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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The Linux Foundation adds three new members to board of directors
  • The Linux Foundation Appoints Three Tech Industry Leaders to Board of Directors
  • Weblate 2.9

    Slightly behind schedule (it should have been released in October), Weblate 2.9 is out today. This release brings Subversion support or improved zen mode.

  • libopus 1.2-alpha
  • Opus 1.2 Alpha Released With Several Quality Improvements

    With the Opus 1.2 Alpha release there is speed quality improvements, improved VBR encoding for hybrid mode, more aggressive use of wider speed bandwidth, and music quality improvements. Other work in libopus 1.2 alpha includes generic and SSE CELT optimizations, support for directly encoding packets up to 120 ms, DTX support for CELT, SILK CBR improvements. Like most software projects, there is also a lot of bug fixes, including some overflow fixes.

  • Getting started with Python scripting in Scribus
  • Hands-on: Using CrossOver Android to run Windows apps on a Chromebook

    Switching from a Windows laptop to a Chromebook is possible only if you can live without any Windows programs.

    But Chrome OS’s newfound support for Android apps from the Google Play Store has opened up a loophole: A program from Codeweavers called CrossOver Android creates a Windows compatibility layer inside Chrome OS, letting users install and run traditional Win32 software.

    As a proof of concept, this is an exciting development for prospective Chromebook owners. But CrossOver is still early in its development. As I discovered while testing out a preview version, getting your favorite Windows programs to work involves an unfavorable roll of the dice.

  • Football Manager 2017 Released For Linux

    If you are a Linux gamer and our 13-way GPU comparison of Deus Ex: Mankind Divided made you realize your system isn't strong enough for this newest AAA Linux game title, perhaps you'll be interested in the just-released Football Manager 2017 with day-one Linux support.

  • WikiToLearn Reaches 1.0

    WikiToLearn is KDE's project to create textbooks for university and school students. It provides free, collaborative and accessible text books. Academics worldwide contribute in sharing knowledge by creating high quality content.

    One year after founding WikiToLearn, the love for sharing knowledge helped our community to grow stronger. During this year a lot of great things happened, but we also had to face some technical and organizational problems.

  • Qt 5.8 Beta Released

    I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.8 Beta is now released. Containing all-new configuration system, new graphics architecture with integrated Qt Quick 2D Renderer for devices without OpenGL, build in QML cache for improved startup and many other new features, Qt 5.8 will be a very interesting release. I hope many will take the Qt 5.8 Beta release, test it and provide feedback for us to complete Qt 5.8. For the big picture of the release, see the alpha release blog post.

  • Qt 5.8 Now In Beta Form

    Qt 5.8 Beta is now shipping with their new configuration system, their graphics changes for the Qt Quick 2D renderer, built-in QML cache, and much more. As covered previously, some of the other work includes an experimental Direct3D 12 back-end for Qt Quick, new Qt Quick Controls 2 additions, Qt WebEngine upgrades, Bluetooth Low Energy improvements, Qt Network improvements, embedded support improvements, and more. New modules for Qt 5.8 coming are the Qt Wayland Compositor, Qt SCXML, Qt Serial Bus, and new platform support is for Apple tvOS and watchOS. There are also technology previews of Qt Gamepad, Qt Speech, and Qt Network Authentication.

  • Searching in GNOME Software

    I’ve spent a few days profiling GNOME Software on ARM, mostly for curiosity but also to help our friends at Endless. I’ve merged a few patches that make the existing --profile code more useful to profile start up speed. Already there have been some big gains, over 200ms of startup time and 12Mb of RSS, but there’s plenty more that we want to fix to make GNOME Software run really nicely on resource constrained devices.

  • New Tumbleweed snapshot 20161102 released!
  • Tumbleweed brings Halloween Treats

    A new framework for desktop applications on Linux has been added to Tumbleweed and now users can enjoy the most up-to-date version of Flatpak.

