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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Singularity 2.0 Software Makes Linux Applications More Portable

    Singularity containers are designed to be as portable as possible, spanning many flavors and vintages of Linux. The only known i86 limitation is the version of Linux running on the host. Singularity has been ported to distributions going as far back as RHEL 5 (and compatibles) and works on all flavors of Debian, Gentoo and Slackware. Within the container, there are almost no limitations aside from basic binary compatibility.

  • Microsoft's Deceptive Tactics Push Customers to Mac, Linux

    Over the past few months, Microsoft has maintained a course that continues to anger and alienate users. Having converted the Windows operating system into a suite of spyware tools designed to harvest users’ data through recommended updates that it has forced on users, the Redmond giant has given many of those users reason to abandon Windows for another operating system. As Windows continues to lose users, Microsoft — rather than adjust course —has instead ramped up the very tactics that angered users in the first place.

    Last summer, Microsoft announced that anyone currently running Windows 7, 8, or 8.1 would be able to upgrade to the new and “improved” Windows 10 for free. Many wondered why the company would give away licenses to use the new operating system, especially considering that in the past users have paid good money to purchase new iterations of Windows. Within days of the release of Windows 10, the reason was clear: greater data-mining opportunities. The entire operating system is designed to harvest users’ data for Microsoft’s financial gain.

  • Kenji Eno’s D Now Available on GOG for PC, Mac, and Linux
  • Ruling stocks in today’s market: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Canonical OTA-11 Ubuntu Smartphones Update Transforms Meizu Pro 5 Into A Pocket Desktop PC (video)

    If you are looking for a way to transform your Ubuntu smartphone into a pocket desktop PC you might be interested in a new update which is being rolled out by Canonical this week in the form of the Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 Update.

  • Monthly News – May 2016

    Thank you all for your donations and for your support. We’ve received a lot of help in preparation for the next release.

  • Hackers Find Bugs, Extort Ransom and Call it a Public Service

    Crooks breaking into enterprise networks are holding data they steal for ransom under the guise they are doing the company a favor by exposing a flaw. The criminal act is described as bug poaching by IBM researchers and is becoming a growing new threat to businesses vulnerable to attacks.

    According to IBM’s X-Force researchers, the new tactic it is a variation on ransomware. In the case of bug poaching, hackers are extorting companies for as much as $30,000 in exchange for details on how hackers broke into their network and stole data. More conventional ransomware attacks, also growing in number, simply encrypt data and demand payment for a decryption key.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to fix any Linux problem

    Everyone has a problem with Linux at some point. The important thing is how quickly that problem gets solved. An amazing element of the open source and computing community is the vast network of help available online in the form of blogs, websites and forums.

    Without doubt this is of huge importance in getting issues known and fixed, and it's wonderful to see how willing the community is to help out complete strangers and beginners alike. That being said, there's nothing that beats a bit of prior knowledge.

    To help arm you with the knowledge you need to keep your Linux systems cheerfully ticking over, we've taken our years of experience answering all manner of reader questions and distilled this into a rich brew of condensed Linux knowledge, which will target the top issues that Linux users regularly run into.

  • Windows 10 nagware: You can't click X. Make a date OR ELSE

    Microsoft’s Windows 10 nagware campaign has entered a new phase, with all options to evade or escape an upgrade finally blocked.

    Recently, Microsoft’s policy had been to throw up a dialogue box asking you whether you wanted to install Windows 10.

    If you clicked the red “X” to close the box – the tried-and-tested way to make dialogue boxes vanish without agreeing to do anything – Microsoft began taking that as permission for the upgrade to go ahead.

  • Samsung: “Don’t Install Windows 10 Because We Suck At Making Drivers”
  • New CoreOS open source storage system Torus fails to impress

    CoreOS has released a prototype version of Torus, an open source distributed storage system primarily intended for providing storage to container clusters.

  • Containers 101: Docker fundamentals

    Docker started out in 2012 as an open source project, originally named dotcloud, to build single-application Linux containers. Since then, Docker has become an immensely popular development tool, increasingly used as a runtime environment. Few -- if any -- technologies have caught on with developers as quickly as Docker.

