to XML and back

    If your GObject class implements GomProperty interface, and is a property in your object, it will be translated to an Element attributes with a name and a text value.

    For simple types, this means you can control if an attribute is written or not, depending if it is not null. Standard properties, not GObject classes implementing GomProperty, they will be always written with its default value. This is, for example, a boolean will always use false by default.

  • EdLogics Addresses Health Literacy Gap with Linux Container and Cloud Solutions from Red Hat

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that EdLogics, a health education-based consumer engagement company and innovator in game-based learning, has built its digital health literacy platform on container and cloud solutions from Red Hat, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat JBoss Middleware, and Ansible by Red Hat. EdLogics’ Education-as-a-Service offering, based on Red Hat technology, is aiming to transform the way consumers learn about health and improve health literacy while simultaneously cutting consumer costs.

  • Linux Top 3: RHEL 7.3, Ubuntu Core 16 and 4MLinux 20.0

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 was officially released on November 3, and now represent the leading edge of Red Hat's Linux enterprise efforts.

    Among the improvements that have landed in RHEL 7.3 are ease-of-use enhancements to SELinux as well as security compliance checking for container via the OpenSCAP protocol.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Linux Foundation adds three new members to board of directors
  • The Linux Foundation Appoints Three Tech Industry Leaders to Board of Directors
  • Weblate 2.9

    Slightly behind schedule (it should have been released in October), Weblate 2.9 is out today. This release brings Subversion support or improved zen mode.

  • libopus 1.2-alpha
  • Opus 1.2 Alpha Released With Several Quality Improvements

    With the Opus 1.2 Alpha release there is speed quality improvements, improved VBR encoding for hybrid mode, more aggressive use of wider speed bandwidth, and music quality improvements. Other work in libopus 1.2 alpha includes generic and SSE CELT optimizations, support for directly encoding packets up to 120 ms, DTX support for CELT, SILK CBR improvements. Like most software projects, there is also a lot of bug fixes, including some overflow fixes.

  • Getting started with Python scripting in Scribus
  • Hands-on: Using CrossOver Android to run Windows apps on a Chromebook

    Switching from a Windows laptop to a Chromebook is possible only if you can live without any Windows programs.

    But Chrome OS’s newfound support for Android apps from the Google Play Store has opened up a loophole: A program from Codeweavers called CrossOver Android creates a Windows compatibility layer inside Chrome OS, letting users install and run traditional Win32 software.

    As a proof of concept, this is an exciting development for prospective Chromebook owners. But CrossOver is still early in its development. As I discovered while testing out a preview version, getting your favorite Windows programs to work involves an unfavorable roll of the dice.

  • Football Manager 2017 Released For Linux

    If you are a Linux gamer and our 13-way GPU comparison of Deus Ex: Mankind Divided made you realize your system isn't strong enough for this newest AAA Linux game title, perhaps you'll be interested in the just-released Football Manager 2017 with day-one Linux support.

  • WikiToLearn Reaches 1.0

    WikiToLearn is KDE's project to create textbooks for university and school students. It provides free, collaborative and accessible text books. Academics worldwide contribute in sharing knowledge by creating high quality content.

    One year after founding WikiToLearn, the love for sharing knowledge helped our community to grow stronger. During this year a lot of great things happened, but we also had to face some technical and organizational problems.

  • Qt 5.8 Beta Released

    I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.8 Beta is now released. Containing all-new configuration system, new graphics architecture with integrated Qt Quick 2D Renderer for devices without OpenGL, build in QML cache for improved startup and many other new features, Qt 5.8 will be a very interesting release. I hope many will take the Qt 5.8 Beta release, test it and provide feedback for us to complete Qt 5.8. For the big picture of the release, see the alpha release blog post.

  • Qt 5.8 Now In Beta Form

    Qt 5.8 Beta is now shipping with their new configuration system, their graphics changes for the Qt Quick 2D renderer, built-in QML cache, and much more. As covered previously, some of the other work includes an experimental Direct3D 12 back-end for Qt Quick, new Qt Quick Controls 2 additions, Qt WebEngine upgrades, Bluetooth Low Energy improvements, Qt Network improvements, embedded support improvements, and more. New modules for Qt 5.8 coming are the Qt Wayland Compositor, Qt SCXML, Qt Serial Bus, and new platform support is for Apple tvOS and watchOS. There are also technology previews of Qt Gamepad, Qt Speech, and Qt Network Authentication.

  • Searching in GNOME Software

    I’ve spent a few days profiling GNOME Software on ARM, mostly for curiosity but also to help our friends at Endless. I’ve merged a few patches that make the existing --profile code more useful to profile start up speed. Already there have been some big gains, over 200ms of startup time and 12Mb of RSS, but there’s plenty more that we want to fix to make GNOME Software run really nicely on resource constrained devices.