    Flatpak 0.6.13 arrived in the 20161028 snapshot last week and complements another package updated in the snapshot; OSTree 2016.12, which is a tool that combines a “git-like” model for committing and downloading bootable filesystem trees, along with a layer for deploying them and managing the bootloader configuration.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20161103-1

    This month’s update falls onto a national holiday in Japan. My recent start as a normal company employee in Japan doesn’t leave me enough time during normal days to work on Debian, so things have to wait for holidays. There have been a few notable changes in the current packages, and above all I wanted to fix an RC bug and on the way fixed also several other (sometimes rather old) bugs.

  • Linux/Moose is loose: Analysis finds IoT botnet malware favors Instagram fraud

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • AWS releases Amazon Linux container image for use in on-premises data centers

    Amazon Web Services (AWS), a division of Amazon that offers cloud computing and storage services, today announced that it has released a container image of its Amazon Linux operating system — which has, until now, only been accessible on AWS virtual machine instances — that customers can now deploy on their own servers.

    Of course, other Linux distributions are available for use in companies’ on-premises data centers — CentOS, CoreOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Canonical’s Ubuntu, and so on. Now companies that are used to Amazon Linux in the cloud can work with it on-premises, too. It’s available from AWS’ EC2 Container Registry. Amazon Linux is not currently available for instant deployment on other public clouds, whether Oracle’s, Google’s, Microsoft’s, or IBM’s.

  • Linux Kernel 4.4.30 LTS Fixes a Bug in 4.4.29 and Older Kernels, Update Now

    After informing the Linux community about the release and immediate availability of the Linux 4.8.6 kernel, renowned Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced the Linux 4.4.29 LTS kernel.

    Linux kernel 4.4.29 LTS was a fairly normal maintenance update that brought changes to a total of 82 files, with 657 insertions and 358 deletions, according to the appended shortlog and the diff from Linux kernel 4.4.28 LTS announced a week ago. However, later that day Greg Kroah-Hartman bumped the version to 4.4.30, removing two patches that shouldn't have been applied in the first place.

  • Intel's Vulkan Linux Driver Gets ~30% Performance Boost, Now Faster Than OpenGL

    With our past Intel Vulkan benchmarks the Vulkan driver was slower than the mature OpenGL driver but this is about to change with an important patch-set published today: a big performance boost is in store.

  • Constraints (reprise)
  • What if Linux never existed?

    Linux has been around for a long time now, and many of us take it for granted as part of our everyday lives. But have you ever paused to consider what life would be like if Linux never existed? A writer at Network World recently explored this question based on some funny social media posts.

  • Linux Journal November 2016

    I like the idea of life hacking. I'm not sure it's a term that you'll find in the dictionary (although perhaps—dictionaries have some odd things in them now), but the idea of improving life by programmatically changing things is awesome. I think that might be why I'm such an open-source fan. When it's possible to change the things you don't like or improve on something just because you can, it makes computing far less mystical and far more enjoyable.

  • Hatchit: An open source game engine

    More students are learning about the world of open source through video games. Open source games like FreeCiv and Minetest invite young gamers to dig into the source code, while projects like SpigotMC empower them to write plugins to extend their favorite games.

    Unfortunately, the open source tools used to build games do not share the same prominence. Rochester Institute of Technology student Matt Guerrette hopes to help change that with Hatchit, his open source gaming engine.

  • Linux Appears To Lose Some Gaming Marketshare With Valve's October Stats

    With the start of a new month comes updated figures from Valve about their Steam hardware/software survey statistics.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Given Consensus Rating of “Buy” by Analysts
  • 2 Stocks Analyst-Opinion Need Close Attention: Red Hat (NYSE:RHT), Dell Technologies (NYSE:DVMT)
  • Hybrid Graphics and Fedora Workstation 25

    When we started the Fedora Workstation effort one thing we wanted to do was to drain the proverbial swamp of make sure that running Linux on a laptop is a first rate experience. As you see from my last blog entry we have been working on building a team dedicated to that task. There are many facets to this effort, but one that we kept getting asked about was sorting out hybrid graphics. So be aware that some of this has been covered in previous blog entries, but I want to be thorough here. So this blog will cover the big investments of time and effort we are putting into Wayland and X Windows, GNOME Shell and Nouveau (the open source driver for NVidia GPU hardware).

