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Audiocasts/Shows: Cooking with Linux and This Week in Linux

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  • Cooking with Linux (Without a Net)

    It's Tuesday, and it's time for Cooking With Linux (without a net) where I do some live Linuxy and open source stuff, live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Today, we're going back to WSL and trying to run X Windows and we're going to take a Linux distribution most people have never heard of out for a spin.

  • Episode 28 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, check out some big distro release news from Fedora, CentOS, CoreOS, KaOS and more. There’s new versions of Firefox, Kdenlive, GNOME and Cinnamon available. Lubuntu announces their switch to LXQt by default. If you’re interested in learning Python, Humble Bundle has a great Python Development bundle available. Ubuntu 18.10’s codename was announced and some of the Ubuntu Flavours might be dropping support for 32bit ISOs in the 18.10 cycle. Google confirmed that Linux Apps are coming to ChromeOS. Then later in the show we’ll look at some gaming news from Atari and Valve, also some mobile news from Puri.sm and Android. All that and much more!

today's leftovers

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  • New Technologies Lead to New Linux and Cloud Training Options
  • Everything You Need to Know about the Cloud and Cloud Computing, Part II: Using the Cloud [Ed: Latest cloudwashing by IBM/LJ; just call it what it is: servers being pushed back to a mainframe era -- companies controlling all the servers.]
  • Kakoune: A Better Code Editor Heavily Inspired by Vim

    It comes with numerous text editing/writing tools such as contextual help, syntax highlighting, auto-completion while typing, and supports many different programming languages. It also implements multiple selections as an essential procedure for interacting with your text.

    In addition, Kakoune’s client/server architecture allows for multiple clients to connect to the same editing session.

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  • New in Qt 5.11: improvements to the model/view APIs (part 1)

    The Qt model/view APIs are used throughout Qt — in Qt Widgets, in Qt Quick, as well as in other non-GUI code. As I tell my students when I deliver Qt trainings: mastering the usage of model/view classes and functions is mandatory knowledge, any non-trivial Qt application is going to be data-driven, with the data coming from a model class.

  • Akademy 2019 Call for Hosts

    The organization of this year's Akademy is in full swing: the official conference program is out, we have had an insightful interview with one of the keynote speakers, another is coming soon, and attendees are already booking flights and accommodation. The #akademy IRC channel on Freenode and the Telegram group are buzzing with messages, advice and recommendations.

  • GNOME Is Removing the Ability to Launch Binary Apps from Nautilus

    Last year Nautilus lost the ability to show desktop icons — now GNOME developers plan to drop another familiar feature.

    According to a code commit on Gitlab the famous file manager is set to lose the ability to run binaries and launch apps directly.

    Or, to put it another way, you won’t be able to double-click on programs, scripts or apps to launch them using Nautilus.

  • Mageia Blog (English) : Issues with the Grand Update?

    This should not be needed, as 32-bit libraries should be able to co-exist on a 64 bit install, as they may be needed for third party applications.

    Bug 23016 has been reopened to study this a bit more. For now, we’re watching for reports, and giving you the workaround of uninstalling the 32 bit library.

    It’s not that 32-bit isn’t able to mix with 64-bit in all cases, just in some, where there are files in the lib package that should be in a different (non-arch specific) package. In these two cases, it’s the /usr/share/locale/ files are in both the 32 and 64 bit packages, with identical names and paths.

    The rpm package manager allows a file to be owned by more than one package, provided the attributes are identical, but it blocks updating with a new version, since it’s trying to update one of the packages, but until the other version is updated too, there is a conflict. We’re keeping a watch-out for these packaging errors.

    It’s possible that if you’ve used DNF to do the update, rather than urpmi, you won’t have this problem; as we gather more information, we’ll add it to roundups in the coming weeks.

    While all this Grand stuff has been happening, we’ve also been doing plenty of the usual things, including over 300 packages into Cauldron.

today's leftovers

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  • Following Microsoft’s lead, Google makes it easy to run Linux apps on ChromeOS [Ed: A Microsoft propaganda site spreads lies. I guess that author never heard of Crouton (which a Google employee developed a long time ago). Never mind cygwin on Windows, which goes nearly 2 decades back and wasn't the work of Microsoft. This is what happens when one drinks Microsoft Kool-Aid.]
  • InvoicePrinter 1.2

    A new version of my Ruby gem for generating PDF invoices InvoicePrinter is out! This time bringing in a bundled server that can be handy for applications not running on Ruby.

