Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Going Linux #375 · Listener Feedback

    In this episode, we have several questions about accessibility in Linux applications, we discuss a couple of cross-platform office suites that provide a bit better compatibility with Microsoft Office file formats, and we discuss problems and solutions for Ubuntu, Barrier, video and privacy and security. Lastly, we comment on Linux Journal's goodbye.

  • Install Java on Debian 9 Operating System
  • List of Inactive/Discontinued Linux Distributions

    This page provides information about the distributions that are no longer supported or developed starting from 2019 with details.

    This table contains the Linux Distribution Name, Distribution Initial Release Date, Distribution Latest Release Date, Reason for distribution inactive, and Distribution Age.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

    When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results.

    In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller.

    Watch Chris' Lightning Talk to learn more about managing etcd controllers and living to tell the tale.

  • VMware's proposed Pivotal acquisition shows Cloud Foundry's strength

    Abby Kearns, executive director of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, reports that in the soon-to-be-released Cloud Foundry end-user survey, "In just two years, broad deployment of Cloud Foundry has nearly doubled. With 45% of our users describing their Cloud Foundry use as 'broad' (compared to 30% in 2018 and 23% in 2017)."

  • Magnetic Lasso for Krita is here

    I won’t say that I am done with Magnetic Lasso now, but the results are a lot better now to be honest. Take a look at one of the tests that I did,

  • [antiX] swapgs mitigations kernels available

    Latest secure kernels available in the repos for 32 and 64 bit architecture (stretch, buster, testing and sid).

    5.2.8 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)
    4.19.66 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)
    4.9.189 (64 bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486)

    Users are strongly advised to upgrade.

  • M5Stack M5StickV is a Tiny AI Camera for Maker Projects

today's leftovers: OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, Fedora Program Management, Security and More

Filed under
Misc
  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2019/33

    Week 2019/33 ‘only’ saw three snapshots being published (3 more were given to openQA but discarded).

  • FPgM report: 2019-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. (Just not this week because I will be traveling)

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (freetype, libreoffice, and openjdk-7), Fedora (edk2, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, mariadb-connector-odbc, python-django, and squirrelmail), Gentoo (chromium, cups, firefox, glibc, kconfig, libarchive, libreoffice, oracle-jdk-bin, polkit, proftpd, sqlite, wget, zeromq, and znc), openSUSE (bzip2, chromium, dosbox, evince, gpg2, icedtea-web, java-11-openjdk, java-1_8_0-openjdk, kconfig, kdelibs4, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, nodejs8, pdns, polkit, python, subversion, and vlc), Oracle (ghostscript and kernel), Red Hat (mysql:8.0 and subversion:1.10), SUSE (389-ds, libvirt and libvirt-python, and openjpeg2), and Ubuntu (nginx).

  • A compendium of container escapes

    My name is Brandon Edwards, I’m Chief Scientist at Capsule8. Today we’ll be talking about a compendium of container escapes in the podcast. We’ve previously talked about escaping containers and the sorts of vulnerabilities people should be concerned with a while back. In particular we’re discussing how the RunC vulnerability had engendered all this interest, or concern, or almost shock, the trust the people are placing in containers was broken. Oh wow, an escape could happen!

    I think it’s really valuable to be able to communicate and show all the other ways that that sort of thing can happen, either from misconfiguration, or over granting privileges, or providing host mounts into the container, or having kernel vulnerabilities that could somehow compromise any of the elements of the security model of container, which is both fragile and complex.

  • Apollo data graph brings managed federation to enterprises

    Data graph vendor Apollo is aiming to help overcome several obstacles to enterprises using graph databases with its latest Apollo Data Graph Platform update, which became generally available on July 16.

    Among the key new features in the platform are federated management capabilities that enable more scalability across different GraphQL data graph instances. GraphQL is an open source query language for APIs, originally created by Facebook that is used to enable data graph capabilities.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • vBSDCon - Sept 5-7 Reston VA

    The schedule has been added to the website: https://www.vbsdcon.com/schedule/

  • Raspberry Digital Signage donation

    The build of Raspberry Digital Signage you can download from SourceForge is limited is some functionality: if you like this project please donate.

    As a donor, you will have full access to the unrestricted versions of: Raspberry Digital Signage (web-based digital signaging), Raspberry Slideshow (image/video slideshow-based digital signaging) and Raspberry WebKiosk (cheap web kiosking), which can be deployed on how many devices you wish!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-maker Red Hat Purchase Adds Risk to Owning IBM Stock

    Amid evolving technologies, IBM has to pivot again to remain relevant. It has attempted this feat by buying Red Hat. Investors are bailing out of the shares as integration of the Linux maker will take time. Given the time lag and the falling profits, owning the stock amounts to a gamble on whether management can successfully absorb Red Hat into the company.