  • Debian developer completes 20 years with project

    The Debian GNU/Linux project is 23 years old and one of its developers has just completed two decades with the community Linux organisation.

    Steve McIntyre, who led the project in 2008 and 2009, joined Debian in 1996. He wrote that he had first installed Debian in late October that year, migrating over from his existing Slackware installation with the help of a friend. It took an entire weekend and he says he found it so painful that he thought of bailing out at many times.

  • Yippie Yak — New Ubuntu T-Shirt Is Now Available To Buy

    A brand new Ubuntu t-shirt is available to buy from the Canonical store bearing the official mascot emblem of Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak.

  • Adlink bakes Apollo Lake into four modules and a Mini-ITX board

    Adlink announced four modules, in SMARC 2.0, Qseven, and COM Express Compact format, plus a Mini-ITX board — all based on Intel’s 14nm “Apollo Lake” SoCs.

    Adlink has rolled out the most comprehensive range of products yet supporting Intel’s 14nm-fabricated Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs. Like rival Congatec’s Apollo Lake roll-out, the Adlink announcement includes one of the first modules supporting the new SMARC 2.0 COM form factor, as well as a COM Express Compact Type 6 module. There’s also a COM Express Mini Type 10 module, a Qseven COM, and a thin Mini-ITX SBC.

  • Security Blogger Identifies Next IoT Vulnerability, This Time on Linux OS [Ed: not Linux is the problem here but bad developers of devices]

    Recommendations for mitigation include turning off global telnet open services and not using known vulnerable usernames or passwords. If a device is infected (or you’re not sure if it is), this can be removed by rebooting the infected devices, the post said. Of course it will then have to be secured against the intrusion, or it will be re-infected.

  • Top GCHQ director calls security industry "witchcraft"

    The National Cyber Security Center's technical director Ian Levy has slammed commonly-accepted cyber security advice, equating the security industry to "witchcraft" and accusing it of deliberately creating unnecessary fear around cyber threats.

    Speaking at Future Decoded 2016, Microsoft's annual digital transformation conference, Levy argued that cyber security is not transparent and that the industry is "blaming the user for designing the system wrong".

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Foundation launches online devops course in move to increase experience

    The online course focused on devops follows the Linux Foundation’s work earlier this year on online classes targeting OpenStack

    The development and operations model is quickly becoming a central focus for companies looking to take advantage of software and information technology in order to increase agility and streamline operations using devops. However, there appears to be a shortfall in terms of qualified employees.

  • Linux Lite 3.2 Released with a Focus on Security, Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS

    A day early than expected, the final release of the Linux Lite 3.2 Ubuntu-based GNU/Linux distribution has been officially announced today, October 31, 2016, by developer Jerry Bezencon.

    Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system and shipping with the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, Linux Lite 3.2 arrives today with a focus on security, as the developer implemented support for fetching the latest Linux kernel security updated as soon as they become available in the repositories. These will be distributed to users via the Install Updates tool.

  • Open Labs Fedora Meetup #5 - Event Report
  • Twenty years...

    So, it's now been twenty years since I became a Debian Developer. I couldn't remember the exact date I signed up, but I decided to do some forensics to find out. First, I can check on the dates on my first Debian system, as I've kept it running as a Debian system ever since!

  • Ubuntu versus Linux Mint: Which one is better?

    Ubuntu and Linux Mint are two of the best known desktop distributions around. Both are extremely popular with Linux users, but which one is better? Since each of these distributions has much to offer it can be difficult to choose between them. Fortunately, a writer at Linux and Ubuntu has a helpful comparison between Linux Mint and Ubuntu.

  • Sub-$100 maker board packs Apollo Lake SoC, 4K video, dual GbE

    Aaeon’s “Up Squared” hacker SBC offers dual- or quad-core Intel Apollo Lake SoCs, plus up to 8GB RAM, SATA, dual HDMI, 4K video, dual GbE, mini-PCIe, and more.

