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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Fedora Removes 32bit, System76 Coreboot, Flatpak, Valve, Atari VCS, Docker | This Week in Linux 84

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we talk about Fedora Removing 32-bit, well sort of. System76’s announced two laptops using Coreboot firmware. There is some interesing news regarding Docker and its future. Then we’ll check out some Linux Gaming news with some really exciting news from Valve! 

  • PostgreSQL 12 boosts open source database performance

    Performance gains are among the key highlights of the latest update of the open source PostgreSQL 12 database.

    PostgreSQL 12 became generally available Oct. 3, providing users of the widely deployed database with multiple enhanced capabilities including SQL JSON query support and improved authentication and administration options. The PostgreSQL 12 update will potentially affect a wide range of use cases in which the database is deployed, according to Noel Yuhanna, an analyst at Forrester Research.

    "Organizations are using PostgreSQL to support all kinds of workloads and use cases, which is pushing the needs for better performance, improved security, easier access to unstructured data and simplified deployments," Yuhanna said. "To address this, PostreSQL12 improves performance by improving its indexing that requires less space and has better optimization to deliver faster access."

  • Olimex Launches NB-IoT DevKit Based on Quectel BC66 Module for 19 Euros

    There are three LPWAN standards currently dominating the space LoRaWAN, NB-IoT, and Sigfox. 

  • Intel Denverton based Fanless Network Appliance Comes with 6x Ethernet Ports, 2x SFP Cages
  • Heading levels

    the headings would be “Apples” (level 1), “Taste” (level 2), “Sweet” (level 3), “Color” (level 2). Determining the level of any given heading requires traversing through its previous siblings and their descendants, its parent and the previous siblings and descendants of that, et cetera. That is too much complexity and optimizing it with caches is evidently not deemed worth it for such a simple feature.

    However, throwing out the entire feature and requiring everyone to use h1 through h6 forever, adjusting them accordingly based on the document they end up in, is not very appealing to me. So I’ve been trying to come up with an alternative algorithm that would allow folks to use h1 with sectioning elements exclusively while giving assistive technology the right information (default styling of h1 is already adjusted based on nesting depth).

    The simpler algorithm only looks at ancestors for a given heading and effectively only does so for h1 (unless you use hgroup). This leaves the above example in the weird state it is in in today’s browsers, except that the h1 (“Color”) would become level 2. It does so to minimally impact existing documents which would usually use h1 only as a top-level element or per the somewhat-erroneous recommendation of the HTML Standard use it everywhere, but in that case it would dramatically improve the outcome.

  • openSUSE OBS Can Now Build Windows WSL Images

    As Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) is becoming a critical piece of Microsoft’s cloud and data-center audience, openSUSE is working on technologies that help developers use distributions of their choice for WSL. Users can run the same WSL distribution that they run in the cloud or on their servers.

    The core piece of openSUSE’s WSL offering is the WSL appx files, which are basically zip files that contain a tarball of a Linux system (like a container) and a Windows exe file, the so called launcher.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Intel Firmware Binaries Land For AX200/AX201 Bluetooth Linux Support

    With devices beginning to hit store shelves using the new Intel WiFi 6 AX200 series chipsets, the firmware binaries have landed in linux-firmware.git for rounding out support for these latest WiFi/Bluetooth adapters.

    For a few kernel releases now since earlier this year these new Intel wireless chipsets have been supported by the mainline kernel but the firmware hasn't been part of the de facto linux-firmware.git tree that houses the various firmware binaries for different hardware component support under Linux.

  • Improving distfile mirror structure

    The Gentoo distfile mirror network is essential in distributing sources to our users. It offloads upstream download locations, improves throughput and reliability, guarantees distfile persistency.

    The current structure of distfile mirrors dates back to 2002. It might have worked well back when we mirrored around 2500 files but it proved not to scale well. Today, mirrors hold almost 70 000 files, and this number has been causing problems for mirror admins.

  • LibreOffice 6.2.7 packages available for Slackware 14.2

    There was a recent update in my repository of LibreOffice packages, but that libreoffice-6.3.2 was just for slackware-current.

