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OSS

OSS: Launchpad, RAMSES, Kodi, WorldWideWeb, D-Bus Broker

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OSS
  • Launchpad news, July 2018 – January 2019
  • BMW Volleys Open-Source "RAMSES" Distributed 3D Rendering System

    For those interested in distributed 3D rendering, the developers at BMW recently received clearance to open-source RAMSES, a 3D rendering system optimized for bandwidth and resource efficiency.

    RAMSES is a distributed rendering engine that's designed for embedded use-cases and thus a heavy emphasis on efficiency, after all it comes out of BMW. RAMSES allows for different processes on different devices connected via a network to provide/consume 3D content and form a unison of cohesive displays.

  • 8 Best Kodi Builds For 2019 That Every Kodi User Must Install

    or Kodi users, it’s always a task to find and install new addons to enjoy live tv, movies, documentaries, and tv shows. To get the Kodi media center up and running, you need to install different Kodi addons which is a time-consuming task. If you want to cut short the amount of time and effort required to install various addons and best Kodi repositories, you must use a Kodi Build.

  • Surf Internet Like It’s 1990: CERN Redesigns World’s 1st Web Browser

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has redesigned the world’s first web browser WorldWideWeb to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the original browser.

    Sir Tim Berners-Lee brought the first proposal for a global hypertext system in 1989, which later came to be known as the World Wide Web that he designed on a NeXT machine in 1990. Internet wasn’t as easy to use as it is today. The primitive version of the internet required users to double click on hyperlinks to open them.

  • D-Bus Broker 18 Released While BUS1 In-Kernel IPC Remains Stalled

    Version 18 of D-Bus Broker has been released, the D-Bus message bus implementation designed for high performance and better reliability compared to the D-Bus reference implementation while sticking to compatibility with the original specification.

    D-Bus Broker 18 isn't the most exciting release but just has two main changes for improving its compatibility launcher. As of D-Bus Broker 18, configuration parsing errors for this launcher are handled in the same manner as dbus-daemon. Also, the compatibility launcher is no longer isolated in its own network namespace to deal with SELinux API requirements.

Events: LibrePlanet, DebConf, Open Infrastructure Summit

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OSS
  • LibrePlanet 2019: Coming to Cambridge, MA

    On March 23rd and 24th, 2019, the free software community will come together at the Stata Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to learn, exchange ideas, catch up with friends, and plan the future of the movement at the LibrePlanet 2019 conference.
    Registration is open, and we hope you’ll join us!

    Hundreds of people from across the globe will join us at LibrePlanet 2019 in Cambridge, Massachusetts to explore this year's theme, "Trailblazing Free Software." With a new and growing generation of free software enthusiasts, we can take this conference as an opportunity to discuss both the present and the future of the free software movement. Using the Four Freedoms as a litmus test for ethical computing, we ask, "How will free software continue to bring to life trailblazing, principled new technologies and new approaches to the world?"

  • Infomaniak Platinum Sponsor of DebConf19
  • A Mile High In Denver

    The OpenStack Foundation have just released the session agenda for the inaugural Open Infrastructure Summit, which will be taking place in May in Denver, Colorado. As you’ll no doubt already know, the OpenStack Summits are no more, so we’ll instead be getting together to talk about all the different open infrastructure components that businesses are using to build their infrastructures.

    Whether you’re a die-hard OpenStack fan, if Kubernetes is more your bag, maybe Kata Containers floats your boat or if Ceph is more your bag, then there’s something for you in the Mile High City this May.

Firebird 4.0 Beta 1 release is available for testing

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OSS

Firebird Project announces the first Beta release of Firebird 4.0, the next major version of the Firebird relational database, which is now available for testing.

This Beta release arrives with features and improvements already implemented by the Firebird development team, as well as with countless bugfixes. Our users are appreciated giving it a try and providing feedback to the development mailing list. Apparent bugs can be reported directly to the bugtracker.

Beta releases are not encouraged for production usage or any other goals that require a stable system. They are, however, recommended for those users who want to help in identifying issues and bottlenecks thus allowing to progress faster through the Beta/RC stages towards the final release.

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WWW and OSS Leftovers

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OSS
Web
  • WWW = Woeful, er, winternet wendering? CERN browser rebuilt after 30 years barely recognizes modern web

    In preparation for next month's 30th anniversary of the proposal that gave us the world wide web, boffins at the behest of CERN have recreated the world's first web browser, and made it accessible as a modern web page.

    Created by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, the ur-browser, first called WorldWideWeb, and later Nexus, was built from Objective-C in 1990 on a NeXT workstation to display its maker's HyperText Markup Language.

    The browser's resurrection – click here to try it out – follows five days of hacking by an international team of nine developers, reunited after a previous effort to revive the original Line Mode Browser in 2013.

