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OSS

OSS/Microsoft Openwashing Leftovers

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OSS

Fediverse and Mastodon

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OSS
Web
  • Spritely: towards secure social spaces as virtual worlds

    If you follow me on the fediverse, maybe you already know. I've sent an announcement to my work that I am switching to doing a project named Spritely on my own full time. (Actually I'm still going to be doing some contracting with my old job, so I'll still have some income, but I'll be putting a full 40 hours a week into Spritely.)

    tl;dr: I'm working on building the next generation of the fediverse as a distributed game. You can support this work if you so wish.

  • The demise of G+ and return to blogging (w/ mastodon integration)

    I’m back to blogging, after shutting down my wordpress.com hosted blog in spring. This time, fully privacy aware, self hosted, and integrated with mastodon.

    Let’s talk details: In spring, I shutdown my wordpress.com hosted blog, due to concerns about GDPR implications with comment hosting and ads and stuff. I’d like to apologize for using that, back when I did this (in 2007), it was the easiest way to get into blogging. Please forgive me for subjecting you to that!

    Recently, Google announced the end of Google+. As some of you might know, I posted a lot of medium-long posts there, rather than doing blog posts; especially after I disabled the wordpress site.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Dropping commercial open source lowers PaaS costs at Fidelity [Ed:  Cliff Saran still cannot tell the difference between "commercial" and "proprietary"]

    Fidelity International has made considerable savings by switching from a commercially supported distribution of Cloud Foundry to the free open source version.

  • Guarda makes available 15 open-source mobile crypto wallets

    Guarda, a custody free blockchain asset security and technology company today announced that it has made available now on GitHub 15 open-source cryptocurrency mobile Android SPV wallets for your disposal.

  • source{d} Engine: A Simple, Elegant Way to Analyze your Code

    From minute one, using source{d} Engine was an easy, efficient process. I ran source{d} Engine chiefly on a virtual machine running Ubuntu 14.04 but also installed it on MacOS and Ubuntu 16.04 for comparison purposes. On all three, install was completely painless, although the Ubuntu versions seemed to run slightly faster. The source{d} Engine documentation is accurate and thorough. It correctly warned me that the first time initializing the engine would take a fair amount of time so I was prepared for the wait. I did have to debug a few errors, all relating to my having a previous SQL instance running so some more thorough troubleshooting documentation might be warranted.

  • The Things Gateway - It's All About The Timing

    In my last posting, I talked about creating an External Rule System for the Things Gateway from Mozilla. This is a key component of the Automation part of a Smart Home system. Of course, the Things Gateway already has a rule system of its own. However, because it is GUI based, it has a complexity ceiling that is rather low by the standards of programmers.

    My External Rule System provides an alternative for more sophisticated rules that leverage the full power and readability of the Python programming language. However, I must ensure the capabilities are a proper superset of the built in Thing Gateway capabilities. The built in GUI Rule System has a special object called the "Clock" that can trigger a rule every day at a specific time. This is for the classic "turn the porch light on in the evening" home automation idea. My External Rule System needs the same capabilities, but as you'll see, it is easy to extend beyond basic time of day idea.

  • How OpenStack Barbican deployment options secure your cloud

    your internal information security policy or trying to meet regulatory requirements such as GDPR, ANSSI, PCI DSS, HIPAA, or NIST, you are likely looking for ways to protect the privacy and integrity of your data and software. That solution can be found in encryption. OpenStack provides all the ingredients necessary to deploy privacy and integrity solutions, but it is up to the operator to deploy them securely. This requires a key-management solution (KMS) to manage and protect the encryption keys.

    Barbican is the OpenStack service that allows operators and users to manage and store secrets securely. It consists of an OpenStack API that provides keystone authentication, oslo.policy and quotas, and backends where the secret is stored. But secrets are only as secure as the storage backend deployed behind Barbican. This article will discuss Barbican deployment options and explore how each affects the security of your cloud.

  • From hype to action: Next steps for edge computing

    Edge computing has gradually climbed the hype curve over the last couple of years, and it now stands at the center of why we do new things and launch new technologies. Why is it so important, what does it mean, where is the money behind the movement, and what does it mean to you? These are all good questions, and there is no simple answer to any of them.