    There’s a recent release in the LibreOffice 6.2 stable series as well (ok… five weeks ago, not that recent…), and so I decided to use my build box’s free weekend to come up with packages for LibreOffice 6.2.7.
    This release has a security improvement over previous versions, in that it will popup a warning to the user if a document tries to run an embedded script (similar to existing warning mechanism for embedded macros).

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Postgres Is Underrated—It Handles More than You Think

    After reading this article, you may want to list down the features you want from your data store and check if Postgres will be a good fit for them. It’s powerful enough for most applications.

  • After nine years, Bill McDermott is stepping down as SAP CEO
  • Dav1d 0.5 Released With AVX2, SSSE3 & ARM64 Performance Improvements - Benchmarks

    Friday marked the release of dav1d 0.5 as the newest version of this speedy open-source AV1 video decoder. With dav1d 0.5 are optimizations to help out SSSE3 most prominently but also AVX2 and ARM64 processors. Here are some initial benchmarks so far of this new dav1d video decoder on Linux.

    The SSSE3 code path for dav1d is now upwards of 40% faster with the v0.5 release. There is also single digit improvements for the AVX2 code path and up to 10% performance improvements for 64-bit ARM. There are also VSX, SSE2, and SSE4 optimizations among the work in this latest release as well as some decoder fixes. Dav1d 0.5 can be found at VideoLAN.org.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • FPgM update: 2019-41

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. The Go/No-Go meeting is next week. We are currently under the Final freeze.

    No office hours next week, but normally I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • 5 Best Magento Extensions That Can Boost On-page SEO

    Therefore, if online resellers want to get the most out of this multifunctional development platform Magento, it is very important to establish an effective expansion on the shopping page. This helps to expand various functionalities and offers users a wide experience of shopping online, as well as brings high profits and optimize Magento 2 Speed.

    Currently, there are many extensions available on the Internet, and it is necessary to choose the most useful ones. This task can be challenging for business owners. To help you choose the best extensions, we have prepared a list of excellent Magento plug-ins that you can install and improve the performance of your website and help you gain an edge over the competition.

  • Intrinsyc Unveils Open-Q 845 µSOM and Snapdragon 845 Mini-ITX Development Kit

    Intrinsyc introduced the first Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 hardware development platform last year with its Open-Q 845 HDK designed for OEMs and device makers.

  • Arduino MKR WAN 1310 LoRa Board Gets HW Security, Longer Battery Life and a 2MB SPI flash

    Two year ago Arduino launched MKR WAN 1300 board powered by Arduino Zero compatible Microchip Atmel SAMD21 32-bit ARM Cortex M0+ MCU and a Murata CMWZ1ZZABZ LoRa module based on Semtech SX1276...

  • Open source hardware: The problems and promise

    Open source hardware projects have struggled to gain the mass audience that popular open source software projects have. This may not matter.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (lucene-solr and ruby-openid), Fedora (krb5 and SDL2), openSUSE (kernel and libopenmpt), and Ubuntu (python2.7, python3.4).

  • Chromium updated

    Here is yet another update for Chromium 77.

    The latest release fixes 8 vulnerabilities, several of them high-risk. You can read all about it in the Google announcement.

  • October 12: International Day Against DRM 2019

    Digital Restrictions Management is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media. When a program is designed to prevent you from copying or sharing a song, reading an ebook on another device, or playing a single-player game without an Internet connection, you are being restricted by DRM. In other words, DRM creates a damaged good; it prevents you from doing what would be possible without it. This concentrates control over production and distribution of media, giving DRM peddlers the power to carry out massive digital book burnings and conduct large scale surveillance over people’s media viewing habits.

    If we want to avoid a future in which our devices serve as an apparatus to monitor and control our interaction with digital media, we must fight to retain control of our media and software.

  • Six extra videos from the LibreOffice Conference 2019

    Here’s the final set of presentations from the “Sala de Grados (Aulario IV)” room at the LibreOffice Conference 2019 in Almeria, Spain. We have many more videos from other rooms to come, of course! (Note: for better audio, use headphones.)

