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today's leftovers

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  • X.Org Foundation Bows Out For Google Summer of Code 2021

    Over the years Google Summer of Code (GSoC) has resulted in some really great projects in the X.Org ecosystem from work in the early days on the open-source Radeon graphics driver stack to VKMS more recently to many other improvements especially as it pertains to open-source graphics drivers / Mesa. But for Google Summer of Code 2021 at least, the organization will not be participating. 

    With rare exceptions, the X.Org Foundation has been a regular fixture of GSoC for as long as Google has been putting it on for more than one decade. It's resulted in many great contributions not only about the X.Org Server but the X.Org Foundation / FreeDesktop.org ecosystem to the likes of Mesa, Wayland, input, and more. 

  • KDE Code Formatting

    Short history of the ‘KDELIBS’ coding style

    Once upon a time, in the monolithic KDELIBS world, we had some document describing the KDELIBS coding style.

    Over the years, that evolved a bit and ended up here as Frameworks Coding Style.

    As noted there, it is more or less the same stuff Qt does style wise.

    How was that coding style handled in practice?

    Actually, this styling was really never enforced on a global scale.

    During the “we split KDELIBS up into Frameworks” time, on the initial import, the code was once run through astyle to ensure that coding style was kept.

    But after the initial import, nothing of that sort happened anymore (at least not in some coordinated fashion).

    Beside, for non-Frameworks, such a mandatory style application never happened. Actually, it was never be agreed that this style is mandatory beside for KDELIBS itself, anyways.

    Naturally, individual sub-projects/maintainers started to enforce either the stuff linked above or individual similar styles through different means.

    e.g. in kate.git we noted in the README that we wanted to follow that style. That was it ;=)

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  • oneAPI Level Zero 1.2.3 Released For Intel's Low-Level Interface

    With oneAPI Level Zero 1.2.3 they now support the Level Zero 1.1 specification, which is just a minor update over last year's official Level Zero 1.0 specification. The original oneAPI Level Zero specification was tentatively published back at the end of 2019 as Intel's direct-to-metal interfaces with a focus on offload accelerators. This is not to be confused with the oneAPI specification itself, which is working towards its v1.1 release later this calendar year, but is solely about the "Level Zero" specification. Yes, the oneAPI versioning scheme has become rather convoluted across its many different software components and specifications. 

    [...]

    The new release does require an updated Intel Compute Runtime stack for hardware support. On that front yesterday marked the Intel Compute Runtime 21.09.19150 release that updates the Intel Graphics Compiler as its only listed change. The Intel Compute Runtime continues to list its Level Zero support as 1.0 in a pre-release stage, while also enjoying OpenCL 3.0 production support)

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  • Five good reasons to try NextCloud in 2021

    I said so because I thought, and still think, that NextCloud is the most promising self-hosted, Free/Open Source alternative for the services that companies like Dropbox, Google, Facebook or Skype provide in exchange for users’ data, privacy and more.

    There were already plenty of good reasons to use NextCloud for those services in 2019, and there are many, many more in 2021. But don’t take my word for it. In case you missed NextCloud so far, here are X reasons to try NextCloud now, both personally, and for your company.

today's leftovers

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  • Daffodil Promoted To Being An Apache Top-Level Project

    Following the recent promotions of DataSketches and ECharts, the Apache Software Foundation has promoted Daffodil as their newest top-level project. Apache Daffodil is an open-source universal interchange implementation of the Data Format Description Language (DFDL).

    The Data Format Description Language (DFDL) standard is a modeling language for text and binary data in a standardized manner. DFDL basically aims to make data more portable thanks to providing an open framework for describing any data format.

  • At Least 30,000 U.S. Organizations Newly Hacked Via Holes in Microsoft’s Email Software

    At least 30,000 organizations across the United States — including a significant number of small businesses, towns, cities and local governments — have over the past few days been hacked by an unusually aggressive Chinese cyber espionage unit that’s focused on stealing email from victim organizations, multiple sources tell KrebsOnSecurity. The espionage group is exploiting four newly-discovered flaws in Microsoft Exchange Server email software, and has seeded hundreds of thousands of victim organizations worldwide with tools that give the attackers total, remote control over affected systems.

  • Linux Developers Continue Discussing "SLS" Mitigation For The Kernel - Phoronix

    Disclosed by Arm last summer was the Straight Line Speculation (SLS) vulnerability and they were quick to introduce new safeguards against SLS in the GCC and LLVM compilers. The compiler-based mitigations to straight-line speculation involves adding speculation barrier sequences around the vulnerable instructions to prevent speculatively executing instructions around changes in control flow. While compiler developers were quick to add the options, so far the Linux kernel developers are in disagreement still over its importance and the proposed patches that would flip on this option when compiling the ARM Linux kernel.

    While compiler support is out there for hardening against straight-line speculation on ARM, seeing these options utilized by potentially affected software hasn't been so quick. In February there were Google engineers proposing a kernel option for enabling the ARM SLS mitigation. The kernel patch is for basically enabling the "-mharden-sls=" compiler option for inserting speculation barrier (SB) instructions or otherwise DSB+ISB instructions around the instructions vulnerable to SLS.

today's leftovers

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  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2021/09

    This week has proven to be challenging for Tumbleweed. We have built and tested 6 snapshots, and only 2 of them were of sufficient quality to send out to the users. Of course, that means our QA infrastructure is well suited in protecting you, the users, from running into trouble – and that is the best thing we can show with this.

  • Yet Another Me - A debuginfod service for Debian

    This last Tuesday, February 23, 2021, I made an announcement at debian-devel-announce about a new service that I configured for Debian: a debuginfod server.

    This post serves two purposed: pay the promise I made to Jonathan Carter that I would write a blog post about the service, and go into a bit more detail about it.

    [...]