    Edge is what happens when we start to look at how we take advantage of all the computing capacity across networks and enterprises—the same way cloud has done in a data center—as a real problem to be solved.

  • Tips for DBAs Managing Open Source Databases

    Companies are now managing a variety of open source and non-relational databases alongside relational databases like SQL Server and Oracle.

    While managing these systems involve the same set of challenges most DBAs are used to: ensuring availability, diagnosing performance problems and managing capacity, just to name a few, each database platform has its own set of processes and workflows for collecting and analyzing information.

  • The completion of Sonali's Outreachy internship work on the Free Software Directory

    I spent the last several weeks of my internship completing the upgrade and improvements to the directory.

    For context, see the previous blog post, Sonali's Internship work on the Free Software Directory, part 2

    After much work, I finally completed the upgrade of the Directory from the previous long term support version of MediaWiki, 1.27, to the current one, 1.31, which was released shortly after my internship started. I also made some general improvements.

  • Illinois Tech School of Applied Technology to Host Richard Stallman

    Illinois Tech’s School of Applied Technology will host Richard Stallman, activist and founder of the Free Software Foundation, on Monday, October 15 at 7 p.m. in Hermann Hall Auditorium. He will discuss the topic of freedom and privacy from computing. This event is open to the public at no charge.

  • DGSE ready to contribute to open source software
  • Open source pharma: How to stop the rot in drug discovery

    Here's the case for a more caring, sharing pharmaceutical industry — one that works with academia, and other public bodies, in the public interest to discover the medicinal drugs and vaccines our global society urgently needs. And not just for the interests of shareholders.

    It's a model for open source pharma — an alternative way of funding and working in drug discovery.

    For some it's a naive idea, for others it's the only way forward, and has been for some time. 

    "Thinking in particular about neglected diseases, or poverty-related diseases, we have long accepted that there is a need for alternative models," says Els Torreele, executive director of Medecins Sans Frontieres' Access Campaign. "And in fact for the last 20 years there have been several successful experiments in piloting different ways of doing research and development to ensure drugs are developed even where there's no market incentive."

    That includes ensuring the drugs are affordable and available to those that need them.

    "We've shown it's possible in a not-for-profit way, with public and philanthropic resources, so there's no reason not to do it for 'profitable' disease, or any diseases," says Torreele. 

    But that's still not how we do business today.

  • The Oasis 3DP Brings Open Source Binder Jetting to Makers

    The 2018 Hackaday Prize will soon be wrapping up, and as always, the contest has yielded some wonderfully innovative and promising ideas. One entry, submitted by Yvo de Haas, aims to make binder jetting accessible to everyone. Binder jetting, in which a liquid binding agent is deposited to bind powder particles together, is an effective method of 3D printing whose benefits include not requiring supports. It’s not a technology, however, that is typically accessible to the average maker. De Haas decided to change that with the development of the Oasis 3DP, an open source binder jetting 3D printer that he built himself.

  • An Open Source Toy Synth

    If you thought the future of electronic musical instruments was massive Emerson-class modular synths, giant MPCs with pads the size of Dance Dance Revolution machines, or hilariously expensive polysynths, you couldn’t be more wrong. The future is, effectively, toys. Those tiny little Korgs you can stuff in your pocket are selling like hot cakes, and Pocket Operators are king of the hill. One of the more interesting musical toys is the Organelle, an aluminum enclosure with maple buttons laid out in a keyboard configuration. It’s a synth, it’s a sound engine, and it does produce some interesting noises. All the software is Open Source, but the hardware isn’t. That leaves it up to someone else to make the hardware for the rest of us. That’s exactly what [mitchell] is doing for his Hackaday Prize entry.

