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Sci/Tech

Female SanDisk engineer who made it in Silicon Valley offers her words of wisdom

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

At Milpitas-based flash memory storage and software company SanDisk Corp., Nithya Ruff, director of the company’s open source strategy, is a huge driver behind science, technology, engineering and math initiatives to get more girls interested in the field. After growing up in Bangalore, India, Ruff learned to code at North Dakota State University, where she earned her computer science master’s degree.

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Also: 8 ways Portland tech companies can follow through on diversity talk

Fedora 22 Scientific

Filed under
Red Hat
Sci/Tech

As you can see, the new home for Fedora Scientific looks amazing. The "Featured Applications" section features the most important and useful tools in Fedora Scientific. I think that is a great idea. Everyone associated with it, thank you very much.

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Carl Sagan's solar-powered spacecraft is in trouble

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech
  • Carl Sagan's solar-powered spacecraft is in trouble
  • Software Glitch Pauses LightSail Test Mission

    But inside the spacecraft's Linux-based flight software, a problem was brewing. Every 15 seconds, LightSail transmits a telemetry beacon packet. The software controlling the main system board writes corresponding information to a file called beacon.csv. If you’re not familiar with CSV files, you can think of them as simplified spreadsheets—in fact, most can be opened with Microsoft Excel.

Research community looks to SDN to help distribute data from the Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Interviews
OSS
Sci/Tech

There is one project called the LHC Open Network Environment (LHCONE) that was originally conceived to help with operations that involved multiple centers. To understand this, though, I have to explain the structure of the data and computing facilities.

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Why the creators of the Julia programming language just launched a startup

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Development
Software
Sci/Tech

And Julia is a big deal — it’s a free alternative to proprietary tools for doing data science, like MathWorks’ MATLAB and Wolfram’s Mathematica, and it’s more contemporary than open-source languages R and Python. More companies are hiring data scientists to make more data-driven decisions, and open-source tools often come in handy.

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Ubuntu Used to Detect Gravitational Waves at LIGO Experiment

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Sci/Tech
Ubuntu

Ligo (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) may not get the same kind of attention in the media as other physics experiments, but it should. It's designed to detect gravitational waves, and it looks like the scientists are also using Linux (Ubuntu) to do that.

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Share your software, says NASA guru

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

He said instead of software’s inherent value being its cost, it was better as a means to an end. “The value isn’t in the software, it’s in the utility that the software provides.”

“My call to action is ... is there something in your portfolio of products or services that you can open source.”

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World record set for 100 TB sort by open source and public cloud team

Filed under
Linux
Server
OSS
Sci/Tech

In October 2014, Databricks participated in the Sort Benchmark and set a new world record for sorting 100 terabytes (TB) of data, or 1 trillion 100-byte records. The team used Apache Spark on 207 EC2 virtual machines and sorted 100 TB of data in 23 minutes.

In comparison, the previous world record set by Hadoop MapReduce used 2100 machines in a private data center and took 72 minutes. This entry tied with a UCSD research team building high performance systems and we jointly set a new world record.

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11 open source tools to make the most of machine learning

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Development
OSS
Sci/Tech

These 11 machine learning tools provide functionality for individual apps or whole frameworks, such as Hadoop. Some are more polyglot than others: Scikit, for instance, is exclusively for Python, while Shogun sports interfaces to many languages, from general-purpose to domain-specific.

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Stephen Hawking unveils 'life changing' new voice technology in London

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OSS
Sci/Tech

Intel said they planned to make the system open-source and free for users.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.4 Lands A Number Of Memory Management Fixes

While mid-way through the Linux 5.4 development cycle with RC4 due out on Sunday, a number of memory management fixes just hit the mainline kernel. Andrew Morton's pull request was merged on Friday night and he noted, "Rather a lot of fixes, almost all affecting mm/" Indeed there were memory management fixes in this pull ahead of 5.4-rc4. Changes include a zRAM race condition fix, avoiding access to uninitialized memory maps, allow dropping transparent huge-pages (THP) from the page cache, and other fixes in this area including the possibility of a kernel crash. Read more Also: Intel's Cloud Hypervisor 0.3 Adds Block Device Offloading, Paravirtualized IOMMU

Programming: eMMC Flash, Compilers and Python

  • Some Tesla EV’s Control Screens Went Dark as Excessive Logging killed the eMMC Flash

    Despite wear-leveling techniques, eMMC flash memories tend to wear out over time as they have limited write cycles.