    You can find more information about our debuginfod service here. Try to keep an eye on the page as it's being constantly updated.

    If you'd like to get in touch with me, my email is my domain at debian dot org.

    I sincerely believe that this service is a step in the right direction, and hope that it can be useful to you Smile.

  • Raspberry Pi thermal camera
  • Librem 5 News Summary: February 2021

    February was a month of strong and steady progress behind the scenes from operational improvements to a lot more code written and released. Each week we ship an increasing number of Librem 5s out to backers. We also continue to work to locate and expedite more i.MX 8M CPU supply for future Librem 5s—the industry has an overall shortage of components—and as we get firm dates for those secured CPU supplies we intend on sending out shipping estimates to Librem 5 backers.

    We have also made progress on the Librem 5 hardware support side. Last month we announced we had finished support for the OpenPGP smart card reader and this month we released a blog post and video that describes how to enable it on existing Librem 5s. We have also made a lot of advancements on camera support and have successfully taken some initial pictures. There is still more work to do to complete the camera driver and get the most out of the camera hardware and we hope to have more announcements on that front soon.

    Speaking of the kernel we also published a post that describes in detail the work we have done in the 5.11 kernel including progress on mainline support for the Librem 5 as well as improvements in power management and overall support for the Librem 5 hardware.

    On the Librem 5 USA front, it has taken much longer than we have expected to locate and secure new supply chains for all of the components we will need to start production of the PCBA due to some of the unprecedented issues in the electronics supply chain over the last year. We are happy to announce that we have tracked down almost every component now and are optimistic we can track down the one or two remaining components soon so that we can start production on the PCBA in the coming month. The Librem 5 USA will be manufactured at our facility in the US with our secure supply chain and Made in USA Electronics.

  • Tantek Çelik: One Year Since The #IndieWeb Homebrew Website Club Met In Person And Other Last Times

    March 2021 is the second March in a row where so many of us are still in countries & cities doing our best to avoid getting sick (or worse), slow the spread, and otherwise living very different lives than we did in the before times. Every day here forward will be an anniversary of sorts for an unprecedented event, experience, change, or loss. Or the last time we did something. Rather than ignore them, it’s worth remembering what we had, what we used to do, both appreciating what we have lost (allowing ourselves to mourn), and considering potential upsides of adaptations we have made.

    A year ago yesterday (2020-03-04) we hosted the last in-person Homebrew Website Club meetups in Nottingham (by Jamie Tanna in a café) and San Francisco (by me at Mozilla).

    Normally I go into the office on Wednesdays but I had worked from home that morning. I took the bus (#5736) inbound to work in the afternoon, the last time I rode a bus. I setup a laptop on the podium in the main community room to show demos on the displays as usual.

  • Firefox B!tch to Boss extension takes the sting out of hostile comments directed at women online

    A great swathe of the internet is positive, a place where people come together to collaborate on ideas, discuss news and share moments of levity and sorrow, too. But there’s also a dark side, where comments, threads and DMs are peppered with ugly, hostile language designed to intimidate and harass. Women online, especially women who are outspoken in any field — journalism, tech, government, science, and so on — know this all too well.

    What’s the solution? People being less terrible, obviously. Until we reach that stage of human maturity, the B!tch to Boss extension for Firefox can help by replacing words like “bitch”, often used in derogatory comments and messages directed at women, with the word “boss”.

  • EU Open Data Days

    Participate in the first edition of the EU Open Data Days 2021 from 23-25 November 2021.

today's leftovers

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  • How to Build Your Own React Hooks: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Custom React hooks are an essential tool that let you add special, unique functionality to your React applications.

    In many cases, if you want to add a certain feature to your application, you can simply install a third-party library that is made to solve your problem. But if such a library or hook doesn't exist, what do you do?

    As a React developer, it's important to learn the process of creating custom hooks to solve problems or add missing features within your own React projects.

    In this step-by-step guide, I will show you how to create your own custom React hooks by breaking down three hooks I've made for my own applications, along with what problems they were created to solve.

  • Linux Release Roundup #21.10: Nitrux 1.3.8, Steam Link, Flameshot 0.9, and More New Releases

    In the Linux Release Roundup series, we summarize the new application and distribution versions release in the last few days. This keeps you informed with the latest developments in the Linux world.

  • Intel Tiger Lake Xe Graphics On Linux 5.12 Git, Mesa 21.1-devel - Phoronix

    Recently I wrapped up some tests looking at the Dell XPS Linux laptop with Core i7 1165G7 "Tiger Lake" processor when looking at the Linux kernel performance of 5.10 vs. 5.11 vs. 5.12 as well as the impact if upgrading to the Linux 5.12 kernel.

    In this quick article are some benchmarks looking at the Tiger Lake Xe Graphics performance with these newest open-source graphics driver components.

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  • Three Top Russian Cybercrime Forums Hacked

           

             

    Over the past few weeks, three of the longest running and most venerated Russian-language online forums serving thousands of experienced cybercriminals have been hacked. In two of the intrusions, the attackers made off with the forums’ user databases, including email and Internet addresses and hashed passwords. Members of all three forums are worried the incidents could serve as a virtual Rosetta Stone for connecting the real-life identities of the same users across multiple crime forums.

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  • US Navy On The Hook For 'Pirating' German Company's Software

           

             

    A couple of years ago, we discussed the somewhat ironic story of a German software company suing the United States Navy for pirating its software. The initial story was a bit messy, but essentially the Navy tested out Bitmanagement's software and liked it well enough that it wanted to push the software out to hundreds of thousands of computers. After Bitmanagement sued for hundreds of millions of dollars as a result, the Navy pointed out that it had bought concurrent use licenses through a third party reseller. While Bitmanagement pointed out that it didn't authorize that kind of license itself, the court at the time noted that without a contractual arrangement between the company and the Navy, the Navy had an implied license for concurrent users and dismissed the case.

today's leftovers

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  • Installation And First Look At Mageia 8

    Mageia is a GNU/Linux distribution that is a community project begin life as Mandrake, which then became Mandriva, which then became Mageia. This is a rpm-based distro that uses a static release model and is known for stability.

