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Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How did you get started with Linux?

    Linux has been around for quite a long time now, and there are always new folks finding their way to it. One Linux redditor recently asked how his fellow users got into Linux, and some of their answers are quite interesting.

  • Report: Linux, NoSQL, Nginx set foundation for AWS app dominance

    Sumo Logic’s report, entitled “The State of the Modern App in AWS,” uses statistics gathered from the company’s base of 1,200 customers to get an idea of how their apps are created and what they run on.

  • Sumo Logic Releases Groundbreaking 'State of Modern Applications in AWS Report'
  • Trends in High Performance NFV

    It’s clear that in the service provider space, using a standard cloud platform to deliver carrier-class applications may not be sufficient. Service provider applications such as virtual private networks (VPNs), VoIP, and other virtual network functions (VNFs) can’t always be delivered by a best-effort cloud approach.

  • Fujitsu and SUSE Expand Strategic Alliance to Develop and Support Open Source Products
  • Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 Available Now

    After entring Beta staged of development three weeks ago, Red Hat's commercial Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 and Red Hat Developer Toolset 6 suites are now generally available and ready for deployment in production environments.

    Prominent new features included in the Red Hat Software Collections 2.3 suite are the latest MySQL 5.7 and Redis 3.2 open-source databases, PHP 7.0 and Perl 5.24 dynamic open-source programming languages, along with the Git 2.9 open-source project management tool, Thermostat 1.6 Java virtual machine (JVM) monitoring utility, and Eclipse Neon 4.6.1 integrated development environment (IDE).

  • Fedora Hubs and Meetbot: A Recursive Tale

    One of the planned features of Fedora Hubs that I am most excited about is chat integration with Fedora development chat rooms. As a mentor and onboarder of designers and other creatives into the Fedora project, I’ve witnessed IRC causing a lot of unnecessary pain and delay in the onboarding experience. The idea we have for Hubs is to integrate Fedora’s IRC channels into the Hubs web UI, requiring no IRC client installation and configuration on the part of users in order to be able to participate. The model is meant to be something like this:

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff: 'The new Microsoft is actually the old Microsoft'

    Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has made it clear he's no longer a fan of the "new" Microsoft under CEO Satya Nadella.

    Speaking at the Code Conference on Monday, Benioff talked about the short-lived bromance between the two companies and how it all ended up falling apart in just two years.

    In particular, Benioff pointed to a meeting that took place between him and Microsoft's cloud boss, Scott Guthrie, that really killed the trust he had placed in the company.

    The story goes that Benioff took a meeting with Guthrie after Microsoft chairman John Thompson, a friend of his, connected the two last year. He believed the meeting was intended to share more about Salesforce's business in hopes of possibly becoming an Azure cloud customer one day. But that wasn't Microsoft's real goal, according to Benioff.

  • Linux hardware support, Creative Commons translation, and more open source news

    While many hardware enthusiasts get excited by the announcement and release of shiny new hardware products, those who are dedicated desktop Linux users have learned to temper their excitement with the reality that when devices lack proper drivers and adequate documentation, it'll take a while before they are made useful. The 2016 MacBook Pro seems to be no different. An early adopter reported that several devices: the built-in keyboard and mouse, as well as the SSD, don't work at all right now for him under Linux. While support may eventually come, it won't be immediate.

  • 2016 MacBook Pro can't run Linux

    There is a subset of the Linux community that likes running Linux on Apple hardware. Strange as it may sound, these users enjoy the virtues of Linux and the elegance of Apple’s computers. Unfortunately, it looks like the 2016 MacBook Pro is not currently compatible with Linux.

  • Don’t Leave Software Testers Out of DevOps
  • Tilling the Brownfield: Bumps on the Road to the Container Dream
  • The overengineering of ALSA userland

    This is a bit of an interesting corner case of a rant. I have not written this when I came up with it, because I came up with it many years ago when I actively worked on multimedia software, but I have only given it in person to a few people before, because at the time it would have gained too much unwanted attention by random people, the same kind of people who might have threatened me for removing XMMS out of Gentoo so many years ago. I have, though, spoken about this with at least one of the people working on PulseAudio at the time, and I have repeated this at the office a few times, while the topic came up.