    Aaeon Europe has launched a Kickstarter project for a follow-up to its x86-based “Up” hacker board. If it shipped today instead of its April 2017 due date, the “Up2” (or “Up Squared”) would be the most powerful hacker-friendly single board computer around. The SBC features the new 14nm-fabricated Intel Apollo Lake system-on-chips, and offers a feature set that is rare even on high end hacker boards.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux in an Apple and Microsoft World

    Sure, Linux and open source has always been more about substance over style. Raw machine power and reliability are what we want, not necessarily chic design and gorgeousness. I said “necessarily”. But we live in a world where hit records assures rock star status. Likewise, Linux needs a machine that rocks like Sabbath, but looks like Taylor Swift.

  • PlayStation 4 Latest News & Update: Unlicensed Games, Apps Can Run on Hacked Firmware; Linux Threatens Even PS4 Pro

    Unlicensed games and applications can run on PlayStation 4 now that firmware version 4.01 was reported hacked. This situation could lead to potential security failure and possible rooting of even the upcoming PlayStation 4 Pro.

    To make the problem worse for Sony's console is the report that PlayStation 4 hack was done using web browser, an exploit that can easily replicate. This info first surfaced during a geek's event in China where PlayStation 4 was shown running an unauthorized Linux system. Digital Trends reported that this Linux can be installed using PS4's built-in web browser.

  • Lenovo downward dogs with Yoga BIOS update supporting Linux installs

    Following last month's criticisms, Lenovo has released a BIOS update for its Yoga 900 range of laptops, finally allowing them to support GNU/Linux installations.

    Lenovo directly denied the sensational allegation that it had conspired with Microsoft to lock its laptops to Windows 10 with a BIOS setting locking the SSD to RAID mode.

    Despite stating that "Linux operating system vendors [would be responsible for] releasing new kernel and drivers to support features such as RAID on SSD", Lenovo has now accepted that other methods of connecting to storage on its machines would be acceptable, if sub-optimal, and has issued a BIOS update for its Yoga 900-13ISK2 models, which will allow GNU/Linux installs.

  • Cooking With Linux, Episode 6 : Desktop Extravaganza

    Now, on with the show.

    Welcome to "Cooking With Linux", episode 6, the show that combines wine, food, and free software. It's all desktops all the time on this episode of "Cooking With Linux". One question that I get asked regularly is why we have all these distributions. One explanation I give is that it provides a way for people to work they way they want to with an environment that works well for them. But what are these desktop environments? On today's episode, I'll take you through a number of different desktop environments and window managers, from slick and modern to just plain strange. Pull up a chair, enjoy a glass of wine, order some food, and enjoy.

  • Maui 2 "Blue Tang" Linux Still Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Ships KDE Plasma 5.8.2

    Do you remember Maui? It's the new name gave by the Netrunner team to their Netrunner Desktop flavor earlier this summer, rebased on KDE Neon and shipping with the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) goodies.

    The first Maui release, versioned 1, landed in mid-August, and we've just been informed about the general availability of Maui 2, dubbed "Blue Tang," featuring the recently released KDE Plasma 5.8.2 LTS desktop environment on top of an updated Ubuntu 16.04 LTS base, and, of course, running the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel.

  • The heroes we deserve

    You may be aware that openSUSE Leap 42.2 is now in the release candidate stage, and there’s a lot of activity aimed at squashing those pesky bugs before they hit the final release. One particular bug proved to be quite tough to fix, and it was only solved thanks to the “heroes” mentioned in the title. This is the history of the bug.

    [...]

    What could I say: upstream-downstream collaboration is truly awesome, and even more so when such a difficult bug is tackled and fixed. The way my fellow KDE team members acted is truly commendable, and so the behavior of upstream KDE (despite the false “they don’t listen” mantra) that helped and offered assistance in getting a proper solution out.

