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4 open source mobile apps for Nextcloud

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OSS

I've been using Nextcloud (and before that, ownCloud), an open source alternative to file syncing and storage services like Dropbox and Google Drive, for many years. It's been both reliable and useful, and it respects my privacy.

While Nextcloud is great at both syncing and storage, it's much more than a place to dump your files. Thanks to applications that you can fold into Nextcloud, it becomes more of an information hub than a storage space.

While I usually interact with Nextcloud using the desktop client or in a browser, I'm not always at my computer (or any computer that I trust). So it's important that I can work with Nextcloud using my LineageOS-powered smartphone or tablet.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • The Power Of Open Source AI

    he open source software movement produced iconic innovations like the Firefox web browser, Apache server software and the Linux operating system—the genesis of the Android OS that currently powers 86% of the world’s smartphones. It also fostered a mindset around continuous improvement of tools that can be collaboratively shared, improved upon and distributed.

  • Apache Dubbo, the Java-based open source RPC framework becomes a Top-Level Project

    The Apache Software Foundation announced that the Java-based open source RPC framework used by giants like Alibaba, Apache Dubbo, is now a Top-Level Project. Let’s have a look at what this framework is all about.
    Apache Dubbo is a high-performance, Java-based Remote Procedure Call framework that has been in use at more than 150 companies, including giants like Alibaba Group or the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China.

    The Dubbo project was originally developed at Alibaba and open-sourced in 2011. It entered the Apache Incubator in February 2018 and the Apache Software Foundation announced that Dubbo is now a Top-Level Project!

  • Bridging divides with open source

    Application delivery is changing. At the risk of using buzzwords, it is being transformed – digitally. Continuous delivery has become the norm for DevOps (71 per cent plan on implementing, according to a study conducted by F5 and RedHat – NetOps Meets DevOps: The State of Network Automation), and continuous deployment must follow if business is to succeed in the era of Application Capital.

    While 73 per cent of organisations plan on pursuing continuous deployment, nearly half of them have yet to begin. A staggering 42 per cent have yet to automate a single component of the continuous deployment pipeline (according to a study conducted by F5 and RedHat – NetOps Meets DevOps: The State of Network Automation).

    [...]

    Applications themselves are mainly developed today from third-party components, a majority of them open source. Application infrastructure is increasingly built from open source components. From web servers to app servers, databases to ingress control, messaging to container runtimes and orchestration. IT operations are driven by open source tools like Puppet, Chef, Terraform, Helm, Kubernetes, and Ansible. These technologies are adopted because they answer multiple challenges: fast, frequent delivery and deployment along with a frictionless business model. They also encourage collaboration and innovation when entire organisations move to standardise on open source-based operations.

    None of that is possible without the passionate communities of developers who work tirelessly to improve their open source solutions.

    At F5, we appreciate the value of such communities. In a comparable example, our DevCentral community is based on collaborative innovation, guided by many of the same principles that drive open source projects. Code sharing and knowledge transfers across the community help the hundreds of thousands of members innovate and create new capabilities for our BIG-IP platform. With those solutions come new extensions, plug-ins, and libraries for open source projects like Puppet and Chef and node.js.

  • Open Source Analytics Platform Grafana Gets Update

    This week Grafana Labs announced the 6.2 release of its Grafana open source analytics platform...

  • Mozilla Revamps WebThings, its Open Source IoT

    Mozilla recently released its open source IoT platform, formerly called Project Things, as WebThings. Mozilla WebThings brings a series of logging, alarm, and networking features.

    Mozilla WebThings is an open source implementation of emerging Web of Things standards at the W3C. W3C Web of Things is an initiative that aims to reduce the IoT fragmentation, through the recently launched Web of Things Working Group. W3C started to develop the initial standards for the Web of Things, aiming to reduce the costs of development, lessen the risks to both investors and customers, and encourage exponential growth in the market for IoT devices and services.

  • WELL Health Acquires Ontario Open Source EMR OSCARprn for $876k

    WELL Health Technologies Corp. (“WELL”), a Vancouver, Canada-based company focused on consolidating and modernizing clinical and digital assets within the primary healthcare sector has acquired Ontario-based EMR provider OSCARprn – Treatments Solutions Ltd. OSCARprn is a trusted provider of EMR software, support and other services that work with OSCAR, an open source EMR platform developed by McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.

  • Carnegie Mellon’s Massive Open Source Initiative – Interview With the Leader Behind It

    In March, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) announced an unprecedented initiative. Over the course of the year, they plan to release dozens of digital learning tools they have developed over the past decade on an open-source license. These include the learning analytics platform LearnSphere and their pioneering adaptive learning project the Open Learning Initiative (OLI). In all, CMU estimates $100 million in grants and university funding went into these efforts. The effort was spearheaded by the Simon Initiative, which continues the legacy of Nobel Laureate, Turing Award recipient, and CMU professor Herbert Simon.

