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OSS

Events: Cloud Foundry Summit, OpenSUSE Asia and FSFE System Hackers

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OSS
SUSE
  • The Importance of Culture in Software Development

    A few weeks ago at Cloud Foundry Summit, I had the chance to grab a few of our partners and talk about how culture plays a part in the software development process. While appropriate tools are very important, it is only part of the story. Culture will make or break any change initiative regardless of how amazing our technology is.

  • openSUSE Asia Summit

    I met Edwin and Ary earlier this year at the openSUSE Conference in Nuremberg. They invited me to come to the openSUSE Asia Summit happening in Bali. I wasn't sure that I would be able to attend it. But then, around June I saw a tweet reminding about the deadline for the Call for Proposal for the openSUSE Asia Summit and I thought maybe I should give it a try.

    I submitted a workshop proposal on MicroOS and a lightning talk proposal to the openSUSE Asia CFP team. Both were accepted and I couldn't be happier. It gave me the chance to meet friends from the openSUSE community again, learn and share more.

    We do not have direct flights to Indonesia. I traveled through Air Mauritius to Kuala Lumpur and then Malaysia Arlines to Denpasar, Bali. I spent almost 24 hours traveling before reaching my hotel in Jimbaran. I was totally knackered when I arrived but the enthusiasm of being there for the summit was stronger than anything.

    I booked a taxi through Traveloka ahead of my arrival in Bali. It was recommended by Edwin. When I compared other taxi fares I felt glad I booked it online. I also bought a SIM card on my way to the hotel with a 6GB data package. I knew we'd all communicate mostly on Telegram, just as we did for oSC 2019. My hotel WiFi connection wasn't great but I was impressed by the 4G coverage of my mobile Internet provider, XL Axiata. Mobile connectivity was extremely helpful as I would rely on GoJek car-hailing for the next few days.

  • The 3rd FSFE System Hackers hackathon

    On 10 and 11 October, the FSFE System Hackers met in person to tackle problems and new features regarding the servers and services the FSFE is running. The team consists of dedicated volunteers who ensure that the community and staff can work effectively. The recent meeting built on the great work of the past 2 years which have been shaped by large personal and technical changes.

    The System Hackers are responsible for the maintenance and development of a large number of services. From the fsfe.org website’s deployment to the mail servers and blogs, from Git to internal services like DNS and monitoring, all these services, virtual machines and physical servers are handled by this friendly group that is always looking forward to welcoming new members.

Commitment To Elevating The Very Best

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OSS

OSI applauds the efforts of every individual who has ever spoken up and taken steps to make free, libre, and open source software communities more inclusive. Without you, the movement would be less vibrant, less welcoming, and irreversibly diminished.

Whether you’ve led your community to implement a code of conduct or taken the time to mentor someone who isn’t like you, whether you’ve reported toxic behavior or pressured community leaders to act: thank you. It takes courage to change the status quo, and all too often, that comes at a personal expense.

Ultimately, ours is a moral movement, and our integrity hinges on whether we rise to meet the challenge of seeking justice and equity for all.

As we move forward, we hope that we can learn as a community and incorporate the lessons of the past into building a better future. Further, we hope we can build bridges to those who have been shut out of our movement, whether by omission or commission, at the hands of systemic bias as well as toxic and predatory behavior.

As the saying goes in open source, “Many eyes lead to shallower bugs.” So too do many perspectives lead to better software. Here’s to a better, more inclusive tomorrow.

- The OSI Board of Directors

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NextCloud on Pi Adventures and Escaping Google

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Server
Google
OSS
Web

  • NextCloud on Pi Adventures

    I spent yesterday *finally* setting up a NextCloud instance of my own. It’s been on my todo since I installed fiber at home and got a decent Internet connection.

    I started out with Rasbian Lite and combined it with the NextCloudPi install script from ownyourbits. I then used certbot to install certificates from let’s encrypt before migrating the data directory using these instructions.

    After that it was happy account creation time, before realizing that I could not upload files larger than ~10kB. Very annoying.

  • Escape Google!