  • Intel SDK OpenCL 2016 R3 Brings OpenCL 2.1 & SPIR-V To Linux

    Intel's SDK for OpenCL Applications 2016 Release 3 was quietly made available earlier this month and it offers some interesting Linux changes.

  • Radeon Open Compute 1.3 Platform Brings Polaris & Other Features
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 M2 Brings FlameGrapher, Other Improvements

    The second development milestone/test release of the upcoming Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana is now available for your cross-platform, open-source benchmarking needs.

  • CMake support in Qt Creator (and elsewhere?)

    Kitware released CMake version 3.7 on Friday night. There is one feature mentioned at the very bottom of the feature list that makes this a really exciting release for people writing tools that integrate with CMake: The server-mode.

  • Qt Creator Gets Excited For CMake Server-Mode

    With last week's CMake 3.7 release one of the less-advertised features is the build system's server-mode functionality, which is sure to excited integrated development environments (IDEs).

  • Lyon GNOME Bug day #1

    Last Friday, both a GNOME bug day and a bank holiday, a few of us got together to squash some bugs, and discuss GNOME and GNOME technologies.

    Guillaume, a new comer in our group, tested the captive portal support for NetworkManager and GNOME in Gentoo, and added instructions on how to enable it to their Wiki. He also tested a gateway related configuration problem, the patch for which I merged after a code review. Near the end of the session, he also rebuilt WebKitGTK+ to test why Google Docs was not working for him anymore in Web. And nobody believed that he could build it that quickly. Looks like opinions based on past experiences are quite hard to change.

  • Solus Linux Distribution Review

    Between Ubuntu, Fedora and OpenSUSE, you have a choice of well-supported distributions with lots of up-to-date software and commercial backing, as well as a choice of almost any desktop environment like GNOME, Unity or KDE.

    There are many others, however. Linux Mint brings the stability of Ubuntu with a more familiar desktop for ex-Windows users, while Elementary OS gives a more simplified, streamlined desktop which may fare well with ex-Mac users.

  • Springdale Linux 7.3 RC released
  • Black Lab Linux 8.0 released
  • Open Build Service in Debian needs YOU!

    openSUSE distributions’ build system is based on a generic framework named Open Build Service (OBS), I have been using these tools in my work environment, and I have to say, as Debian developer, that it is a great tool. In the current blog post I plan for you to learn the very basics of such tool and provide you with a tutorial to get, at least, a Debian package building.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, October 2016

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Monthly News – November 2016

    The latest XApps and the new MATE 1.16 desktop environment were pushed towards the Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” and LMDE 2 “Betsy” repositories.

    We just finished addressing some issues with MDM, and we’re currently working on a few compatibility issues which affect the Cinnamon screensaver in LMDE and in Slackware before announcing the official release of Cinnamon 3.2.

    We were expecting Cinnamon 3.2 to be out at the end of October and this probably will push the release of Linux Mint 18.1 into the month of December.

  • Top 20 Best Tizen Apps for October 2016

    Last month was a very busy month for the Tizen store as lots more games / apps have started being released on the Tizen platform. A recent boost to the ecosystem has been the launch of the world’s first 4G Tizen smartphone, the Samsung Z2, which has helped drive more Tizen apps to the store.

  • Game: SEA Conflict: Naval Artillery for Samsung Z1, Z2 and Z3

    Taking the role of a Coast Guard Ship, you will fight the Chinese, protecting South East Asia Sea. They will send various ships and you will need to be precise because of the winds, strong or light, you will need to aim correctly with the right amount of power.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • A few drawings about Linux

    For the last few days, I’ve been doing a drawing about Linux on my Twitter every day. Here they are.

    It’s been really lovely to see the response to these – some of these (like /proc) I’ve known about for quite a while, and it makes me really happy to hear “wow, I didn’t know that! That’s really cool!”

    I’ll try to keep up making one a day for the rest of November.