  • Paul E. Mc Kenney: The Old Man and His Smartphone, Episode II

    At some point in the setup process, it was necessary to disable wifi. And I of course forgot to re-enable it. A number of apps insisted on downloading new versions. Eventually I realized my mistake, and re-enabled wifi, but am still wondering just how severe a case of sticker shock I am in for at the end of the month.

    [...]

    My new smartphone's virtual keyboard represents a definite improvement over the multipress nature of text messaging on my old flip phone, but it does not hold a candle to a full-sized keyboard. However, even this old man must confess that it is much faster to respond to the smartphone than to the laptop if both start in their respective sleeping states. There is probably an optimal strategy in there somewhere! Smile

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/41

    Just like the previous week, we have again released 4 snapshots since last Friday (1003, 1004, 1007 and 1009). 3 more have been tested but have been discarded by openQA; two of them only due to OBS being ‘too fast’ and random failures marking a snapshot as failed; likely they would have been ok. Snapshot 1010, on the other hand, was declined by openQA as the yast software management was not usable due to an ABI break. This has since been fixed and snapshot 1011 is expected to be releasable again (currently building).

  • Update on Oracle Certifications with SLES 15

    The latest versions of Oracle Database and Oracle Fusion Middleware and related products are available with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 15. This provides flexibility to customers who are migrating from SLES 12 to 15, and for Oracle customers who are still running older versions of the database and middleware products.

  • Build a simple chat app with Site.js

    This weekend, I released Site.js version 12.7.0 with improvements to its WebSocket interface. Today, I want to take you step-by-step through building and running a basic chat app using Site.js.

  • Onboarding edge applications on the dev environment
  • Kubernetes on Windows nodes hits GA in Rancher, Amazon EKS

    Rancher 2.3 and Amazon EKS were first to roll out support for Windows nodes in Kubernetes clusters this week, as well as mixed-mode clusters that encompass both Windows and Linux nodes. Most Kubernetes platforms already supported Windows containers but running on Linux host nodes; in all cases, including upstream Kubernetes, the Kubernetes master node still runs on Linux.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • System on module fully-integrated Linux system for accelerated machine learning

    Coral System on Module is a fully-integrated Linux system for accelerated Machine Learning inferencing to be integrated into existing hardware with three 100-pin connectors. The SoM is available now from Mouser. The SoM comprises the NXP iMX8M SoC, eMMC memory, LPDDR4 RAM, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and the Google Edge TPU Coprocessor for acceleration.

  • Norbert Preining: R with TensorFlow 2.0 on Debian/sid

    I recently posted on getting TensorFlow 2.0 with GPU support running on Debian/sid. At that time I didn?t manage to get the tensorflow package for R running properly. It didn?t need much to get it running, though.

  • My Free Software Activities in September 2019

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • What are microservices? Your next software architecture

    Nearly every computer system performs multiple tasks using shared resources, and one of the questions of computer programming is how closely the bits of code that perform those tasks should be tied to one another. An increasingly popular answer is the concept of a microservice—a small, discrete chunk of functionality that interacts with other microservices to create a larger system.

    Although the basic idea of having such discrete components isn’t new, the way microservices are implemented makes them a natural foundation for both modern cloud-based applications. Microservices also dovetail with the devops philosophy, which encourages rapidly and continuously rolled out new functionality.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces Chinese Automaker SAIC Motor as a New Member

    AGL is an open source project at the Linux Foundation that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open, shared software platform for all technology in the vehicle, from infotainment to autonomous driving. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces Chinese Automaker SAIC Motor as a New Member

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, announces seven new members. SAIC Motor has joined as a Silver member, and German Autolabs, KPIT, MontaVista, OTAinfo, OUTCERT and Ovo Automotive join as Bronze members.

  • What?s New In Zephyr 2.0.0?

    The Zephyr Project is a small, scalable real-time operating system (RTOS) for use on resource-constrained systems supporting multiple architectures

  • openSUSE WSL images in OBS

    A fundamental concept of all openSUSE packages as well as any image offered for download is a fully transparent, reproducible and automatic build and development process based on sources.