  • Hedera Hashgraph Releases Open Source SDK And Announces Final Speaker Lineup For Hedera18 Developer Conference

FUD/Openwashing: Lawyers' FUD, Microsoft Openwashing and Facebook Tries to Make Surveillance Seem Ethical

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OSS
  • Evaluating Open Source Software to Build a Connected Autonomous Vehicle [Ed: Lawyers badmouthing FOSS to attract 'sales']
  • 4 Key Takeaways: Blockchain and Open Source [Ed: As above]
  • Minecraft will be making two of its libraries open source [Ed: So they can call proprietary game "open"]
  • Infer.NET Machine Learning Framework Now Open Source [Ed: MIcrosoft is openwashing a surveillance component used "in a number of Microsoft products in Office, Xbox and Azure."]
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Skip [Ed: Facebook skips pretence of being "open"]

    Built by a team of veteran open-source contributors within Facebook, Skip is described by the developer team as “a programming language to skip the things you have already computed.” After three years, the project has left active development and has been open sourced.

    The team wrote that the statically-typed language is experimental, with a goal to “explore language and runtime support for correct, efficient memoization-based caching and cache invalidation.”

    [...]

    The team also highlights the project’s support for “efficient and predictable” garbage collection utilizing “a novel approach to memory management that combines aspects of typical garbage collectors with more straightforward linear (bump) allocation schemes,” which minimizes memory scanning by only focusing on memory reachable from the root of a computation.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Spinnaker is the next big open source project to watch

    Spinnaker is an open source continuous delivery (CD) platform from Netflix and Google, though it now also has the backing of other major software companies. Spinnaker 1.0 launched last July, so it’s not the newest kid on the block, but the service is slowly but surely gaining momentum now, with users that include Target, Adobe, Daimler and Capital One, as well as a growing ecosystem of vendors who support it.

    Today, after a few years of working on the project without any formal structure in place, the Spinnaker project announced that it is growing up and putting a formal governance system in place at the project’s second community summit in Seattle this week.

  • Andy Wingo: heap object representation in spidermonkey

    I was having a look through SpiderMonkey's source code today and found something interesting about how it represents heap objects and wanted to share.

    I was first looking to see how to implement arbitrary-length integers ("bigints") by storing the digits inline in the allocated object. (I'll use the term "object" here, but from JS's perspective, bigints are rather values; they don't have identity. But I digress.) So you have a header indicating how many words it takes to store the digits, and the digits follow. This is how JavaScriptCore and V8 implementations of bigints work.

    Incidentally, JSC's implementation was taken from V8. V8's was taken from Dart. Dart's was taken from Go. We might take SpiderMonkey's from Scheme48. Good times, right??

    When seeing if SpiderMonkey could use this same strategy, I couldn't find how to make a variable-sized GC-managed allocation. It turns out that in SpiderMonkey you can't do that! SM's memory management system wants to work in terms of fixed-sized "cells". Even for objects that store properties inline in named slots, that's implemented in terms of standard cell sizes. So if an object has 6 slots, it might be implemented as instances of cells that hold 8 slots.

    Truly variable-sized allocations seem to be managed off-heap, via malloc or other allocators. I am not quite sure how this works for GC-traced allocations like arrays, but let's assume that somehow it does.

  • Pocket Offers New Features to Help People Read, Watch and Listen across iOS, Android and Web

    We know that when you save something to Pocket, there is a reason why. You are saving something you want to learn about, something that fascinates you, something that will help shape and change you. That’s why we’ve worked hard to make Pocket a dedicated, quiet place to focus so that you can come back and absorb what you save when you are ready.

    The trick is, in the reality of our lives, it’s not always that simple. Our lives don’t always have a quiet moment with a coffee cup in hand with Pocket in the other. We have work to do, kids to take care of, school to attend. But with Pocket we’ve always worked hard to ensure that Pocket gives you tools to fit content around your life, freeing you from the moment of distraction and putting you in control.

  • OpenBSD's unveil()

    One of the key aspects of hardening the user-space side of an operating system is to provide mechanisms for restricting which parts of the filesystem hierarchy a given process can access. Linux has a number of mechanisms of varying capability and complexity for this purpose, but other kernels have taken a different approach. Over the last few months, OpenBSD has inaugurated a new system call named unveil() for this type of hardening that differs significantly from the mechanisms found in Linux.