    Drawing these is a fun puzzle – I can’t draw most things (a cat? forget it!) so I need to figure out which things are within my capabilities (a lighting bolt? stars? hearts? okay!) and will communicate what I want.

  • GNU/Linux Still Relevant On The Desktop

    The future is now, I suppose. Lots of folks still have fleets of PCs running That Other OS. They don’t need to spend the time, money and freedom that OS demands. They can have Free Software with GNU/Linux to access their web-applications just as they do from their smartphones and tablets. There just isn’t much reason to depend on a tyrannical single-source for software for your PCs. Free Software is software you can run, examine, modify and distribute according to the accompanying licence. What a refreshing change to more and more difficult commandments than God makes for your soul. The cost of a licence is ~$0 too. It’s a bargain. You get to keep your soul and your money.

  • The status of kernel hardening

    At the 2015 Kernel Summit, Kees Cook said, he talked mostly about the things that the community could be doing to improve the security of the kernel. In 2016, instead, he was there to talk about what had actually been done. Kernel hardening, he reminded the group, is not about access control or fixing bugs. Instead, it is about the kernel protecting itself, eliminating classes of exploits, and reducing its attack surface. There is still a lot to be done in this area, but the picture is better than it was one year ago.

    One area of progress is in the integration of GCC plugins into the build system. The plugins in the kernel now are mostly examples, but there will be more interesting ones coming in the future. Plugins are currently supported for the x86, arm, and arm64 architectures; he would like to see that list grow, but he needs help from the architecture maintainers to validate the changes. Plugins are also not yet used for routine kernel compile testing, since it is hard to get the relevant sites to install the needed dependencies.

    Linus asked how much plugins would slow the kernel build process; linux-next maintainer Stephen Rothwell also expressed interest in that question, noting that "some of us do compiles all day." Kees responded that there hadn't been a lot of benchmarking done, but that the cost was "not negligible." It is, though, an important part of protecting the kernel.

  • Adaptive mutexes in user space

    One of the frustrations of computer programming (almost certainly shared with other engineering disciplines) is that, often, a simple, elegant, and general design doesn't work as well as an ugly hack. Such designs still have value as they are more maintainable and more extensible, so it is not uncommon to need to find a balance between simple elegance and practical efficiency. The story of futex support in Linux could be seen as a story of trying to find just this balance. The latest episode adds a new special case, but provides impressive performance improvements.

  • Announcement: GoboLinux 016 beta
  • Despite New FCC Rules, Linksys, Asus Say They'll Still Support Third Party Router Firmware

    The apocalypse for those who like to tinker with their router firmware may be postponed.

    Last year we noted how the FCC updated router and RF device rules for safety reasons, stating that some illegally modified router radios operating in the unlicensed bands were interfering with terminal doppler weather radar (TDWR) at airports. The rule changes prohibited tinkering with the just the RF capabilities of devices. But some sloppy FCC language worried tinker advocates and custom-firmware developers, who feared that because many routers have systems-on-a-chip (SOC) where the radio isn't fully distinguishable from other hardware -- vendors would take the lazy route and block third-party firmware entirely.

  • The Turris Omnia router: help for the IoT mess?

    The Turris Omnia router is not the first FLOSS router out there, but it could well be one of the first open hardware routers to be available. As the crowdfunding campaign is coming to a close, it is worth reflecting on the place of the project in the ecosystem. Beyond that, I got my hardware recently, so I was able to give it a try.

  • Slender Man Chapter 2: Now available in the Tizen Store

    Kenneth Lemieux has also made Chapter 1 ($0.99 and free) and it is now joined by Chapter 2 for $0.99.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Tresorit Offers Encrypted Cloud Storage for Linux Businesses

    Tresorit for Linux is an end-to-end encrypted file sharing service that allows teams to collaborate securely and easily.

  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 1.9.23 is now available.

  • A Number Of KDE Apps Will Be Dropped If They Don't Get Ported To KF5

    Around three dozen apps from the KDE Applications suite could be dropped if they don't see a port from kdelibs4 to KDE Frameworks 5 within the next year.

