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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Windows 10 switchover will cost Linux champion Munich €50m

    A major factor driving the decision to return to Windows appears to be changes in the political make-up of the council since the LiMux project began in 2003. Today the CSU political party, which has a long track record of opposition to LiMux, is also part of the ruling coalition in Munich. It was this coalition of CSU and SPD politicians that put forward the proposals to switch back to Windows 10 earlier this year.

  • Introducing BuildKit

    BuildKit is a new project under the Moby umbrella for building and packaging software using containers. It’s a new codebase meant to replace the internals of the current build features in the Moby Engine.

  • Containers and Kubernetes: What's next?

    If you want a basic idea of where containers are headed in the near future, follow the money. There’s a lot of it: 451 Research projects that the overall market for containers will hit roughly $2.7 billion in 2020, a 3.5-fold increase from the $762 million spent on container-related technology in 2016.

    There’s an obvious fundamental factor behind such big numbers: Rapidly increasing containerization. The parallel trend: As container adoption grows, so will container orchestration adoption.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces 2018 Events Schedule
  • Top 10 Moments in 2017 Linux Foundation Events
  • Marek Posts Gallium3D HUD Multi-Context Support

    Marek Olšák's latest project has been adding support for multi-context applications to the Gallium3D Heads-Up Display (HUD).

  • Updates from last 3 weeks or so...

    I took part in Codechef's November Challenge (which stretched from 3rd till 13th of Nov.) intermittently solving some of the tough problems (not necessarily quickly) to keep a track of my progress and increase my comfort in solving problems in a long contest setting.

  • Kodi Linux distro LibreELEC gets final Krypton update

    LibreELEC is a fantastic open source Linux-based operating system designed to run Kodi. It is particularly well suited for devices like Raspberry Pi. If you want to build your own Kodi box, it's ideal.

    Today, the LibreELEC team releases a new build that it expects will be the last from the current branch -- going forward the focus will be firmly on LibreELEC (Leia) 9.0 development.

  • Slackware Plasma5 updates for November

    I have uploaded my November ’17 set of Plasma 5 packages for Slackware 14.2 and -current. KDE 5_17.11 contains: KDE Frameworks 5.40.0, Plasma 5.11.3 and Applications 17.08.3. All based on Qt 5.9.2 for Slackware-current and Qt 5.7.1 for Slackware 14.2.
    For Slackware -current there’s again a choice of ‘latest‘ and ‘testing‘ where the ‘testing’ repository contains 17 recompiled packages that provide a Wayland compositor stack. This means you have a working Plasma5 Wayland session if you use ‘testing‘ as opposed to ‘latest‘.

    The ‘testing‘ repository is for… testing. Do not use those packages on a production environment unless you are familiar with Slackware, debugging graphical sessions and know your way around slackpkg/slackpkg+.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Analysts Remain Upbeat Despite 0.26% Gain
  • Introducing the UP² Grove IoT development kit with Ubuntu

    As computing at the edge grows, so does the need to connect a flurry of IoT devices directly into a device that can do advanced analytics and processing. The whole journey from prototype to production is often bumpy, having to switch from a tangle of wires and development boards to production hardware: portability issues, lack of performance and so on. To help address this, Canonical is working with Intel, Arduino, AAEON and SEEED to deliver the UP² Grove IoT development kit. In short, it has the simplicity of development of Ubuntu Server, the connectivity options of Arduino, the community support of these 2 ecosystems and a clear path to production with support for the board and the software stack.

  • LXD Weekly Status #24: LXD 2.20

    The highlight of this week was the release of LXD 2.20 which introduces a number of exciting new features.

    LXD 2.20 should now be available everywhere through both native packages and snap.
    We also started the process of deprecating the various LXD PPAs, see below for details.

Videos: Akademy 2017 Talk, Upgrading Linux Mint, This Week in Linux

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Misc
  • Akademy 2017 talk

    The talk by Jean-Baptiste Mardelle’s at Akademy 2017 is released along with many other interesting talks.

    Akademy is the annual world summit of KDE, one of the largest Free Software communities in the world. It is a free, non-commercial event organized by the KDE Community.

  • How To In-place Upgrade Linux Mint

    This video shows how to upgrade Linux Mint from 17.3 to 18.3 while keeping all of your personal data intact.

    Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks! Also check out http://www.ezeelinux.com for more about Linux.