    Not every app out there is a Ruby application and I wanted for people on different stacks to be able to benefit from super simple PDF invoicing that InvoicePrinter enable. This is the reason why I implemented JSON support and a command line in version 1.1 and why am I adding the server in 1.2. You can run it as a standalone server or mount it in any Rack application and use its JSON API to generate the documents.

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  • How to Fix 503 Service Unavailable Error in WordPress
  • GSoC 2018 with KDE – Community bonding period

    The community bonding period ends today and the coding period begins.

    Community bonding period had been quite hectic for me with respect to learning new things and thinking of good ways to implement them. I didn’t know much about piano or other musical instruments (as I had never played them before) and was unaware of many notations and usages, but thanks to my mentor Emmanuel Charruau (allon on IRC) who suported me a lot and always cleared even my very silly doubts (as I myself was learning various elements of piano and its notations for the first time). He provided me all the resources step-by-step and helped me learn so much about the project in such less time.

    It was quite fun exploring new things and learn them which I would never had.

  • IWD: the new WPA-Supplicant Replacement

    IWD comes with a more secure approach. It doesn't use OpenSSL or GnuTLS. Instead it uses different Kernel functions for cryptographic operations.

  • Sky’s the limit as Cathay Pacific deploys Red Hat cloud

    Cathay Pacific has deployed Red Hat solutions and services to drive customer experience across the airline, transforming legacy infrastructure into a modern hybrid cloud architecture.

    Specifically, the carrier leveraged the vendor’s OpenStack Platform and OpenShift Container Platform offerings, in a bid to improve end-user experience through digital technologies.

    Based in Hong Kong, Cathay Pacific is an international airline offering passenger and cargo services to 200 destinations in 52 countries and territories worldwide.

  • Xilinx Virtex 7 FPGA bitstream reverse engineered

    While my article on HN is getting no traction I might as well post on here some fantastic news: The Xilinx Virtex 7 FPGA bitstream has been reverse engineered by Clifford Wolf.

    For some context this is a very popular and cheap series of FPGA devices. For example you can buy the Arty board which has one of these FPGAs for $99, or the slightly more advanced Nexys 4 DDR for $265.

today's leftovers

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  • Mark Text: FOSS Markdown Editor With Realtime Preview

    Mark Text is a fairly new free, open source Markdown editor for Linux, Windows and Mac. Aimed at improving your editing efficiency, the editor supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec.

    The application tries not to get in your way, by using a clean interface that tries to focus on your writing and nothing more, with a seamless live preview, while still allowing you to easily access its menu or see the current file name.

  • MySql DataTime/TimeStamp fields and Scala
  • Making Videos (that work in Firefox) from a Series of Images
  • Linux Fun – Play Old Classic Snake Game in Linux Terminal

    msnake is the Linux command line version of the most popular old classic snake game was written in C using ncurses library by Mogria and Timo Furrer. The game can be played at terminal with textual interface in almost all GNU/Linux distributions.

    The game is highly customizable and includes free/classic gameplay modes, keybindings, and even the GUI-like appearance of the application.

    To run msnake game on all modern Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Fedora and Arch Linux, simply install it from the snapd package management software as shown.

  • Linuxfx LTS 9.0

today's leftovers

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  • Purism's Librem 15 v2 Laptop Now Supported By Mainline Coreboot

    While Purism had already been shipping Coreboot on their Librem 15 v2 laptop two years ago and has already succeeded by their third revision that does have mainline Coreboot support, the support was merged today to Coreboot proper for the Librem 15 v2.

    Mainline Coreboot has already supported the earlier iteration of the original Librem 15, the newer and current Librem 15 v3, as well as the Librem 13. As of today the second version of the Librem 15 is now officially supported in its Git code-base. The Librem 15 v2 was their updated Broadwell-based like the Librem 15 v1 while the current-generation Librem 15 v3 is utilizing an Intel Skylake processor.