    In openSUSE developers do not perform manual builds on some specially crafted machine in their basement and then upload the result somewhere. Instead all sources are stored in a version control system inside the open build service (OBS) instance at build.opensuse.org. OBS then automatically builds the sources including all dependencies according to defined build instructions (eg spec files for rpms). OBS also automatically adds cryptographic signatures to files that support it to make sure nobody can tamper with those files.

  • Don’t Get Left Behind, Upgrade to SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Today
  • Atari disputes reports that its retro-inspired console is doomed

    Atari put out a lengthy development update for the Atari VCS console earlier this week, on the same day that The Register reported that the project is experiencing significant difficulties. One source with knowledge of the project reportedly described it as a “shit show,” and the console is reportedly shaping up to be more of a Linux PC than a dedicated games console.

    Atari’s post sought to assure backers that the project is proceeding as planned. Amidst numerous photographs of the console’s circuit boards and chassis, the company claimed that the molds for the plastic housing of the console are “largely complete,” that its controllers and joysticks are “just about ready for mass production,” and that it expects to host hands-on preview events for the console later this fall.

  • IRS-Funded Review Confirms TurboTax Hid Free Filing From Search Engines, but Says There’s No Need for Major Changes

    A four-month outside review of the IRS’ partnership with the private tax software industry to provide free tax preparation offered mixed conclusions: It found serious problems in the program and confirmed ProPublica’s reporting this year that companies, including Intuit, the maker of TurboTax, had hidden the free option from search engines. But the report, written by an IRS contractor that has previously supported the industry’s position, also defended the program’s oversight.

    The review did not recommend sweeping changes. The mandate of the review was to narrowly assess the program to “ensure the continued operations and integrity of the Free File Program.” It did not examine the broader question of whether the premise of the program is sound or look at the IRS’ role in tax filing.

  • Digital Watchdog Adds Extensive List of Features to Spectrum IPVMS

    The DW Spectrum IPVMS server software is included with pre-configured DW Blackjack NVR servers and MEGApix CaaS edge cameras or it can be installed on third-party Windows or Ubuntu Linux-based systems.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Collapse OS is a Special Operating System for the Post-Apocalyptic Future

    As reported by Motherboard, there’s a new open-source operating system that is currently under heavy development, and it looks like it will soon be ready for a very dire scenario. Its creator, Virgil Dupras, is a person who believes there’s a good chance that by 2030, the world will have collapsed. The software developer isn’t absolutely certain about this, but he believes that the chances of the scenario are high enough to justify the development of a post-apocalyptic operating system, called “Collapse OS”.

    So, what would the ideal scavenger’s operating system be like? The simple answer to this would be “one that can run on virtually anything”. If there is one system out there that can run on almost any hardware, this is the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Collapse OS is taking things a lot further, being able to run on microcontrollers such as the ubiquitous Z80 microprocessor. Dupras considered what piece of hardware would be the easiest to find in a post-apocalyptic world, and Z80 came as the definitive answer. This 8-bit microprocessor is in cash registers, computers, music instruments, calculators, and virtually anything electronic.

  • PostgreSQL considers seccomp() filters

    A discussion on the pgsql-hackers mailing list at the end of August is another reminder that the suitability of seccomp() filters is likely more narrow than was hoped. Applying filters to the PostgreSQL database is difficult for a number of reasons and the benefit for the project and its users is not entirely clear. The discussion highlights the tradeoffs inherent in adding system-call filtering to a complex software suite; it may help crystallize the thinking of other projects that are also looking at supporting seccomp() filters.

    Joe Conway raised the idea in an RFC patch posting. It added a way to filter system calls in the main postmaster process and, with a separate system-call list, in the per-session backends. It also showed how to generate the list of system calls that are being used by PostgreSQL under various workloads, such as the test targets in the Makefile or by running a specific application. Information on the system calls made is logged by the audit subsystem; those logs are then processed to produce the list. Once there is confidence that the list is complete—which may be a sticking point—the remaining system calls could be blocked so that executing them would cause an error.