  • Linux Kernel 4.14, Firefox Quantum, Fedora 27, Munich? Meh | This Week in Linux 14

    On this episode of This Week in Linux. The first 6 Year LTS Linux Kernel was released this week. Huge Update from Mozilla with Firefox Quantum. New distro releases from Fedora and Slax.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Linus is right (as usual)

    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable.

    This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs.
    The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.

  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes

    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies.

    One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.

  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • [LabPlot] Improved data fitting in 2.5

    Until now, the fit parameters could in principle take any values allowed by the fit model, which would lead to a reasonable description of the data. However, sometimes the realistic regions for the parameters are known in advance and it is desirable to set some mathematical constrains on them. LabPlot provides now the possibility to define lower and/or upper bounds for the fit parameters and to limit the internal fit algorithm to these regions only.

  • [GNOME] Maps Towards 3.28

    Some work has been done since the release of 3.26 in September. On the visual side we have adapted the routing sidebar to use a similar styling as is used in Files (Nautilus) and the GTK+ filechooser.

  • MX 17 Beta 2
  • MiniDebconf in Toulouse

    I attended the MiniDebconf in Toulouse, which was hosted in the larger Capitole du Libre, a free software event with talks, presentation of associations, and a keysigning party. I didn't expect the event to be that big, and I was very impressed by its organization. Cheers to all the volunteers, it has been an amazing week-end!

  • DebConf Videoteam sprint report - day 0

    First day of the videoteam autumn sprint! Well, I say first day, but in reality it's more day 0. Even though most of us have arrived in Cambridge already, we are still missing a few people.

    Last year we decided to sprint in Paris because most of our video gear is stocked there. This year, we instead chose to sprint a few days before the Cambridge Mini-Debconf to help record the conference afterwards.

  • Libre Computer Board Launches Another Allwinner/Mali ARM SBC

    The Tritium is a new ARM single board computer from the Libre Computer Board project.

    Earlier this year the first Libre Computer Board launched as the Le Potato for trying to be a libre and free software minded ARM SBC. That board offered better specs than the Raspberry Pi 3 and aimed to be "open" though not fully due to the ARM Mali graphics not being open.

  • FOSDEM 2018 Will Be Hosting A Wayland / Mesa / Mir / X.Org Developer Room

    This year at the FOSDEM open-source/Linux event in Brussels there wasn't the usual "X.Org dev room" as it's long been referred to, but for 2018, Luc Verhaegen is stepping back up to the plate and organizing this mini graphics/X.Org developer event within FOSDEM.

  • The Social Network™ releases its data networking code

    Facebook has sent another shiver running up Cisco's spine, by releasing the code it uses for packet routing.

    Open/R, its now-open source routing platform, runs Facebook's backbone and data centre networks. The Social Network™ first promised to release the platform in May 2017.

    In the post that announced the release, Facebook said it began developing Open/R for its Terragraph wireless system, but since applied it to its global fibre network, adding: “we are even starting to roll it out into our data center fabrics, running inside FBOSS and on our Open Compute Project networking hardware like Wedge 100.”

  • Intel Icelake Support Added To LLVM Clang

    Initial support for Intel's Icelake microarchitecture that's a follow-on to Cannonlake has been added to the LLVM/Clang compiler stack.

    Last week came the Icelake patch to GCC and now Clang has landed its initial Icelake enablement too.

  • Microsoft's Surface Book 2 has a power problem

     

    Microsoft’s Surface Book 2 has a power problem. When operating at peak performance, it may draw more power than its stock charger or Surface Dock can handle. What we’ve discovered after talking to Microsoft is that it’s not a bug—it’s a feature.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Blockchain Moves Beyond its 'Moonshot' Phase
  • Some reading

    I've complained previously about disliking benchmarking. More generally, I'm not really a fan of performance analysis. I always feel like I get stuck at coming up with an approach to "it's going slower, why" beyond the basics. I watched a video of Brendan Gregg's talk from kernel recipes, and ended up going down the black hole1 of reading his well written blog. He does a fantastic job of explaining performance analysis concepts as well as the practical tools to do the analysis. He wrote a book several years ago and I happily ordered it. The book explains how to apply the USE method to performance problems across the system. This was helpful to me because it provides a way to generate a list of things to check and how to check them. It addresses the "stuck" feeling I get when dealing with performance problems. The book also provides a good high level overview of operating systems concepts. I'm always looking for references for people who are interested in kernels but don't know where to start and I think this book could fill a certain niche. Even if this book has been out for several years now, I was very excited to discover it.

  • Introducing container-diff, a tool for quickly comparing container images

    The Google Container Tools team originally built container-diff, a new project to help uncover differences between container images, to aid our own development with containers. We think it can be useful for anyone building containerized software, so we’re excited to release it as open source to the development community.