  • Web Design Survey Findings and Next Steps

    Now we need your help again! The main takeaway from the first survey was that developers and designers of every experience level want to better understand CSS issues like unexpected scrollbars and sizing. We’ve started researching and prototyping potential tool ideas for investigating specific types of CSS bugs, but we need your feedback to guide our work.

    Please take a moment with our quick single-page CSS Layout Debugging survey and help us rank the most time-consuming bugs. Your feedback will be immensely helpful in clarifying our plans in 2019 and beyond.

  • How donations helped LibreOffice and TDF in 2018

    Donations to The Document Foundation, the non-profity entity behind LibreOffice, help us to grow our community, share knowledge about the software (and its development), maintain our infrastructure, organise events and much more. The image below shows what was made possible in 2018, thanks to your generous donations – click for a larger version!

  • NomadBSD 1.2-RC2 released!

    The second release candidate of NomadBSD 1.2 is now available! We would like to thank all the RC1 testers who sent us feedback and bug reports. If you notice any problems, please let us know.

  • Mi 9 kernel source code available on launch day

    Xiaomi literally declared war against Samsung by setting the launch date of Mi 9 on the same day with Galaxy S10. The Chinese launch event by Xiaomi completed just now – Mi 9, Mi 9 Transparent Edition and Mi 9 SE are now official.

  • Bell Labs, Skunk Works, and the Crowd Sourcing of Innovation

    I’ve noticed that we hear a lot less from corporate research labs than we used to. They still exist, though. Sure, Bell Labs is owned by Nokia and there is still some hot research at IBM even though they quit publication of the fabled IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin in 1998. But today innovation is more likely to come from a small company attracting venture capital than from an established company investing in research. Why is that? And should it be that way?

Events: Fedora at CLT 2019, LF's Open Networking Summit and Cloud Foundry Summit on Serverless, Knative, Microservices

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OSS
  • Fedora will be at CLT 2019

    The Fedora Project will be at the Chemnitzer Linux Tage 2019. So far, Robert Scheck and I will make it happen. As we pretty much did it for the last 10 years.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces the 2019 Open Networking Summit North America Speaking Schedule

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has announced the keynote speakers and session line-up for Open Networking Summit North America (ONS), taking place April 3-5 in San Jose, Calif.

    The full lineup of sessions can be viewed here, and features speakers from AT&T, China Mobile, Ericsson, Google, Huawei, Intel, KPMG, Nokia, Red Hat, Target, and more.

    “The Open Networking Summit is a chance to bring together the entire open networking community – from telco providers to cloud providers – to share best practices and discuss how we can work together to advance networking technology,” said Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation. “Gathering the industry’s foremost innovators and technologists, ONS is a must-attend event for collaboration and knowledge sharing.”

  • 6 Must-Attend Talks at Cloud Foundry Summit on Serverless, Knative, Microservices

    That’s a lot of technical content, so make sure to also get your ideal ratio of business impact content and check out the User Stories track.

The battle between real open source vs. faux open source heats up

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OSS

On February 19, Redis Labs, the home of Redis, the popular open-source in-memory data structure store, announced it has raised $60 million in new financing. Redis Labs CEO Ofer Bengal told Ars Technica that one reason for this was its new "open-source" Common Clause license. "The community now understands that the original concept of open source has to be fixed because it isn't suitable anymore to the modern era where cloud companies use their monopoly power to adopt any successful open-source project without contributing anything to it," Bengal said.

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Decentralized Slack Alternative Riot Releases its First Stable Version

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OSS

As you can see, here you can change the homeserver. The idea of riot as was shared before is to have de-centralized chat services, without foregoing the simplicity that centralized services offer. For those who want to run their own homeservers, you need the new matrix-syanpse 0.99.1.1 reference homeserver.

You can find an unofficial list of matrix homeservers listed here although it’s far from complete.

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Software Code’s “Wayback Machine” Gets a Boost

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OSS
Web

Call it the Wayback Machine of code: a searchable open archive of software source code across iterations; from buggy beta versions, to sophisticated contemporary release.

Software Heritage is a non-profit initiative developed and hosted by the French Institute for Research in Computer Science and Automation.

Officially created in 2015, the project has been growing over the years. It now spans 5.6 billion source files from more than 88 million projects.

Software Heritage is itself built on open-source code. It gathers source files by trawling through repositories that developers uses to create and share code, such as Github, Gitlab, GoogleCode, Debian, GNU and the Python Package Index, with users able to trace detailed revision history of all the codebase versions that it stores.

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Events: Qt World Summit 2018, NetSurf Developer, LibreOffice Asia Conference

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Development
LibO
OSS
  • Networking in Berlin: Qt World Summit 2018

    At our little booth we showcased Plasma running on a variety of devices, ranging from a Nexus 5X running Plasma Mobile through two ARM laptops to the powerful KDE Slimbook. Plasma was praised for its performance and reliability and since the focus of the event was mostly on embedded systems, we could easily demonstrate with our selection of devices that Plasma and the KDE Frameworks are a viable option for an endeavor in this area, too.