    Being practical most people are going to want to keep using Google services, but at least knowing what the issues are, how you can use privacy-enhanced versions or escape completely with your own services is good to know. While Nextcloud is so slick these days and with pre-packaged options it’s certainly fun just to try out, if not deployed as a full-time personal cloud solution.

    But it’s not all worrying about invasion of the privacy snatchers, we’ve plenty of down-to-earth tutorials and projects to keep you busy. We take another look at using Audacity to improve your YouTube audio and create effects, we test out of a bunch of server distros to see which is best for you in Roundup, there’s some lovely retro loving with a look at running ZX Basic and we look at building a wearable webcam from a Pi Zero. Enjoy!

Open source database use is a growing trend

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Server
OSS

Open source databases are a growing segment of the overall database management system market, but according to a new survey, users are working with multiple databases adapted for specific purposes and not looking at single databases as multi-purpose.

The Open Source Data Management Software survey was conducted by Percona, a vendor based in Raleigh, N.C. that provides supported versions of multiple open source database platforms including PostgreSQL, MySQL and MongoDB.

Some 92% of survey respondents saying they are using multiple database technologies, with 89% using more than one open source database platform. The study, conducted earlier this year, also found that cloud deployments are a growing trend, with more than 50% running at least one workload in the public cloud.

"It's hard for one database to do everything well, so the trend is definitely to use the best database for the job, rather than try and fit into a single technology," said Matt Yonkovit, chief experience officer at Percona.

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Also: Sourcehut Q3 2019 Financial report

Events: CopyleftConf, Oggcamp and FOSDEM

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OSS
  • CopyleftConf 2020

    A week before Software Freedom Conservancy had announced the CopyleftConf 2020. The conference is going to take place on 3 February 2020, Monday, in Brussels, Belgium.

    The first edition of CopyleftConf took place in February 2019. One can have a look at the videos here The organizers do plan it after Fosdem.

  • The fight to get home from Oggcamp 2019

    I’d heard that parking in Manchester was not only a nightmare and that you would have to sell your children into slavery to pay the parking fee for a few hours so with that in mind I decided to use the train. Now to get to Manchester by car from my house

    takes around an hour and a half so long as you stick within the speed limit. My train was set to eat two and a half hours from my lifes timeline, but I felt it was a small price to pay given I was only going to do one day of a two-day event.

    My journey to Oggcamp started at 6.55 am the train took me to Birmingham New Street, where I was due to change for the onward train to Manchester, on the way up to Birmingham, we stopped at Wolverhampton train station. My connection was on-time, and I made myself as comfortable as possible in my reserved seat. To my horror, a rather large gentleman poured himself into the seat next to me and mine if truth be told. We set off heading back the way we came and just for the fun of it and to wind me up a little our first stop was, yes, you guessed it, Wolverhampton train station. I could see the next two hours were going to be a bundle of joy as I tried to look at my phone while feeling that I was confined in an invisible straight jacket if only that were the extent of my problems. Mr Creosote decided that after consuming his breakfast which he had brought on board, it was now time to have a little sleep. “What’s wrong with that?” I hear you ask. Mr Creosote promptly started to snore like farmer Giles’s prized Gloucestershire Old Spot pig. Two hours later, frazzled we arrived in Manchester Mr Creosote had been kind enough to wake up in Macclesfield just enough time for my bladder to fill to bursting along with my fit to burst brain after all that snoring. Oh, and I forgot to mention the lad opposite who while sat underneath a sign saying “Please be considerate to those around you” played videos of South Park amongst other things at full volume on his phone. Never heard of headphones arsehole?

  • FOSDEM 2020 IoT Devroom Call for Proposals

    FOSDEM (Free & Open-source Software Developers’ European Meeting) takes place every year in Brussels, Belgium on the first weekend of February.

Open source technology, enabling innovation

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OSS

One of the most exciting projects to come out of the open source revolution is Kubernetes, a tool helping companies running their software on cloud services. It enables them to get the most out of the processing power they’re paying for by identifying machines that are being underutilised. So, if the software detects that a machine is not being optimised, it will load it up with another task so it’s working as hard as it can.

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[libre-riscv-dev] power pc

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GNU
Linux
Hardware
OSS

So as you know, the RISCV Foundation is seriously impeding progress. There
is huge momentum around RISCV itself, however as far as open *innovation*
is concerned, the sheer arrogance of the Foundation in failing to respect
the combination of Libre goals and business objectives has us completely
isolated from key critical resources such as the closed secret lists and
wiki.