  • NATTT – A Modern Multi-Platform Time Conscious Tracker App

    It’s not that there aren’t already a lot of time tracker apps but my conscience wouldn’t let me sleep if I didn’t tell you about NATTT. So grab your cup of whatever you’re probably drinking as we delve into this app a little.

    NATTT is an acronym for “Not Another Time Tracking Tool”; a free and multi-platform app with which you can keep track of your work and how much you have spent at it.

  • Running Bitcoin node and ElectrumX server
  • todo.txt done
  • GNOME's Calendar & TODO Applications Are Looking Better For v3.28

    Adding to the growing list of changes for GNOME 3.28 are improvements to the Calendar and To Do applications by Georges Stavracas.

    Stavracas has been reworking the month view of GNOME Calendar and it's looking much better, some applications for Calendar via libdazzle, and more.

  • Compact DAQ systems offer a choice of 12- or 16-bit I/Os

    Advantech’s Linux-ready “MIC-1810” and “MIC-1816” DAQ computers offer 12- and 16-bit analog I/O, respectively, plus 24x DIOs, Intel CPUs, and 4x USB ports.

    Advantech’s MIC-1810 and MIC-1816 are digital acquisition computers that run Linux or Windows 7/8/10 on Intel 3rd Gen “Ivy Bridge” processors. If the aging CPU is a turn-off, keep in mind that many DAQ applications don’t require that much processing power, and perhaps Advantech’s “entry-level” label for the systems extends to the price, as well. The 165 x 130 x 59mm, DIN-rail mountable systems should also prove useful for environments with limited space.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • How to Install OpenVPN on CentOS 7
  • How to turn your website into a desktop app
  • The Quantum of Firefox: Why is this one unlike any other Firefox?

    The Mozilla Foundation has officially launched a radical rewrite of its browser, a major cross-platform effort to regain relevance in a world that seems to have forgotten Firefox. The much-rewritten browser claims to be 30 per cent faster with half the memory load, although this comes at the cost of compatibility, as Scott Gilbertson found here.

    The proof’s in the pudding, and this pudding doesn’t feel like the old Firefox behemoth at all. It’s long overdue.

    "Firefox is 13 years old – and very few applications have been around for 13 years without accruing technical debt,” Nick Nguyen, Mozilla’s VP of technology told us.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • AMD Stoney Ridge Audio Supported By Linux 4.15

    The sound driver changes have been submitted for the Linux 4.15 kernel and includes finally supporting AMD Stoney Ridge hardware.

    Takashi Iwai of SUSE today sent in the sound updates for the Linux 4.15 kernel window. The noteworthy mentions are a new AC97 bus implementation and AMD Stoney platform support. There was also some hardening work of USB audio drivers, cleanups to the Intel ASoC platform code, and a variety of other low-level changes.

  • ​Kubernetes vendors agree on standardization

    Everyone and their uncle has decided to use Kubernetes for cloud container management. Even Kubernetes' former rivals, Docker Swarm and Mesosphere, have thrown in the towel. Mesosphere came over in early October and Docker added Kubernetes support later the same month. There was only question: Would all these Kubernetes implementations work together? Thanks to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), the answer is yes.

  • Igalia is Hiring

    Igalia is hiring web browser developers. If you think you’re a good candidate for one of these jobs, you’ll want to fill out the online application accompanying one of the postings. We’d love to hear from you.

    We’re especially interested in hiring a browser graphics developer. We realize that not many graphics experts also have experience in web browser development, so it’s OK if you haven’t worked with web browsers before. Low-level Linux graphics experience is the more important qualification for this role.

  • Lunduke goes 100% indie – Leaves SUSE & Network World

     

    It also means that I am completely independent.  I am not employed by any company that can influence the words that I say or the topics that I cover.

  • Writing Installer Images Directly With WebUSB
  • End of PHP 7.2 FTBFS marathon
  • Compact COM Express-based subsystem packs plenty of DAQs
  • Microsoft Sued Over ‘Baseless’ Piracy Threats

     

    Microsoft and the BSA are accusing Rhode Island-based company Hanna Instruments of pirating software. Despite facing threats of millions of dollars in damages the company maintains its innocence, backed up by license keys and purchase receipts. The BSA's lawyers are not convinced, however, so Hanna have decided to take the matter to court.  