    It was very interesting to see the diverse set of people presenting their products and roaming the stalls, to see where Qt is in use today without you even realizing. We were approached by several companies evaluating using KDE Frameworks in their products and also tried to lay a foundation for an eventual partnership. And then there was Daimler who just parked an A-Class in the hallway, whose MBUX infotainment system is also powered by Qt.

  • Vincent Sanders: A very productive weekend

    I just hosted a NetSurf Developer weekend which is an opportunity for us to meet up and make use of all the benefits of working together. We find the ability to plan work and discuss solutions without loosing the nuances of body language generally results in better outcomes for the project.

    [...]

    We rounded the Saturday off by going out for a very pleasant meal with some mutual friends. Sunday started by adding a bunch of additional topics to consider and we made good progress addressing these.

    We performed a bug triage and managed to close several issues and commit to fixing a few more. We even managed to create a statement of work of things we would like to get done before the next meetup.

    My main achievement on the Sunday was to add WEBP image support. This uses the Google libwebp library to do all the heavy lifting and adding a new image content handler to NetSurf is pretty straightforward.

  • First LibreOffice Asia Conference to Take Place May 25-26, 2019 in Tokyo, Japan

    The Document Foundation published today more information on when and where the first ever LibreOffice Asia Conference event will take place this year.

    LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019 will be the project's first conference event to take place in a country in the Asia region where the free and open source software movement is rapidly growing. The Document Foundation decided it's time to put together a conference in Asia after the massive success of the LibreOffice Conference Indonesia 2018 event.

    "It’s a real leap of faith," says Franklin Weng, an Asian member in the Board of Directors of The Document Foundation. "Asia is a rapidly growing area in adoptions of ODF and LibreOffice, but our ecosystem for LibreOffice and FOSS has not been good enough yet. In this conference, we’re not only trying to make the FOSS ecosystem in Asia more healthy but also to encourage Asian community members to show their potential.”

5 Good Open Source Speech Recognition/Speech-to-Text Systems

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OSS

A speech-to-text (STT) system is as its name implies; A way of transforming the spoken words via sound into textual files that can be used later for any purpose.

Speech-to-text technology is extremely useful. It can be used for a lot of applications such as a automation of transcription, writing books/texts using your own sound only, enabling complicated analyses on information using the generated textual files and a lot of other things.

In the past, the speech-to-text technology was dominated by proprietary software and libraries; Open source alternatives didn’t exist or existed with extreme limitations and no community around. This is changing, today there are a lot of open source speech-to-text tools and libraries that you can use right now.

Here we list 5 of them.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Variscite unveils two i.MX8 QuadMax modules

Variscite announced Linux-powered “VAR-SOM-MX8” and “SPEAR-MX8” modules with an up to an i.MX8 QuadMax SoC plus up to 8GB LPDDR4 and 64GB eMMC. It also previewed a VAR-SOM-6UL COM. At Embedded World next week in Nuremberg, Germany, Variscite will showcase its Linux and Android driven i.MX8-family computer-on-modules, including new VAR-SOM-MX8 and SPEAR-MX8 modules that feature NXP’s highest-end i.MX8 SoC up to a QuadMax model (see farther below). We have already covered most of the other showcased products, including the 14nm fabricated, quad -A53 i.MX8M Mini based DART-MX8M-Mini. When we covered the DART-MX8M-Mini in September, Variscite didn’t have an image or product page, but both are now available here Read more

Android Leftovers

Programming: Developer Happiness, Rblpapi 0.3.8 and Python

  • Developer happiness: What you need to know
    A person needs the right tools for the job. There's nothing as frustrating as getting halfway through a car repair, for instance, only to discover you don't have the specialized tool you need to complete the job. The same concept applies to developers: you need the tools to do what you are best at, without disrupting your workflow with compliance and security needs, so you can produce code faster. Over half—51%, to be specific—of developers spend only one to four hours each day programming, according to ActiveState's recent Developer Survey 2018: Open Source Runtime Pains. In other words, the majority of developers spend less than half of their time coding. According to the survey, 50% of developers say security is one of their biggest concerns, but 67% of developers choose not to add a new language when coding because of the difficulties related to corporate policies.
  • Rblpapi 0.3.8: Keeping CRAN happy
    A minimal maintenance release of Rblpapi, now at version 0.3.9, arrived on CRAN earlier today. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required). This is the ninth release since the package first appeared on CRAN in 2016. It accomodates a request by CRAN / R Core to cope with staged installs which will be a new feature of R 3.6.0. No other changes were made (besides updating a now-stale URL at Bloomberg in a few spots and other miniscule maintenance). However, a few other changes have been piling up at the GitHub repo so feel free to try that version too.
  • Episode #200: Escaping Excel Hell with Python and Pandas
  • Testing native ES modules using Mocha and esm.

Games: Steam, Devil Engine, City Game Studio and More