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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Purism announces the creation of its Advisory Board

    Purism is pleased to announce the creation of its Advisory Board, comprised of top-tier experts from the Free Software community: Kyle Rankin, Matthew Garrett, Aaron Grattafiori, and Stefano Zacchiroli. Together, they bring their vision—with decades of experience in cybersecurity, privacy protection, and digital freedom—to Purism’s product development, as the company continues to create products that finally address privacy and digital rights by default, rights that 86% of computer users cite as a concern.

  • Microsoft made 'em do it: The latest Kaby Lake, Zen chips will support only Windows 10
  • Linux Journal September 2016
  • September 2016 Video Preview
  • IBM links Blockchain with AI in new Industry Platforms business unit

    IBM has underscored how seriously its taking Blockchain technology with the creation of a new business unit centered around it. The new business, called Industry Platforms, will be led by Global Business Services chief, Bridget van Kralingen.

    IBM’s entire blockchain leadership team will transition to the new business, which was first announced last year.

    As well as working on Blockchain technology, the Industry Platforms business will also work to promote its Watson artificial intelligence platform in the financial services sector.

    “The Industry Platforms business will bring clients radically optimized processes and marketplaces that leverage Watson, IBM Cloud, IBM Systems, blockchain, deep domain expertise and ecosystems of partners and developers,” said IBM CEO Ginni Rometty.

  • Habitat: Automating Applications, Minus Platform and Infrastructure Hassles

    Remember the days when technology platforms sat in silos and our fierce allegiance to them did too? “We’re a Mac shop,” admins would announce. “We’re all in on Windows,” another might say.

    Those days are quickly fading, along with the barriers that used to separate platform and infrastructure technologies. Instead, we are moving toward a world of containers, multiple instances of virtual machines, and multiple operating systems working in tandem. This is especially true in data centers, and open source tools are helping to drive the trend.

    There is a pronounced need for ways to run applications on multiple types of infrastructure, ranging from bare metal to virtual machines to containers to the cloud. That’s where Habitat comes in. It’s an open source project focused on “automation that travels with the application.” It has pedigree, too. Habitat comes from the makers of the venerable configuration management and automation platform Chef, which, like Puppet, has helped to optimize many heterogeneous technology environments.

  • KDE Arrives in Berlin, Elects Thomas Pfeiffer to the e.V. Board

    Today KDE has been arriving in Berlin for Akademy, our annual meeting, which is year is part of the larger QtCon conference. This year we are teaming up with KDAB to gather together with the wider community of Qt developers for the first time, which is a major opportunity to share experiences between the open source and the commercial worlds. Also at the gathering are the VLC developers. VLC is one of the most successful open source projects successfully reaching out to users on all platforms and is a project we have long cooperated with. And the Free Software Foundation Europe will be brining the important political edge to our talks.

  • Kubuntu-16.04 and updates

    I installed kubuntu-16.04 in April. Although I don’t use it much, I occasionally boot into it to check a few things. Whenever I booted into Kubuntu, I looked to see if the update applet was notifying me of updates. I left the system running for an hour or more, to give it plenty of time to find out.s

  • GTK Developers Continue Firming Up Their Long-Term Toolkit Plans

    Earlier this summer at a hackfest of GTK+ developers they came up with a plan for GTK4 and beyond with reworking how they'll do long-term stable releases. With GNOME/GTK+ 3.22 approaching, they are firming up their plans.

    Being published today via the GTK+ blog is Versioning and long term stability promise in GTK+. Hit that up if you want all the details about it.

  • Nautilus 3.22 Adds Batch File Renaming, Native Compression Features

    There are plenty of new and improved features to enjoy in Nautilus 3.22, which is on course to ship as part of GNOME 3.22 late next month.

  • Tumbleweed Enhances Encryption, has Massive Updates

    openSUSE users are at no loss for getting new software as this week the rolling distribution Tumbleweed had several snapshot releases and there was a beta release for openSUSE Leap 42.2.

    openSUSE’s rolling distribution Tumbleweed, which was originally created by Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, had six snapshots two weeks ago and four last week. This week we will look at another six snapshots.

  • Red Hat Takes Aim at VMware With RHV

    Although VMware and Red Hat might have seemed to be best buddies at last week's LinuxCon, this week it's become obvious that Red Hat is locked and loaded and has VMware in its sites. During a week when the suits at the virtualization company would doubtlessly like attention focused on Las Vegas and its VMWorld 2016 users' conference, Red Hat has been stealing the headlines on just about every major tech site with news of its own virtualization products.