  • OpenShot: Windows Movie Maker Of Linux - YouTube

    OpenShot is one of those video editors that everyone tries at least once, and I feel like it should stay at only once. While it's not unusable you could get some work done with it, it has some serious limitations as a video editor that take all the fun out of making videos.

  • Google Patches Actively-Exploited Flaw in Chrome Browser

    A flaw (CVE-2021-21166) in the Audio component of Google Chrome is fixed in a new update being pushed out to Windows, Mac and Linux users.

    Google has fixed a high-severity vulnerability in its Chrome browser and is warning Chrome users that an exploit exists in the wild for the flaw.

    The vulnerability is one of 47 security fixes that the tech giant rolled out on Tuesday in Chrome 89.0.4389.72, including patches for eight high-severity flaws.

  • GOGGLES: Democracy dies in darkness, and so does the Web

    This paper proposes an open and collaborative system by which a community, or a single user, can create sets of rules and filters,called Goggles, to define the space which a search engine can pull results from. Instead of a single ranking algorithm, we could have as many as needed, overcoming the biases that a single actor (the search engine) embeds into the results. Transparency and openness, all desirable qualities, will become accessible through the deep re-ranking capabilities Goggles would enable. Such system would be made possible by the availability of a host search engine, providing the index and infrastructure, which are unlikely to be replicated without major development and infrastructure costs. Besides the system proposal and the definition of the Goggle language, we also provide an extensive evaluation of the performance to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach. Last but not the least, we commit the upcoming Brave search engine to this effort and encourage other xsearch engine providers to join the proposal.

  • hipSYCL Sees Work-In-Progress Support For Intel oneAPI Level Zero Backend

    hipSYCL, the innovative implementation of Khronos' SYCL for targeting CPUs and GPUs by integrating with existing toolchains, is seeing work on supporting Intel oneAPI Level Zero for running directly off Intel graphics hardware.

    The open-source hipSYCL project already supports SYCL CPU-based execution via OpenMP, targeting NVIDIA GPUs using CUDA, and targeting AMD Radeon graphics using HIP/ROCm. Now with a new work-in-progress back-end is support for Intel graphics using Level Zero. The hipSYCL project is one of several SYCL implementations aiming to support various CPUs and GPUs/accelerators while so far it's been one of the most diverse. The hipSYCL project supports most of SYCL 2020 at present.

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 5 March 2021 : The Apache Software Foundation Blog

    Welcome, March! We've had a great week within the Apache community.

  • Is your Cloud infrastructure securely configured?

    The trend toward deploying security as part of the DevOps process has been shifting left the security and compliance processes. The DevSecOps practices have introduced processes to inspect application-code, Docker, and Kubernetes. These practices have allowed teams to detect and fix security issues faster and provide high-quality and compliant code.

    Still, many admins of Cloud accounts are securing account configuration by configuring an account via a UI, running a configuration assessment scan, and then fixing any issues found. While this might lead eventually to a securely configured account, they are essentially experimenting with an account until it becomes secure.

  • Delivering more flexible and tailored cloud-native management with the latest version of Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes

    Today, we’re pleased to announce the general availability of Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes 2.2, which delivers even greater integration and customization to how enterprises manage cloud-native workloads and environments. This latest release simplifies and streamlines operations and captures additional performance metrics to ensure optimization of Red Hat OpenShift clusters.

    Introduced in the summer of 2020, Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes enables organizations to manage multiple Kubernetes clusters and automate multi-cluster application deployments across the hybrid cloud. As the industry’s leading enterprise Kubernetes platform, Red Hat OpenShift is a crucial component in how organizations build a more agile hybrid cloud, and Advanced Cluster Management for Kubernetes helps these enterprises get the most out of these deployments by extending and scaling Red Hat OpenShift clusters.

  • OpenBSD/loongson on the Lemote Fuloong

    This machine uses the same CPU than the Yeeloong, a Loongson 2F which is a single-core MIPS-III 64-bit processor running at 800/900 MHz.

    As hinted in my previous article, contrarily to the Yeeloong, the Fuloong is less strict with the type of RAM it accepts, and my device is happily running with a Kingston 2GB DDR2 SO-DIMM module (ASU256X64D2S800C6), replacing the original 512MB module.

  • waylandmar21

    While struggling with Pfizer second dose side effects yesterday, with little ability to do anything serious – so surreal to have a fever yet also certainty you’re not actually ill[1] – I thought I’d try building the branch of Emacs with native Wayland support, and try starting up Sway instead of i3. I recently upgraded my laptop to Debian bullseye, as I usually do at this stage of our pre-release freeze, and was wondering whether bullseye would be the release which would enable me to switch to Wayland.

    Why might I want to do this? I don’t care about screen tearing and don’t have any fancy monitors with absurd numbers of pixels. Previously, I had been hoping to cling on to my X11 setup for as long as possible, and switch to Wayland only once things I want to use started working worse on X11, because all the developers of those things have stopped using X11. But then after upgrading to bullseye, I found I had to forward-port an old patch to xfce4-session to prevent it from resetting SSH_AUTH_SOCK to the wrong value, and I thought to myself, maybe I could cut out some of the layers here, and maybe it’ll be a bit less annoying. I have a pile of little scripts trying to glue together xfce4 and i3 to get all the functionality I need, but since there have been people who use their computers for similar purposes to me trying to make Sway useful for quite some time now, maybe there are more integrated solutions available.