We cannot even get access to documentation explaining how to propose new
extensions.

I have been considering for some time to reach out to MIPS and PowerPC.
Yesterday I wrote to the OpenPower Foundation and was really surprised and
delighted to hear back from Hugh Blemings, whom I worked with over 20 years
ago.

I outlined some conditions (no NDAs, open mailing lists, use of
Certification Marks and Compliance Suites) and he replied back that this
was pretty much along the lines of what they were planning.

I will have a chat with him some time, in the meantime I found the spec:

https://openpowerfoundation.org/?resource_lib=power-isa-version-3-0

It is eeenooormous, however Hugh reassures me that they want to break it
into sections.

Why would we even consider this?

The lesson from RISCV is really clear: if the ISA is set up as a cartel,
Libre innovation is not welcome.

If we had a goal to just *implement* a *pre existing* Extension, there
would be no problem.

It is the fact that we wish to implement entirely new extensions, for CPU
and GPU *and* VPU purposes, but not as a separate processor (which would be
classified as "custom") that is the "problem".

So starting at page 1146, we need to work out how to shoe horn a ton of
stuff into the ISA, as well as fit 16 bit compressed in as well.

L.

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Also: Libre RISC-V Open-Source Effort Now Looking At POWER Instead Of RISC-V

An Interview With Zlatan Todoric, Open-Source Developer & Former Purism CTO

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Interviews
OSS

With the early Librem 5 smartphones now shipping from their "Aspen" batch and recent Reddit discussions about the Librem 5 roping him in, former Purism CTO Zlatan Todoric has agreed to a brief interview on Phoronix.

Zlatan Todoric is no longer employed by Purism but was one of the original staff members going back to 2015 when they were primarily focused on shipping Linux laptops and then developed their privacy-minded smartphone ambitions. He's been out since September 2018 but that also means his NDA has expired. Through this he's also a Debian developer and contributor to other free software projects. So let's welcome Zlatan and the opportunity to learn more about some of the history of Purism's Linux hardware efforts.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • npm is moving back to its developer roots, founder says

    Everyone has an opinion on what NPM should do next, both as a company (npm, Inc.) and as the package manager (npm) made essential by Node.js. That's not surprising: More than 11 million JavaScript developers use npm (and associated npm registry) to build their applications, whether they use Node.js or not. It's also not a particularly easy question to resolve, given the turmoil npm Inc. has experienced over the past year, what with the introduction (and eventual departure) of CEO Bryan Bogensberger and employee unrest in his wake.

    Talking to npm founder and Chief Open Technologies officer Isaac Schlueter, however, the right strategy for "building a sustainable engine behind an open source labor of love" might well be a return to npm's roots.

  • Open source community should help fight fake news

    That’s the view of Aroma Rodrigues, a full-time Python developer at a major bank in India and a part-time software activist. She told delegates at last week’s PyConZA 2019, part of SA’s Open Source Week, that they can and should be doing more to use their skills for social good.

    [...]

    For example, the US-based Knight Foundation, which was established to promote excellence in journalism, examined more than 10 million tweets from 700 000 Twitter accounts before, during and after the 2016 US presidential election. The study found that identified clusters of Twitter accounts linked back to more than 600 fake and conspiracy news sites repeatedly, often in ways that seemed to be co-ordinated, or even automated, in order to sway public opinion one way or another.

  • Open source community should embrace the spirit of ubuntu

    In an interview with ITWeb at the conference, Nkosi pointed out that although open source was about community, “we are not using it as community”.

    [...]

    The word 'ubuntu' loosely translates to “I am because we are”. This, Nkosi asserted, was essentially the premise of open source software, which was about harnessing the collective power of the community.

  • How the top open source AI software drives innovation

    Open source software and tools have long been a mainstay of the computing ecosystem, especially over the past two decades. From the popularity of Linux in the enterprise server environment to the Firefox browser, open source has found a successful place in the computing hierarchy. It should come as little surprise that open source AI software is finding significant popularity and use within the machine learning and deep learning ecosystem, as well.