    So if you ever meet Antonio, David, Fabian, and Martin, please offer them a beverage of their choice. They’re the heroes Free Software deserves.

  • 51,060 Shares of Red Hat Inc. (RHT) are sold by Frontier Capital Management Co. LLC
  • Stocks Jolted By FBI, How Did this Stock Fare: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • KNOPPIX release version 7.7.1
  • Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Released

    Hot on the heels of the Moksha 0.2.1 desktop release I am happy to announce the stable release of Bodhi 4.0.0. I would like to start by extending a giant thank you to all of the Bodhi Team Members who made the release possible. Stefan, Sef, Charles, Ylee, Okra, Tristram, and all our users taking the time to report issues on the forums – this release would not have happened without all of your help. For those who are more interested in download links than the details here you go:

  • Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Released

    Hot on the heels of the Moksha 0.2.1 desktop release I am happy to announce the stable release of Bodhi 4.0.0. I would like to start by extending a giant thank you to all of the Bodhi Team Members who made the release possible. Stefan, Sef, Charles, Ylee, Okra, Tristram, and all our users taking the time to report issues on the forums – this release would not have happened without all of your help. For those who are more interested in download links than the details here you go:

  • Terminals

    To implement the terminal you could fix a Raspberry Pi or similar to the back of the screen. Could it be powered by the same PSU as the screen? Perhaps if the screen had a USB port.

  • Game: Sputnik Eyes now available on Tizen Store

    Game: Sputnik Eyes now available on Tizen Store

  • Android 7.0 Nougat update: Download and installation will bring 5 best features into the device.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Voice / Linux Magazine Merge

    Issue 32 is the last issue of Linux Voice as a stand-alone magazine as we have joined Linux Magazine. This newly merged magazine will bring the best bits of Linux Voice and Linux Magazine together into a single volume. All four of us Linux Voice founders will still be here contributing to the newly merged magazine – you’ll find us in the aptly named Linux Voice section. We’ll continue to write about the things that excite us in the world of open source software and we’ll continue making our popular podcast.

  • Linux Marketshare is Above 2-Percent For Third Month in a Row
  • Linux Marketshare Is Above 2-Percent For Third Month in a Row [Ed: Basing statistics about usage based on a Microsoft-connected firm. "Net Market Share" is like a rename of Net Applications. Evading negative publicity like Apple and Microsoft ties?]
  • BFQ I/O Scheduler Patches Revised, Aiming To Be Extra Scheduler In The Kernel

    FQ developers had hoped to replace CFQ in the mainline Linux kernel with Budget Fair Queueing for a variety of reasons but it hadn't ended up making it mainline. Now the developers are hoping to introduce BFQ back to mainline as an extra available scheduler.

    Paolo Valente on Wednesday published the latest patches dubbed "BFQ-v0" for adding it as an extra scheduler. He began by saying, "this new patch series turns back to the initial approach, i.e., it adds BFQ as an extra scheduler, instead of replacing CFQ with BFQ. This patch series also contains all the improvements and bug fixes recommended by Tejun, plus new features of BFQ-v8r5...On average CPUs, the current version of BFQ can handle devices performing at most ~30K IOPS; at most ~50 KIOPS on faster CPUs. These are about the same limits as CFQ. There may be room for noticeable improvements regarding these limits, but, given the overall limitations of blk itself, I thought it was not the case to further delay this new submission."

  • X.Org To Begin Accepting Donations Again

    The X.Org merger with the SPI is almost complete and the X.Org Foundation is soon going to begin accepting donations.

    Years ago the X.Org Foundation relied upon donations from Sun Microsystems, Intel, and the other big names to assemble their war-chest, but in the past few years they haven't really been pursuing donations from these big companies while their expenditures have continued with the annual XDC conference, X.org EVoC, travel expenses, and other costs.

  • More Details On Enlightenment's Ecore_Drm2 Atomic Modesetting

    Back in September the Enlightenment project's EFL library added atomic mode-setting and nuclear page-flipping support to provide a "perfect rendering" and a "buttery smooth" experience. Earlier this month was then an update on the Ecore_Drm2 state while coming out this week is a Samsung OSG blog post explaining more about the atomic mode-setting details.