  • Opera 53 Web Browser Hits Stable with Revamped Appearance of Tabs, Address Bar

    Opera released today a new stable version of its Chromium-based web browser for computers, Opera 53, which is a minor update revamping the look of the tabs and the address bar.
    Based on the latest Chromium 66.0.3359.139 open-source web browser, Opera 53 is now rolling out to Linux, Mac, and Windows users worldwide with optimizations to how tabs are displayed on the tab bar when you have numerous tabs opened, especially for Mac users, making it easier to find a certain tab in the multitude of opened tabs.

    "Today, we’re transitioning Opera 53 from the beta line to stable. This build revamps the appearance of tabs and the address bar," said Krystian Kolondra, EVP Desktop at Opera. "Mac users find it difficult to locate and manage a particular tab when many of them are open. We figured out a way to optimize this and made your plentiful tabs’ favicons more visible."

  • Adaptive GNOME Web

    I started working on making GNOME Web work well on the Librem 5; to be sure it fits a phone's screen I want the windows to fit in a 360 points width, which is definitely small. To do so I started with the advices from Tobias Bernard to make Web have two modes that I named normal and narrow. The normal mode is Web as you know it, while the narrow mode moves all buttons from the header bar but the hamburger menu to a new action bar at the bottom, letting the windows reach yet unreachable widths.

  • GNOME Terminal: separate menu items for opening tabs and windows

    Astute users might have noticed that the GNOME Terminal binary distributed by Fedora has separate menu items for opening new tabs and windows, while the vanilla version available from GNOME doesn’t.

  • The Grand Update – brace yourselves!

    In the remaining hours before the hdlists are regenerated, and we can all update our Mageia 6 systems with more than 400 packages, here’s some info – very important info – about the update process.

    It’s vitally important that the update completes without interruption! Here’s what you need to do:

  • CentOS 7 1804 Linux Distro Available For Download: Here’s How To Update

    While making a list of free operating systems that can be used both as a daily use system as well as a server, CentOS gets an early mention. Based on RHEL base, CentOS is known for being a stable and manageable platform. Just recently, the developers have shipped the sixth CentOS-7 release.

  • Red Hat Summit: An introduction to OpenShift.io

    Red Hat OpenShift.io is an innovative online service for development teams. Installing and configuring IDEs, libraries, and various tools is a major time sink. OpenShift.io is a cloud-native set of zero-install tools for editing and debugging code, agile planning, and managing CI/CD pipelines. It also features package analytics (an unbelievably cool feature we’ll discuss more in a minute), and has various quick starts for common frameworks. Because everyone on the team uses the exact same tools, “It works on my machine” becomes a thing of the past.

    [...]

    One more thing: package analytics is an amazing feature. In Todd’s example, he added a package (the name of which we shall not mention) and the tools flagged it as having a security vulnerability. This is done in an elegant, friendly UI as opposed to a text message you might not notice in a console. In addition, the product uses machine learning to analyze your project. If you’re using an unusual combination of packages, the tools let you know. That might not be a problem, but it’s a sign that you might want to re-examine your choices. To quote Todd, package analytics is “freaky, freaky cool.”

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  • [Slackware] Moving to OpenSSL 1.1.0 and Firefox 60
  • [Slackware] May ’18 security update for Adobe Flashplayer

    Here’s the latest security update for Adobe’s Flash Player plugins.

    The version 29.0.0.171 of the flashplayer-plugin (NPAPI plugin for Mozilla based browsers) and the chromium-pepperflash-plugin (PPAPI plugin for Chromium based browsers) was released yesterday and you can find Slackware packages for it in my repository.

  • [DNG] Devuan "ASCII" 2.0 Release Candidate
  • Systemd-free Devuan Linux looses version 2.0 release candidate

    Devuan Linux, the Debian fork that offers "init freedom" has announced the first release candidate for its second version.

    Dubbed "ASCII", Devuan 2.0 uses Debian Stretch as its base, doesn't use Systemd, and reached beta in February 2018.

    This week, the developers behind the distro announced ASCII's first release candidate, along with news that the installer "now offers a wider variety of Desktop Environments including XFCE, KDE, MATE, Cinnamon, LXQT (with others available post-install)."