  • AMD Zen 2 Improvements For LLVM Have Been Held Up For Months By Code Review

    Back in February for LLVM Clang 9.0 was the initial AMD Zen 2 "znver2" enablement, but like the GCC support at the time it was the very basics. With time GCC picked up Zen 2 scheduler improvements and other work while sadly in the case of LLVM the improvements are still pending. Back in August, AMD's Ganesh Gopalasubramanian sent out the znver2 scheduler model for LLVM for Zen 2 CPUs but a focus on the EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors. "There are few improvements with respect to execution units, latencies and throughput when compared with znver1. The tests that were present for znver1 for llvm-mca tool were replicated. The latencies, execution units, timeline and throughput information are updated for znver2."

  • Python Add Lists

    This tutorial covers the following topic – Python Add lists. It describes various ways to join/concatenate/add lists in Python. For example – simply appending elements of one list to the tail of the other in a for loop, or using +/* operators, list comprehension, extend(), and itertools.chain() methods. Most of these techniques use built-in constructs in Python. However, the one, itertools.chain() is a method defined in the itertools module. You must also see which of these ways is more suitable in your scenario. After going through this post, you can evaluate their performance in case of large lists.

  • StackOverflow Report: (cxcix) stackoverflow python report

today's howtos

  • How to install Chromium on Ubuntu using SNAP
  • 3D using Godot

    It is time for another installment of Godot (previous entries: introduction, 2D). This time, I have dived into the world of 3D. The goal is to recreate parts of an old time favorite: Kosmonaut. Something I remember playing a lot on my dad’s 286 with amazing EGA graphics. The state of the game when writing can be seen in the short screen capture below. This is more of a tech demo status than a full game at the moment, but I hope you will still find it interesting. You can also get the complete source code. [...] Once we have a world with a track (the grid map), we add a player to the scene (the yellow blob in the image above – I need to learn Blender to create a proper ship). The player scene contains the ship – and the camera. This means that the camera follows the player automatically – very convenient. The player script is responsible for this ship’s movements based on user input. Inputs can either be pressed for a long time, used for sideways movement, or just tapped (i.e. the release is ignored), used for jumping. Each of the inputs are mapped to a keyboard key (or other input device) in the Project Settings dialog, under the Input Map tab. This feels a bit awkward to me and makes me lose the feeling of flow – but I don’t know how to do it better.

  • How to install OpenOffice on Linux
  • How To Install Free SSL Certificate for Apache on CentOS 8
  • Install VirtualBox 6 on CentOS 8
  • How to Install Odoo 13 on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install Anaconda on Debian 10
  • Install Shutter Screenshot Tool via PPA in Ubuntu 19.10

Xfce 4.16 development phase starting

In the 4.14 cycle we tried to do a 1:1 port of what used to be our Gtk2 desktop environment, avoiding visual changes. In the 4.16 cycle we plan to harmonize the appearance of certain elements that either became inconsistent through the port or already were inconsistent before (e.g. toolbars or inline toolbars). We will also play with client-side decorations where we feel it makes sense (for instance replacing the so-called XfceTitledDialog, that is used for all settings dialogs with a HeaderBar version). Before anyone gets too excited (both positively or negatively): It is not planned to redesign more complex applications (like Thunar) with Headerbars in 4.16. We will however try to keep the experience and looks consistent, which means gradually moving to client side decorations also with our applications (please note that client side decorations are not the same as HeaderBars!). Through this change e.g. “dark modes” in applications will look good (see the part about the Panel below). Now before there is a shitstorm about this change I would kindly ask everyone to give us time to figure out what exactly we want to change in this cycle. Also, switching to client-side decorations alone is not a big visual departure – feel free to also dig through the client-side decorations page if you want to read/see more on this. Read more