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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • The Story of the Last Linux Action Show

    The final episode of the Linux Action Show was a really special time, and during a special event. Friends from all over the world joined us for one big goodbye party.

  • Zukitwo and Zukitre Themes Available for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Since many of us heard that Ubuntu is making Gnome desktop its default desktop again, many creators got motivation to make eyecandy stuff again for Ubuntu. Zuktiwo and Zukitre themes are not new in the market and quite famous among users who are using Linux from sometime, the initial release of this pack was way back in 2011. These themes give light and grayish look to the desktop, the basic aim of these themes to enhance the look of GTK and Gnome-Shell just like many other great Gtk themes. Both themes works perfectly under all resolutions bigger screens and with smaller screens. These themes supports latest GTK 3.22/3.20/3.18 and Gnome Shell 3.24/3.22/3.18. Zukitre and Zukitwo themes supports GTK 3 and GTK 2 based desktop environments such as Gnome Shell, Gnome Classic, Gnome Fallback, Cinnamon, Mate, XFCE, Budgie, Pantheon, etc.

  • Obsidian Gtk Themes Looks Amazing On Gnome Desktop

    If you are looking for dark themes for your Linux desktop then you are on the right page. Obsidian themes looks great and gives your desktop a dark bluish and greenish flavor. Gtk theme is based on Adwaita-Maia and it has Gnome Shell theme as well, it is currently compatible with Gtk 3.20/3.22/3.24 versions and only works fine in Gnome Desktop, this pack is pretty simple and elegant. If you find any issues with this theme then report it to developer and hopefully it will get fixed in the next update. If you are using other distribution you can directly download theme from its page and install it manually in ~/.themes folder or /usr/share/themes/. You can use Gnome-tweak-tool to change themes.

  • New build server was ordered

    OK, so I got frustrated too many times when waiting for packages that were compiling. My current build machine with its AMD ‘Athlon II X4 640’ CPU and 8 GB of RAM, is now 5 years old and obviously no longer quite fit for the tasks I need it to perform. Compiling Chromium for 64bit Slackware in a virtual machine took more than 24 hours last week (yes, for a single package). Basically, that convinced me to empty my stash of donated funds (thanks to all of you Slackware supporters) and order the most powerful midi tower I could buy for that money. What else is that money for, after all. Well, beer perhaps

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Automotive Grade Linux shops for hypervisor to accelerate smart cars

    The Automotive Grade Linux has revealed it's going shopping for a hypervisor so that in-car computers can handle lots of different jobs.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Reaches Key Car Platform Milestones

    Automotive Grade Linux on Wednesday released version 4.0 of the AGL infotainment platform and announced new projects to support telematics, instrument cluster, heads-up-display and a virtualization component.

    The group also announced that seven new companies have joined AGL and The Linux Foundation. The addition of Brison, Karamba Security, Lear Corporation, Luxoft, Thundersoft, SafeRide Cyber Security and Wipro increases AGL's membership to more than 100 partners.

  • AMDGPU DC Display Code Updated In amd-staging-drm-next
  • AMD Ryzen 3 1200 & Ryzen 3 1300X Linux Performance

    I just received the Ryzen 3 1200 and Ryzen 3 1300X yesterday, so have been rushing to get out these initial Linux figures for those curious how they compare to the many Windows results that came out last week. In this article are the initial Ryzen 3 Linux benchmark results compared to a variety of Intel and AMD CPUs on Ubuntu Linux. In the days ahead I intend to do several more Ryzen 3 powered articles including a fresh look at Mesa Git with KHR_no_error support enabled, an OpenGL vs. Vulkan comparison with these low-end CPUs, and possibly a fresh compiler comparison and more. If you have any other Linux test requests for Ryzen, feel free to let me know by commenting on this article in our forums.

  • Samsung’s Bixby—A frustrating voice assistant with all the wrong features

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux desktop market share hit an all time high in July, according to one measure [Ed: According to a Microsoft-connected firm]

    In June of 2016, Linux market share on the desktop according to their statistics hit over 2% for the first time. People were sceptical, but it seems it has mostly stayed above that 2% mark. In May of this year it did dip down to 1.99%, but as of July it recorded the highest yet at 2.53%.