    I have also been getting tired of things which have only ever half-worked under X, like toggling autolock off when there isn’t fullscreen video playing (when I’m video conferencing on another device, I often want to prevent my laptop’s screen from locking, and it works most of the time, but sometimes still locks, sigh). I have a “normalise desktop” keybinding which tries to fix recurrent issues by doing things like restarting ibus, and it would be nice to drop something so hackish.

  • Robert Kaiser: Mozilla History Talk @ FOSDEM

    The FOSDEM conference in Brussels has become a bit of a ritual for me. Ever since 2002, there has only been a single year of the conference that I missed, and any time I was there, I did take part in the Mozilla devroom - most years also with a talk, as you can see on my slides page.

    This year, things were a bit different as for obvious reasons the conference couldn't bring together thousands of developers in Brussels but almost a month ago, in its usual spot, the conference took place in a virtual setting instead. The team did an incredibly good job of hosting this huge conference in a setting completely run on Free and Open Source Software, backed by Matrix (as explained in a great talk by Matthew Hodgson) and Jitsi (see talk by Saúl Ibarra Corretgé).

  • An Introduction to WebAssembly

    WebAssembly, also called Wasm, is a Web-optimized code format and API (Application Programming Interface) that can greatly improve the performances and capabilities of websites. Version 1.0 of WebAssembly, was released in 2017, and became an official W3C standard in 2019.

    The standard is actively supported by all major browser suppliers, for obvious reasons: the official list of “inside the browser” use cases mentions, among other things, video editing, 3D games, virtual and augmented reality, p2p services, and scientific simulations. Besides making browsers much more powerful than JavaScript could, this standard may even extend the lifespan of websites: for example, it is WebAssembly that powers the continued support of Flash animations and games at the Internet Archive.

    WebAssembly isn’t just for browsers though; it is currently being used in mobile and edge based environments with such products as Cloudflare Workers.

    [...]

    There are more and more programming language communities that are supporting compiling to Wasm directly, we recommend looking at the introductory guides from webassembly.org as a starting point depending what language you work with. Note that not all programming languages have the same level of Wasm support, so your mileage may vary.

  • NXP i.MX 9 processors to integrate Arm Ethos U-65 microNPU, EdgeLock secure enclave

    NXP i.MX 6 and i.MX 8 processors are widely used in industrial boards and systems-on-module, and the company has now teased a new family with i.MX 9 processors integrating Arm Ethos-U65 1 TOPS microNPU, as well as the company’s EdgeLock secure enclave for increased security.

    The company did not provide that many technical details, so we still don’t know which CPU cores, GPU, and exact peripherals will be found in the processor. But we do know the i.MX 9 processors will be manufactured with a 16/12nm FinFET class of process technology optimized for low power, and features the “Energy Flex” architecture that combines “heterogeneous domain processing (independent applications processor and real-time domains with a separate low-power multi-media domain), design techniques, and process technology to maximize performance efficiency”. That means most blocks of the processor can be turned off for low power audio or CAN networking use cases, and other industrial applications requiring fast boot, defined as sub-100 milliseconds boot time.

today's leftovers

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  • Phillips 66 reduces costs and increases agility with SUSE

    How does one of the largest oil producers in the world mitigate a global pandemic that completely wipes out global demand? That was precisely the situation American oil giant Phillips 66 was faced with when Coronavirus first emerged in late 2019.

    For the first time in history, crude oil prices fell below zero, throwing this often volatile market into a new level of uncertainty. Oil production facilities, unable to cease operations, were filling up storage tanks faster than expected demand, forcing them pay buyers to take oil off their hands.

  • Cintiq or Intuos? ...or both? The tablets I use. - David Revoy

    I'm showing my usage of two different tablets to answer the classic "What tablet are you using?". I also do that because I'm tired about the numbered videos "Intuos VS Cintiq" as if you had to choose one clan over the other... Both have pros and cons and with a sane operating system (like my Kubuntu Linux 20.04) you can unplug one on the fly and use the other without too much magnetic noises and a get plug'n'play experience. It really helps, I don't even need to restart Krita. For more information about my tablets, read this blog post where I detail all the one I owned over the last 20 years: https://www.davidrevoy.com/article332/tablet-history-log

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  • The Apache Software Foundation Announces Apache® Daffodil™ as a Top-Level Project

    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today Apache® Daffodil™ as a Top-Level Project (TLP).

    Apache Daffodil is an Open Source implementation of the Data Format Description Language 1.0 specification (DFDL; the Open Grid Forum open standard framework for describing the attributes of any data format [1]) to enable universal data interchange. The project was first created at the University of Illinois National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) in 2009, and entered the Apache Incubator in August 2017.

    "We're extremely excited that Apache Daffodil has achieved this important milestone in its development. The Daffodil DFDL implementation is a game changer in complex text and binary data interfaces and creates massive opportunities for organizations to easily implement highly sophisticated processes like data decomposition, inspection, and reassembly," said Michael Beckerle, Vice President of Apache Daffodil. "Instead of spending a lot of time worrying about how to deal with so many kinds of data that you need to take in, from day one you can convert all sorts of data into XML, or JSON, or your preferred data structure, and convert back if you need to write data out in its original format."

  • Privacy-Focused Brave Browser Plans to Challenge Google With A Private Search Engine

    Brave Browser has been quite impressive with its constant developments for privacy-focused users as a Google Chrome alternative.

    No wonder why Google could be locking down Chrome to resist the rise of Chromium-based browsers.

    Recently, they announced their acquisition of an open-source search engine ‘Tailcat’ by the ex-Devs of Cliqz and shared plans to utilize it to introduce a private Google search alternative.

    Yes, we may have several privacy-focused Google search alternatives already. However, with Brave Search, it could be a proper alternative to the offering of Google Chrome + Google Search.

    Let me highlight a few details that you might want to know about Brave Search.