    One reason Docker is so popular is that it delivers the promise of “develop once, run anywhere.” Docker offers a simple way to package an application and its runtime dependencies into a single container; it also provides a runtime abstraction that enables the container to run across different versions of the Linux kernel.

  • Infographic: Companies want flexibility and faster production time from software defined networking. And they get it.

    Results from the latest Tech Pro Research survey reveal why companies are choosing to implement SDN, why they're choosing not to, and what happens after the implementation is done.

  • The rise of SDDC and the future of enterprise IT

    If you've worked in enterprise IT over the last few years, you'll undoubtedly have heard the phrase 'software defined' being bandied around. Whereas software once merely played a support role to the hardware on which it was running, cloud and virtualization technologies have now moved software into the spotlight, with hardware now playing second fiddle.

  • deepin 15.2 Screenshot Tour
  • Arch Linux 2016.06.01 Released, Download The Most Customizable Linux Distro Here

    Arch Linux, one of the most customizable Linux distros around, is here with the latest Arch Linux 2016.06.01 release. This monthly ISO respin is powered by Linux kernel 4.5.4 and includes all the changes made since May 1, 2016. The existing Arch users need to simply execute “sudo pacman -Syu” to update their Arch Linux installation.

  • How is that 10 Dollar iPhone (clone) Prediction Coming, for 2020? Lets do an update

    So I applied Moore's Law. Moore's Law is a computer science law that says, that every 18 months the amount of microprocessors that can be squeezed onto the same space of a silicon chip will double. So in effect, computing power doubles every 18 months. The corollary to the law says, to get the SAME computing power, every 18 months, the COST of producing the same computing power will be cut in half. And if we start from 600 dollars in the summer of 2010, then cut it in half in 18 months, by Christmas of 2011, there should be an equivalent smartphone costing 300 dollars, and 18 months later, by the summer of 2013, one should exist for 150 dollars etc. You see how this goes. I am looking for specs of 5mp camera, 3.5 inch touch screen, smartphone, on 3G, WiFi, with GPS (and an LED flash for the camera). If you've seen me speak in the past 6 years, you've seen this slide and my latest update of where we are:

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers

    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.

  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library

    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements.

    The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.

  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code

    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.

  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid

    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.

  • vcswatch is now looking for tags

    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories.

    Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • What is Linux?
  • The Rumors Aren’t True

    I was listening to my usual round of amazing Linux Podcasts this week (you know who you are) and one of the discussions that made the rounds was about hardware compatibility issues with Linux. One of the hosts was bemoaning the issues with running linux on a repurposed MacBook and trying to get the wireless drivers to work. That led to a discussion about proprietary vs. non-proprietary drivers and you can pretty much guess how the conversation went from there.

  • Download Linux Voice issue 19

    Issue 19 of Linux Voice is nine months old, so we’re releasing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA license. You can share and modify all content from the magazine (apart from adverts), providing you credit Linux Voice as the original source and retain the same license.

  • LabXNow – Code, Develop, and Test Software From Anywhere on the Cloud

    LabXNow is a cloud service provider that offers a free and personal online environment to different users with direct access from a web browser. You can think of it as your personal remote lab, where you can play around, code, develop or whatever you want. You can access it from anywhere with an Internet connection.

  • BoilingSteam has a nice podcast episode with the creator of SteamOS tools
  • Please, Don’t Touch Anything now supports Linux, don't you dare touch that button

    You all just want to buy it so you can press the button don't you? I know I do. Please, Don’t Touch Anything is now officially available on Linux with a nice discount.

  • Meet KDE Neon, A New Linux Distro Based on Ubuntu Linux

    KDE Neon is the latest and probably the best technology the KDE Community has developed, and I stand to be corrected if it is not so. You can call it a new Linux distro but KDE Neon is basically built comprehensively on Ubuntu Linux as the core, to bring the latest and hottest software developed by the KDE Community in a rolling release format to KDE desktop environment users.