  • Crash test dummy? Love the excitement of breaking an OS? Fedora 25 Alpha has landed

    If you're a chronic complainer and nit-picker with a spare machine and a willingness to suffer multiple crashes, weird screen artefacts and possible data loss: Fedora 25's alpha has landed ahead of its anticipated November 2016 release.

    If you want to help the developers by breaking stuff, don't risk dual-boot on OS X if you've got live data, because this known bug is a treat:

    “The installer appears to support volume shrink for OS X volumes (Apple Core Storage) by offering a Shrink button and sizing slider in Automatic partitioning; and likewise allow numeric resizing in Manual partitioning. However, setting the installer to resize these volumes and proceeding with installation will result in complete data loss of the volume. Resize the volume in OS X's Disk Utility to create free space before proceeding with the installation of Fedora.”

  • Linaro Announces First Development Board Compliant with 96Boards TV Platform Specification

    Linaro Ltd, the collaborative engineering organization developing open source software for the ARM® architecture, today announced support for the HiSilicon ‘Poplar’ board – the first development board compliant with the 96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform specification. The board is the latest addition to the 96Boards family, the open specification defining a platform for the delivery of low-cost 32-bit and 64-bit ARM ecosystem developer boards. It is available to purchase for under $100 from Tocoding Technologies.

  • HiSilicon's Poplar Is The First Linaro 96Boards EE TV Platform

    Linaro has announced the first development board that supports their 96Boards' Enterprise Edition TV Platform specification.

    The HiSilicon Poplar development board is their first TV Platform compliant product and targets set-top box developers and hobbyists. The Poplar dev board is powered by a Hi3798C V200 SoC that packs in a quad-core 64-bit Cortex-A53 processor and Mali T720 for graphics. The Poplar board costs $79 USD or closer to $100 when factoring in shipping.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Bill Pollock Publishes Books About Linux and Open Source

    Meet Bill Pollock, founder, CEO and chief editor of No Starch Press, who loves to put out books about Linux and Open Source for reasons he explains in the interview. But No Starch also publishes books about Legos, security, and a lot of other, seemingly unrelated topics that fall at least broadly under the “geek interest” label. Interested in hacking cars, teaching electronics to kids or showing an older friend or relative how to use Facebook? No Starch has you covered. Want to write a book? Pollock doesn’t publish a lot of titles, but you never know. He’s open to almost anything interesting about Linux and Open Source — and interested, if less so (for reasons he explains in the interview) in titles about proprietary software. FYI, Pollock is a Linux user himself, and does most of his editing with LibreOffice, so he has unimpeachable personal Open Source credentials.

  • Multiload-ng 1.2.0 Released With Color Schemes Support, More

    Multiload-ng, a graphical system monitor for Xfce, LXDE, and MATE panels, was updated to version 1.2.0 recently, getting color schemes support, a redesigned preferences window, and more.

  • Installing BlackArch Linux on a Raspberry Pi
  • Jarvis, Please Lock the Front Door
  • Jose Dieguez Castro's Introduction to Linux Distros (Apress)
  • Some Quick Basic Gaming Tests With Wine/Wine-Staging vs. Linux vs. Windows

    With having just wrapped up the Windows 10 vs. Linux Radeon Software Performance benchmarking roundabout, I decided to run some very quick tests with Wine and Wine-Staging while gauging interest to run a larger Wine comparison.

    After finishing up the AMD tests for the multi-OS/driver comparison, I installed Wine 1.9.17 followed by Wine-Staging 1.9.17 on the Ubuntu system while using the latest open-source Radeon driver (Linux 4.8 + Mesa 12.1-dev) and carried out some basic tests. Of the games I ran for the earlier article, I just chose The Talos Principle and Tomb Raider for now to gauge interest and because they ran cleanly out-of-the-box with Steam on Wine without having to deal with any hacks or extra steps... Tests were done with the Radeon R9 Fury.

  • Enlightenment 0.21.2 Desktop Environment Adds Wayland Support for EFL 1.18.0

    A new maintenance update of the lightweight Enlightenment open-source desktop environment has been released recently for Linux kernel-based operating systems, namely version 0.21.2.