    But Peter Eisentraut was concerned that the list is going to be incomplete due to the "fantastic test coverage" needed to generate it and that it will require constant maintenance to keep up with GNU C Library (glibc) and other changes. Beyond that, PostgreSQL extensions will need their own lists of allowed system calls. Conway seems to see the support as something that those interested will maintain for themselves, rather than having a list that the project will distribute. "Perhaps most people never use this, but when needed (and increasingly will be required) it is available."

  • mjbots quad A0: October 2019 Roadmap

    My last video gave an overview of what I’ve accomplished over the past year. Now, let me talk about what I’m planning to work on going forward:

    I intend to divide my efforts into two parallel tracks. The first is to demonstrate increased capabilities and continue learning with the existing quad A0, and second is to design and manufacture the next revision of all its major components.

  • Philip Chimento: Free software at 40°C

    It’s that time of year again, time for a belated reflection on the GUADEC conference!

    In August I traveled to Thessaloniki, Greece, to attend first the annual GNOME Foundation board handover day, then the advisory board meeting, then the GUADEC conference and associated unconference days.

    The board discussion focused quite a lot on the strategic goals for the GNOME Foundation which you can hear more about in executive director Neil McGovern’s talk. Nuritzi has also blogged about the process of putting together these strategic goals.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • LHS Episode #307: Ansible Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to Episode 307 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts have an in-depth conversation with Jon Spriggs, G7VRI, an Ansible fanatic and guru. We cover the project, its installation, setup and operation from point A to point Z. If you're deploying multiple machines in your shack, are a systems administrator or just want to automatic some deployment procedures, this conversation is for you. Thank you for listening.

  • Navi 14 AMDGPU Firmware Lands In The Linux-Firmware.Git Tree

    This easy availability of the firmware bits is the last piece of the puzzle for rounding out their Linux driver support. On the kernel side Linux 5.4 has the initial Navi 14 support albeit is disabled by default unless using the experimental feature bit. Mesa 19.2 also has the preliminary Navi 14 support in the RadeonSI OpenGL and RADV Vulkan drivers, but I would recommend using Mesa 19.3-devel for the best feature coverage and performance. And then there's LLVM 9.0+ for the AMDGPU back-end, particularly with the RADV ACO back-end not yet having stable support for Navi. Lastly there are these necessary binary blobs now in linux-firmware.git for rounding out the Navi 14 GPU initialization.

  • Ubuntu and ZFS on Linux [Status Update]

    Somewhat recently, I posted about Ubuntu enabling ZFS [as the root filesystem] in its operating system installer, alongside other much needed updates. Well, here we are and the Ubuntu 19.10 release is right around the corner. Last Friday, ZFS guided partitioning support was officially merged into the Ubiquity mainline. Ext4 will continue to be the default option.

  • Haiku monthly activity report - September 2019

    Some initial work for ARM64 was completed by kallisti5. This includes setting up the Haikuports package declarations, writing the early boot files, and in general getting the buildsystem going. Jaroslaw Pelczar also contributed several further patches (some of these still undergoing review), providing the initial interrupt handling support, and various stubs to let things compile

    kallisti5 did some work on 32bit ARM as well, cleaning up some of the code to better match other platforms and preparing the reuse of EFI for ARM and ARM64 (as u-boot now implements an EFI interface, which would make things much simpler for our ARM boot process if we manage to use it).

  • BeOS-Inspired Haiku Making Progress On ARM, Various Kernel Improvements

    Just last week marked the one year anniversary since shipping the Haiku R1 beta release for this BeOS-inspired open-source operating system. The developers remain though as busy as ever with advancing this interesting open-source project.

  • Open source is just OEM software

    Open source software is just fake name used for a trojen horse to destroy Free Software Movement, which is defending the right of users. It is nothing but a new name for the old concept of OEM.

    OEM means Original Equipment Manufacturer. It is a company that produces parts and equipment that may be marketed by another manufacturer. But there are different mode of operations. We have to focus on one particular way of OEM.