  • New Tumbleweed snapshot 20161102 released!
  • Tumbleweed brings Halloween Treats

    A new framework for desktop applications on Linux has been added to Tumbleweed and now users can enjoy the most up-to-date version of Flatpak.

    Flatpak 0.6.13 arrived in the 20161028 snapshot last week and complements another package updated in the snapshot; OSTree 2016.12, which is a tool that combines a “git-like” model for committing and downloading bootable filesystem trees, along with a layer for deploying them and managing the bootloader configuration.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20161103-1

    This month’s update falls onto a national holiday in Japan. My recent start as a normal company employee in Japan doesn’t leave me enough time during normal days to work on Debian, so things have to wait for holidays. There have been a few notable changes in the current packages, and above all I wanted to fix an RC bug and on the way fixed also several other (sometimes rather old) bugs.

  • Linux/Moose is loose: Analysis finds IoT botnet malware favors Instagram fraud

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • AWS releases Amazon Linux container image for use in on-premises data centers

    Amazon Web Services (AWS), a division of Amazon that offers cloud computing and storage services, today announced that it has released a container image of its Amazon Linux operating system — which has, until now, only been accessible on AWS virtual machine instances — that customers can now deploy on their own servers.

    Of course, other Linux distributions are available for use in companies’ on-premises data centers — CentOS, CoreOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Canonical’s Ubuntu, and so on. Now companies that are used to Amazon Linux in the cloud can work with it on-premises, too. It’s available from AWS’ EC2 Container Registry. Amazon Linux is not currently available for instant deployment on other public clouds, whether Oracle’s, Google’s, Microsoft’s, or IBM’s.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.30 LTS Fixes a Bug in 4.4.29 and Older Kernels, Update Now

    After informing the Linux community about the release and immediate availability of the Linux 4.8.6 kernel, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the Linux 4.4.29 LTS kernel.

    Linux kernel 4.4.29 LTS was a fairly normal maintenance update that brought changes to a total of 82 files, with 657 insertions and 358 deletions, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from Linux kernel 4.4.28 LTS announced a week ago. However, later that day Greg Kroah-Hartman bumped the version to 4.4.30, removing two patches that shouldn't have been applied in the first place.

  • Intel's Vulkan Linux Driver Gets ~30% Performance Boost, Now Faster Than OpenGL

    With our past Intel Vulkan benchmarks the Vulkan driver was slower than the mature OpenGL driver but this is about to change with an important patch-set published today: a big performance boost is in store.

  • Constraints (reprise)
  • What if Linux never existed?

    Linux has been around for a long time now, and many of us take it for granted as part of our everyday lives. But have you ever paused to consider what life would be like if Linux never existed? A writer at Network World recently explored this question based on some funny social media posts.

  • Linux Journal November 2016

    I like the idea of life hacking. I'm not sure it's a term that you'll find in the dictionary (although perhaps—dictionaries have some odd things in them now), but the idea of improving life by programmatically changing things is awesome. I think that might be why I'm such an open-source fan. When it's possible to change the things you don't like or improve on something just because you can, it makes computing far less mystical and far more enjoyable.

  • Hatchit: An open source game engine

    More students are learning about the world of open source through video games. Open source games like FreeCiv and Minetest invite young gamers to dig into the source code, while projects like SpigotMC empower them to write plugins to extend their favorite games.

    Unfortunately, the open source tools used to build games do not share the same prominence. Rochester Institute of Technology student Matt Guerrette hopes to help change that with Hatchit, his open source gaming engine.

  • Linux Appears To Lose Some Gaming Marketshare With Valve's October Stats

    With the start of a new month comes updated figures from Valve about their Steam hardware/software survey statistics.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Given Consensus Rating of “Buy” by Analysts
  • 2 Stocks Analyst-Opinion Need Close Attention: Red Hat (NYSE:RHT), Dell Technologies (NYSE:DVMT)
  • Hybrid Graphics and Fedora Workstation 25

    When we started the Fedora Workstation effort one thing we wanted to do was to drain the proverbial swamp of make sure that running Linux on a laptop is a first rate experience. As you see from my last blog entry we have been working on building a team dedicated to that task. There are many facets to this effort, but one that we kept getting asked about was sorting out hybrid graphics. So be aware that some of this has been covered in previous blog entries, but I want to be thorough here. So this blog will cover the big investments of time and effort we are putting into Wayland and X Windows, GNOME Shell and Nouveau (the open source driver for NVidia GPU hardware).

  • Debian developer completes 20 years with project

    The Debian GNU/Linux project is 23 years old and one of its developers has just completed two decades with the community Linux organisation.

    Steve McIntyre, who led the project in 2008 and 2009, joined Debian in 1996. He wrote that he had first installed Debian in late October that year, migrating over from his existing Slackware installation with the help of a friend. It took an entire weekend and he says he found it so painful that he thought of bailing out at many times.