  • FLOSS Weekly 542: Dancer

    Dancer is a web application framework for Perl. It was inspired by Sinatra and was written by Alexis Sukrieh originally.

    It has an intuitive, minimalist, and very expressive syntax: has PSGI support, plugins and its modular design allow for strong scalability: and Dancer depends on as few CPAN modules as possible, making it easy to install.

  • Biometrics of one million people discovered on publicly accessible database

    A biometrics database used by the police, banks and defence contractors has been discovered online unprotected, with the fingerprints and facial recognition scans unencrypted.

    Furthermore, the Biostar 2 database - used as part of security systems for warehouses and offices - also contained user names, passwords and other personal information. And the database was so exposed that data could easily be manipulated, and new accounts with corresponding biometrics added

  • Apple locked me out of its walled garden. It was a nightmare

    I started to realize just how far-reaching the effects of Apple disabling my account were. One of the things I love about Apple’s ecosystem is that I’ve built my media collection on iTunes, and can access it from any of my Apple devices. My partner and I have owned numerous iPods, iPhones, iPads, MacBooks, iMacs, Apple Watches, Apple TVs, and even a HomePod, over the years. Apple plays a big part in my professional life too: I’m the IT manager for Quartz, and we use Apple hardware and publish on Apple platforms.

    But when Apple locked my account, all of my devices became virtually unusable. At first, it seemed like a mild inconvenience, but I soon found out how many apps on my iOS and Mac devices couldn’t be updated, not to mention how I couldn’t download anything new. When I had to take a trip for a family emergency, the JetBlue app wouldn’t let me access my boarding pass, saying I had to update the app to use it. It was the first time I’d flown with a paper boarding pass in years. I couldn’t even pass time on the flight playing Animal Crossing on my phone, because I got a similar error message when I opened the game.

  • VMware says it’s looking to acquire Pivotal

    VMware today confirmed that it is in talks to acquire software development platform Pivotal Software, the service best known for commercializing the open-source Cloud Foundry platform. The proposed transaction would see VMware acquire all outstanding Pivotal Class A stock for $15 per share, a significant markup over Pivotal’s current share price (which unsurprisingly shot up right after the announcement).

  • VMware All Set To Acquire Pivotal
  • rideOS Launches New Devoted Platform to Power the Future of Ridehailing

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Development
Misc
  • Teaching People to Share Technology: Adafruit Founder Limor Fried

    When Adafruit founder Limor Fried was studying electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, she realized she was less interested in the electrical engineering part.

    “What I really liked to do was build stuff,” she said.

    Instead of working on her homework or thesis, Fried spent her time designing hardware projects in her dorm. She built an MP3 player way before Apple made iPods popular.

    “With electronics, you could build anything from an MP3 player to a GPS tracker,” she said.

    [...]

    “Open source hardware is a perfect middle ground. It’s inexpensive and allows you to customize the way you need it,” Fried said. “The code is there. Instructions are there. Anyone can do it. Since it’s open source, people can iterate, tweak, fine-tune to their needs. We are seeing a lot of interest in open source hardware for assistive technologies.”

    Adafruit’s hardware is working for everyone from creative hobbyists to people interested in building things for their smartphones to developers inventing products for the next industrial revolution. Adafruit also worked with computer game company Nvidia to help build its Jetson Nano Developer Kit, which lets users run multiple neural networks for artificial intelligence, machine learning and edge computing.

  • Gcc 4.2.1 to be removed before FreeBSD 13, a firm timeline
    Greetings,
    
    
    
    
    As promised for almost the past decade or so, gcc 4.2.1 will be removed
    from the tree before FreeBSD 13 is branched.
    
    
    
    
    I propose the following timeline for its removal:
    
    
    
    
    2019-08-31: disconnect gcc 4.2.1 from CI build
    
    
    
    
    Turn off -Werror on gcc 4.2.1 platforms
    
    
    
    
    Turn off all gcc 4.2.1 from universe by default (can be turned on)
    
    
    
    
    2019-12-31: Turn off gcc 4.2.1 build by default (can be turned on)
    
    
    
    
    2020-03-31: svn rm gcc 4.2.1 and friends
    
    
    
    
    2020-05-31: svn rm all non-clang platforms not supported by in-tree LLVM or
    converted to ext toolchain.
    