    As you might have already guessed, Enlightenment 0.21.2 is the second point release in the stable 0.21 series of the graphical desktop environment used in various GNU/Linux distributions, and it promises to address more than 30 reported issues, but also to add various much-needed improvements to keep it stable and reliable. All the details about the new changes are available for your reading pleasure at the end of the article.

  • Fedora 25 Alpha Linux distro now available
  • First draft Norwegian Bokmål edition of The Debian Administrator's Handbook now public
  • My work for Debian in August
  • DANE and DNSSEC Monitoring

    At this year's FrOSCon I repeted my presentation on DNSSEC. In the audience, there was the suggestion of a lack of proper monitoring plugins for a DANE and DNSSEC infrastructure that was easily available. As I already had some personal tools around and some spare time to burn I've just started a repository with some useful tools. It's available on my website and has mirrors on Gitlab and Github. I intent to keep this repository up-to-date with my personal requirements (which also means adding a xmpp check soon) and am happy to take any contributions (either by mail or as "pull requests" on one of the two mirrors). It currently has smtp (both ssmtp and starttls) and https support as well as support for checking valid DNSSEC configuration of a zone.

  • Next-gen TV STB platform runs Android on quad-core Cortex-A53

    The “Poplar Board,” based on HiSilicon’s quad-core Hi3798C V200 SoC, is the first SBC to implement Linaro’s “96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform” spec.

    The “under $100” Poplar Board is aimed primarily at Internet connected TV set-top box (STB) developers, but it also targets hobbyists and the open-source community, according to HiSilicon’s announcement. The SBC, which is the first to adopt Linaro’s “96Boards Enterprise Edition TV Platform” form-factor specifications, was developed for use in “Digital Home applications including Digital TV and Set Top Boxes,” says HiSilicon.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Romp Home with these 21 Peerless ASCII Games

    Linux has a raft of open source games. The vast majority of these games are atheistically pleasing. Popular games often have full motion video, vector graphics, 3D graphics, realistic 3D rendering, animation, texturing, a physics engine, and much more. Computer graphics have been advancing at a staggering pace. At the current rate of progress, in the next 10 years it may not be possible to distinguish computer graphics from reality.

    Early computer games did not have these graphic techniques. The earliest video games were text games or text-based games that used text characters rather than vector or bitmapped graphics.

    Text-based games are often forgotten and neglected. However, there are many ASCII gems out there waiting to be explored which are immensely addictive and great fun to play. The developers' works featured in this article focus on content and fun gameplay.

  • GNOME's Mutter 3.21.91 Brings Wayland Improvements

    Florian Müllner announced the release today of Mutter 3.21.91, the near-final version of this compositing window manager and Wayland compositor for the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop.

  • Red Hat CEO: Taking Open Source Beyond the Data Center

    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst spoke at LinuxCon last week, he hardly mentioned RHEL or the company's stack. Instead, he focused almost entirely on Linux in general and the open source development model in particular. This wasn't a surprise, as there probably isn't an organization on the planet with a deeper understanding of open source methodology and its potential. It's how it built free software into a $2 billion business.

    Most people familiar with Red Hat know the company's broader vision for open source -- sometimes referred to as "the open source way" -- goes beyond software, so it also wasn't much of a surprise when Whitehurst's talk strayed from data centers and workstations and into areas not normally associated with IT at all.

  • Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open For Entries

    Doors have opened on the Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest.

    Few desktop operating systems offer amateur and professional illustrators, photographers and graphic designers the chance to have their artwork seen by millions of people around the world.

    But then, Ubuntu isn’t your average operating system!

  • Compact, rugged Skylake computer-on-module is big on PCIe

    Kontron’s Linux-ready “COMe-cSL6” COM Express Compact Type 6 module offers 10 PCIe lanes, up to 24GB RAM and 32GB eMMC, and industrial temperature support.

  • Credit card-sized module runs Linux on Braswell

    Axiomtek’s credit card-sized “CEM300” module runs Linux on Intel Braswell SoCs at 4-6W TDP and offers HD graphics, dual SATA III ports, and four PCIe lanes.