  • Screenshots suck. But they’re about to get a lot smarter

    Screenshots are ubiquitous. From shopping references to memes and from saving cat photos to serious research, they’re a routine and important quality-of-life feature on computers and mobile devices everywhere.

    Android 12 should finally get full-page website screenshots, if Google can iron the bugs out before release. Samsung and Apple have had that feature for a while, but their recent patents show an interest in capturing metadata, from live links to site-specific information like street addresses and song titles.

    Tap Scroll Capture when you screenshot a Samsung Galaxy, and the phone’s screenshot tool will stitch together a long screenshot to capture an entire website. Browse your screenshots in the Gallery, and you’ll see a Go To Website shortcut, a feature introduced in 2017.

  • Security updates for Thursday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (389-ds-base, dogtag-pki, freeipa, isync, pki-core, and screen), Mageia (firefox, kernel, kernel-linus, libtiff, nonfree-firmware, and thunderbird), Red Hat (bind and java-1.8.0-ibm), Scientific Linux (grub2), and SUSE (kernel-firmware, openldap2, postgresql12, and python-cryptography).

  • Positive Technologies Researcher Discovers And Fixes Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities

    Positive Technologies security researcher Alexander Popov has discovered and fixed five similar issues in the virtual socket implementation of the Linux kernel.

    These vulnerabilities could be exploited for local privilege escalation, as confirmed by Popov in experiments on Fedora 33 Server. The vulnerabilities, known together as CVE-2021-26708, have received a CVSS v3 base score of 7.0 (high severity).

    [...]

    Popov said: “I successfully developed a prototype exploit for local privilege escalation on Fedora 33 Server, bypassing x86_64 platform protections such as SMEP and SMAP. This research will lead to new ideas on how to improve Linux kernel security.”

  • Most Reliable Hosting Company Sites in February 2021 [Ed: 9 out of 10 are GNU/Linux-powered]

    Choopa.com took the top spot as the most reliable hosting company site in February. The top five hosting company sites all had no failed requests during the month, with the ranking decided by fastest average connection time. Choopa.com had the fastest connection time out of all of the top 10 hosting company websites, at just 5ms. In the past 12 months Choopa.com appeared in the top 10 nine times. Choopa.com offers a range of services including cloud hosting, dedicated hosting and colocation in its own primary facility in Piscataway, New Jersey as well as other facilities in Los Angeles, Amsterdam, and Tokyo.

    Spots two and three in February go to Rackspace and Webair. Rackspace provide a wide variety of cloud services from its global network of over 50 locations in five continents, and Webair offer managed and private cloud services, storage and backup solutions from its eight facilities in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Montreal, London, Paris, Amsterdam and Singapore.

    The other two hosting companies to respond to every request during February were Hyve and CWCS.

  • LinuxLinks – The Home of Linux

    Over the years, we’ve written an enormous range of articles showcasing the finest free and open source Linux software. There’s other computer related areas that we also regularly dive into such as programming, hardware, Android, and more.

    Many of these articles are published in a series. It therefore makes sense to collate all of these series into a central location.

today's leftovers

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  • Changing Of The Guard For HPC And Big Iron At HPE

    Hewlett Packard Enterprise has been building a mainstream and grassroots server business aimed at large enterprises, HPC centers, and academic and government institutions for two decades. HPE took a run at the hyperscalers and cloud builders and large service providers with its Cloudline minimalist machinery, but has largely backed away from that business because margins are thin to non-existent.

    The systems business that is left represents the core of HPE after it has largely divested its software and services business, which it spent tens of billions of dollars to acquire to try to create a clone of IBM, and split off its PC and printer business into an entirely different company.

    While the original Hewlett Packard has a long history in proprietary and Unix systems, it was the acquisition of Compaq way back in September 2001 for $25 billion that gave what is now HPE a volume server business aimed at small, medium, and large enterprises as well as the emerging webscale companies. The rivalry with Dell (and to a lesser extent with Lenovo, Inspur, and Sugon) and the rise of the original design manufacturers who work directly with the hyperscalers and large public cloud builders (Foxconn, Quanta, Inventec, WiWynn, and such) have put the hurt on this ProLiant server business. But that ProLiant business is still formidable, and has many millions of loyal customers.

  • SUSE: 7 Digital Transformation Questions IT Should Ask Their Business Managers

    During the journey of digital transformation, organizations have to master several things at the same time: adopting new innovations, increasing efficiency, and maintaining continuity. IT not only plays a crucial role in these improvements but in many cases also leads transformation projects that improve the business.

  • Freedom to map depends on WHO delivers it

    At the moment, I do not know enough about this reform and its general background, to have a definite opinion on who is wrong or right here. But that is not important. My only goal with this post is to remind everybody, in India and everywhere else, that “map or you will be mapped” is not just a fancy slogan.

    Whoever draws the maps, or controls the data needed to draw them, can concretely increase, or limit, your personal freedom and rights. This is the only thing that you surely want to learn from all the congratulations and concerns above. Take them as concrete examples of what could actually go wrong, or right, with mapping laws, whatever digital map you are already living in.

  • Microsoft Attacks The Open Web Because It's Jealous Of Google's Success

today's leftovers

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  • mintCast 355.5 – McKnight in Shining Armor

    1:49 Linux Innards
    27:06 Vibrations from the Ether
    51:29 Check This Out
    58:45 Announcements & Outro

    In our Innards section, we talk to community member Mike!

    And finally, the feedback and a couple suggestions

  • The small web is beautiful

    About fifteen years ago, I read E. F. Schumacher’s Small is Beautiful and, despite not being interested in economics, I was moved by its message. Perhaps even more, I loved the terse poetry of the book’s title – it resonated with my frugal upbringing and my own aesthetic.