  • Razor- the next generation bare-metal provisioning software

    When you have a machine with just BIOS (basic input-output system) on it, one way to load an Operating system is to use a bootable thumb drive, similar to the way you work with a laptop. However, installing OS on remote systems in data centers that are present in remote locations might not be feasible. Installing an operating system over the network directly to the computer’s hardware is known as bare metal provisioning.

    A network boot screen in a network is similar to the one displayed below that shows up only when both the new gods and old gods are content to give us something known as Preboot Execution Environment (PXE).

  • Automotive Grade Linux New UCB 4.0 & New Member Karamba

    There were two announcements about Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). Karamba Security, a provider of cybersecurity solutions for connected and autonomous vehicles, today announced that it has joined the Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) Project and The Linux Foundation to help develop its cybersecurity best practices. AGL released the latest version of the AGL infotainment platform, Unified Code Base (UCB) 4.0, which includes support for SmartDeviceLink integration, Speech Recognition APIs, secure Over-the-Air Updates (SOTA) and improvements to the App Framework and Software Development Kit (SDK).

  • Cylon – Arch Linux Distribution Maintenance Program/Tool

    Cylon is a menu driven small shall script which basically gives you an idea to manage/maintain the Arch Linux and it’s derivatives by offering fourteen categories with variety of applications (hassle free application installation), which helps you to compete your day to day operation very smoothly.

    The script provides updates, maintenance, backups and system checks utilities for an Arch based Linux distribution like Manjaro, Antergos, Chakra, etc.,.

  • Red Hydrogen phone gets a video preview: It’s big—very big

    Many were confused earlier in July when Red, makers of ultra high-end 4K and 8K cameras for Hollywood, announced it was making an Android smartphone.

    Dubbed Red Hydrogen, the phone's substantial $1,595 price tag was accompanied by all manner of lofty promises about shattering "the mould of conventional thinking" and "nanotechnology." The phone supposedly had a "holographic" display, too.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Journal August 2017
  • Tacoma, the sci-fi narrative adventure has released with day-1 Linux support, some thoughts

    Tacoma [GOG, Steam, Official Site], the sci-fi narrative adventure from the developer of Gone Home has officially launched. It includes day-1 Linux support so I took a look.

  • Super NES Classic pre-orders start later this month

    Nintendo's announcement follows a retail fiasco last week in which Walmart mistakenly offered Super NES Classic systems for pre-order then was forced to cancel those pre-orders. "We know this is incredibly disappointing to those customers and we apologize for the mistake," the retailer said in a statement. The mistaken listing sold out within minutes late on a Friday night.

  • The State Of KDE Plasma For Summer 2017

    Last week was KDE's annual Akademy conference where developers and enthusiasts came together to recap the past year of KDE software development as well as some of what's ahead.

    Longtime KDE developer Sebastian Kügler has provided a recap of the KDE Plasma activities from Akademy 2017. Those interested in the state of Plasma can read Sebastian's post at dot.kde.org. Below are some of the highlights.

  • OSMC's July update is here

    We hope you're having a great Summer break. OSMC's July update is ready with a few improvements to keep your device running in tip-top shape. The Vero 4K also sees a large number of improvements, particularly with regards to HDR and 10-bit content. We would like to thank everyone who tested these improvements in our forums and ensured they got included in OSMC quickly.

  • Samsung’s 88-inch Ultra-Large QLED TV, the Q9, launched in North America and Korea
  • DragonFly 4.8.1 released

    DragonFly version 4.8.1 is a bugfix release for 4.8, and also includes improved Intel video support and support for the virtio_scsi driver.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • XWayland Grabs Onto Keyboard Grab Support

    Adding to the list of changes for X.Org Server 1.20 that will be released in the future is grab protocol support for XWayland.

    Last year is when the keyboard grabbing protocol for Wayland was proposed and made it into Wayland-Protocols 1.9. This is about allowing virtual machines, VNC viewers, or XWayland to be able to "grab" all input from a device and send to a particular surface, modeled like a keyboard locking mechanism.