    "In addition, there are options for 'Console productivity' with hundreds of CLI and TUI utils, as well asa minimal base system ideal for servers," the team stated.

  • Yet Another Message Bug Crashes iPhones, iOS 11.3 and iOS 11.4 Affected

    The message bug crashing WhatsApp on Android is now hitting iPhones as well, only that in Apple’s ecosystem it breaks down Messages to a point where it’s fairly difficult to bring it back.
    Specifically, a specially crafted message that includes invisible Unicode characters causes the Messages app on an iPhone to crash completely. The app no longer launches, despite the typical workarounds like forced closes or phone reboots.

    At this point, the message bug appears to spread online with the following string of emoji, though it’s worth noting that the body can be easily modified by anyone, as long as the invisible Unicode characters are still there:

today's leftovers

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  • CNCF’s CloudEvents Spec Could Facilitate Interoperability across Serverless Platforms

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) wants to foster greater interoperability between serverless platforms, through its release of the CloudEvents specification. The project is at version 0.1 iteration, and hopes that it will be approved as a CNCF sandbox project in June.

    The CloudEvents specification provides (formerly called OpenEvents) a path that would allow any two components to transfer an event, regardless of whether they are functions, apps, containers or services, said Doug Davis, an IBM senior technical staff member at IBM and a member of the CNCF serverless working group.

    “Much in the same way HTTP — in its most basic form — helped interoperability between any two components by standardizing how to represent well-defined metadata about the message being transferred, CloudEvents is doing the same thing,” said Davis. “Defining the common metadata will aid in the transferring of an event from any producer to any consumer.”

  • GNOME Announces New Internship Program For Complex Projects

    Complementing GNOME's involvement in Google Summer of Code and Outreachy, the GNOME Foundation has announced a new internship program aimed for more complex projects.

    This new internship program is higher-paying due to greater complexity: the foundation will pay interns $8,000 USD for three months of work.

    The first round of internship projects are open for USB protection via USBGuard for fending off USB-based attacks, improved credentials management via a new program, a new PipeWire portal system, private session support for the desktop, crypto hardware enablement like making TPMs easier to use, and location aware policies/security handling.

  • Microsoft Brings Ubuntu Linux To Windows 10 On ARM; More Distros To Follow
  • CodeWeavers has Released CrossOver 17.5.0 for Linux and MacOS

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 17.5.0 for both macOS and Linux. CrossOver 17.5.0 has many improvements to the core Windows compatibility layer and also specific enhancements for several popular applications.

today's leftovers

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  • Bcachefs File-System Is Working On Going Upstream In The Linux Kernel

    Kent Overstreet who has been spending the past few years working on the Bcachefs file-system born out of the BCache block cache technology is now starting work on upstreaming the code to the mainline kernel.

    For facilitating an easier review process, he begun by sending out the patches for the on-disk data structures and ioctl interface exposed to user-space. This is just over one thousand lines of code while the entire file-system implementation is more than fifty thousand lines of new code.

  • ROCm 1.8 Beta Packages Available For Radeon GPU Compute/OpenCL Testing

    While ROCm 1.7.2 is the latest stable release for this Radeon GPU compute stack, there are 1.8.0 beta packages available for testing.

    A few days ago AMD developers quietly made available ROCm 1.8 beta packages for Ubuntu 16.04 and RHEL/CentOS 7.4.

  • Docker for Desktop is Certified Kubernetes

    “You are now Certified Kubernetes.” With this comment, Docker for Windows and Docker for Mac passed the Kubernetes conformance tests. Kubernetes has been available in Docker for Mac and Docker for Windows since January, having first being announced at DockerCon EU last year. But why is this important to the many of you who are using Docker for Windows and Docker for Mac?

    Kubernetes is designed to be a platform that others can build upon. As with any similar project, the risk is that different distributions vary enough that applications aren’t really portable. The Kubernetes project has always been aware of that risk – and this led directly to forming the Conformance Working Group. The group owns a test suite that anyone distributing Kubernetes can run, and submit the results for to attain official certification. This test suite checks that Kubernetes behaves like, well, Kubernetes; that the various APIs are exposed correctly and that applications built using the core APIs will run successfully. In fact, our enterprise container platform, Docker Enterprise Edition, achieved certification using the same test suite You can find more about the test suite at https://github.com/cncf/k8s-conformance.