    
    
    
    2020-07-31: svn rm all ext toolchain platforms not supported by re@ release
    scripts
    
    
    
    
    The basic notion is that it’s long past time to have a firm plan for EOL
    gcc 4.2.1 in the tree. There is ample external toolchain support today for
    platforms that need it to build images, though that integration with
    buildworld could use some more polish. It’s now completely sufficient to
    move to the next phase of removing gcc 4.2.1 from the tree.
    
    
    
    
    We already have gcc 6.4 as an xtoolchain on amd64 in CI. This should
    somewhat mitigate the risk for cross-compiler portability. This is a
    long-established part of our CI. We want to retain gcc support for modern
    versions of gcc since its debuggability is higher. Notifications for this
    are currently turned off, but will be enabled soon. It’s expected that this
    always will be working later in the year. We’ll work to update the
    committers guide to reflect this, as well as give a recipe for testing.
    
    
    
    
    The first phase will be at the end of the month. We’ll turn off -Werror on
    gcc 4.2.1 (and MFC it to stable/11 and stable/12). We’ll then stop building
    all platforms that require it as part of CI. New warnings will come up, but
    will no longer waste developer time in trying to fix. Gcc 4.2.1 platforms
    will no longer be built as part of universe, unless you add
    -DMAKE_OBSOLETE_GCC is added to the command line. We plan on implementing
    this by 2019-08-31.
    
    
    
    
    An experimental branch will be created that will remove gcc related bits to
    expose gaps in planning and to come up with a list of action items needed
    to ensure Tier 1 platforms are unaffected by the gcc removal. The timeline
    for this is by the end of September.
    
    
    
    
    Next, we’ll turn off building gcc by default. This will effectively break
    all gcc platforms with in-tree compilers. The external toolchain support we
    have will suffice here, and patches will be accepted for whatever
    integration are needed for these platforms with our current ports /
    packages. The onus for these changes will be squarely on people that want
    the platforms to continue. However, as a stop-gap gcc building can be
    turned on for those people transitioning gcc-only platforms until gcc 4.2.1
    is removed. This will happen on or about 2019-12-31.
    
    
    
    
    After a 3 month transition period, gcc 4.2.1 will be removed from the tree.
    This will be done on or about 2020-03-31.
    
    
    
    
    After an additional 2 month transition period, all those platforms that
    have not integrated with the FreeBSD CI system, work in a make universe
    with the proper packages installed, and are shown to boot on real hardware
    will be removed from the tree. This will happen on or about 2020-05-31.
    
    
    
    
    After an additional 2 month grace period, those platforms that require
    external toolchain integration that aren’t supported by the release
    engineer’s release scripts will be removed. This  will happen on or about
    2020-07-31.
    
    
    
    
    The timeline gives powerpc, mips, mips64, and sparc64 9 months to integrate
    either into an in-tree compiler, or to have a proven external toolchain
    solution. This is on top of the many-years-long warnings about this being
    the end game of the clang integration.
    
    
    
    
    This is the proposed timeline, but should there be a significant issue
    that’s discovered, the timeline can be amended.
    
    
    
    
    Also note: the all toolchains in tree discussions are specifically out of
    bounds here. Let’s remove one compiler and get the infrastructure needed to
    make external toolchains robust before embarking on that discussion.
    
    
    
    
    Comments?
    
    
    
    
    Warner
    
  • FreeBSD 13 Is Preparing To Finally Retire GCC 4.2

    A firm timeline has been established for removing GCC 4.2.1 before next year's FreeBSD 13 release. This timeline includes dropping GCC 4.2.1 from continuous integration builds at the end of the month and turning off GCC 4.2.1 from universe by default. At the end of the calendar year they will turn off GCC 4.2.1 by default and at the end of March is when they will remove the compiler code entirely from their SVN. Next May they also intend to drop non-Clang platforms that are not supported by the in-tree LLVM or converted to an external toolchain. 

  • Designing Continuous Build Systems: Handling Webhooks with Sanic

    After covering how to design a build pipeline and define build directives in the continuous builds series, it’s time to look at handling events from a code repository.

    As internet standards evolved over the years, the HTTP protocol has become more prevalent. It’s easier to route, simpler to implement and even more reliable. This ubiquity makes it easier for applications that traverse or live on the public internet to communicate with each other. As a result of this, the idea of webhooks came to be as an “event-over-http” mechanism.

  • No, Zwift Racing Wasn’t Hacked. Yet. Sorta. Let Me Explain.

    One of the most well-known conferences from a lore standpoint is Def Con, but there are also many other huge ones such as BlackHat, SANS, and RSA, and other vendor-specific ones like BlueHat (run by Microsoft for Microsoft technologies) or government-specific ones. Again, in general the goal of these summits is to learn about security and improve security practices.