  • Supercomputing by API: Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC

    In this video from OpenStack Australia, David Perry from the University of Melbourne presents: Supercomputing by API – Connecting Modern Web Apps to HPC.

  • [Video] What’s New in Mageia 6
  • Geeko in the Wild
  • Technical Standards: The Hard Part of Making Everyone Happy

    A recent controversy involving the group that sets the rules of the road for the web is a great reminder of how challenging standards-making really is, even if your standards are the ones everyone is using.

    Standards have a way of bleeding into parts of life that you might not give a second thought to, as a consumer.

    Case in point: Watching a show on Netflix is a pretty satisfying ritual, isn’t it? Lots of people do it. Tens of millions in fact, many of them on their computers, in their web browsers.

  • Apple can’t end lawsuit over “breaking” FaceTime on iPhone 4, judge rules

    Back in February 2017, two Californians sued Apple in a proposed class-action lawsuit over the fact that the company disabled an older version of iOS. Disabling the outdated iOS had the effect of making FaceTime stop working on the customers' iPhone 4 devices.

    [...]

    "Apple broke FaceTime in order to gain a financial advantage and reduce relay fees," Judge Koh also wrote. "Further, although Apple knew that it had intentionally disabled FaceTime, Apple told consumers that FaceTime had stopped working because of a 'bug resulting from a device certificate that expired.' Apple did not tell users that Apple had intentionally caused the digital certificate to expire prematurely."

  • The complete history of the IBM PC, part two: The DOS empire strikes

    The ethicality or lack thereof of what Paterson did has been debated for years. Gary Kildall stridently claimed many times that he ripped off the actual CP/M source code, but this is a very problematic assertion. There is no evidence that he even had access to the source, which Digital, like most companies then and now, guarded carefully.

    [...]

    The real victor was Microsoft, which built an empire on the back of a shadily acquired MS-DOS.

Leftovers: Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review; upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre

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  • Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review

    I ordered a litebook after emailing back and forth questions about Linux and the product. They replied super fast and everything sounded great.

    In reality, if I had to guess what is happening, it's a couple teenagers working out of their moms basement, ordering laptops from aliexpress in bulk, installing Linux and then selling them for a profit.

  • Coming Soon | For The Record

    Are we too dependent our Internet connectivity? Should we instead, explore creating our own Linux media servers in place of common streaming services? I’ll give you a preview of my effort to reduce my reliance with common streaming services. I’ll talk about upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre and more!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Google Grabs Nielsen as Business Apps User From Microsoft

    For word processing and spreadsheets, Nielsen staff now uses Google Docs and Sheets instead of Microsoft’s Word and Excel applications from its familiar Office suite of software. For video conferencing and messaging, Nielsen dropped Microsoft’s Skype in favor of Google equivalents.

  • 3DR Solo Back as Open Source Platform

    Don’t play Taps for 3DR‘s Solo yet. 3DR’s CEO Chris Anderson tweeted today that the Solo is getting a second life.

    In an article title “The Solo Lives On,” on the ArduPilot Blog – ArduPilot is an opensource autopilot system – the team explains how a community of developers worked to give the Solo a “heart transplant.” The developer of the now-obselete Pixhawk 2.0 hardware flight system, the Solo’s stock system, has developed a bolt-on replacement which will allow for new ArduCopter firmware changes.

  • Bluetooth Mesh networks: Is a standards body right for IoT innovation?

        

    Mesh networks are not new. It is a network topology in which each node relays data for the network. All mesh nodes cooperate in the distribution of data in the network. The IoT-purpose-built Zigbee—a low-power, low-bandwidth ad hoc network—is a mesh network. Dating to 2002, Aruba Networks was founded to build Wi-Fi mesh networks. In 2014, student protesters in Hong Kong used mobile app FireChat to turn the crowd’s smartphones into a Wi-Fi and Bluetooth mesh network so authorities could not interrupt protester’s coordinating conversations by blocking 3G and 4G network access.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Arch Linux host cites freedom of speech defense, after using offensive domain name

    According to a user on Reddit by the name of 'fameistheproduct', this isn't the first time something in the community has offended some users. At one point, the system automatically generated license codes that could be regarded as offensive by some. The offending content has since been removed by the organization.