    The value of restricting access to the filesystem, from a security point of view, is fairly obvious. A compromised process cannot exfiltrate data that it cannot read, and it cannot corrupt files that it cannot write. Preventing unwanted access is, of course, the purpose of the permissions bits attached to every file, but permissions fall short in an important way: just because a particular user has access to a given file does not necessarily imply that every program run by that user should also have access to that file. There is no reason why your PDF viewer should be able to read your SSH keys, for example. Relying on just the permission bits makes it easy for a compromised process to access files that have nothing to do with that process's actual job.

  • digest 0.6.18

    Earlier today, digest version 0.6.18 arrived on CRAN. It will get uploaded to Debian in due course.

    digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64 and murmur32 algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects.

  • Did your first pull request get accepted?
  • Clazy 1.4 released

    Clazy 1.4 has been released and brings 10 new checks.

    Clazy is a clang compiler plugin which emits warnings related to Qt best practices. We’ll be showing Clazy at Qt World Summit in Boston, Oct 29-30, where we are a main Sponsor.

  • I'd like to interject for a moment

    Mastodon is merely an implementation of Fediverse. As it happens, only one of my Fediverse channels runs on Mastodon (the Japanese language one at Pawoo). Main one still uses Gnusocial, the anime one was on Gnusocial and migrated to Pleroma a few months ago. All of them are communicating using the OStatus protocol, although a movement is afoot to switch to ActivityPub. Hopefully it's more successful than the migration from RSS to Atom was.

    Yet, I noticed that a lot of people fall to the idea that Mastodon is an exclusive brand. Rarely one has to know or care what MTA someone else uses. Microsoft was somewhat successful in establishing Outlook as such a powerful brand to the exclusion of the compatible e-mail software. The maintainer of Mastodon is doing his hardest to present it as a similar brand, and regrettably, he's very successful at that.

  • How to level up your organization's security expertise

    IT security is critical to every company these days. In the words of former FBI director Robert Mueller: “There are only two types of companies: Those that have been hacked, and those that will be.”

    At the same time, IT security is constantly evolving. We all know we need to keep up with the latest trends in cybersecurity and security tooling, but how can we do that without sacrificing our ability to keep moving forward on our business priorities?

    No single person in your organization can handle all of the security work alone; your entire development and operations team will need to develop an awareness of security tooling and best practices, just like they all need to build skills in open source and in agile software delivery. There are a number of best practices that can help you level up the overall security expertise in your company through basic and intermediate education, subject matter experts, and knowledge-sharing.

PostgreSQL 11 Almost Ready

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Server
OSS
  • PostgreSQL 11 RC1 Released!

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces that the first release candidate of PostgreSQL 11 is now available for download. As a release candidate, PostgreSQL 11 RC 1 should be identical to the initial release of PostgreSQL 11, though some more fixes may be applied prior to the general availability of PostgreSQL 11.

  • PostgreSQL 11 RC1 Released Ahead Of Stable Release Next Week

    -
    One week from today will hopefully mark the release of the PostgreSQL 11 stable database server release.

    PostgreSQL 11.0 delivers more performance tuning optimizations with that work being never-ending. There are also various other improvements.

Openwashing Leftovers

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Microsoft
OSS

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • POA Network launches BlockScout, an open-source Ethereum block explorer

    POA Network, the Ethereum-based platform offering an open-source framework for smart contracts, has unveiled BlockScout, a full-featured block explorer tool for the Ethereum ecosystem. BlockScout is an easy-to-use and secure tool that lets users search and explore transactions, addresses, and balances on the Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, and POA Network blockchains.

  • BlockScout is a New Ethereum Blockchain Explorer Tool by POA Network

    The Ethereum based platform, the POA Network that is offering an open-source platform for smart contracts has established a block explorer that is fully futured called BlockScout for the Ethereum ecosystem. BlockScout is a secure tool that is easy to use allowing users to explore and search transaction, balances and addresses on the Ethereum, POA Network and Ethereum Classic blockchains.

  • POA Network launches open-source Ethereum block explorer tool

    POA Network, the Ethereum-based platform offering an open-source framework for smart contracts, has just announced that it has unveiled BlockScout, the first full featured open-source block explorer tool for the Ethereum ecosystem. BlockScout is a secure tool that lets users search and explore transactions, addresses, and balances on the Ethereum, Ethereum Classic, and POA Network blockchains.