    I think it’s time for a version of that book about technology, with a chapter on web development: The Small Web is Beautiful: A Study of Web Development as if People Mattered. Until someone writes that, this essay will have to do.

    There are two aspects of this: first, small teams and companies. I’m not going to talk much about that here, but Basecamp and many others have. What I’m going to focus on in this essay is small websites and architectures.

  • PS2 Emulation Gets Even Nicer With Custom Textures

    PCSX2 has long been a fantastic PS2 emulator, but a recent advance has made it all the more appealing for anyone playing on a PC: the ability to swap textures in games.

    While the famous Dolphin emulator for the GameCube has long supported this feature, PCSX2 has only just brought it in, and it’ll allow modders to improve any kind of texture they want in an old PS2 game. In the example video below by someother1ne, we can see everything from the road in Gran Turismo to the helmets and jerseys in NFL2K5 get swapped out.

  • Epic Games is buying Fall Guys creator Mediatonic

    According to the blog posts and FAQs detailing the announcement, Fall Guys will remain available on Steam for the time being, and the developer is still bringing the game to both the Xbox and Nintendo Switch platforms. Epic and Mediatonic say there are no plans right now to make the game (which currently costs $19.99) free-to-play, as Epic did with Rocket League. Epic later confirmed it plans to make the PC version of Fall Guys available on the Epic Game Store.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Five Tips For The Openbox Window Manager

    Openbox has always been my favorite floating window manager. It holds a special place in my heart due it being the first window manager that I used when I switched to Linux. And I still find it so darn comfy to use!

  • The Waybig Machine | LINUX Unplugged 395

    It's our worst idea yet. We share the password to our brand-new server and see who can own the box first. Whoever wins gets a special prize.

    Plus how Archive.org uses Linux, and more.

  • Tachyum Delivers First Software Emulation Systems

    Native Tachyum Linux 5.10

  • Big Gains for Open Aerospace: Interview with Open Research Institute

    The Open Research Institute (ORI) is an OSI Affiliate project that works to facilitate worldwide collaboration in the development of technology. The past year has been a particularly exciting one -- achieving some groundbreaking wins for open source in aerospace. ORI’s co-founder and CEO, Michelle Thompson took some time out of her busy schedule to talk with me about their recent regulatory initiatives.

    DN: Can you tell us a little bit about the Open Research Institute's history and mission?

    MT: Open Research Institute's mission is to provide a friendly, safe, and accessible place to do open source research and development for amateur radio and beyond. We have been fully operational since March 2019 and have contributed technical and regulatory work central to the mission of the international amateur radio service. This work is useful outside of the amateur community because it allows a wide variety of organizations to use open source communications technology where they would otherwise have to reinvent a wheel, or restrict the work to US persons only.

    DN: It was a big year for ORI, with the determination that "Open Source Satellite Work" is free of International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR.) What prompted ORI to draft a commodity jurisdiction request?

    MT: We were able to do this work due to the generous support of YASME Foundation, ARRL Foundation, and ARDC Foundation. Without their generous financial support and guidance, the technical and regulatory victories over the past 18 months would simply not have happened.

  • Sparky System

    There is a new, small application available for Sparkers: Sparky System

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 118

    You may know that both the SUSE and openSUSE families of operating systems include container-oriented members, namely openSUSE MicroOS and SLE Micro. In order to make them even more awesome, we got the request to make possible to propose and configure the usage of Security-Enhanced Linux, more widely known as SELinux, during the (auto)installation. This is a complex change affecting several parts of YaST and various versions of (open)SUSE, but you can get a good overview in the description of this pull request which includes some screenshots that may be worth a thousand words. Right now, the feature may look different on each one of the distributions due to the different state of SELinux on them. While in SLE Micro the new setting is visible during installation and activated at its more restrictive level, in others it may look more permisive or even not be presented at all. We expect things to consolidate during the upcoming weeks.

    And talking about things that take their time, for a long time we had wanted to improve the usability of the configuration of wireless network adapters. Finally we found the time to reorganize the corresponding tab in the YaST Network module, improving the mechanism to select a wireless network and automatically pre-filling as much information as possible. You can see the result in the following animation and in the detailed pull request with the usual before-and-after screenshots.

  • Steam On Linux In February Still Residing Below 1% - Phoronix

    Valve has released their updated Steam Survey figures for February 2021.

    For January, the reported Steam Linux usage hit 0.91%, similar to where it was in November of last year. With the ongoing success of Steam Play (Proton + DXVK/VKD3D-Proton) for running many modern Windows games well under Linux, Steam on Linux has been enjoying the upper sub-1% space on a monthly basis -- normally 0.8~0.9%.

  • Try the demo of Dashing Dodgems, a frantic and hilarious bumper cars party game

    In development by Yellowcake Games, it's all about last driver remaining and it's really fun. When a match starts to take too long, the world will start to crumble around you with tiles vanishing into the water. You cars can annihilate the environment too, which you need to do to get power-ups hidden inside buildings - which is quite satisfying when you bump your way through a town.

    [...]

    You can follow it on Steam and try the Linux demo on itch.io.

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Option To Force Smart Access Memory Behavior

    The latest "Smart Access Memory" work by the open-source AMD Radeon graphics driver stack is an option for the RADV Vulkan driver to force the "SAM" behavior even if the system is not advertising all the video RAM as visible or even if using APU graphics.

  • Update on tender for a built-in UNO object inspection tool in LibreOffice

    In July last year, we launched a tender to implement a dedicated, built-in UNO object inspection tool in LibreOffice. UNO refers to Unified Network Objects, the component model used by the software.

    Tomaž Vajngerl was assigned to work on the tender, and has blogged about his progress. He discusses the point-and-click functionality to inspect selected objects in the document, and his next steps.