    Like Axiomtek’s Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CEM846 computer-on-module, its new CEM300 supports Linux and Windows, and uses the 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini form factor. The CEM300 advances to 14nm Intel Braswell SoCs, which offer much improved Intel HD Graphics Gen8, while reducing TDPs to a 4W to 6W range. Supported models include the quad-core 1.6GHz (2.4GHz burst) Pentium N3700, the quad-core Celeron N3160, and the dual-core Celeron N3060.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • BSODs at scale: we laugh at your puny five storeys, here's our SIX storey #fail

    It's an easy drive-by troll, isn't it? Last week, we asked readers to top the five-storey Blue Screen of Death spotted in Thailand, and examples big and small flooded the inbox.

    Manchester Piccadilly Station is either vying for the crown with last week's entry, or perhaps it's a display from the same maker. Thanks to James for catching this shot from 2013.

  • Monitoring of Monitoring

    I was recently asked to get data from a computer that controlled security cameras after a crime had been committed. Due to the potential issues I refused to collect the computer and insisted on performing the work at the office of the company in question. Hard drives are vulnerable to damage from vibration and there is always a risk involved in moving hard drives or systems containing them. A hard drive with evidence of a crime provides additional potential complications. So I wanted to stay within view of the man who commissioned the work just so there could be no misunderstanding.

    The system had a single IDE disk. The fact that it had an IDE disk is an indication of the age of the system. One of the benefits of SATA over IDE is that swapping disks is much easier, SATA is designed for hot-swap and even systems that don’t support hot-swap will have less risk of mechanical damage when changing disks if SATA is used instead of IDE. For an appliance type system where a disk might be expected to be changed by someone who’s not a sysadmin SATA provides more benefits over IDE than for some other use cases.

    I connected the IDE disk to a USB-IDE device so I could read it from my laptop. But the disk just made repeated buzzing sounds while failing to spin up. This is an indication that the drive was probably experiencing “stiction” which is where the heads stick to the platters and the drive motor isn’t strong enough to pull them off. In some cases hitting a drive will get it working again, but I’m certainly not going to hit a drive that might be subject to legal action! I recommended referring the drive to a data recovery company.

    The probability of getting useful data from the disk in question seems very low. It could be that the drive had stiction for months or years. If the drive is recovered it might turn out to have data from years ago and not the recent data that is desired. It is possible that the drive only got stiction after being turned off, but I’ll probably never know.

  • Blender 2.78 Is Adding Pascal Support, Fixes Maxwell Performance Issues
  • motranslator 1.1

    Four months after 1.0 release, motranslator 1.1 is out. If you happen to use it for untrusted data, this might be as well called security release, though this is still not good idea until we remove usage of eval() used to evaluate plural formula.

  • Live dmesg following
  • WineTricks has seen a massive amount of improvements this year

    WineTricks has seen allot of development recently, some of the notable changes are better IE 8 support, MetaTrader 4 support, Kindle improvements, Russian translation, A new self update function and a massive amount of other fixes and updates. The full changelog sense February 2016 and August 2016 is provided below with a download link to get the latest release.

  • Sunless Sea expansion Zubmariner releases on October 11th with Linux support

    Sunless Sea is about to get bigger, as Zubmariner has been confirmed for release on October 11th with Linux support.

  • Agenda, control an organization trying to take over the world in this strategy game
  • Clarity (Vector Design) Icon Theme for Linux Desktop’s

    Clarity Icon Theme is completely different from other icon themes because its purly based on Vector design. This theme is based on AwOken and Token, lots of shapes and basic color pallete was taken from these icons. Few icons was taken from Raphael. used some shapes from OpenClipart, Wikipedia, Humanity and AnyColorYouLike Themes. The rest of icons designed by developer by simplifying existed icons or logos. Two types of fonts used Impact and Cheboygan.

  • GUADEC 2016

    I have just returned from our annual users and developers conference. This years’ GUADEC has taken place in the lovely Karlsruhe, Germany. It once again was a fantastic opportunity to gather everyone who works pretty hard to make our desktop and platform the best out there. Smile

  • GUADEC 2016, Karlsruhe

    Nice thing this year was that almost everyone was staying in the same place, or close; this favoured social gatherings even more than in the previous years. This was also helped by the organized events, every evenings, from barbecue to picnic, from local student-run bar to beer garden (thanks Centricular), and more.

    And during the days? Interesting talks of course, like the one offered by Rosanna about how the foundation runs (and how crazy is the US bank system), or the Builder update by Christian, and team meetings.