    A proposal laid out yesterday would make next summer's KDE Applications 17.08 release be the last to allow applications based on kdelibs4. After that, kdelibs4 applications would not be permitted given that KDE Frameworks 5 has already been around for a while and KDE4 is no longer maintained. In other words, there's just about one year to port the relevant applications to KF5 by interested developers otherwise they will not be present in KDE Applications 17.12.

  • November is Bugsquash month – Open Source Aalborg is joining

    Me and my friend Daniel from Open Source Aalborg will arrange that the local participants from the open source group in Aalborg will join in on the final bug squashing day, November the 30th. OS Aalborg has recently joined a lot of Capture the flag’s and I think we will try to put up some very basic infrastructure (read google forms + spreadsheet) to do something similar for the GNOME Bug Squashing initiative.

  • b2k16 hackathon report: Antoine Jacoutot on GNOME's path forward, various ports progress

    First task of this hackathon was for Jasper and I to upgrade to GNOME 3.22.1 (version 3.22.2 hit the ports tree since). As usual I already updated the core libraries a few days before so that we could start with a nice set of fully updated packages. It ended up being the fastest GNOME update ever, it all went very smoothly. We're still debating the future of GNOME on OpenBSD though. More and more features require systemd interfaces and without a replacement it may not make sense to keep it around. Implementing these interfaces requires time which Jasper and I don't really have these days... Anyway, we'll see.

  • Tea Time is a Simple Timer App for Ubuntu Desktops

    On the hunt for a simple timer app for Ubuntu? Look no further than this cute little tool, called Tea Time.

    Whether you’ve a pizza in the oven, want to set aside a specific study period, or are letting some posh tea steep in water, Tea Time will be right on time.

Xfce 4.14 and Fedora

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Misc
  • Many Xfce Package Updates Bring Stable GTK3 Support, Notifyd Gets Do-Not-Disturb

    While it's likely a long time before Xfce 4.14 gets released with full GTK3 tool-kit integration, there are some new Xfce4 package updates available this week.

    Xfce4-settings 4.13 is out and is a development release for the 4.13 series. This initial release marks Xfce Settings being fully-ported to GTK+ 3.x. That's the main change with this release is the port from GTK2 to GTK3 but some bugs do remain. There are some screenshots via this blog post.

  • Fedora Looks At Changing The Default Hostname For F26 & Beyond

    One of the most discussed items this week on the Fedora developers' mailing list is in regards to changing the hostname on Fedora 26 and future versions.

    Fedora has defaulted to localhost.localdomain but this is becoming a problem for systems acting as a client to FreeIPA and Active Directory domain controllers.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Techrights Turns 10 Years Old

    The site Techrights is turning 10 years old. Though now called Techrights, it was best known as Boycott Novell until 2010. It has become an internationally recognized site whose aim has been advocacy of digital rights with the goal of maximizing freedom, reducing surveillance, and generally promoting the sharing of knowledge. This, in turn, requires transparent systems, open licensing terms, no censorship, and active collaboration among parties. Its focus has always included the fight against software patents and in recent years it pays special attention to the goings on and intrigues within the European Patent Office and their attempt to bring by hook or crook software patents into Europe.

  • Lenovo releases BIOS for loading Linux on Yoga 900, IdeaPad 710S BIOS

    Lenovo took some heat from Linux users a few months ago when it was discovered that some of the company’s recent Windows laptops were configured in a way that blocked them from running Linux or other operating systems.

    Some saw a conspiracy, while others pointed out that it had to do with the lack of Linux drivers for the storage configuration in those laptops. Either way, the end result was that it was difficult, if not impossible to install Linux on a Lenovo Yoga 900 or IdeaPad 710 notebook.

  • After protest, Lenovo brings Linux compatibility to Yoga 900 and 900S [Ed: Techrights started the protest]

    Lenovo created a stir when it said the Yoga 900 and 900S hybrids would work only with Windows, not Linux. The company has now changed its stance, bringing Linux support to those PCs.

    The PC maker earlier this month issued a BIOS update so Linux can be loaded on Yoga 900, 900S and IdeaPad 710 models.