  • Yippie Yak — New Ubuntu T-Shirt Is Now Available To Buy

    A brand new Ubuntu t-shirt is available to buy from the Canonical store bearing the official mascot emblem of Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak.

  • Adlink bakes Apollo Lake into four modules and a Mini-ITX board

    Adlink announced four modules, in SMARC 2.0, Qseven, and COM Express Compact format, plus a Mini-ITX board — all based on Intel’s 14nm “Apollo Lake” SoCs.

    Adlink has rolled out the most comprehensive range of products yet supporting Intel’s 14nm-fabricated Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs. Like rival Congatec’s Apollo Lake roll-out, the Adlink announcement includes one of the first modules supporting the new SMARC 2.0 COM form factor, as well as a COM Express Compact Type 6 module. There’s also a COM Express Mini Type 10 module, a Qseven COM, and a thin Mini-ITX SBC.

  • Security Blogger Identifies Next IoT Vulnerability, This Time on Linux OS [Ed: not Linux is the problem here but bad developers of devices]

    Recommendations for mitigation include turning off global telnet open services and not using known vulnerable usernames or passwords. If a device is infected (or you’re not sure if it is), this can be removed by rebooting the infected devices, the post said. Of course it will then have to be secured against the intrusion, or it will be re-infected.

  • Top GCHQ director calls security industry "witchcraft"

    The National Cyber Security Center's technical director Ian Levy has slammed commonly-accepted cyber security advice, equating the security industry to "witchcraft" and accusing it of deliberately creating unnecessary fear around cyber threats.

    Speaking at Future Decoded 2016, Microsoft's annual digital transformation conference, Levy argued that cyber security is not transparent and that the industry is "blaming the user for designing the system wrong".

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Foundation launches online devops course in move to increase experience

    The online course focused on devops follows the Linux Foundation’s work earlier this year on online classes targeting OpenStack

    The development and operations model is quickly becoming a central focus for companies looking to take advantage of software and information technology in order to increase agility and streamline operations using devops. However, there appears to be a shortfall in terms of qualified employees.

  • Linux Lite 3.2 Released with a Focus on Security, Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS

    A day early than expected, the final release of the Linux Lite 3.2 Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution has been officially announced today, October 31, 2016, by developer Jerry Bezencon.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and shipping with the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, Linux Lite 3.2 arrives today with a focus on security, as the developer implemented support for fetching the latest Linux kernel security updated as soon as they become available in the repositories. These will be distributed to users via the Install Updates tool.

  • Open Labs Fedora Meetup #5 - Event Report
  • Twenty years...

    So, it's now been twenty years since I became a Debian Developer. I couldn't remember the exact date I signed up, but I decided to do some forensics to find out. First, I can check on the dates on my first Debian system, as I've kept it running as a Debian system ever since!

  • Ubuntu versus Linux Mint: Which one is better?

    Ubuntu and Linux Mint are two of the best known desktop distributions around. Both are extremely popular with Linux users, but which one is better? Since each of these distributions has much to offer it can be difficult to choose between them. Fortunately, a writer at Linux and Ubuntu has a helpful comparison between Linux Mint and Ubuntu.

  • Sub-$100 maker board packs Apollo Lake SoC, 4K video, dual GbE

    Aaeon’s “Up Squared” hacker SBC offers dual- or quad-core Intel Apollo Lake SoCs, plus up to 8GB RAM, SATA, dual HDMI, 4K video, dual GbE, mini-PCIe, and more.

    Aaeon Europe has launched a Kickstarter project for a follow-up to its x86-based “Up” hacker board. If it shipped today instead of its April 2017 due date, the “Up2” (or “Up Squared”) would be the most powerful hacker-friendly single board computer around. The SBC features the new 14nm-fabricated Intel Apollo Lake system-on-chips, and offers a feature set that is rare even on high end hacker boards.