  • Debian-Based Q4OS 1.6 "Orion" Linux Distro Launches with Trinity Desktop 14.0.3

    Softpedia has been informed today, August 28, 2016, by the developer of the Debian-based Q4OS GNU/Linux distribution about the immediate availability for download of a new stable release to the "Orion" series, version 1.6.

    The biggest new feature of the Q4OS 1.6 "Orion" release is the latest Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) 14.0.3 desktop environment, an open source project that tries to keep the spirit of the old-school KDE 3.5 desktop interface alive. Q4OS was used the most recent TDE version, so Q4OS 1.6 is here to update it.

    "The significant Q4OS 1.6 'Orion' release receives the most recent Trinity R14.0.3 stable version. Trinity R14.0.3 is the third maintenance release of the R14 series, it is intended to promptly bring bug fixes to users, while preserving overall stability," say the Q4OS developers in the release announcement.

  • Antergos installation guide with screenshots
  • Reproducible builds: week 70 in Stretch cycle
  • Ubuntu's Mir May Be Ready For FreeSync / Adaptive-Sync

    The Mir display server may already be ready for working with AMD's FreeSync or VESA's Adaptive-Sync, once all of the other pieces to the Linux graphics stack are ready.

    If the comments from this Mir commit are understood and correct, it looks like Mir may be ready for supporting FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync.

    While NVIDIA's proprietary driver supports their alternative G-SYNC technology on Linux, AMD FreeSync (or the similar VESA Adaptive-Sync standard) has yet to be supported by the AMD Linux stack. We won't be seeing any AMD FreeSync support until their DAL display stack lands. DAL still might come for Linux 4.9 but there hasn't been any commitment yet by AMD developers otherwise not until Linux 4.10+, and then after that point FreeSync can ultimately come to the open-source AMD driver. At least with the AMDGPU-PRO driver relying upon its own DKMS module, DAL with FreeSync can land there earlier.

  • Python vs. C/C++ in embedded systems

    The C/C++ programming languages dominate embedded systems programming, though they have a number of disadvantages. Python, on the other hand, has many strengths that make it a great language for embedded systems. Let's look at the pros and cons of each, and why you should consider Python for embedded programming.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Debugging gnome-session problems on Ubuntu 14.04
  • Introducing snapd-glib
  • An awesome experience!

    GUADEC has been a week full of memorable moments. As my friend Rares mentioned in his post, our newcomers group was welcomed by friendly community members right as we arrived at the hotel. For someone who has never attended a similar event before, this really helped with getting into the conference atmosphere.

    In the first couple days of the conference, I found myself meeting a lot of people that I knew from IRC. It felt really nice to finally know the person behind the internet nick. I was especially excited about getting to meet my mentor, Carlos Soriano =). In between the presentations I also took the time to prepare my own lightning talk about compressed files in Nautilus. Speaking in front of the GNOME community for the first time was a unique experience.

  • Commvault Announces Support of Red Hat Virtualization 4 with Commvault Software
  • Modularity Infrastructure Design

    The purpose of our Modularity initiative is to support the building, maintaining, and shipping of modular things. So, in order to ensure these three requirements are met, we need to design a framework for building and composing the distribution.

    In terms of the framework, in general, we are concerned about the possibility of creating an exponential number of component combinations with independent lifecycles. That is, when the number of component combinations becomes too large, we will not be able to manage them. So that we don’t accidentally make our lives worse, we must limit the number of supported modules with a policy and provide infrastructure automation to reduce the amount of manual work required.

  • more, less, and a story of typical Unix fossilization

    In the beginning, by which we mean V7, Unix didn't have a pager at all. That was okay; Unix wasn't very visual in those days, partly because it was still sort of the era of the hard copy terminal. Then along came Berkeley and BSD. People at Berkeley were into CRT terminals, and so BSD Unix gave us things like vi and the first pager program, more (which showed up quite early, in 3BSD, although this isn't as early as vi, which appears in 2BSD). Calling a pager more is a little bit odd but it's a Unix type of name and from the beginning more prompted you with '--More--' at the bottom of the screen.

