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Sci/Tech

Engineers turn to 'soft offices'

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Sci/Tech

Offices of the future could become havens of peace and tranquillity instead of hotbeds of slamming drawers and rattling filing cabinets.

Google feature incorporates satellite maps

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Web
Sci/Tech

Online search engine leader Google has unveiled a new feature that will enable its users to zoom in on homes and businesses using satellite images, an advance that may raise privacy concerns as well as intensify the competitive pressures on its rivals.

the world's only blue rose

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Sci/Tech

Australian and Japanese researchers have demonstrated the application of RNAi technology for gene replacement in plants, developing the world's only blue rose.

Breeders have attempted to make true blue roses over many years, but none have successfully bred roses with blue pigment. In its first commercial application in plants, the CSIRO-developed RNAi technology was used to remove the gene encoding the enzyme dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) in roses.

Pope's influence includes technology firsts

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Sci/Tech
Misc

While Pope John Paul II will largely be remembered for his influence on social issues ranging from euthanasia to AIDS, he also earned a place in history as the first pontiff to embrace computer technology.

Metallic glass: a drop of the hard stuff

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Sci/Tech

IN THE movie Terminator 2, the villain is a robot made of liquid metal. He morphs from human form to helicopter and back again with ease, moulds himself into any shape without breaking, and can even flow under doorways.

Now a similar-sounding futuristic material is about to turn up everywhere. It is called metallic glass.

Japanese Co. sells ghost detector

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Sci/Tech

The Japanese company that launched popular computer data storage units shaped like rubber ducks and sushi started selling a new product Friday - a ghost detector.

No Comdex this year?

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Hardware
Sci/Tech

No Comdex 2005 IT trade show this November in Las Vegas? No problem, according to IT users interviewed after yesterday's announcement that this year's event is off. It's the second year in a row Comdex has been canceled. One past attendee said Comdex had become a 'flea market'

Brain chip reads man's thoughts

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Sci/Tech
Misc

A paralysed man in the US has become the first person to benefit from a brain chip that reads his mind.

Hollywood seeks iTunes for film

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Movies
Sci/Tech

In other movie news, Sony Pictures Digital Entertainment is trying to develop and own the next iTunes--but for films.

Taking the Film out of the Film Industry

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Movies
Sci/Tech

Wired.com is running a story about how Mark Cuban, co-owner of Landmark Theatres, is converting his theaters to all digital playback of movies. Starting with theaters in San Francisco and Dallas, he plans to change all 60 to the "first all-digital theater empire".

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