    This past Sunday at Def Con (considered one of the more rambunctious events on the circuit) a presentation was given around Zwift and ‘hacking’ it – titled “Cheating in eSports: How to Cheat at Virtual Cycling Using USB Hacks”. Now one has to understand that while in the ‘mainstream’ the term ‘hacking’ is usually akin to ‘breaking’, in the computer world, the term ‘hacking’ is often a bit more nebulous. Sometimes used interchangeably with ‘tweaking’ or ‘optimizing’, and sometimes used in the less ideal variant such as ‘credit cards were hacked’. So one has to take any usage of that term with a bit of sanity check to see what’s going on.

  • Protecting your organization against privileged identity theft

    What do the top data breaches of the 21st century have in common? Privileged identity abuse. In these breach instances, well-resourced, external actors were able to gain the credentials of users with access to privileged accounts – such as administrative, service or operational accounts – giving them the ability to collect and exfiltrate industrial-scale amounts of data.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Mint 19.2 "Mate" overview | Stable, robust, traditional

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Linux Mint 19.2 "Mate" and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Abbey Games have released the Will Of The People update for Godhood

    After entering Early Access in July, Godhood from Abbey Games has received a bit of a mixed impression from users but they're moving quickly to improve it.

    I can understand where some of the negative reviews have currently come from, while a nice looking game and one I've enjoyed playing, it's currently pretty simple. To be expected from Early Access though, it's going to evolve over time. They've recently adjusted the way they describe it too, originally saying it was a "strategy god game" but they're now saying it's a "roster-management auto-battling god game"—okay then. Hoping to hook in some auto-battler fans I see!

  • SUSE Academic Program News: Working With Students Around The Globe

    The end of summer for many marks the start of a new semester or calendar school year. At SUSE, we have been working harder than ever to engage with more academic partners and customers, bringing the latest in Linux and Open Source training and education. To only name a few, here are some highlights of recent success within the academic community;

  • University Research Teams Open-Source Natural Adversarial Image DataSet for Computer-Vision AI

    In a paper published in July, researchers from UC Berkeley, the University of Washington, and the University of Chicago described their process for creating the dataset of 7,500 images, which were deliberately chosen to "fool" a pre-trained image recognition system. While there has been previous research on adversarial attacks on such systems, most of the work studies how to modify images in a way that causes the model to output the wrong answer. By contrast, the team used real-world, or "natural" images collected un-modified from the internet. The team used their images as a test-set on a pre-trained DenseNet-121 model, which has a top-1 error rate of 25% when tested on the popular ImageNet dataset. This same model, when tested with ImageNet-A, has a top-1 error rate of 98%. The team also used their dataset to measure the effectiveness of "defensive" training measures developed by the research community; they found that "these techniques hardly help."

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, postgresql, and postgresql-libs), Debian (atril, chromium, evince, ghostscript, jackson-databind, kernel, and php5), Fedora (kf5-kconfig, mingw-sqlite, pam-u2f, and poppler), Mageia (kernel), openSUSE (aubio, chromium, kconfig, kdelibs4, nodejs10, osc, and zstd), Red Hat (ghostscript), and Ubuntu (ghostscript and MariaDB). 

  • When your mail hub password is updated...
    don't
     forget
      to
       run
        postmap
         on
          your
           /etc/postfix/sasl_passwd
    
    
    
    
    
  • How to Install Telegram on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS & Up
  • how to upgrade Alpine Linux 3.6.2 to Alpine Linux 3.7
  • LiVES Video Editor 3.0 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu
  • For Linux, a brand-new companion package that supports all major Linux distros is now available.

    For Linux, a brand-new companion package that supports all major Linux distros is now available.

today's howtos and leftovers

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • Install Automad CMS with Nginx and Let's Encrypt SSL on Debian 10
  • First step with ionic framework.
  • How to extract a single page from PDF files
  • How to Avoid Server Reboots with Ubuntu Livepatch
  • Killing a process and all of its descendants
  • Krita 2019 Sprint

    Officially, on Friday the 2019 Krita Sprint was over. However, most people stayed until Saturday… It’s been a huge sprint! Almost a complete convention, a meeting of developers and artists.

  • [Older] Bodhi Linux 5.0 | Review from an openSUSE User

    Linux is a fun thing and trying out other distributions can result in a myriad of experiences. Some distributions concentrate on user experience or mostly the technical underpinnings. Some distributions put their own feel while others minimize their modifications. I am a long time openSUSE user and am perfectly content with all that it has to offer, not just as a distribution but as a project in its totality. As a part of the Big Daddy Linux Community, there is an optional weekly challenge to try out a Linux distribution. My process for this is to put it in a VM first and then go to ?bare metal? for further testing if my initial experience is compelling enough and I have the time.