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Red Hat News

  • Improving Storage Performance with Ceph and Flash
    Ceph is a storage system designed to be used at scale, with clusters of Ceph in deployment in excess of 40 petabytes today. At LinuxCon Europe, Allen Samuels, Engineering Fellow at Western Digital, says that Ceph has been proven to scale out reasonably well. Samuels says, “the most important thing that a storage management system does in the clustered world is to give you availability and durability,” and much of the technology in Ceph focuses on controlling the availability and the durability of your data. In his presentation, Samuels talks not just about some of the performance advantages to deploying Ceph on Flash, but he also goes into detail about what they are doing to optimize Ceph in future releases.
  • Ceph and Flash by Allen Samuels, Western Digital
  • Red Hat Opens Up OpenShift Dedicated to Google Cloud Platform
    When businesses and enterprises begin adopting data center platforms that utilize containerization, then and only then can we finally say that the container trend is sweeping the planet. Red Hat’s starter option for containerization platforms is OpenShift Dedicated — a public cloud-based, mostly preconfigured solution, which launched at this time last year on Amazon AWS.
  • Volatility Numbers in View for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Rhizome is working on an open-source tool to help archive digital content
    "The stability of this kind of easy archiving for document storage, review and revision is a great possibility, but the workflow for journalists is very specific, so the grant will allow us to figure out how it could function." Another feature of Webrecorder that journalists might find appealing, and one of the software's core purposes, is to preserve material that might be deleted or become unavailable in time. However, the tool is currently operated under a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) Takedown policy. This means any individual can ask for a record of their web presence or materials to be removed, so Rhizome will be working to "answer the more complicated questions and figure out policies" around privacy and copyright with the latest round of funding.
  • An ode to releasing software
    There is one particular moment in every Free and Open Source Software project: it’s the time when the software is about to get released. The software has been totally frozen of course, QA tests have been made, all the lights are green; the website still needs to be updated with the release notes, perhaps some new content and of course the stable builds have to be uploaded. The release time is always a special one. The very day of the release, there is some excitement and often a bit of stress. The release manager(s), as well as everyone working on the project’s infrastructure are busy making sure everything is ready when the upload of the stable version of the software, binaries and source, has been completed. In many cases, some attention is paid to the main project’s mirror servers so that the downloads are fluid and work (mostly) flawlessly as soon as the release has been pushed and published.
  • Diversity Scholarship Series: My Time at CloudNativeCon 2016
    CloudNativeCon 2016 was a wonderful first conference for me and although the whirlwind of a conference is tiring, I left feeling motivated and inspired. The conference made me feel like I was a part of the community and technology I have been working with daily.
  • WordPress 4.7 Content Management System Provides New Design Options
    WordPress is among the most widely used open-source technologies in the world, powering more than 70 million websites. WordPress 4.7 was released Dec. 6, providing a new milestone update including new features for both users and developers. As is typically the case with new WordPress releases, there is also a new default theme in the 4.7 update. The 2017 theme provides users with a number of interesting attributes including the large feature image as well as the ability to have a video as part of the header image. The Theme Customizer feature enables users to more intuitively adjust various elements of a theme, to fit the needs of websites that use will upgrade to WordPress 4.7. In addition, the new custom CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) feature within a theme preview lets users quickly see how style changes will change the look of a site. As an open-source project, WordPress benefits from participation of independent contributors and for the 4.7 release there were 482 contributors. In this slideshow eWEEK takes a look at some of the highlights of the WordPress 4.7 release.
  • Psychology Professor Releases Free, Open-Source, Preprint Software
    The Center for Open Science, directed by University of Virginia psychology professor Brian Nosek, has launched three new services to more quickly share research data as the center continues its mission to press for openness, integrity and reproducibility of scientific research. Typically, researchers send preprint manuscripts detailing their research findings to peer-reviewed academic journals, such as Nature and Science. The review process can take months or even years before publication – if the research is published at all. By contrast, “preprinting,” or sharing non-peer-reviewed research results online, enables crucial data to get out to the community the moment it is completed. That, said Nosek, is critical.
  • Integral Ad Science Launches Open Source SDK to Drive Mobile Innovation for the Advertising Industry
  • Tullett Prebon Information, Quaternion and Columbia University form open source risk collaboration
  • Tullett Prebon Information And Quaternion Risk Management Partner To Enhance Transparency And Standardisation In Risk Modelling – Partnership Fuels Columbia University Research To Improve Understanding Of Systemic Risk
  • Integral Ad Science Partners with Google, Others for Open Source Viewability
  • DoomRL creator makes free roguelike open-source to try and counter Zenimax legal threat
  • DoomRL Goes Open-Source in Face of Copyright Claims
    Earlier this week, ZeniMax Medi hit DoomRL, a popular roguelike version of the original first-person shooter, with a cease-and-desist order. This order instructed producer ChaosForge to remove the free downloadable game to prevent further legal action. Instead of taking it down, co-creator Kornel Kisielewicz turned the game open-source.
  • This Indian software company just partnered with the world’s biggest open source community
    In what can be called a major motivation for Indian tech firms, Amrut Software, an end-to-end Software, BPO services and solutions provider has become a GitHub distributor for India region. GitHub hosts world’s biggest open source community along with the most popular version control systems, configuration management and collaboration tools for software developers. It has some of the largest installations of repositories in the world.
  • Python 3.6 released with many new improvements and features
    Python,the high-level interpreted programming language is now one of the most preferred programming language by beginners and professional-level developers.So,here Python 3.6 is now available with many changes,improvements and of course the ease of Python was not left in the work list.

Security Leftovers