  • iXsystems TrueNAS brings Open Source Economics to VMware vSphere [Ed: A BSD company is hooking up with a majot GPL violator]
  • André Laperrière: Executive Director at Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition

    Andre Laperrière is executive director at the Global Open Data for Agriculture and Nutrition (GODAN) an initiative aiming to exchange ideas and knowledge to solve the world's looming food crisis

  • Open-source gene expression platform could yield more efficient food, biofuel crops

    An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time — a breakthrough that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crop plants.

    The technology, called Drop-seq, is a method for measuring the RNA present in individual cells, allowing scientists to see what genes are being expressed and how this relates to the specific functions of different cell types …. [T]he freely shared protocol had previously only been used in animal cells.

Open Hardware: Adafruit Feather and Stanford Doggo

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Hardware
OSS
  • Feather Plus Blackberry Equals Open Source Fauxberry

    The keyboard is a superior means of input, but to date no one has really figured out how to make a keyboard for small, handheld electronics. You could use tact switches, but that’s annoying, or you could use a touch screen. The best option we’ve seen is actually a Blackberry keyboard, and [arturo182] has the best example yet. It’s a small handheld device with a screen, keyboard, and WiFi that’s ready to do anything imaginable. Think of it as an Open Source Fauxberry. In any case, we want it.

    This project is actually a breakout board of sorts for the Adafruit Feather system, and therefore has support for WiFi, cellular, or pretty much any other networking of connectivity. To this blank canvas, [arturo] added an accelerator/magnetometer sensor, a single Neopixel, and of course the beautiful Blackberry keyboard. This keyboard is attached to an ATSAMD20G, a microcontroller with a whole bunch of I/O that translates key presses into I2C for the Feather.

  • Students from Stanford's Robotics Club Releases Open-Source Robo-Dog Online

    Robotics isn't cheap by any means, and no one knows this better than the students of the Extreme Mobility Team of Standford University's Robotics Club (SEMT). The materials used by university robotics clubs can cost upwards of tens of thousands of dollars, making it that much harder for many high schools and less well-funded colleges and universities to invest heavily in this important field of research.

  • Watch this open-source dog robot do backflips [Ed: This is more likely to be used in military rather than in aeronautics and astronautics (luxury of the rich)]

    “We’re hoping to provide a baseline system that anyone could build,” says Patrick Slade, graduate student in aeronautics and astronautics and mentor for Extreme Mobility.

  • Meet Doggo: Stanford’s cute open-source four-legged robot

    Doggo follows similar designs to other small quadrupedal robots, but what makes it unique is its low cost and accessibility. While comparable bots can cost tens of thousands of dollars, the creators of Doggo — Stanford’s Extreme Mobility lab — estimate its total cost to be less than $3,000. What’s more, the design is completely open source, meaning anyone can print off the plans and assemble a Doggo of their very own.

  • Stanford Students Built This Adorable, Bouncy, Open-Source Robot Dog

    Nearly all of the parts used to create Doggo were bought intact through the internet, while the rest can be easily 3D-printed. The total costs involved in building Doggo—including shipping and handling—amounted to less than $3,000, Kau and his team claim. Via the website Github, the team has also released all of the relevant information you would need to create your Doggo, including software coding, supply list, and manual instructions. From there, any enterprising roboticist could tweak the design to create an even more capable Doggo.

New FOSS Listings at Solutions Review

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OSS
  • The Top 15 Free and Open Source BPM Solutions

    Searching for BPM software (BPMS) can be a daunting (and expensive) process, one that requires long hours of research and deep pockets. The most popular BPM systems often provide more than what’s necessary for non-enterprise organizations, with advanced functionality relevant to only the most technically savvy users. Thankfully, there are a number of free and open source process management solutions out there. Some of these solutions are offered by vendors looking to eventually sell you on their enterprise product, and others are maintained and operated by a community of developers looking to democratize BPM.

    In this article we will examine free and open source BPM software, first by providing a brief overview of what to expect and also with short blurbs about each of the currently available options in the space. This is the most complete and up-to-date directory on the web.

  • Top 12 Free and Open Source Talent Management Software

    Searching for talent management software can be a daunting (and expensive) process, one that requires long hours of research and deep pockets. The most popular HR systems often provide more than what’s necessary for non-enterprise organizations, with advanced functionality relevant to only the most technically savvy users. Thankfully, there are a number of free and open source talent management solutions out there. Some of these solutions are offered by vendors looking to eventually sell you on their enterprise product, and others are maintained and operated by a community of developers looking to democratize HR technology.