  • Redesigning the lock screen

    Last November we had a small hackfest in London, focused on GNOME Shell design. We explored various themes during the hackfest and came up with a bunch of initial designs, which we’ve subsequently been developing. The main area of recent work has been the login and unlock experience. The rest of this post gives an overview of the design that we’ve come up with.

  • Trello Alternative Project Management Tool Zenkit is Now Available as Snap Package

    Brief: Project management app Zenkit is now available as a Snap application for Linux desktop.

    Zenkit – in case you did not know – is a collaboration tool for managing projects and tasks for work just like Trello. And, recently, Zenkit released a “snap” on Snapcraft which enables you to use Zenkit on any Linux distribution without having to worry about updates and stability.

  • Starting Up With Xubuntu

    Xubuntu is a variant of Ubuntu without GNOME as its default desktop environment. It comes with XFCE desktop environment, and X-F-C-E just pronounced as it is, is not an abbreviated word at all.

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  • Qualcomm announces support for 'fast commercial availability' of Android P

    Qualcomm announced today that it's working with Google to get Android P to more devices, sooner. The chipmaker had early access to the new OS version, allowing it to optimize its Snapdragon 845, 660, and 636 processors "to ensure readiness for OEMs to upgrade to Android P at the time of launch."

today's leftovers

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  • Windows 10 update bug locks machines running Chrome, Cortana and others

    Microsoft working on fix for machines and suggests temporary solutions to bug caused by installation of April 2018 update

  • How Kubernetes Aligns with Cisco's Intent Based Networking

    Cisco first announced its Intent Based Networking strategy in June 2017 and has expanded it with assurance and IoT capabilities in the months since.

    "Intent Based Networking is really a big step from traditional networking where you log in and configure individual switches and configuration is supposed to match some goal," Tucker said. "When you reverse that, you become explicit, and say here is what i want to achieve. and let automation make it so."

    "Kubernetes is starting right from that premise," Tucker added. "It has always been about, here is the model i want to see in the world and then the Kuberentes engine makes that so."

    In Tucker's view, the Kubernetes model is going to fit very well with Cisco's intent based networking model as well.

  • The Last Of The X.Org Server 1.20 Patches Posted

    Release manager Adam Jackson has sent out the last planned patches for integrating into xorg-server 1.20 prior to its long-awaited release.

    On Monday were four more patches with the final cleanups and polish for this X.Org Server update that's been in the making for more than the past year and a half.

  • My Free Software Activities in April 2018

    My monthly report covers a large part of what I have been doing in the free software world. I write it for my donors (thanks to them!) but also for the wider Debian community because it can give ideas to newcomers and it’s one of the best ways to find volunteers to work with me on projects that matter to me.

today's leftovers

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today's leftovers

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  • Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu Flavours, GIMP 2.10, FFmpeg 4.0, neofetch, Clonezilla | This Week in Linux 27
  • The ultimate guide to EAPI 7

    Back when EAPI 6 was approved and ready for deployment, I have written a blog post entitled the Ultimate Guide to EAPI 6. Now that EAPI 7 is ready, it is time to publish a similar guide to it.

    Of all EAPIs approved so far, EAPI 7 brings the largest number of changes. It follows the path established by EAPI 6. It focuses on integrating features that are either commonly used or that can not be properly implemented in eclasses, and removing those that are either deemed unnecessary or too complex to support. However, the circumstances of its creation are entirely different.

  • Hands on with Docker, openSUSE Leap 15

    This blog is part of a series of technical blogs leading up to the release of openSUSE Leap 15. All of the blogs provide a use case regarding openSUSE Leap and the packages available in the distribution. Happy reading.

    [...]

    Docker implements a high-level Application Programming Interface to provide lightweight containers that run processes in isolation.

    Because Docker containers are so lightweight, a single server or virtual machine can run several containers simultaneously.