  • Ubuntu Still Working On Unity 7 Low Graphics Mode Improvements

    While Ubuntu's desktop future now rests with GNOME Shell for Ubuntu 17.10 and beyond, developers are still working on some Unity 7 refinements for existing Ubuntu desktop users.

    With Ubuntu 16.04 LTS still to be supported for years to come, Unity 7 is seeing a bit more than just maintenance take place. One of the areas of Unity 7 still being worked on is improving its low graphics mode for helping users on low-end/older systems as well as running within VMs where there may not be 3D acceleration available.

  • Intel kills Curie module and Arduino 101 SBC

    Intel is discontinuing its Curie wearables module and its Curie-enabled Arduino 101 SBC. Last month, Intel shut down the Joule, Edison, and Galileo.

    A month after Intel discontinued its Linux-ready, Atom-based Intel Joule and Intel Edison COMs, as well as its Quark-based Galileo Gen 2 SBC and its Recon Jet sports eyewear, the chipmaker announced the “end-of-life timeline” for its Quark-based Intel Curie module and the discontinuation of its Curie-based Arduino 101 SBC.

  • Chinese smartphone brands captured 87% of home market

     

    These top four Chinese brands now capture 69% of the market and have raced ahead of international and other local brands with expansive distribution reach and exciting portfolio.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Weather Forecast

    This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

  • Linux guru Linus Torvalds is reviewing gadgets on Google+

    Now it appears the godfather of Linux has started to put all that bile to good use by reviewing products on Google+.

  • Learning to love Ansible

    I’ve been convinced about the merits of configuration management for machines for a while now; I remember conversations about producing an appropriate set of recipes to reproduce our haphazard development environment reliably over 4 years ago. That never really got dealt with before I left, and as managing systems hasn’t been part of my day job since then I never got around to doing more than working my way through the Puppet Learning VM. I do, however, continue to run a number of different Linux machines - a few VMs, a hosted dedicated server and a few physical machines at home and my parents’. In particular I have a VM which handles my parents’ email, and I thought that was a good candidate for trying to properly manage. It’s backed up, but it would be nice to be able to redeploy that setup easily if I wanted to move provider, or do hosting for other domains in their own VMs.

  • GSoC: Improvements in kiskadee architecture

    Today I have released kiskadee 0.2.2. This minor release brings some architecture improvements, fix some bugs in the plugins and improve the log messages format. Initially, lets take a look in the kiskadee architecture implemented on the 0.2 release.

  • How UndoDB works

    In the previous post I described what UndoDB is, now I will describe how the technology works.

    The naïve approach to record the execution of a program is to record everything that happens, that is the effects of every single machine instruction. This is what gdb does to offer reversible debugging.

  • Wild West RPG West of Loathing Launches for PC/Mac/Linux on August 10th

    Today, developer Asymmetric announced that its comedy, wild west RPG, West of Loathing, is poised to launch for PC, Mac, and Linux on August 10th.

  • Canonical asks users' help in deciding Ubuntu Linux desktop apps

    Canonical Ubuntu Linux has long been one of the most popular Linux desktop distributions. Now, its leadership is looking to its users for help to decide the default desktop applications in the next long-term support version of the operating system: Ubuntu 18.04.

    This release, scheduled for April 2018, follows October's Ubuntu 17.10, Artful Aardvark. Ubuntu 18.04 will already include several major changes. The biggest of these is Ubuntu is abandoning its Unity 8 interface to go back to the GNOME 3.x desktop.