    In fact, much of the technology that powers AI is open source. This comes as a contrast to other enterprise technology, such as operating systems and databases that had their initial roots in closed, licensed software.

  • Catalan separatists have tooled up with a decentralized app for civil disobedience

    One of the first protest actions programmed by a new online activist group, calling itself Tsunami Democràtic, saw thousands of protestors coalescing on Barcelona airport Monday, in an attempt to shut it down. The protest didn’t quite do that but it did lead to major disruption, with roads blocked by human traffic as protestors walked down the highway and the cancelation of more than 100 flights, plus hours of delays for travellers arriving into El Prat.

    For months leading up to a major Supreme Court verdict on the fate of imprisoned Catalan political leaders a ‘technical elite‘ — as one local political science academic described them this week — has been preparing to reboot Catalonia’s independence movement by developing bespoke, decentralized high-tech protest tools.

    A source with knowledge of Tsunami Democràtic, speaking to TechCrunch on condition of anonymity, told us that “high level developers” located all around the world are involved in the effort, divvying up coding tasks as per any large scale IT project and leveraging open source resources (such as the RetroShare node-based networking platform) to channel grassroots support for independence into a resilient campaign network that can’t be stopped by the arrest of a few leaders.

  • To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source

    The European Union aims to reduce carbon emissions by at least 80 percent by 2050. Former California Governor Jerry Brown signed an executive order last year calling for the state, the fifth-largest economy in the world, to go carbon neutral by 2045. Meeting these goals, or even the less ambitious goals set by other governments, will require utilities to buy more energy from sustainable sources like wind and solar power. That shift is already creating logistical challenges for utilities. Unlike more predictable sources of energy, the energy produced by a wind farm can vary from day to day, forcing utilities to offload excess supplies and make up for shortages. The solar panels on residential rooftops that feed into the grid pose their own challenges because the grid wasn't designed to facilitate a two-way flow of energy.

    To meet those technological challenges, the energy sector is turning to open source software. Open source, which anyone can modify or share, helped power the rise of internet giants like Google, Facebook, and Amazon. Ostensible competitors worked together to develop software like the data-crunching platform Hadoop because it enabled them to solve difficult computing problems. Now all sorts of companies, ranging from Microsoft to Walmart to JP Morgan Chase use and make open source software.

    But the energy industry has lagged behind others in using and creating open source software, says Loek Bakker, head of information management at Dutch energy distribution company TenneT. "The energy industry isn't known for being innovative," he says. "I think we're quite a traditional industry."

  • Open FinTech Forum Brings Together Technologists and Business Executives to Accelerate Development in Finance Sector

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the speakers and program for Open FinTech Forum taking place December 9, 2019 at the Convene Conference Center in New York.

  • LF Energy Brings Power System Leaders Together with Open Source Experts at Paris Summit to Implement the Grid of the Future

    LF Energy, a nonprofit, vendor-neutral initiative from The Linux Foundation, whose mission is to accelerate the energy and electricity sectors’ worldwide decarbonization goals through open-source technology, announced the full agenda for its first global summit, NOW TO NEXT - The Power of Together, as well as the addition of Alliander, EDP, Lucerne University of Applied Sciences and Arts and Unicorn as new LF Energy members.

    NOW TO NEXT, which will be hosted in La Défense, Paris, on Nov. 4-5, will bring together leaders and innovators in the power and technology industries to discuss the global transition to clean energy. Industry leaders have realized that no one can meet decarbonization goals alone. Instead, we must work together to transition the 150-year-old power grid infrastructure to smarter and more efficient digital technologies that enable decentralized energy resources.

  • Percona Open Source Software Database Survey Reveals Shift Toward Diversity

    Percona, a leader in open source database software and services, today announced the results of its Open Source Software Database Survey. More than 830 members of the Percona community and customer base, representing small, medium and large companies from around the world, responded to questions regarding open source database usage and growth. The survey revealed that diverse tools and environments, including multiple databases and multi-cloud and hybrid environments, are transforming today’s datacenters.