    For example, US government spent huge amount of money in telecommunications and electronics. Once the technology was ready the iIdiot company took required knowledge and designed a new product. They then gave all these details to a Chinese company called Foxconn which employs child labour. Because children have delicate fingers useful for assembling components. (Around their office there are nets placed to avoid frustrated employee suicide. I dont know how they avoid other forms of suicide So the fancy gadget you hold in your may has blood all over.) They will manufacturer the equipment. But put sticker of original company. Then it will be shipped to all over the world.

  • LibreOffice 6 “Getting started” guide translated into Russian

    LibreOffice has extensive documentation, thanks to our worldwide community of volunteers. Recently, Lera Goncharuk, Alex Denkin and Roman Kuznetsov worked on a Russian translation of the getting started guide – click the image below to read it. If you want to help with a translation in your own language, see this page to get started – and thanks for your help!

  • [Tips for remotees 1/xxx] Don't be Isolated.

    So let's start by the obvious first tip : don't stay alone. When I started working remote I had a girlfriend so I was quite occupied, when I wasn't working and when I was. But I was working from home, so Id' miss chitchatting with colleagues over a coffee. But I was coming out of a startup that was using skype as it's main chat tool and there was/(still is) an alumni chat session. So when I had a question or when I wanted to rant or think about something else or just have a pause I would chat with my ex-colleagues. After a few month I broke up with the woman I was with. And was left with almost not physical interaction with humans. The only thing close to it was me going to a swimming pool once a week and seeing people - but hardly interacting with them.After a month or two of that regime I started looking for a new job - a non remote one. Thankfully the 1,5h train ride killed the idea, while I made local friends using the meetup service (I was a Frenchman living in The Nederlands - Met Other people like me , we ended up having a weekly get together - which ended up in me meeting my wife). I also had an ex-coworker not living far from me that was also working on his own venture. We ended up having weekly lunches at the same restaurant were we could both bitch at life work and food :-p.

  • Spreadsheet Regrets

    Fiction writer F. L. Stevens got a list of literary agents from AAR Online. This became a spreadsheet driving queries for representation. After a bunch of rejections, another query against AAR Online provided a second list of agents.

    Apple's Numbers product will readily translate the AAR Online HTML table into a usable spreadsheet table. But after initial success the spreadsheet as tool of choice collapses into a pile of rubble. The spreadsheet data model is hopelessly ineffective for the problem domain.

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Action News 126

    Microsoft’s CEO says Windows doesn’t matter anymore, but do we buy it? Nextcloud 17 goes enterprise-grade and the Internet’s horrifying new method for installing Google apps on Huawei phones.

    Plus, Google finds an Android zero-day in the wild, and the Document Collective’s new approach to earn revenue for LibreOffice.

  • A diary program for GNOME: Almanah Diary

    Almanah Diary is a project I started many years ago for maintaining a personal diary, with encryption and tracking of the events you did that day (from your calendar). It’s been neglected for a long time — given that I no longer use it, I have no incentive to maintain it and improve it, and have only held on to maintainership for so long out of a feeling of duty.

    However, having me listed as a maintainer might have been giving people the false impression that it was actually maintained. So I’m removing myself as maintainer, having just made the 0.12.0 release. Álvaro Peña is also listed as a maintainer, but hasn’t been active for over a year. The project is technically now his, but if someone else turns up wanting to work on it, I am happy to add them as a co-maintainer, especially if they are going to revitalise things.

  • ctxLink Open Hardware WiFi Debug Probe is based Black Magic Probe (Crowdfunding)

    Last month, we wrote about Blip nRF52840 dev board that also included an STM32F103 MCU running the open source Black Magic Probe (BMP) firmware for debugging and programming.

  • How Bash completion works

    Recently, I added Bash completion to my tool. I’ve wanted this for a while, but decided to add it now in preparation for secrets management. For example, I want to be able to type zz secret --readamaz and have it complete to zz secret --read amazon/. Perhaps hitting again will list all secrets under this path, e.g. username, password, access_key, etc.

  • 3 ways to build an open-source startup

    Founders might be wondering whether there’s still space for new open-source software companies among all of these heavy hitters.