    The BIOS update adds an AHCI (Advance Host Controller Interface) SATA controller mode so users can load Linux on the laptops.

    This is a Linux-only BIOS, meaning it should be used only by those who want to load the OS. If you want to continue with Windows, do not load the firmware.

  • New Laptop / Problems with Windows part 896,324

    I had mentioned previously that I had been forced to purchase a new laptop. I decided that I didn't want another Thinkpad. The Lenovo ones no longer have the high quality they had in the IBM days and while support is still pretty good by todays dismal standards it's not worth the premium price. (If I'm buying it with my own money that is.) I had heard good thing about Dells' Linux support so I looked into their offerings and ended up buying a Precision 7510. Mind you this model came with Windows 7 installed but I didn't mind. As I wanted to install Debian according to my own specs anyway, I was ok with just knowing that the hardware would be compatible. So I prepared a Jessie USB installation stick (This model doesn't have a CD/DVD drive.) and shrunk down the Windows installation (but not deleted it altogether for reasons to be explained below.)

  • Mitchell Hashimoto talks about new technologies and DevOp tools

    A few weeks earlier, when I'd talked with him to kick off IT Pro's coverage of ATO, I purposefully didn't ask him about his upcoming conference talks because I didn't want to spoil it for him or his audience. That he would talk about DevOps tools was a given. After all, HashiCorp, the company he co-founded and where he's CTO, is known for tools like Vagrant, Packer, Terraform, Consul and Vault, which are designed to help DevOps secure and operate distributed application infrastructures. In this keynote he would be talking about automation tools in general. Later in the day, he'd conduct a workshop that would focus specifically on his company's products.

  • anytime 0.1.0: New features, some fixes

    A new release of anytime is now on CRAN following the four releases in September and October.

    anytime aims to convert anything in integer, numeric, character, factor, ordered, ... format to POSIXct (or Date) objects -- and does so without requiring a format string. See the anytime page for a few examples.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Agile, DevOps and the algorithmic enterprise [Ed: Buzzword, buzzword, and more buzzwords; what happened to technology journalism?]

    Mike Mason, technology activist and adviser to the CTO at ThoughtWorks, discusses the next big thing in technology, and how business and tech leaders should prepare

  • 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud
  • Linux Foundation Releases 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud
  • 'F*cking crap' aside, Linus Torvalds says Linux 4.9 is coming along nicely

    Linux 4.9 is coming along nicely, with Linus Torvalds emitting the fourth release candidate on Saturday evening.

    But before he got there, he offered a minor kernel mailing list explosion when developer Miklos Szeredi proposed “the concept of feature flags to allow backward incompatible changes to the overlay format” in overlayfs. Szeredi opined that the feature was long overdue.

    Torvalds disagreed that the feature was needed, never mind overdue. Another poster to the Linux Kernel Mailing List, Amir Goldstein, asked for clarification of Linus' thinking.

  • GXml: Objects and Collections to XML and back

    If your GObject class implements GomProperty interface, and is a property in your object, it will be translated to an Element attributes with a name and a text value.

    For simple types, this means you can control if an attribute is written or not, depending if it is not null. Standard properties, not GObject classes implementing GomProperty, they will be always written with its default value. This is, for example, a boolean will always use false by default.

  • EdLogics Addresses Health Literacy Gap with Linux Container and Cloud Solutions from Red Hat

    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that EdLogics, a health education-based consumer engagement company and innovator in game-based learning, has built its digital health literacy platform on container and cloud solutions from Red Hat, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, Red Hat JBoss Middleware, and Ansible by Red Hat. EdLogics’ Education-as-a-Service offering, based on Red Hat technology, is aiming to transform the way consumers learn about health and improve health literacy while simultaneously cutting consumer costs.

  • Linux Top 3: RHEL 7.3, Ubuntu Core 16 and 4MLinux 20.0

    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 was officially released on November 3, and now represent the leading edge of Red Hat's Linux enterprise efforts.

    Among the improvements that have landed in RHEL 7.3 are ease-of-use enhancements to SELinux as well as security compliance checking for container via the OpenSCAP protocol.

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