  • Public Health England - open source and containerisation key to tech agenda
  • Moodle Announces the Integration of H5P
  • SDSC Launches Open-Source ‘SeedMeLab’

    Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego have launched an open-source software called SeedMeLab, which provides a host of features for researchers across all disciplines to manage and disseminate their data products internally and externally from a personalized and branded data cloud with full ownership and control.

    Under development and rigorous testing for past five years, SeedMeLab is a result of $1.3 million National Science Foundation (NSF) award to create a set of web-based building blocks that lets scientists seamlessly share and access preliminary results and transient data from research on a variety of platforms, including mobile devices. SeedMe is short for ‘Swiftly Encode, Explore and Disseminate My Experiments.’

    “Offered as an open-source software or a managed service from SDSC, SeedMeLab eliminates content fragmentation—that is data, its context, and its discussion—and enables quick reference of data/research context that’s critical during research phase and very useful for long tail use of data products” said SDSC Visualization Group leader Amit Chourasia, principal investigator for the project. “SeedMeLab also boosts team productivity by facilitating knowledge transfer between lab members in a sustained way, and it is now available for researchers to overcome data management gaps that have been an issue in the past. SeedMeLab is an important stepping stone for researchers to realize FAIR data management in practice.”

  • Senate Bill Would Open Some Weather Agency Models to the Public

    A bipartisan bill introduced in the Senate Tuesday would require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which collects and models scientific data for weather forecasting purposes, to make certain operational weather models publicly available.

    Under the Learning Excellence and Good Examples from New Developers, or LEGEND Act, NOAA would also “periodically review innovations and improvements” to operational models made by third parties and the public. The bill would give NOAA’s administrator authority to utilize certain outside innovations.

  • Former Catalyst CEO Launches New Open Source Push for Legal Tech

    John Tredennick, founder and former CEO of e-discovery company Catalyst Repository Systems, has accepted the challenge of bringing free, open source legal tech to an industry notoriously known as a slow tech adopter.

Openwashing Leftovers

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OSS
  • SOSA Consortium’s C4ISR Demonstrator System Shows Value of Open-Source Tech in Mil/Aero Apps

    Actually, these marketplaces have had some level of collaborative effort due to common development trends and regulatory compliance activity, but nothing like the kind of active open environment that exists in other spaces. The military community is specifically reluctant to adopt more open development methods due to the secretive nature of military capability disclosure. Yet there are areas in core platform development that can benefit from an open-source approach.

  • New WSO2 Identity Server Release Provides a Hassle-Free Configuration Model and RESTful APIs for Self-Service IAM

    Digitally driven businesses face unprecedented complexity in protecting not only their own data and privacy but that of globally distributed customers, partners and employees using a variety of personal computing and mobile devices. WSO2 offers several new capabilities to help enterprises address these demands with the latest release of WSO2 Identity Server for identity and access management (IAM). Using WSO2 Identity Server, IT organizations now have an open source, API-driven, developer friendly solution for modernizing application security and delivering an enhanced user experience that encourages adoption.

  • Winding Tree and Travel Forward to host open-source Hackathon

    Key industry leaders such as Air France, KLM, and Etihad Airways have participated in Winding Tree’s previous two #HackTravel hackathons, one in Prague in December 2018, and the second most recently in Lisbon in July 2019.

  • SalesAgility announces 7th UK Open Source Awards, 2020

    SalesAgility are delighted to announce that the 7th UK Open Source Awards (UKOSA) will take place on Thursday May 21st 2020. We're also delighted to announce that once again they'll be held in the Edinburgh University Computing faculty's Informatics Forum.

    The awards are designed to recognise and celebrate the innovation, diversity, collaboration and creativity that are core components of Open Source software creation and maintenance. Previous winners have included contributors from several NHS healthcare projects, the Gnome project, Collabora (LibreOffice) and students from Edinburgh and Aberystwyth Universities.

  • How Google and Facebook do code analysis

    Facebook has reported target “fix rates” (how often developers fix the bug flagged by a tool) of 70% to 80%, and Google strives for greater than 90% fix rates for its ErrorProne code analysis tool. By only deploying tools with high fix rates, these companies maintain the trust of developers and ensure that they continue to act on important issues found by these tools. But how do you know whether a new tool meets this threshold?