    The answer is yes. As an investor, I have a front-line perspective on the many successful attempts to turn open-source projects into successful software startups. Startups actually have an advantage these days because they can learn from what’s worked and what hasn’t when it comes to commercializing open-source software.

    Looking at the successes, I’ve identified three proven paths from project to commercial success. Here’s a look at these models and the successful companies associated with each.

  • The Best WordPress Invoice Plugins in 2019

    Managing a business is never easy because selling stuff is not the only task you have to oversee. You also need to keep track of what your clients buy, which clients like what, which transactions were completed, whether refunds were requested for, how much you spend vs how much you ear, etc.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (jackson-databind, libapreq2, libreoffice, novnc, phpbb3, and ruby-mini-magick), Fedora (mbedtls and mosquitto), Mageia (xpdf), openSUSE (bind, firefox, nginx, openssl-1_0_0, php7, python-numpy, and thunderbird), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (ansible1, ardana-ansible, ardana-cluster, ardana-db, ardana-extensions-nsx, ardana-glance, ardana-input-model, ardana-installer-ui, ardana-manila, ardana-monasca, ardana-neutron, ardana-nova, ardana-octavia, ardana-opsconsole-ui, ardana-osconfig, ardana-service, ardana-tls, crowbar-core, crowbar-ha, crowbar-openstack, crowbar-ui, grafana, novnc, openstack-cinder, openstack-dashboard, openstack-designate, openstack-glance, openstack-heat, openstack-horizon-plugin-heat-ui, openstack-horizon-plugin-monasca-ui, openstack-ironic, openstack-ironic-python-agent, openstack-keystone, openstack-manila, openstack-neutron, openstack-neutron-gbp, openstack-nova, openstack-octavia, openstack-sahara, openstack-tempest, openstack-watcher, python-ardana-configurationprocessor, python-cinder-tempest-plugin, python-urllib3, rubygem-easy_diff, bind, compat-openssl098, nginx, and openssl-1_0_0), and Ubuntu (linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon and openexr).

  • Rootconf 2019 Pune

    Rootconf is a professional conference on security and systems and this was their first time in pune. I chose to spoke about TLS 1.3 and also did a BoF on fuzzing.

    Rootconf is typically a single track conference, which means that everyone has only one talk to go to at a time. This was my first time i spoke at a single track event. My talk was the first one in the day. I started with talking about the importance of SSL/TLS , then talked about few of the security flaws, described key difference between TLS 1.3 and its previous versions and ended with lot of questions. Eventually ran out of time with people catching me in the hallway to ask tons of questions ranging from security, asking how Red Hat identifies, fixesflaws etc to people even asking if we have vacancies at Red Hat.

    The second talk was about automating security workflow using docker. This was given by a security engineer from appsec, and had some important points about how he conducted pentesting and how bits of it can be automated.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • AMD Ryzen Embedded SBC Supports 4x 4K Displays Ready for Linux and Windows
  • Chips with everything—could open-source technology solve the tech trade war?

    AS THE trade war intensifies, China wants to reduce its reliance on imports of foreign computer chips. Could open-source technology solve its problems?

  • Huawei Shock: Mate 30 Pro's Back Door To Google Apps Slams Shut
  • Intellectual Property Or Open Source?

    The SAP partner community still follows the software license model, and many of them are raising concerns regarding their intellectual property. And rightly so; after all, their livelihood is at stake.
    An important discussion is happening inside the SAP community right now: intellectual property or open source?

    For years, SAP’s ERP has been a black box. Most SAP partners make their living off of selling add-ons for the system. These add-ons have to be licensed and customers must pay maintenance fees. It’s profitable business for SAP partners, and customers can enjoy good service and cost-efficient offers.

    [...]

    Fact of the matter is that the software licensing business is changing. Therefore, Business Application Programming Interface (SAP BAPI) should be transferred to SAP Cloud Platform and Github as app. These kinds of apps could not only be open source, but they could also be further developed and optimized with tools like Mendix (listed as SAP Cloud Platform for Rapid Application Development by Mendix in SAP’s pricing list).

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