  • PRESS: Hardware hacker and academic Nadya Peek to keynote LibrePlanet 2021

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today announced digital fabrication expert and University of Washington assistant professor Nadya Peek as a keynote speaker for LibrePlanet 2021. The annual technology and social justice conference will be held online on March 20 and 21, 2021, with the theme "Empowering Users."

    [...]

    At this year's LibrePlanet conference, Peek will discuss the increasingly ambiguous dividing line between hardware and software, and how everyone can ensure that the physical tools created by digital fabrication methods are as hackable and reconfigurable as free software tools. On Peek's announcement as LibrePlanet 2021's third keynote speaker announcement, FSF program manager Zoë Kooyman stated, "Her work in human-centered design is exactly that: human-centered. Nadya Peek's research and work is guided by the powerful belief that machines, as well as the concept of automation itself, can be approached in a different way. By giving users access to all the pieces they could need to build a machine, she gives individuals the creative freedom to make or automate almost anything. It's empowering to the core and we're excited to learn more about her work."

    Asked to comment on being selected to keynote at the LibrePlanet conference, Peek stated, "LibrePlanet has an amazing community. I like it when I'm the person in the room who knows the fewest FFmpeg [a popular free software multimedia encoder] flags by heart. I'm very excited to spend time together, albeit virtually during an extremely strange time."

  • Intel Looking To Upstream A Proper SPIR-V Compute Back-End For LLVM

    It's been talked about many times from various parties but so far has remained elusive from the mainline LLVM code-base: a SPIR-V back-end for LLVM that would go from LLVM into this Khronos intermediate representation most notably used by OpenCL and Vulkan drivers. Intel engineers are stepping up and hope to help get a proper SPIR-V back-end upstreamed into LLVM.

    There have been various out-of-tree efforts and plans talked about by different companies/developers for having a SPIR-V back-end in LLVM as this key IR supported by the modern Khronos APIs. With Intel's latest push and "request for comments", they are looking to have a proper back-end in LLVM for targeting SPIR-V -- initially with a compute focus but the possibility of extending to 3D shader support for Vulkan later on.

  • Python For Loop Examples - nixCraft

    ow and when do I use for loops under Python programming language? How can I use the break and continue statements to alter the flow of a Python loop?

    A for loop is a Python statement which repeats a group of statements a specified number of times. You can use any object (such as strings, arrays, lists, tuples, dict and so on) in a for loop in Python. This page explains the basics of the Python for loop in including break and continue statements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • tCam-Mini IR thermal camera board ships with ESP32 module

    While there are plenty of ESP32 camera boards, it’s much harder to find off-the-shelf solutions with ESP32 wireless SoC and an IR thermal camera.

    That’s likely why Dan Julio decided to design tCam-Mini board combining an ESP32 module with a Flir Lepton 3.5 sensor with 160×120 resolution to capture radiometric data for thermographic analysis.

    [...]

    It’s possible to connect to the ESP32 thermal camera board in access point or station mode to control it with “tCam console” desktop application compatible with Linux...

  • How your young people can create with tech for Coolest Projects 2021
  • Canonical completes Azure Arc Validation Program, helps increase user confidence in Arc enabled production Kubernetes [Ed: Canonical has been boosting Microsoft for years and it closed bug #1 which basically means they don't wish to actually replace Windows]
  • Ubuntu Blog: Ubuntu in the wild – 2nd of March 2021

    The Ubuntu in the wild blog post ropes in the latest highlights about Ubuntu and Canonical around the world on a bi-weekly basis. It is a summary of all the things that made us feel proud to be part of this journey. What do you think of it?

    [...]

    This one could interest our Italian readers: Lorenzo Cavassa, Field Engineer at Canonical, will be talking about how to create Kubernetes clusters on any type of substrate, from public clouds to private data centers to the Edge, with the automation and flexibility provided by Juju and Ubuntu.

  • New Garuda Linux “Hawk Eagle” Released With LibreWolf Browser

    Following its monthly release model, the Garuda team has announced a new version called Garuda Linux “Hawk Eagle” (210225).

    Like all previous releases, this February update also comes with a new edition called KDE Dragonized BlackArch Edition. It features the BlackArch repository, tweaks, and most common tools.

    So, in total, Garuda now has 16 editions with different desktop environments: KDE Multimedia, GNOME, Xfce, LXQT-Kwin, Wayfire, i3WM, Qtile, MATE, Cinnamon, Recbox, UKUI, BSPWM, dr460nized, dr460nized gaming, dr460nized blackarch, Barebone KDE, and GNOME.

    Another important change that Garuda Linux “Hawk Eagle” has brought for all editions (except Xfce and i3WM) is the inclusion of the LibreWolf (with extensions) as the default web browser.

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 114

    Linux on another planet, Chrome OS enjoys huge success, great Firefox improvements, a flawed but well-meaning idea for a laptop, free RHEL for FOSS projects, Xfce news, and KDE Korner.

  • Cartesi (CTSI) Opens Linux Environment Gates for Avalanche

    Cartesi, the layer-2 decentralized Linux infrastructure announced its integration with Avalanche, the open-source platform for highly decentralized apps. With this integration, Cartesi’s Layer-2 infrastructure will expand within DeFi for the first time. Additionally, it will enable a Linux environment on Avalanche for smart contracts and higher computational scalability. Once the integration completes, the developers building on Avalanche will first time have access to develop smart contracts using Linux and uncountable mainstream software stack.

  •  

  • Official Evernote Application For Linux Available For Download (Beta)

    Let me start by telling you a bit about Evernote, in case you've never heard of it (which is weird, because this is a quite popular application). Evernote is an application for note-taking, organizing, task management, and archiving. Using it you can create notes using text, drawings, add photographs, audio, or web content. Each note can be tagged, annotated, edited, searched, given attachments, and exported. The application is free to use (but not free, open source software) with monthly usage limits, or you can use a paid plan. Up until recently, Evernote was available for Microsoft Windows, macOS, Android and iOS.