    In this article we will examine free and open source talent management software, first by providing a brief overview of what to expect and also with short blurbs about each of the currently available options in the space. This is the most complete and up-to-date directory on the web.

  • Top 15 Free and Open Source ERP Solutions

    Searching for ERP software can be a daunting (and expensive) process, one that requires long hours of research and deep pockets. The most popular ERP systems often provide more than what’s necessary for non-enterprise organizations, with advanced functionality relevant to only the most technically savvy users. Thankfully, there are a number of free and open source ERP solutions out there. Some of these solutions are offered by vendors looking to eventually sell you on their enterprise product, and others are maintained and operated by a community of developers looking to democratize ERP.

Databases: Couchbase, Databricks, DataStax and Cloudwashing

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Server
OSS
  • Couchbase pumps ups ‘Autonomous Operator’ function

    NoSQL database company Couchbase has moved off the sofa (the firm is no couch potato, get it?) and come forward with new features aligned to allow ‘deployers’ to build (and scale) applications.

    The new version of Couchbase Autonomous Operator is enables Kubernetes-based application deployers to bring in a database ready for flexibility and micro-services.

  • Databricks Open Sources Delta Lake to Make Data Lakes More Reliable

    Databricks recently announced open sourcing Delta Lake, their proprietary storage layer, to bring ACID transactions to Apache Spark and big data workloads. Databricks is the company behind the creators of Apache Spark, while Delta Lake is already being used in several companies like McGraw Hill, McAffee, Upwork and Booz Allen Hamilton.

    Delta Lake is addressing the heterogeneous data problem that data lakes often have. Ingesting data from multiple pipelines means that engineers need to enforce data integrity manually, throughout all the data sources. Delta Lake can bring ACID transactions to the data lake, with the strongest level of isolation applied, serializability.

  • DataStax CEO Bosworth : accelerating development on (and in) the cloud

    DataStax CEO Billy Bosworth started out as a database administrator (DBA), so one would hope that he knows how to build, compile, manage and deploy in all senses of those terms, right?

  • DataStax details road to Apache Cassandra future

    DataStax closed out the final day of its ‘Accelerate 2019’ conference by focusing on a selection of platform-level developments including its community development stream.

  • DataStax has stars in its eyes over Constellation, its latest tweak on Apache Cassandra

    DataStax, the business built around the Apache Cassandra open source database, is creating a new system-as-a-cloud service using the platform.

  • Open source is big in databases, but cloud is bigger [Ed: Adobe's Asay calls everything "cloud" (I wonder if he even understands what that means). Had Aasay ever set up a database or written a single line of code (he's a lawyer), he'd know "cloud" just means anything including a database hosted where you have no real control over it. It's outsourcing.]

Many Openwashing Examples (Past Week)

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Microsoft
OSS

Linux Foundation: KubeCon + CloudNativeCon, Blockchains and Surveillance

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Linux
OSS
  • Praqma puts Atlassian’s Data Center products into containers

    It’s KubeCon + CloudNativeCon this week and in the slew of announcements, one name stood out: Atlassian . The company is best known as the maker of tools that allow developers to work more efficiently, and now as a cloud infrastructure provider. In this age of containerization, though, even Atlassian can bask in the glory that is Kubernetes, because the company today announced that its channel partner Praqma is launching Atlassian Software in Kubernetes (ASK), a new solution that allows enterprises to run and manage as containers its on-premise applications like Jira Data Center, with the help of Kubernetes.

    Praqma is now making ASK available as open source.

  • Oracle Expands its Cloud Native and Open Source Solutions

    At KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2019 in Barcelona, Oracle open source projects and cloud services are helping enterprise development teams embrace cloud native culture and open source. With the announcement and open sourcing of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure Service Broker for Kubernetes, Oracle continues to expand its commitment to open source and cloud native solutions targeted at helping move enterprise workloads to the cloud.

  • Project Genesis Pushing an Open-Source and Community Initiative to Supplement Cryptocurrency Growth

    The history of open-source community initiatives reveals just how powerful they are. The Linux Foundation has achieved some incredible feats over the course of its existence, the Internet was founded on community-driven open protocols, and cryptocurrencies are supplemented by open-source communities of developers and other professionals.

  • Hyperledger — Open Source Blockchain Technologies

    Blockchain is not just cryptocurrency, it is the whole decentralized ecosystem. In this field, Hyperledger is one of the key players.

  • New open source body to promote better, healthier cities [Ed: LF works for surveillance capitalism in the form of so-called 'smart' cities and here we have fools who twist this harmful agenda as "healthier cities". Now that the former spokesperson of James Clapper is the chief spokesperson of Linux Foundation it might not be long before the foundation sets up a "collaboration platform" for "openDrone strikes" (there's one for drones already).]

