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Sci/Tech

Scientific Linux 7.3 Released

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Red Hat
Sci/Tech
  • Scientific Linux 7.3 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3

    After two Release Candidate (RC) development builds, the final version of the Scientific Linux 7.3 operating system arrived today, January 26, 2017, as announced by developer Pat Riehecky.

    Derived from the freely distributed sources of the commercial Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3 operating system, Scientific Linux 7.3 includes many updated components and all the GNU/Linux/Open Source technologies from the upstream release.

    Of course, all of Red Hat Enterprise Linux's specific packages have been removed from Scientific Linux, which now supports Scientific Linux Contexts, allowing users to create local customization for their computing needs much more efficiently than before.

  • Scientific Linux 7.3 Released

    For users of Scientific Linux, the 7.3 release is now available based off Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3.

The code that took America to the moon was just published to GitHub, and it’s like a 1960s time capsule

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OSS
Sci/Tech

When programmers at the MIT Instrumentation Laboratory set out to develop the flight software for the Apollo 11 space program in the mid-1960s, the necessary technology did not exist. They had to invent it.

They came up with a new way to store computer programs, called “rope memory,” and created a special version of the assembly programming language. Assembly itself is obscure to many of today’s programmers—it’s very difficult to read, intended to be easily understood by computers, not humans. For the Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC), MIT programmers wrote thousands of lines of that esoteric code.

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Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

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OSS
Sci/Tech
  • Open source machine learning tools as good as humans in detecting cancer cases

    Machine learning has come of age in public health reporting according to researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. They have found that existing algorithms and open source machine learning tools were as good as, or better than, human reviewers in detecting cancer cases using data from free-text pathology reports. The computerized approach was also faster and less resource intensive in comparison to human counterparts.

  • Machine learning can help detect presence of cancer, improve public health reporting

    To support public health reporting, the use of computers and machine learning can better help with access to unstructured clinical data--including in cancer case detection, according to a recent study.

FOSS and Artificial Intelligence

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OSS
Sci/Tech

RoboPhone: Sharp to Sell Real Android Phones in Japan

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Android
Sci/Tech

The Osaka-based electronics maker said Tuesday it would introduce a new mobile communication device in 2016 that is a tiny android robot. It will come with features of a smartphone including email, Internet connectivity, camera and a 2-inch display. Still to be decided is whether the device will use Google Inc.’s Android mobile operating system or another operating system.

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Accelerating Scientific Analysis with the SciDB Open Source Database System

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OSS
Sci/Tech

Science is swimming in data. And, the already daunting task of managing and analyzing this information will only become more difficult as scientific instruments — especially those capable of delivering more than a petabyte (that’s a quadrillion bytes) of information per day — come online.

Tackling these extreme data challenges will require a system that is easy enough for any scientist to use, that can effectively harness the power of ever-more-powerful supercomputers, and that is unified and extendable. This is where the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center’s (NERSC’s) implementation of SciDB comes in.

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Scientific Linux 6.7 Officially Released, Based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7

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Red Hat
Sci/Tech

The Scientific Linux team, through Pat Riehecky, has had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the Scientific Linux 6.7 computer operating system.

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When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

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