  • MySQL from Below

    When you insert data into a database and run COMMIT you expect things to be there: Atomically, Consistent, Isolated and Durable, like Codd commanded us 40 years ago, but also quickly. There is a surprising amount of sophistication being poured into this, but since I do not want to shame MongoDB and Redis developers in this post, I am not going to talk about that much in this place.

    We are instead trying to understand what our databases are doing all day, from the point of view of the storage stack.

  • To Prevent the Resurgence of the Pandemic, Can We Talk About Open-Source Research?
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Audiocasts/Shows: Open Source Security Podcast, Linux Action News, and SMLR

Review: Artix Linux in 2021

Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects. Artix Linux offers a lightweight, rolling-release operating system featuring alternative init software options, including OpenRC, runit, and s6. The distribution is available in many editions, including Base, Cinnamon, LXDE, LXQt, MATE, KDE Plasma and Xfce. With all of the desktop options, combined with the available init choices, there are 21 editions, not including community spins from which to choose. All editions appear to be built for 64-bit (x86_64) machines. Picking randomly, I selected Artix's Plasma edition featuring the runit init software. The download for this edition is is 1.3GB. Browsing the other editions it looks like most flavours are about 1.1GB to 1.3GB in size, though the minimal Base edition is a compact 618MB. The project's live media boots to the KDE Plasma desktop. On the desktop we find multiple documentation and README icons. There is also an icon for launching the system installer. The default layout places a panel at bottom of the screen where we can find the application menu and system tray. The default wallpaper is a soft blue while the theme for windows and menus is dark with high contrast fonts. [...] Artix Linux is one of those distributions I really enjoy using and yet struggle to review in a meaningful way because it doesn't really go out of its way to introduce new or exciting features and everything works smoothly. The distribution is wonderfully easy to install, offers top-notch performance, and is unusually light on resources. Artix is somewhat minimal, but still ships enough software to be immediately useful right out of the gate. We can browse the web, install packages, view files, and play videos. Meanwhile the application menu isn't cluttered with a lot of extras. The developers clearly expect us to install the functionality we need, while doing a really good job of providing enough for the desktop environment to feel base-line useful right from the start. Artix does a nice job of balancing performance and functionality while also juggling ease of use against not getting in the way. There is a little documentation, but no initial welcome screen or configuration wizards that might distract the user. The one piece I felt was missing was a graphical package manager which would have made it easier to build the extra functionality I wanted on top of the base distribution. However, that one piece aside, I felt as though Artix was really well designed and put together, at lease for someone like me. It's not a distribution geared toward beginners, it's not a "first distro". It is a bit minimal and requires command line knowledge. However, for someone with a little experience with Linux, for someone who doesn't mind the occasional trip to the command line or installing new applications as needed, then Artix provides an excellent experience. It's fast, light, looks (in my opinion) great with the default theme, and elegantly walks the line between minimalism and having enough applications ready to go out of the box to be immediately useful. I'm unusually impressed with how smooth and trouble-free my experience was with this distribution and the fact it offers such a range of desktop and init diversity is all the more appealing. Read more

Alpine Linux Review: Ultimate Distro for Power Users

Alpine Linux is gathering a lot of attention because of its super-small size and focus on security. However, Alpine is different from some of the other lightweight distros we covered on FOSSLinux. It isn’t your typical desktop distribution as it is terminal-based like Arch and is marketed as a “general purpose distro.” It is currently widely adopted as a Docker container thanks to its ultra-small footprint. However, it can be used for all sorts of Linux deployments that benefit from small, resource-efficient Linux distros. Now, that statement might feel too generic. But don’t worry, as we have put together an in-depth and comprehensive review of Alpine Linux, giving you a detailed look at what it has under the hood and how to use it. As such, by the end, you should have a clear understanding of whether you should consider Alpine Linux as your next Linux distro. So without further ado, let’s dive in. Read more

Programming Leftovers

  • How to manipulate strings in bash

    Without explicit support for variable types, all bash variables are by default treated as character strings. Therefore more often than not, you need to manipulate string variables in various fashions while working on your bash script. Unless you are well-versed in this department, you may end up constantly coming back to Google and searching for tips and examples to handle your specific use case. In the spirit of saving your time and thus boosting your productivity in shell scripting, I compile in this tutorial a comprehensive list of useful string manipulation tips for bash scripting. Where possible I will try to use bash's built-in mechanisms (e.g., parameter expansion) to manipulate strings instead of invoking external tools such as awk, sed or grep. If you find any missing tips, feel free to suggest it in the comment. I will be happy to incorporate it in the article.

  • Python Generators

    Python generators are very powerful for handling operations which require large amount of memory.

  • We got lucky

    If you’re having enough production incidents to be able to evaluate your preparation, you’re probably either unlucky or unprepared ;) If you have infrequent incidents you may be well prepared but it’s hard to tell. Chaos engineering experiments are a great way to test your preparation, and practice incident response in a less stressful context. It may seem like a huge leap from your current level of preparation to running automated chaos monkeys in production, but you don’t need to go straight there. Why not start with practice drills? You could have a game host who comes up with a failure scenario. You can work up to chaos in production.

  • React Testing Library – Tutorial with JavaScript Code Examples

    This post will help you to learn what React Testing Library is, and how you can use it to test your React application. This tutorial will assume you already know some basic JavaScript and understand the basics of how React works. React Testing Library is a testing utility tool that's built to test the actual DOM tree rendered by React on the browser. The goal of the library is to help you write tests that resembles how a user would use your application, so that you'll have more confidence that your application work as intended when a real user do use it.

  • Why I Moved From Ops to DevOps (and why you might want to)