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Top 20 Best Computer Algebra Systems for Linux in 2019

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Solving computational problems was the first inspiration behind the invention of computers. Although modern computers have come a long way since its inception, it continues to play the de-facto role in solving complex computations. A Computer Algebra System (CAS) is a software environment that allows tackling modern-day, complex computational problems without having to manipulate complicated equations or computational systems manually. These computer algebra systems can manipulate mathematical formulae in a manner similar to traditional mathematicians and thwarts away potential errors effectively. There are a wide variety of computer algebra systems for Linux, both general-purpose and specialized.

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Stellarium v0.19.1 has been released!

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

Thank you very much to community for bug reports, feature requests and contributions!

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Also: Stellarium 0.19.1 Released with A Large List of Changes

KStars v3.2.3 is Released!

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

Another minor release of the 3.2.X series is released, KStars v3.2.3 is out for Windows/Mac/Linux. This would probably the last minor release of the 3.2.X series with 3.3.0 coming into development now.

This release contains a few minor bug fixes and some few convenient changes that were requested by our users.

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KStars v3.2.2 is Released!

Filed under
KDE
Sci/Tech

Thanks to all to the hard work by KStars developers and volunteers, we are happy to announce KStars v3.2.2 release for Windows, MacOS, and Linux.

In this release, support for x86-32 bit architecture has been dropped and the Windows 10 executable now requires an x86-64 bit system.

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SQLite 3.28.0 and Gnuastro 0.9 Released

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Sci/Tech
  • SQLite Release 3.28.0
  • SQLite 3.28 Released With More Feature Additions, Performance Enhancements

    SQLite 3.28 is now the latest version of this widely-used, embed-friendly cross-platform database library.

    As is the case for most SQLite releases, new features and performance enhancements are the principle changes. SQLite 3.28 presents enhanced window functions, enhancements to its TCL interface, various CLI improvements, new API additions, security improvements to its tokenizer, more robust handling against corrupt database files, and various fixes.

  • Gnuastro 0.9 released

    I am happy to announce the 9th stable release of GNU Astronomy
    Utilities (Gnuastro).

    Gnuastro is an official GNU package consisting of various command-line
    programs and library functions for the manipulation and analysis of
    (astronomical) data. All the programs share the same basic
    command-line user interface (modeled on GNU Coreutils). For the full
    list of Gnuastro's library, programs, and a comprehensive general
    tutorial (recommended place to start using Gnuastro), please see the
    links below respectively:

    https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-library.html
    https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/Gnuastro-programs-list.html
    https://www.gnu.org/s/gnuastro/manual/html_node/General-program-usage-tutorial.html

    Many features have been added and Gnuastro has become much more stable
    with the many bugs that were found and fixed (see [1], below). The most
    interesting new feature may be that Gnuastro now also installs scripts
    (with this naming convention: `astscript-*'). Since Gnuastro's
    programs are designed to be highly modular, they are relatively
    low-level. With this new feature, it is now very easy to include
    common higher-level operations within Gnuastro also, for example to
    call multiple programs together, or use a single program's outputs in
    a special way. With version 0.9, only one script is installed (as
    described in [1]), but because of their high-level nature, we expect
    many more to be added soon. If you commonly run several Gnuastro
    programs together for a certain operation, please share it with us so
    we add it as a script for everyone to use.

GNU GPLv3 At The Center Of The Black Hole Image

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Sci/Tech

Scientists have finally seen what could not have been seen – a black hole. As fascinating is the fact that we can now ‘see’ a black hole, the story behind this achievement is even more fascinating.

It’s a story of victory of science in the political era of science denials. It’s a victory of diversity in the era of homophobia and sexism. It’s a victory of free software in the era of…well, we live in the era of free software.

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KDE Cantor - Sing me some math

Filed under
KDE
Software
Sci/Tech

It's a song, but it needs refinement. Cantor seems like a clever piece of software, but it lacks refinement and sophistication to match its own goals. I did only test Octave, but I think my findings are pretty indicative. After all, if there were issues with one backend, whatever they are, they need to be fixed. And these weren't trivial issues, either. Slow performance, memory and CPU noise, frozen interface, bad-looking figures.

The configuration also needs to be improved. All in all, it's very difficult doing what Cantor tries, so the idea is really cool. But it seems to be a complex task, and at the moment, it brings more woes than benefits. I'd like to see a smoother integration, and a clever wizard that lets you add backends. Maybe a smart clipboard to share code with other programs. I'd expect a fully HW-accelerated graphics module, so everything responds fast and looks peachy. Finally, Cantor mustn't work any worse than the native engines it represents, because it invalidates its own purpose by doing that (or rather not doing that, hi hi). At the moment, it's a raw product, and it needs a lot of fixes. But me likey, so I will be testing in the future. Unique software, here I go.

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Stellarium v0.19.0 has been released!

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

The major changes of this version:

5 new sky cultures
Refactoring the code: many improvements and fixes
Added many DSO textures
Many improvements for Scripting Engine
Thank you very much to community for bug reports, feature requests and contributions!