  • Ecore_Drm2: How to Use Atomic Modesetting

    In a previous article, I briefly discussed how the Ecore_Drm2 library came into being. This article will expand on that article and provide a brief introduction to the Atomic Modesetting and Nuclear Pageflip features inside the new Ecore_Drm2 library.

  • Papirus Icon Theme Scores Big October Update
  • Network shutdown

    From our part we will try our best to make the migrating process as smooth and seamless as possible for our partners.
    Note that the most possible period for unavailability of our resources is this weekend, but there is some probability it may also occur on Friday 10/28/16.
    In the first place, this process is aimed to improve the quality of our services, so please be patient and cooperative.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/43

    The magic number this week is 6: that’s how many snapshots have been published since the last weekly review (1020, 1022, 1023, 1024, 1025 and 1026). Some of them were a bit larger than average (1026 – a big rebuild due to bash 4.4).

  • Identify constraint problems

    Until now it was not possible to easily identify if the constraints are the reaseon for your job to hang in state scheduled and not switching to building. That caused a lot of confusion for it was not clear what the problem is and if the state would change.

  • Option Market: Red Hat Inc Risk Hits A Substantially Lowered Level
  • KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Public Release
  • Linux Mint 18.1 codenamed “Serena”
  • Linux Mint 18.1 Slated For Release In November/December

    Clement Lefebvre has confirmed that Linux Mint 18.1 will still be shipping before the end of the year.

  • Video: Introducing Samsung ARTIK Cloud with Samsung Gear S2

    Samsung Electronics have previously announced SAMSUNG ARTIK Cloud™, which is an open data exchange platform designed to connect devices and applications. One of the goals of the SAMSUNG ARTIK Cloud is to provide developers the tools they need to securely connect to Internet of Things (IoT) devices, collect data and react to it accordingly.

    Companies can benefit from using open APIs and tools in order to accelerate their “time to market” and ultimately start monetizing their Investment. SAMSUNG ARTIK Cloud has a tiered pricing model, but the great thing is that you can actually start using it for FREE.

  • Game: Group Play Drag Racing in Tizen Store for Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3

    Remember the World Cricket Championship 2 game? The most rated cricket game in the Tizen Store by Nextwave Multimedia Pvt. Ltd. Today they have added a new game named “Group Play Drag Racing“. It’s a Racing game against 6 racers, and you have to use your gears to the best of your ability in order to be fast fast fast !

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Is The Penguin Tux Official Mascot of Linux? Because Torvalds Had Penguinitis!

    The official mascot of the Linux kernel developed by Linus Torvalds is a penguin named Tux. You might have thought about the probable reasons why a penguin has been used as the face of the Linux kernel. Some people believe that Torvalds was bitten by a penguin that’s why he chose one to represent his kernel.

  • SafeEyes – An Useful Linux Utility That Prevents Eye Strain

    Working in Computer for long hours is pain, and it will definitely affect your eyes. You must take some breaks for your eyes at regular intervals. There are numerous utilities available out there to remind you to take breaks. The one we are going to discuss now is SafeEyes. It is a free and open Source Linux alternative for EyeLeo, a MS Windows-only app. As the name suggests, SafeEyes will protect you from Eye Strain by reminding or forcing you to take breaks after a particular period of time. During the break, it will suggest you some simple exercises like walking for a while, rolling your eyes etc., to relax yourself. If you are a hardcore user who work on computers for long hours, I recommended you to use SafeEyes in your system.

  • Awwh, This Linux Wallpaper Is Adorable

    I pimped some Fedora community wallpapers yesterday, there was that (rather gorgeous) Ubuntu Timeline wallpaper a few weeks back, and the steam from hype-train that brought the “new” Ubuntu default wallpaper still lingers in the air a bit.

    So — honestly — I wanted so bad not to write about yet another wallpaper.