  • Enhanced Open Source Framework Available for Parallel Programming on Embedded Multicore Devices
  • Studiolada used all wood materials to create this affordable open-source home anyone can build

    Using wood panels as the principal building material reduced the project’s overall cost and footprint because the wooden beams and wall panels were cut and varnished in a nearby workshop. Prefabricated concrete was used to embed the support beams, which were then clad in wooden panels. In fact, wood covers just about everything in the home, from the walls and flooring to the ceiling and partitions. Sustainable materials such as cellulose wadding and wood fibers were even used to insulate the home.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Slaps and Beans and Games Online For Android

  • Slaps and Beans now in Early Access
    Bud Spencer & Terence Hill: Slaps and Beans [Steam] is now in Early Access after a successful Kickstarter campaign in which the developers gained over $200k.
  • Best First Person Shooter Games Online For Android
    With the ever shining genre of First Person Shooters making it Huge in the PC market, game studios have brought the best of FPS action to people’s mobile devices. Here I present to you my best picks for the Free first person shooter games online for Android.

Software and howtos

New: NuTyX 9.93 and Linux Mint 18.3

  • NuTyX 9.93 available with cards 2.3.105
    The NuTyX team is please to annonce the 9.93 release of NuTyX. NuTyX 9.92 comes with kernel LTS 4.14.6, glibc 2.26, gcc 7.2.0, binutils 2.29.1, python 3.6.0, xorg-server 1.19.5, qt 5.10.0, KDE plasma 5.11.3, KDE Framework 5.41.0, KDE Applications 17.12.0, mate 1.18.2, xfce4 4.12.4, firefox 57.0.2 Quantum, etc...
  • Linux Mint 18.3 'Sylvia' Xfce and KDE editions are available for download
    Linux Mint is killing the KDE version of its operaring system -- a move some people applaud. That's what makes the new 18.3 version -- named "Sylvia" -- so frustrating. It's bizarre to release a new version of an operating system that essentially has no future. But oh well, here we are. After a short beta period, the KDE distro is now available for download -- if you still care. I recommend that KDE loyalists just switch to Kubuntu or Netrunner, but I digress. Despite being the final version of Linux Mint KDE, it is still a great alternative to the consistently disappointing Windows 10. After all, it has been discovered that Microsoft is bundling a bug-ridden password-manager with its operating system without user consent! How can you trust such an OS?! Sigh.
  • Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce Editions Officially Released, Download Now
    The Linux Mint team released the final Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" Xfce and Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE editions to download, as well as an upgrade for existing Linux Mint 18.2 "Sonya" users. Previously in beta, the Linux Mint 18.3 "Sylvia" KDE and Xfce editions are now officially released and ready for production use. Just like the Cinnamon and MATE flavors, they are based on Canonical's long-term supported Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and use the Linux 4.10 kernel by default for new installations.

GNU: Glibc, GIMP, GCC

  • Glibc 2.27 Lands Yet More Performance Optimizations
    Earlier this month I wrote how Intel engineers have been busy with continuing to tune glibc's performance with FMA and AVX optimizations. That work has continued but also other architectures continue tuning their GNU C Library performance ahead of the expected v2.27 update. There has been a ton of optimization work this cycle, particularly on the Intel/x86_64 front. For those with newer Intel 64-bit processors, this next glibc release is shaping up to be a speedy update.
  • GIMP PIcks Up Support For The New Flatpak/FreeDesktop.org Screenshot API
    Hot off the release of the new GIMP 2.9.8 and ahead of the expected GIMP 2.10 release candidates that are expected to begin, a new addition to GIMP is a plug-in supporting the new FreeDesktop.org/Flatpak screenshot API. The org.freedesktop.portal.Screenshot specification aims to be a screenshot API that will work not only cross-desktop (e.g. KDE, GNOME, etc) but also work for sandboxed applications (i.e. Flatpak) and also work regardless of whether you are using Wayland or X11.
  • GCC Prepares For Fortran 2018 Support
    The Fortran committee decided last month to rename the upcoming Fortran 2015 programming language update to Fortran 2018. GCC support is being prepped. With this updated programming language technical specification not expected to be published until mid-2018, the committee behind this long-standing programming language decided to rename Fortran 2015 to Fortran 2018. Fortran 2018 should further improve interoperability with C code, improve its parallel programming capabilities, support hexadecimal inputs/outputs, and other improvements over Fortran 2008.