    The latest challenge is Bodhi Linux it is built on the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS but targeting machines with fewer resources. The Bodi Linux Project offers forums for help and advice, they have a wiki to help with configurating the system, and offer a live chat through Discord to get help or just get to know members of the community. Unfortunately, I didn?t notice any IRC options. I downloaded the ISO from here. There are few different options from which to choose. I went with the ?AppPack? ISO as it has more applications bundled in it. For more information on choosing the correct ISO for you, see here.

    Bottom Line Up Front, Bodhi Linux is well put together and the Moksha Desktop is a crisp, low resource, animated (almost excessively) environment that is worthy of giving it a spin. This distribution is certainly worth the time, especially if you have an older system you want to keep going a little longer. The Moksha Desktop looks good and is more functional than GNOME so that is already a leg up on many distributions.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • IFStile – Iterated Function Systems – visualize substitution tilings

    One of the ways to generate fractals is using the Iterated Function System (IFS).

    In mathematical terms the system is a finite set of contraction maps w_i for i=1, 2, …, N, each with a contractivity factor s<1, which map a compact metric space onto itself. It’s the basis for fractal image compression techniques.

    IFS fractals, as they are known, can be of any number of dimensions, but are often calculated and drawn in 2D. The fractal is made up of the union of several copies of itself, each copy being transformed by a function (hence “function system”). The canonical example is the Sierpiński triangle. Substitution tilings are great source of fractal shapes, due to their recursive nature. This method can generate regular-looking fractals as well as non-geometric fractals.

  • OpenComic – Open Source Cross-platform Comic and Manga Reader

    OpenComic is an open-source comic and manga reader that works on Windows, mac OS, and Linux.

  • FPgM report: 2019-32

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week.

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • West Coast Hackfest – Summary

    This year, I helped organize West Coast Hackfest with my stalwart partner and friend Teresa Hill in Portland – with assistance from Kristi Proggi. Big thanks to them for helping to make this a success!

    Primarily the engagement hackfest was focused on the website content. The website is showing its age and needs both a content update and a facelift. Given our general focus on engagement, we want to re-envision the website to drive that engagement as a medium for volunteer capture, identity, and fundraising.

    [...]

    I would like to thank the GNOME Foundation for providing the resources and infrastructure to have us all here.

  • Fontwork challenge

    I plan to update all kind of visual aspects in LibreOffice (6.4), if you are interested in feedback, help, support, you are welcome.

    Download the Fontwork.odp file where all 40 existing fontwork’s are shown. Play around with them and submit the updated file. Nothing is easier to contribute back and have fun with LibreOffice.

  • How to Increment and Decrement Variable in Bash (Counter)
  • Multiple Examples Of ls Command In Linux
  • Multiple Examples Of netcat Or nc Or ncat Command
  • [Old] Microsoft to Pay $25 Million to Settle Foreign Bribery Probe

    The computer behemoth settled the alleged Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations by four Microsoft subsidiaries in separate agreements with the SEC and the U.S. Department of Justice.

    Microsoft, as part of its settlement with the SEC, neither admitted nor denied the misconduct described by the agency.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Dev branch moving towards Qt 6

As you know, Qt 5.14 will be branched pretty soon. After that I would expect that most new development work would start to be aimed towards Qt 6. As it looks right now, 5.15 will be a smaller release where we polish what we have in 5.14, and prepare some things for Qt 6. To reflect that and help us all understand that the development focus is now towards Qt 6, I would like to propose that dev becomes the Qt 6 branch after we branched away 5.14 (and we merge wip/qt6 back into dev). We can then either create a 5.15 branch at the same time, or slightly later, once 5.14 has stabilised a bit more (e.g. after the beta or RC). Read more Also: Qt's Development Branch To Begin Forming Qt 6

Today in Techrights

How to Check Which Debian Version are you Running

Wondering which Debian version are you running? This tutorial teaches you several ways to check Debian version in the terminal. Read more

Tilda: A Great Dropdown Terminal

If you need a full sized, full featured persistent terminal that appears and hides at a single keystroke, Tilda is your friend. Like most Free Software, it has too little documentation, and some conflicting documentation out on the web. That's OK, with this document make Tilda do a heck of a lot of what it was designed to do. This document didn't cover multiple Tilda instance or transparency, but I'm sure both will be easy for you to achieve with a little web search and experimentation. Read more