    The KDE Neon project is intended to provide users cutting-edge features on a highly configurable and yet stable desktop in a single package. The packages made in KDE Neon are based on Ubuntu and are not compatible with other Linux distros such as Arch Linux and OpenSUSE as stated by Jonathan Riddell, one of the project heads and who was previously in charge of the Kubuntu Linux project.

  • Do you like Windows 10 Look but Love LINUX? Here are Windows 10 GTK Themes for you!

    Many people liked the Interface of Windows 10 because now it carries all those features which Linux already have from years. Do you like the look of Windows 10 but don't want to use it? Here we brought Windows 10 GTK themes for you, this theme offers two versions Light and Dark, you can use whatever you like. But hold on, now many people will say like 'why you are so obsessed by other operating systems and so, Linux is great OS', yeah I do agree that many geeks consider Linux above all operating systems. The superiority of the Linux shows that you can do whatever you like to do with your OS, change look/design and so, that's called freedom. We should appreciate new comers to Linux instead of letting them down, and people leave Linux because they think it is quite difficult to survive with this OS.

  • Manjaro Update 2016-05-22 (stable)

    We are happy to announce our first update for Manjaro 16.06-rc1 (Daniella)!

  • Hackfest 1.2 (Day 2)

    Welcome to Day 2 of the Solus Hackfest 1.2!

  • This Week in Solus – Install #29
  • Unixstickers Gives Back to FOSS Projects
  • Chalet OS 16.04LTS
  • ChaletOS 16.04 - See What's New
  • New Gentoo LiveDVD "Choice Edition"
  • Chromium 51 packages available
  • Debian: Outreachy, Debian Reproducible builds Week 1 Progress Report
  • Puppet 4 uploaded to Debian unstable

    Puppet 4 has been uploaded to Debian unstable. This is a major upgrade from Puppet 3.

    If you are using Puppet, chances are that it is handling important bits of your infrastructure, and you should upgrade with care.

    Here are some points to consider.

  • Pocket CHIP $49 Indie Game Console

    Last year, we were impressed by Next Thing Co's $9 CHIP computer. At Maker Faire 2016, we were able to check out their PocketCHIP housing, which puts CHIP into a portable console package that runs Linux and indie game console Pico-8. Here's what you can do with the $49 system!

  • Finnish Govt Disappointed with Microsoft’s Job Cuts, Says They Impact Economy

    Microsoft has recently announced a new round of job layoffs at its Mobile unit in Finland, as it moves forward with its restructuring and reorganization plan following the acquisition of Nokia’s Devices and Services unit.

  • The Nokia Saga Predictions on This Blog: Full Listing with Links[Ed: Microsoft killed Nokia]

    So lets understand the context of when Elop came in. Nokia in 2009 sold 67.8 million smartphones globally (with 39% market share). This was a world record obivously and Nokia set record profits in its smartphone unit. In 2010 Nokia then grew 35.8 million new smartphone sales (growth rate of 53% !!!!). Nokia from 2009 to 2010 grew MORE than Apple even thought Apple released its most popular new iPhone model ever, the iPhone 4. Apple grew 22.4 million units but Nokia grew more, Nokia grew 35.8 million new smartphones. Very literally mathematically irrevocably true - Nokia was WINNING against Apple iPhone in 2010. Nokia GREW MORE than Apple with its MOST iconic new smartphone. The GAP between Nokia and Apple was NOT CLOSING, it was GROWING. Nokia was PULLING AWAY from Apple in 2010. Look at the numbers side-by-side...

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • FLOSS Weekly 389: Best Practices Badge
  • OpenGL 4.5 For The Intel Mesa Driver May Be Imminent

    Intel has been rapidly advancing their OpenGL 4.x support and OpenGL 4.5 is even in sight now.

    Kristian Høgsberg today landed GL_KHR_robustness support in the i965 DRI driver, a requirement for OpenGL 4.5.