  • IBM DB2 database gets ‘significant advances’ across Windows, Linux and z/ OSs

    IBM put ‘significant advances’ into its database software DB2, helping companies lower their operating costs while bringing together transactions and analytics in the same database to increase the speed of real-time data analysis.

    The new DB2 will incorporate hybrid transactional analytical processing (HTAP) available for Linux, Unix, Windows, and z/OS in December

  • Spotify for Linux – In the friendzone

    Spotify is arguably the most popular music streaming service out there. Apologies to any diehard fanboys who may have been offended by this statement. With 100 million users and tight social media integration, it sure plays in the big league. You can also go premium and this will render your interface ad-free and fidelity-high.

    But what about Linux? As it turns out, Linux has never been high on the list of priorities for the Spotify team, and at some point, the support was discontinued, then it was revived recently, which prompted me to give it a try. Seeking originality and uniqueness in my work, I opted for Fedora, only to learn that only builds for Debian-based distributions are available. In other words, Ubuntu and friends. Very similar to my experience with Sayonara. Anyhow, let’s see what gives.

  • Benefits Of Using Lightweight Linux Distributions

    There are quite a few lightweight linux distributions around but why should you care especially when most of our PCs that are on the market boast some very fast multi-core processors, large volumes of RAM and very fast Solid State Drives. Sure they can bring new life to old machines but there are many other reasons why they could be awesome for you.Let me give you a few reasons you would so much benefit from going with a Lightweight Linux distribution.

  • Alpine Linux 3.4.5 Released with Linux Kernel 4.4.27 LTS, Latest Security Fixes

    A new maintenance update of the server-oriented Alpine Linux 3.4 operating system has been released, bringing a new Linux kernel version from the long-term supported 4.4 series and the latest security patches.

    According to the release notes, Alpine Linux 3.4.5 is now available as the most up-to-date version of the GNU/Linux distribution based on musl libc and BusyBox, it's powered by the Linux 4.4.27 LTS kernel, which was fully patched against the "Dirty COW" vulnerability, and includes numerous updated components and applications.

  • Upgrade OpenSUSE Leap to OpenSUSE Tumbleweed Rolling Release
  • ArchBang – Best Arch based distro for old or low-end hardware with high performance and low resource utilization

    Arch Linux is very unique, compare with other Linux distributions because it doesn’t comes with live ISO & Desktop Environment. Arch gives you the full freedom to customize the installation as you wish, When you boot up, you’ll be end up with a terminal and most of the people panic here because they don’t want to build from scratch.

    There are many, Actively developed Arch derived Linux distributions are available with pre-installed Desktop environment. I would advise you to go with any one distribution as you wish.

  • Red Hat Stock Sees Short Interest Make 21% Move
  • New Video Shows Changes Headed to Unity 8

    A new YouTube video claims to show an ‘quick overview of what’s to come to Unity 8’ in a future update.

    Uploaded by Kugi Javacookies (not sure if that’s his real name), the clip is described as offering a “quick overview of what’s to come soon to Unity 8. Since the silo has now been signed-off by QA, so it will probably land really soon.”

    Kugi adds that he finds it “awesome to actually follow projects even up to the small details. Codes in launchpad, actual projects in bileto and queued silos for QA testing in Trello. Really cool! :D”.

  • [Bodhi Linux] Modules and Themes in 4.0.0 Repos

    We will be stamping the 4.0.0 release as stable fairly soon and one the last pieces of that puzzle is getting all the “extras” for moksha into the repos. Users can now find the following modules and themes in the Bodhi 4.0.0 main repository for usage / testing:

  • Congatec’s first Apollo Lake COMs include SMARC 2.0 model

    Congatec announced three Linux-friendly COMs based on Intel’s new Atom E3900 SoC: a Qseven, a COM Express Compact, and one of the first SMARC 2.0 modules.