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux 4.14 Release Provides Long Term Support and Larger Memory Limits

    Linus Torvalds officially released the Linux 4.14 kernel on Nov. 12, providing users of the open-source operating system with new features and long term support. Linux 4.14 is a special release in that it has been designated as an LTS (Long Term Support) meaning that it will be maintained for at least the next two years.

    Linux 4.14 is the fifth new major Linux kernel release in 2017, following the Linux 4.13 kernel that debuted on Sept. 3.

    "Go out and test the new 4.14 release, that is slated to be the next LTS kernel - and start sending me pull request for the 4.15 merge window," Torvalds wrote in his release announcement.

  • Intel Vulkan Driver Preparing For Faster MSAA Performance

    Jason Ekstrand of Intel who contributes significantly to the development of their open-source "ANV" Vulkan driver has prepped a new patch series.

  • VP's ARMA 3 1.76 beta now out, compatible with Windows for now

    As stated by Bohemia Interactive themselves, this means the game is at least temporarily compatible with the Windows version when it comes to multiplayer. However, there are no guarantees that the Linux port will remain in sync with the Windows version when the game next updates

  • We Are Likely To See More Vulkan Driver Fixes From Feral

    Feral developer Alex Smith is requesting commit rights to the Mesa code-base.

    Alex Smith is the developer at the Linux/macOS game porting company Feral Interactive who previously worked on AMD_shader_info for RADV, various Vulkan driver bug fixes, and other RADV updates as well as some minor work too for the Intel ANV driver.

  • My Free Software Activities in October 2017

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Rakuten TV to add more 4K HDR content for Samsung TV Plus

    The European video-on-demand (VOD) service Rakuten TV has announced that it will release 100 Ultra HD HDR movies for Samsung Smart TVs by the end of this year.

    According to Rakuten TV (formerly Wuaki.tv), titles like Baywatch, Transformers: The Last Knight, Baby Driver and Spider-Man: Homecoming are already available in 4K HDR quality. They will be adding more to the list soon. The content, with Dolby Digital Plus sound, will be only available through Samsung’s TV PLUS service for Tizen Smart TVs.

  • 15 Smart Ways To Re-Purpose Your Old Android Smartphone And Give It A New Life
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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Intel, Torvalds

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Intel: We've found severe bugs in secretive Management Engine, affecting millions
    Thanks to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel's hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers. The flaws affect Management Engine (ME), Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Server Platform Services (SPS).
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 71 - GitHub's Security Scanner
    Josh and Kurt talk about GitHub's security scanner and Linus' security email. We clarify the esoteric difference between security bugs and non security bugs.
  • Linus Torvalds 'sorry' for swearing, blames popularity of Linux itself
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has apologised – a bit – for calling some security-centric kernel contributors “f*cking morons”. Torvalds unleashed a profanity-laden rant at Google developer Kees Cook, over the latter's proposal to harden the kernel. Another Google security chap, Matthew Garret, asked Torvalds “ Can you clarify a little with regard to how you'd have liked this patchset to look?” To which Torvalds responded that “I think the actual status of the patches is fairly good with the default warning.”

Benchmarks: Linux Power Use, Sabrent EC-SS31, Phoronix Test Suite 7.6 M3

LinuxAndUbuntu Review Of Ubuntu MATE 17.10

Ubuntu Mate 17.10 is a pretty stable and rock solid distribution which has got most things right. There is nothing unlikable about the distro. However, I feel it could have been a lot better if they had allowed 4 windows to be snapped on each corners and done something about the opaque top panel. The software included are very much standard and even though some of their names have been changed we all know what’s under the hood. Overall Experience has been good. Having already tested Ubuntu with Gnome 3, I can say that Ubuntu Mate 17.10 feels a lot faster and quicker in terms of GUI response. Read more

Compact carrier turns Nvidia Jetson TX2 into an SBC

Aetina’s “ACE-N510” carrier for the Linux-powered Jetson TX1 and TX2 measures only 87 x 50mm, and offers HDMI, 2x USB 3.0, 2x CAN, and optional -20 to 70°C. When Aetina recently unveiled its Nano-ITX (120 x 120mm) ACE-N261 carrier for Nvidia’s Jetson TX2 and earlier, pin-compatible Jetson TX1 COMs, it mentioned an upcoming ACE-N510 that was even smaller. Now we have the details on the little beastie, which like Connect Tech’s Sprocket Jetson carrier, has a compact 87 x 50mm footprint that matches the Jetson modules it stacks on. The ACE-N510 is designed for smart cameras, robots, drones, industrial inspection, mobile medical, and deep learning. Read more