  • LXD Clusters: A Primer

    Since its inception, LXD has been striving to offer a fresh and intuitive user experience for machine containers. LXD instances can be managed over the network through a REST API and a single command line tool. For large scale LXD deployments, OpenStack has been the standard approach: using Nova LXD, lightweight containers replace traditional hypervisors like KVM, enabling bare metal performance and very high workload density. Of course OpenStack itself offers a very wide spectrum of functionality, and it demands resources and expertise. So today, if you are looking for a simple and comprehensive way to manage LXD across multiple hosts, without adopting an Infrastructure as a Service platform, you are in for a treat.

  • Rugged, Ubuntu-ready computers are on a mission from Intel

    Diamond has launched three rugged, Linux-friendly “SabreCom” mission computers with MIL-spec connectors and IP67 protection, based on its Aries (Bay Trail), Venus (Skylake), and Zeta (Apollo Lake) boards with mini-PCIe and PC/104 expansion.

  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC offers eMMC and dual mini-PCIe slots

    Aaeon’s 3.5-inch “GENE-APL6” SBC ships with an Intel Apollo Lake SoC, SATA storage, a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, and mini-PCIe, and up to 128GB eMMC.

  • Star Wars Jedi Challenges Gets Lightsaber Versus Mode, Version 0.1 of Kubeflow Released, Arch Linux 2018.05.01 Snapshot Now Available and More

    Google today announced the release of version 0.1 of the open-source Kubeflow tool, which is "designed to bring machine learning to Kubernetes containers". According to TechCrunch, "the idea behind the project is to enable data scientists to take advantage of running machine learning jobs on Kubernetes clusters. Kubeflow lets machine learning teams take existing jobs and simply attach them to a cluster without a lot of adapting."

  • DigitalOcean Brings Kubernetes Orchestration to Its Cloud Platform

    Developer focused cloud company DigitalOcean is bringing Kubernetes to its platform and upping its CNCF membership from silver to gold.

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GNOME Foundation to Receive $1M from Anonymous Donor over Next Two Years

The donation was made by an anonymous person, though the money will be received by the GNOME Foundation over the next couple of years. Honored by this gesture, the team pledges to use the money to hire more developers and streamline their operations to improve the GNOME desktop environment. "We are honored by the trust given to us and will work hard to justify that trust. This particular donation will enable us to support the GNOME project more widely, and tackle key challenges that the free software community faces," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director of GNOME Foundation. Read more

UP Core Plus SBC launches with Cyclone 10 and Myriad 2 AI add-ons

Aaeon has launched an “UP AI Edge” family of products that builds on a new Apollo Lake based “UP Core Plus” SBC with stacking AI companion boards based on the Movidius Myriad 2 or Intel Cyclone 10GX plus add-ons including a quad-GbE board and a camera. Aaeon Europe quickly met its modest $11K Kickstarter goal for the new UP AI Edge ecosystem, which builds on its UP board products and community. The centerpiece is a new UP Core Plus SBC, although the official, Ubuntu-equipped UP AI Edge development package uses the larger, more feature-rich UP Squared SBC. Read more

MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

Roughly fourteen full phases of the moon ago, I wrote an article on MX Tools, a unique and useful bunch of dedicated utilities packaged with the MX Linux distribution. This toolbox offered the ordinary (or new) MX Linux user a chance to perform some common configuration tasks with easy and elegance. In general, MX-16 was a great player, and the recent MX-17 is even better - and at a first glance, so is the new version of MX Tools bundled with the system. Good stuff. So I set about testing, to see what has changed, and in what way this set of utilities has improved, if at all. But I'm positive. Let us commence. [...] MX Tools turned out to be a predictable gem, just as I'd expected. Well, I'm cheating, because I wrote this article after some rather thorough testing. But then, if you look across the wider spectrum of Linux home distributions, there aren't that many unique players with distinctive features. Quite often, it's the rehash of old and familiar with some extra color, polish and rebranding. MX Linux goes the extra mile (or kilometer, if you will) in making the newbie experience meaningfully different. Future improvements could potentially include an interactive walkthrough - so users will be actively prompted and helped along in their tasks. Then of course, there's the matter of visual appearance, in the UI itself. But in general, MX Tools TNG is better than we had before. More elegant, more streamlined, better looking, and most importantly, more practical. This is a good and useful toolbox, and it makes a solid distro even more appealing. Well worth testing. So do it. And take care. Read more

The story of Gentoo management

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference. What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table. Read more