    All of the Unix vendors that based their work on BSD Unix (like Sun and DEC) naturally shipped versions of more along with the rest of the BSD programs, and so more spread around the BSD side of things. However, more was by no means the best pager ever; as you might expect, it was actually a bit primitive and lacking in features. So fairly early on Mark Nudelman wrote a pager with somewhat more features and it wound up being called less as somewhat of a joke. When less was distributed via Usenet's net.sources in 1985 it became immediately popular, as everyone could see that it was clearly nicer than more, and pretty soon it was reasonably ubiquitous on Unix machines (or at least ones that had some degree of access to stuff from Usenet). In 4.3 BSD, more itself picked up the 'page backwards' feature that had motived Mark Nudelman to write less, cf the 4.3BSD manpage, but this wasn't the only attraction of less. And this is where we get into Unix fossilization.

  • PNScan Linux Trojan Resurfaces with New Attacks Targeting Routers in India

    A trojan thought to have died out resurfaced with new attacks and a new and improved version, launching new attacks on routers running Linux-based firmware located in India's cyber-space.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Refracta 8 Beta 2 Screenshot Tour
  • Please share the news! OpenMandriva Lx Project of the Week at SourceForge

    OpenMandriva Lx has been chosen by SourceForge to be among Projects of the Week August 22nd, 2016.

  • Ceph, Git, YaST, kernel update in Tumbleweed

    Four Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article and the snapshot of the week, 20160816, brought users a new version of gtk3 (3.20.8). Updated in the repositories for this snapshot was an updated version of yast2-auth-client (3.3.10). Cairo graphics fixed several bugs and Apache2 removed the omc xml config because the change log states it is “useless nowdays.”

    Snapshot 20160817 has several updates for the scalable storage platform ceph, which added an ability to reduce the constraints on resources required to build ceph and ceph-test packages. Git updated to version 2.9.3 and glib2 had several subpackages updated as did gnome-desktop. This snapshot caused quite a bit of chatter on the openSUSE Factory mailing list and serves as a reminder for people using openSUSE Tumbleweed to subscribed to the mailing list so they are aware of the updates.

  • Slackware Live Edition 1.1.3 based on Slackware -current 11 Aug 2016

    Last time I wrote about Slackware Live Edition was when I released the version 1.1.0 of the scripts. And that was two months ago; lots of updates have been made inbetween. Today I released version 1.1.3 of ‘liveslak’.

    I made a set of ISO images (during the last couple of days actually… it is time-consuming) for the Slackware Live Edition based on liveslak 1.1.3 and using Slackware-current dated “Thu Aug 11 18:24:29 UTC 2016“. These ISO images have been uploaded and are available on the primary server ‘bear‘.

  • Take that boredom

    While I was bored on Defcon, I took the smallest VPS in DO offering (512MB RAM, 20GB disk), configured nginx on it, bought domain zlatan.tech and cp'ed my blog data to blog.zlatan.tech. I thought it will just be out of boredom and tear it apart in a day or two but it is still there.

    Not only that, the droplet came with Debian 8.5 but I just added unstable and experimental to it and upgraded. Just to experiment and see what time will I need to break it. To make it even more adventurous (and also force me to not take it too much serious, at least at this point) I did something on what Lars would scream - I did not enable backups!

  • Mir 0.24 Released, Vulkan Still Not Supported
  • First Ever Smartphone Market Recession - Two Quarters of Market Decline Means Flat or Declining Annual Smartphone Sales for 2016 - Oh, and Q2 Market Data

    First off, the big news. We’ve hit the first Smartphone Market Recession. I just finished doing the Q2 market analysis (its the summer vacation and a slow time in tech, and the numbers are of course here, below) but yeah. We now do see the numbers clearly. Like in how they measure the GDP growth/decline as a measure of an economy being in a recession, we can now declare that officially, the smartphone market has hit its first-ever recession. For two quarters in a row, counting a 12 month moving average sales, the smartphone market has contracted. It hasn’t contracted by much (only 2%) but it is nonetheless the first time ever that this industry of less than 20 years of age has contracted. Even in previous global economic recessions, the smartphone market grew. Now it didn’t. So previously I was predicting a modest growth for the market from year 2015 to 2016, now I say there will be no growth, we’ll be lucky to have flat sales (about 1.44 Billion smartphones sold) and its likely we’ll be down a bit, like 1.41 Billion)

today's leftovers

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  • Microsoft Has Broken Millions Of Webcams With Windows 10 Anniversary Update

    On August 2nd, Microsoft released the Anniversary Update for Windows 10 and when the bits arrived on computers around the globe, it brought with it new features and also broke webcams for millions of consumers. If your webcam has stopped functioning since the release of the Anniversary update, you are not alone but the good news is a fix is coming, hopefully in September.