    The Linux Foundation has established the Urban Computing Foundation, whose goal is to make life more pleasant and sustainable in cities around the world.

    It is a result of growing recognition of the important role of technology in the development of sustainable urban living, which is plagued by such issues as congestion, traffic chaos, pollution and increasing energy consumption.

    Making the announcement earlier this month, the Linux Foundation said early sign-ups to the foundation such as Uber, Facebook, Google and IBM believe it is essential to accelerate open source software that improves mobility, safety, road infrastructure, traffic congestion and energy consumption in connected cities.

  • Linux Foundation forms Urban Computing Foundation to support connected cities [Ed: LF has surveillan cecapitalism in its Board; yes, the "Linux" Foundation is now a proponent and driver of surveillance everywhere. So much for freedom...]

    The initial contributors include developers from industry heavyweights such as Uber, Facebook, Google, and IBM, as well as HERE Technologies, Interline Technologies, Senseable City Labs, StreetCred Labs and the University of California San Diego.

PyGamer open source handheld games console $39.95

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Google
OSS

Gamers, coders and electronic enthusiasts looking to own a pocket sized open source handheld games console may be interested to know that the Adafruit PyGamer is now available priced at $39.95. Offering a small games console that can be coded using MakeCode Arcade, CircuitPython or Arduino. The PyGamer is powered by the ATSAMD51, with 512KB of flash and 192KB of RAM, Adafruit has also added 8 MB of QSPI flash for file storage, handy for images, fonts, sounds, or game assets.

“On the front you get a 1.8″ 160×128 color TFT display with dimmable backlight – we have fast DMA support for drawing so updates are incredibly fast. A dual-potentiometer analog stick gives you great control, with easy diagonal movement – or really any direction you like. There’s also 4 square-top buttons, which fit our square top button caps. The buttons are arranged to mimic a gaming handheld, with 2 menu-select buttons and 2 fire-action buttons. There’s also 5 NeoPixel LEDs to dazzle or track activity.”

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Also: Honeycomb CRUNCH releases, an example Godot game with sources

Korean Public Sectors Begin to Incorporate Open-Source Software

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OSS

Major departments such as Ministry of Interior and Safety (MOIS), Ministry of National Defense (MND), and Korea Post announced one after another that they would introduce open-source software (SW) this year. As major departments that had been hesitant on adopting open-source SW are starting to introduce open-source SW, more public sectors are beginning to adopt open-source SW as well. Open-source SW draws spotlight from the fact that it reduces costs, avoids dependence on certain SW, and responds to Cloud environment. Stable support and actions are becoming more important as there are more examples of introduction of open-source SW in public sectors.

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2018 Open Source Initiative Annual Report and Licensing Discussions

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OSS
  • 2018 Open Source Initiative Annual Report

    Welcome to the Open Source Initiative’s 2018 annual report. In this year's report you’ll learn about the organization’s activities from the past year, which captures the hard work of employees, contractors, volunteers, and those passionate about open source. I hope this will give you some context on why this work happened and what makes it so important. The Open Source Initiative was started in 1998 by a group of people interested in seeing ethics applied to the creation and distribution of software. This approach was built on a foundation of ideals – a specific philosophy on the rights and responsibilities of software users and creators. More than twenty years later, I am writing as a director of the OSI, which has grown into a robust organization with record numbers of individual and affiliate members, a dedicated all volunteer board, and the incredible support of volunteers and open source enthusiasts around the world.

    2018 brought amazing successes for the OSI. We celebrated our 20th anniversary, which took us around the world where we were able to look back on thousands of victories for open source. Every line of code or translation; every piece of documentation and version controlled repository; every successful business, happy user, and committed contributor, continues to shape a movement that has changed the face of technology, business, and community. It was also a year in which Microsoft acquired GitHub, one of the largest distributors of open source licensed code, and IBM purchased open source business giant Red Hat, showing that the companies that built their success around proprietary software see the need for an open source future.

  • OSI License Discuss and Review: Evolution and Improvement

    The directors of the board of the Open Source Initiative recognize the process for discussion and review of new licenses proposed for approval by the organization can use improvement and would benefit from evolution. In particular, it does not appear as though all points of view on open source licensing are represented in the discussion here. To address this situation we have created a Board Committee for license approval to evaluate responses on-list, appointed more moderators, and will devise a new moderation strategy.

    [...]

    Changes to the Website
    We have also made a minor change to the language describing the license review process on https://opensource.org/approval. The page formerly said “Approve, if (a) there is sufficient consensus emerging from community discussion that approval is justified, and (Cool the OSI determines that the license conforms to the Open Source Definition and guarantees software freedom." The page now says “Approve if, after taking into consideration community discussion, the OSI determines that the license conforms to the Open Source Definition and guarantees software freedom.”

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