  • BlockScout: The first full-featured open-source Ethereum blockchain explorer
  • Ethereum Based POA Network Launches Open-Source Block Explorer for ETH, ETC and POA

    The team at the POA Network have unveiled the first full featured open-source block explorer tool for the Ethereum ecosystem. This new block explorer is called BlockScout. It is an easy-to-use  and secure tool that allows users to search and explore transactions, addresses, and balances on the three blockchains of Ethereum (ETH), Ethereum Classic (ETC) and POA Network.

  • Asterisk 16.0.0 Now Available
  • Asterisk 16.0 VoIP / PSTN PBX Open-Source Software Released

    Version 16.0 of the long-standing, open-source Asterisk VoIP/PSTN telephony software is now available for voice communication deployments.

    Asterisk 16.0 brings improved media playback via reading the file type from the HTTP header, support for systemd socket activation, and fixes ten security issues ranging from Asterisk crashes to possible DoS vulnerabilities and stack corruption.

  • Sangoma Reaffirms Open Source Communications Commitment and Leadership at AstriCon

    Sangoma Technologies Corporation (TSX VENTURE: STC), a trusted leader in value-based Unified Communications (UC) and UC as a Service (UCaaS) solutions and the world's largest provider of open source communications solutions, today at the annual AstriCon users and developers conference, announced Asterisk 16 and FreePBX 15, the next major releases of the world's two most popular open source communications projects.

  • 5 Tips for Deploying Open-Source Software

    While the democratic ideals and distributed development model of open source are appealing to developers, some elements of that model are less attractive in production systems. The biggest drawback is that community control means distributed responsibility. Implementing pure open source can create problems and burdens that are less likely with systems have professional sales and service organizations behind them.

    In short, with an open-source system, there is no throat to choke and IT professionals can be left with only community support when something goes awry.

    That doesn’t mean that implementing open-source software is a bad idea. Doing so just requires taking a different approach to planning than you would with a proprietary software roll out. To help alleviate some of the problems, here are five things to remember when implementing open-source software.

  • Industry Voices—Doyle: The promise of open source and the current state of telecom adoption

    The adoption of open source software for NFV deployments by CSPs has largely failed to live up to industry expectations. 

    Open source software has been installed in communication service providers' IT departments, some tactical parts of the network and is being widely tested in the labs of the leading CSPs. Despite the hype around “cloud-native” advancements, open source is unlikely to “bend the cost curve” of deploying new network elements – at least not in the next several years.

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  • I have resigned as the WordPress accessibility team lead. Here is why.

    After several years of working on WordPress and accessibility and being part of the accessibility team, I have taken the very difficult decision to leave the WordPress accessibility team. I owe it to the team to explain why I have made this decision and how I hope things can improve for the future.

​Cloud Foundry embraces Kubernetes

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Server
OSS

Cloud Foundry, a prominent open-source Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud, isn't giving up on BOSH its tool chain for release engineering, deployment, and life-cycle management of large scale distributed services. But Cloud Foundry is making it easier to use Kubernetes both independently and as part of BOSH.

The Cloud Foundry Foundation is doing this by accepting two new projects: Eirini and CF Containerization. This comes after last year's adoption of Cloud Foundry Container Runtime (CFCR), which started Cloud Foundry's integration of Kubernetes. CRCR makes it possible to deploy and manage Kubernetes clusters using the BOSH release engineering tool chain.

Read more

Also: The Linux Foundation – Open Networking Summit Europe: Integrate | Automate | Accelerate

5 alerting and visualization tools for sysadmins

Gains for Open Document Format (ODF) and Nextcloud

Filed under
LibO
OSS
  • Renewed push for adoption of ODF document standard

    The Document Foundation, the organisation supporting the development of LibreOffice, is calling for supporters to promote the use of Open Document Format (ODF). Standardisation organisation OASIS would welcome and assist renewed marketing efforts, as would the Open Source Initiative, says OSI director Italo Vignoli.

  • Microsoft and Telekom no longer offer cloud storage under German jurisdiction

    Nextcloud is an open source, self-hosted file share and communication platform. Access & sync your files, contacts, calendars & communicate and collaborate across your devices. You decide what happens with your data, where it is and who can access it!

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