    Microsoft made a significant change with the release of Windows 10 and support for webcams that is causing serious problems for not only consumers but also the enterprise. The problem is that after installing the update, Windows no longer allows USB webcams to use MJPEG or H264 encoded streams and is only allowing YUY2 encoding.

    Why did the company remove these options? The short answer is that with the Anniversary update there are new scenarios for applications to be able to access the webcam and the MJPEG or H264 encoding processes could have resulted in duplication of encoding the stream (poor performance) so the company limited the input methods to stop this from happening.

    Because of this change, which Microsoft tried to defend but then realized the scale of the impact this change has caused, means that when a webcam tries to use MJPEG or H264, the device will freeze. If you use Skype and your webcam freezes after about a minute, this is the reason.

  • RcppEigen 0.3.2.9.0
  • Flock 2016 in Krakow – Recap

    The fourth annual Flock conference for Fedora contributors took place from August 2nd-5th in Krakow, Poland. Over 200 developers and enthusiasts from different continents met to learn, present, debate, plan, and celebrate. Although Fedora is the innovation source for a major Red Hat product (Red Hat Enterprise Linux), this event received “gold” level sponsorship from a sister community — openSUSE. openSUSE serves the same function for SuSE Linux Enterprise as Fedora does for RHEL. SUSE showed the fellowship that rules in the open source world, which is why we love it!

  • GSoC 2016: That’s a wrap!

    Tomorrow, August 22, 2016, marks the end of the Google Summer of Code 2016 program. This year, I participated as a student for the Fedora Project working on my proposal, “Ansible and the Community (or automation improving innovation)“. You can read my original project proposal on the Fedora wiki. Over the summer, I spent time learning more about Ansible, applying the knowledge to real-world applications, and then taking that experience and writing my final deliverable. The last deliverable items, closing plans, and thoughts on the journey are detailed as follows.

  • Freelance Debian consultant: running DEBAMAX

    Everything started two years ago. Back then I blogged about one of the biggest changes in my life: trying to find the right balance between volunteer work as a Debian Developer, and entrepreneurship as a Freelance Debian consultant. Big change because it meant giving up the comfort of the salaried world, and figuring out whether working this way would be sufficient to earn a living…

  • Instagraph Update Adds Direct Messages, Pull-to-Refresh Support, Plus More

    A big update to the unofficial Instagram app for Ubuntu Touch just hit the Ubuntu Store.

  • Lunduke & Whatnot - Solus, elementary & Ubuntu-MATE
  • $5 Linux IoT compute module targets connected hardware applications

    Omega 2 is a Linux compute module designed specifically for building connected hardware applications. It combines, say Onion, its designers, “the tiny form factor and power-efficiency of the Arduino, with the power and flexibilities of the Raspberry Pi.”

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Foundation Picks Up a Big Data Platform

    The Linux Foundation announced today that it is adding Platform for Network Data Analytics (PNDA) as a Linux Foundation project. PNDA provides users with an open source big data platform for network analytics.

    PNDA’s vision is to remove the complexity of combining multiple technologies into an end-to-end system, using open source technology to provide a big data analytics platform. It has a streamlined data pipeline to surface the right data at the right time.

  • Intel Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Linux

    Earlier this year I heard from an Intel PR representative they had no plans for a Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Linux driver and immediately heard after that from a developer it was bollocks from the media department as usual. Today patches have emerged for supporting Turbo Boost Max 3.0 in the Linux kernel.

    Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is a feature to the Intel Broadwell-E CPUs and presumably more forthcoming high-end CPUs. Turbo Boost Max 3.0 is about boosting the frequency of a single CPU core when a single-threaded application is busy on the system occupied. TBM Tech 3.0 is in contrast to Turbo Boost 2.0 that boosts the frequency of all CPU cores when needed for short periods of time. But over the older Turbo Boost tech, TBM 3.0 can maintain its single-boosted-core frequency for a longer duration.

  • Linux Foundation Offering New Online Security Course

    The Linux Foundation's new online Linux security training program will cover a broad range of topics, from application security to network security. The course is geared toward professionals who are already running Linux systems.
    IT security threats seem to be everywhere, but skilled IT security professionals do not seem to be nearly as pervasive. It's a conundrum that the Linux Foundation wants to help alleviate with the introduction of a new online Linux skills training program.