    Congatec is one of the first vendors to announce a major product lineup based on Intel’s newly announced, 14nm-fabricated Atom E3900 “Apollo Lake” SoCs. In addition to the Qseven form-factor Conga-QA5 and the COM Express Compact Type 6 CongaTCA5 modules, the company unveiled the Conga-SA5, which is billed as Congatec’s first SMARC 2.0 module. In fact, the Conga-SA5 appears to be the company’s first SMARC COM ever, and one of the first SMARC 2.0 models to be fully announced. (See more on SMARC 2.0 below.)

  • Intel launches 14nm Atom E3900 and spins an automotive version

    The Linux-ready Atom E3900 series, which was formally announced at the IoT Solutions World Congress in Barcelona on the same day as the start of ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, has already started rolling out to some 30 OEM customers, some of which have already announced products (see below). The first Apollo Lake based products will ship 2Q 2017, says Intel.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windows Btrfs Driver Updated With New Capabilities (WinBtrfs)
  • Install Laravel on Ubuntu 16.04
  • 'Tether' a very promising UE4 first-person adventure game will be coming to Linux

    It's not often a trailer leaves me begging for more, but 'Tether' [Steam Greenlight, Official Site] ticked all my boxes. The developer is using UE4 and claims the Linux builds are working as expected.

  • If you're in the mood for a decent Zombie survival game, don't pass up on Project Zomboid

    Project Zomboid [Steam, GOG, Official Site] is the rather good sandbox Zombie survival game from The Indie Stone, and it has come a long way!

    It doesn't have a SteamOS icon on Steam, as Valve removed it a long time ago as it (and a bunch of other games) wouldn't launch correctly on SteamOS. It works perfectly fine on a normal Linux distribution and I assure you the Linux version is still on Steam and perfectly up to date.

  • GTK+ 3.22.2 Deprecates APIs That Will Be Removed in GTK+ 4, Improves Win32 Theme

    Today, October 24, 2016, the GTK+ development team released the second stable maintenance update to the GTK+ 3.22 GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit for GNOME-based desktop environments.

    GTK+ 3.22.2 comes just two weeks after the release of GNOME 3.22.1 and in time for the upcoming GNOME 3.22.2 milestone, which will also be the last one pushed for the GNOME 3.22 series. GTK+ 3.22.2 is mostly a bugfix release, but also adds various improvements to the win32 theme and deprecates APIs (Application Programming Interface) that'll be removed in the next major branch, GTK+ 4.

  • No One Is Buying Smartwatches Anymore

    Remember how smartwatches were supposed to be the next big thing? About that...

    The market intelligence firm IDC reported on Monday that smartwatch shipments are down 51.6 percent year-over-year for the third quarter of 2016. This is bad news for all smartwatch vendors (except maybe Garmin), but it’s especially bad for Apple, which saw shipments drop 71.6 percent, according to the IDC report

    Apple is still the overall smartwatch market leader, with an estimated 41.3-percent of the market, but IDC estimates it shipped only 1.1 million Apple Watches in Q3 2016, compared with 3.9 million in 2015. To a degree, that’s to be expected, since the new Apple Watch Series 2 came out at the tail-end of the quarter. But the news is still a blow, when you consider how huge the Apple Watch hype was just 18 months ago.

  • 10 must-have Android apps for Halloween
  • What’s wrong with Git? A conceptual design analysis

    We finished up last week talking about the how to find good concepts / abstractions in a software design and what good modularization looks like. Today’s paper jumps 40+ years to look at some of those issues in a modern context and a tool that many readers of this blog will be very familiar with: Git. With many thanks to Glyn Normington for the recommendation.

    [...]

    The results of the reworking are made available in a tool called gitless, which I’ve installed on my system to try out for a few days. (Note: if you use oh-my-zsh with the git plugin then this defines an alias for gl which you’ll need to unalias). As of this paper (2013), Gitless was only just beginning as a project, but it continues to this day and tomorrow we’ll look at the 2016 paper that brings the story up to date.

    The kinds of concepts the authors are interested in are those which are essential to the design, to an understanding of the workings of the system, and hence will be apparent in the external interface of the system, as well as in the implementation.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more