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Also: Free Software Planetarium Stellarium 0.19.0 Released (How to Install)

The Raspberry Pi Cluster from Outer Space

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Sci/Tech

We see a lot of weird and esoteric stuff here at Hackaday, but even by our standards, Bell Lab’s Plan 9 operating system is an oddball. Named after the science fiction film Plan 9 from Outer Space, it was designed to extend the UNIX “everything is a file” mentality to the network. It envisioned a future where utilizing the resources of another computer would be as easy as copying a file. But as desktop computers got more powerful the idea seemed less appealing, and ultimately traditional operating systems won out. Of course, that doesn’t mean you still can’t play around with it.

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Astronomy Software by Any Other Name

Filed under
Software
Sci/Tech

In this article, I introduce another option available for the astronomers out there—specifically, Cartes du Ciel, also known as SkyChart. Similar to other larger astronomy programs, you can use SkyChart from the desktop to the observatory.

SkyChart probably won't be available in your distribution's package management system, so you'll need to go to the main website to download it. DEB, RPM and TAR files are available, so you should be able to use it for just about any distribution. Downloads also are available for other operating systems and for other hardware. You even can download a version to run on a Raspberry Pi.

When you first start Cartes du Ciel, you'll be asked where on the globe your observatory is located.

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More in Tux Machines

5 ways to conduct user research with an open source mindset

There are common beliefs about user experiences—the best ones are user-centered, iterative, and intuitive. When user experience (UX) research is conducted, user stories about these experiences are collected—but the research methods chosen inform user experiences, too. So, what makes for an engaging research experience, and how can methods evolve alongside products to better connect with users? Red Hat's User Experience Design (UXD) research team has the answer: a community-centered, open source mindset. As a UX writer on Red Hat's UXD team, I create new design documentation, empower team voices, and share Red Hat's open source story. My passion lies in using content to connect and inspire others. On our Twitter and Medium channels, we share thought leadership about UX writing, research, development, and design, all to amplify and grow our open source community. This community is at the heart of what we do. So when I learned how the research team centers community throughout their user testing, I leaped at the chance to tell their story. Read more

Linux Jargon Buster: What is FOSS (Free and Open Source Software)? What is Open Source?

FOSS means Free and Open Source Software. It doesn’t mean software is free of cost. It means that source code of the software is open for all and anyone is free to use, study and modify the code. This principle allows other people to contribute to the development and improvement of a software like a community. In the 60s and 70s, computers were hardware focused and the hardware were expensive. They were mainly used by academics in universities or researchers in labs. The limited amount of software used to come for free or with their source code and the users were allowed to modify the source code to suit their need. In the late 70s and early 80s, the manufacturer’s stopped distributing source code in an attempt to not let their software run on their competitor’s computers. Read more

Announce: OpenSSH 8.4 released

It is now possible[1] to perform chosen-prefix attacks against the SHA-1 algorithm for less than USD$50K. For this reason, we will be disabling the "ssh-rsa" public key signature algorithm by default in a near-future release.

This algorithm is unfortunately still used widely despite the existence of better alternatives, being the only remaining public key signature algorithm specified by the original SSH RFCs.

The better alternatives include: [...]

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Tiny Rock Pi S and Raspberry Pi

  • Tiny Rock Pi S SBC gets 802.3af PoE & audio HAT add-on board

    Powered by a Rockchip RK3308 quad-core Cortex-A35 processor, Radxa Rock Pi S single board computer was launched with specifications listing PoE support via an add-on board. Just one little problem though: it was not available for sale. The good news is that Radxa has now launched a PoE HAT for the Linux SBC adding support for 802.3af PoE up to 10W input, making it one of the smallest single board computers with PoE support in the world, and adding audio features with a 3.5mm audio jack, and an FPC connector for a microphone array. It can be purchased on Seeed Studio for $13.00.

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  • Raspberry Pi: Five handy home office projects to try

    Initially designed as a low-cost computing board for teaching kids to code, the Raspberry Pi has since evolved into a fully fledged PC comfortably capable of replacing your desktop setup. At the same time, the board's legions of dedicated fans have ensured a steady stream of ingenious open-source projects: media center, weather station, virtual assistant, Lego-powered book scanner – if you can imagine it, the chances are it's been done. [...] Cybersecurity has become a major concern for companies while their employees are working from home, who now have far less visibility on the devices being used to access corporate data. While a Raspberry Pi won't provide the solution for IT admins, it can be modified into a handy network-monitoring tool that will allow you to keep an eye on devices and data connecting to your home network.

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  • Iain R. Learmonth: Multicast IPTV

    For almost a decade, I’ve been very slowly making progress on a multicast IPTV system. Recently I’ve made a significant leap forward in this project, and I wanted to write a little on the topic so I’ll have something to look at when I pick this up next. I was aspiring to have a useable system by the end of today, but for a couple of reasons, it wasn’t possible. [...] The Raspberry Pi devices will run DVBlast, an open-source DVB demultiplexer and streaming server. Each of the tuners will be tuned to a different transponder giving me the ability to stream any combination of available channels simultaneously. This is everything that would be needed to watch TV on PCs on the home network with VLC. I’ve not yet worked out if Kodi will accept multicast streams as a TV source, but I do know that Tvheadend will. Tvheadend can also act as a PVR to record programmes for later playback so is useful even if the multicast streams can be viewed directly. So how far did I get? I have built two Raspberry Pis in cases with the DVB-T hats on. They need to sit in the lounge as that’s where the antenna comes down from the roof. There’s no wired network connection in the lounge. I planned to use an OpenBSD box as a gateway, bridging the wireless network to a wired network.