    The online course, called Linux Security Fundamentals (LFS216), is an attempt to help individuals evaluate their own organizations' security readiness. The course is not intended as an introduction for those who are new to Linux, but rather is targeted at those already running Linux systems.

  • Geary User? Here’s A Question For You…

    If you’ve ever used the (frankly awesome) desktop e-mail app Geary, its maintainer has a question for you. He’s launched a poll asking for your feedback on whether the app should switch to instant search and away from the single-keystroke commands it currently uses. Not sure what either of those are? I’ll explain.

  • keysafe alpha release

    Keysafe securely backs up a gpg secret key or other short secret to the cloud. But not yet. Today's alpha release only supports storing the data locally, and I still need to finish tuning the argon2 hash difficulties with modern hardware. Other than that, I'm fairly happy with how it's turned out.

    Keysafe is written in Haskell, and many of the data types in it keep track of the estimated CPU time needed to create, decrypt, and brute-force them. Running that through a AWS SPOT pricing cost model lets keysafe estimate how much an attacker would need to spend to crack your password.

  • RQuantLib 0.4.3: Lots of new Fixed Income functions
  • Wammu 0.42
  • Full Metal Backup Using the dd Command
  • Basics of Backups
  • Monit is not limited to Monitor Linux system performance, also doing auto repair action for dead services
  • Latest Steam Client Update Now Rolling Out, This Is What’s New

    A new update to the Steam desktop client on Linux is rolling out. Though short on big new features there are some welcome fixes on offer.

  • The BeagleBone's I/O pins: inside the software stack that makes them work

    This article focuses on the BeagleBone Black, the popular new member of the BeagleBoard family. If you're familiar with the Arduino, the BeagleBone is much more complex; while the Arduino is a microcontroller, the BeagleBone is a full computer running Linux. If you need more than an Arduino can easily provide (more processing, Ethernet, WiFi), the BeagleBone may be a good choice.

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Ubuntu 16.10 Final Beta Officially Released with Linux Kernel 4.8, Download Now

Delayed six days, the Final Beta release of the upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) operating system launched today, September 28, 2016, as the final development snapshot in the series. Today's Final Beta is in fact the first Beta pre-release version of Ubuntu 16.10, and the only development milestone that you'll be able to test if you want to see what's coming to the next major release of Ubuntu Linux. However, we can tell you that it is powered by Linux kernel 4.8, contains up-to-date applications, and still uses the Unity 7 UI. "The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop, Server, and Cloud products. Codenamed "Yakkety Yak", 16.10 continues Ubuntu's proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs," reads the announcement. Read more

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 "Atticus" to Reach End of Life on September 30, 2016

The Parsix GNU/Linux developers announced that the end-of-life status is approaching fast for the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 "Atticus" operating system, urging users to upgrade to the latest release immediately. Dubbed Atticus and based on the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" operating system, Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 was unveiled seven months ago, on February 14, 2016. Running the long-term supported Linux 4.1.17 kernel injected with TuxOnIce 3.3 and BFS patches, it was built around the GNOME 3.18 desktop environment with the GNOME Shell 3.18.3 user interface. The end of life (EOL) will be officially reached on September 30, 2016, which means that users of the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.5 "Atticus" operating system will no longer receive security and software updates. Therefore, they are urged today to upgrade to the latest, most recent version of the Debian-based distribution, Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik." Read more

SteamOS 2.93 Brewmaster Beta Adds New Security Fixes from Debian GNU/Linux 8.6

Valve's SteamOS 2 gaming operating system is still getting goodies, and it looks like a new Beta update has been pushed on September 26, 2016, to the brewmaster_beta channel for public beta testers. That's right, SteamOS 2.93 Brewmaster Beta is here to replace the previous build announced earlier this month, SteamOS 2.91 Brewmaster Beta, and add the latest security fixes and updates from upstream. This means that SteamOS is now officially based on the recently released Debian GNU/Linux 8.6 "Jessie" operating system. "SteamOS brewmaster update 2.93 pushed to brewmaster_beta. Corrects a build issue where the last kernel updates were not actually included. Also updates from the Debian 8.6 release[www.debian.org] and the usual security fixes," says John Vert, Valve engineer, in the release announcement. Read more