  • Shotwell vs. digiKam

    How to manage your photos? – That is probably the biggest question for anyone doing anything with a photo camera. As resolutions of cameras grow, the data we have to manage is growing ever. In my case I am talking about more than 50000 photos and videos measuring up to about 200Gb of disk space, constantly growing. There are several photo management softwares out there, I guess the most commonly used ones are Shotwell for the Gnome desktop, digiKam for the KDE world, and FotoXX. I have not used Shotwell and digiKam for quite some time, and collect here my experiences of strength and weaknesses of the two programs. FotoXX seems to be very powerful, too, but I haven’t tested it till now.

  • Tweet your database with db2twitter

    db2twitter is developed by and run for LinuxJobs.fr, the job board of th french-speaking Free Software and Opensource community.

  • Tiny Core Linux 7.1 Screenshot Tour
  • Annoying myths about Linux that won't go away

    Linux has been around for many years, and has gotten better and better as time has gone by. Yet there are some enduring, inaccurate, and annoying myths about Linux that persist to this day.

    A Linux redditor started a thread about Linux myths and got some interesting responses from his fellow Linux users:

  • GStreamer Spring Hackfest 2016

    After missing the last few GStreamer hackfests I finally managed to attend this time. It was held in Thessaloniki, Greece’s second largest city. The city is located by the sea side and the entire hackfest and related activities were either directly by the sea or just a couple blocks away.

  • My talk at OSDC 2016: Continuous Integration in Data Centers – Further 3 Years Later
  • Isenkram with PackageKit support - new version 0.23 available in Debian unstable

    The isenkram system is a user-focused solution in Debian for handling hardware related packages. The idea is to have a database of mappings between hardware and packages, and pop up a dialog suggesting for the user to install the packages to use a given hardware dongle. Some use cases are when you insert a Yubikey, it proposes to install the software needed to control it; when you insert a braille reader list it proposes to install the packages needed to send text to the reader; and when you insert a ColorHug screen calibrator it suggests to install the driver for it. The system work well, and even have a few command line tools to install firmware packages and packages for the hardware already in the machine (as opposed to hotpluggable hardware).

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu specs and features

    Canonical's Meizu line of smartphones may not mean a lot to UK readers, but the Pro 5 should help to raise its profile.

    Unlike its competitors the Meizu Pro 5 runs the Ubuntu operating system. This approach means it relies less on apps and more on an integrated experience.

    It's just as powerful as the Samsung Galaxy S6, but does that mean it's worth your cash?

  • What containers and unikernels can learn from Arduino and Raspberry Pi

    Currently, unikernels seem quite similar to building printed circuits. They require a lot of upfront investment to utilize and are very specialized, providing benefits for certain workloads. In the meantime containers are quite interesting even for conventional workloads and don't require as much investment. Typically an operations team should be able to port an application to containers, whereas it takes real re-engineering to port an application to unikernels and the industry is still not quite sure what workloads can be ported to unikernels.

  • Coming soon! First ever certification for open hardware

    At the Summit, OSHWA will launch the first ever (version 1) of the open source hardware certification, administered by OSHWA. This certification is designed to benefit at least two parts of the open source hardware community.

    First, it benefits purchasers of open source hardware by making it easy to identify truly open source hardware in the marketplace. Projects and products obtaining certification and displaying the certification logo clearly communicate a commonly agreed upon definition of openness with customers and users. While certification is not a condition for openness, obtaining certification is a way to make it clear to others that a given project is open source hardware.

  • 3 alternatives to resumes for hiring talent

    By 2020, there will be 1.4 million new computer science jobs but only 400,000 computer science students. The number of computer science jobs is growing twice as fast as the national average for job growth. Hiring is not a filtering problem anymore, it's a sourcing problem. We need to "sell" our companies and hire the most qualified people before our competitors do.

  • Open-source blueprint Pepperoni released for mobile development

    Named Pepperoni, the development team behind this open-source project has been working for more than 10 months trying to build apps and learning the best ways to do it using React Native. The company powering Pepperoni is Futurice, a software consulting company that creates digital services for its customers. Futurice is also behind the open-source social impact Spice Program, where it serves as advocate of open-source projects.

  • Install GrandCMS on an Ubuntu VPS
  • Install GLPI (IT and asset Managemet Software) on Ubuntu 16.04 Server
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