    The best approach is to be data-driven. The developer tooling groups at these companies collect data on which bugs are getting fixed and support explicit developer feedback on tool results. This data is constantly monitored to flag tools that are underperforming so they can improve or remove them.

  • Weekly Wrap: AWS Makes It Rain, Extends Credits to Open Source Projects
  • AWS Makes It Rain, Extends Credits to Open Source Projects
  • AWS tempts open source projects with promo credit sweeteners

    Principal Open Source Technologist Arun Gupta and Operations Manager Vicente explained the initiative in a blog post mentioning the credits were typically used for testing, storage, or CI/CD purposes. First beneficiaries include the Rust and Julia programming languages, Java community project AdoptOpenJDK, Java component repository Maven Central, and a couple of projects hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation.

  • AWS' open source entreaties now include cloud credits

    AWS will offer promotional cloud credits to open source project maintainers that meet certain criteria. The move comes after repeated tensions with some companies.

  • Is AWS sponsoring Rust? Only a bit – and so is Microsoft Azure

    AWS has announced its "Sponsorship of the Rust project", causing some initial excitement in the community. However, in reality it only amounts to a year of AWS "promotional credits."

    "We're really excited to announce that AWS is sponsoring the Rust programming language," reads a statement by David Barsky (engineer on Rust runtime for Lambda), Arun Gupta (open source technical evangelist), and Jacob Peddicord (open-source engineer).

  • Groundbreaking CloudCO Demo at Broadband World Forum 2019 Made Possible by UNH-IOL’s Role as Open Broadband Lab

    The intention of the OB-Labs initiative is to demonstrate an open framework for cloud-based broadband for carriers globally, and bring the promise of SDN and NFV to fruition. The demo at BBWF 2019 was built from a combination of open source from the OPNFV, ONAP, and Open Broadband Access Abstraction (OB-BAA) projects and products from Nokia, Altice Labs, DZS, and VMware. A first of its kind demonstration, this implementation truly shows the power of a well-defined architecture and the agility of an open community.

  • flexiWAN Announces Global Channel Partner Program for MSPs, SIs and VAR Offering SD-WAN Services
  • Mavenir Swings for Big Leagues With OpenRAN
  • Beware Systems Integrator Lock-In, Open Source Dependency

    Broadband World Forum 2019 -- Kings can be tyrants, but at least they give you an easy target to punch when something goes wrong and revolution follows. Telcos in a perpetual huff about the ruling trio of Ericsson, Huawei and Nokia could be in for a more slippery autocracy with the emergence of systems integrators, a cabal of tiny vendors and some unwieldy open source platforms.

    Operators are worried, too. "Yes," said BT's Simon Fisher when asked during a panel session here if there is a danger of going from one form of lock-in to another. "You are squeezing complexity and cost into the software side of the business."

    [...]

    "I guess the fear is that because ONAP is open source it will be easier for bad actors to explore (than a commercial solution) and, if widely adopted, worthwhile trying to hack," noted Crawshaw.

  • Broadband Forum, ONF create virtualisation and open source roadmap

    A new agreement between Broadband Forum (BBF) and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) is set to ease the path to automated and open virtualised access networks.
    The roadmap sets forth how operators seeking to effectively use virtualisation and open source to increase agility can leverage open source and standardisation projects side-by-side to ease their migrations to automated access networks and enable seamless co-existence.
    As the broadband industry embarks on the next phase of broadband deployment, numerous new business opportunities are emerging that require rapid service instantiation, often across disparate, software-defined networks, and leveraging third-party applications.

  • Broadband Forum and ONF collaborate on automation and virtualization in access networks

    In yet another example of open source groups working together, the Broadband Forum and the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) announced on Monday that they have signed an agreement to mutually drive automation and virtualization across access networks.

    Over the past several years, open source communities and standards development organizations (SDOs) have started to collaborate with each other in order to speed up the development of new applications and services while not duplicating each other's efforts.

  • Broadband Forum and ONF Ease the Path to Automated and Open Virtualized Access Networks

    As the broadband industry embarks on the next phase of broadband deployment, numerous new business opportunities are emerging that require rapid service instantiation, often across disparate, software-defined networks, and leveraging third-party applications. To take advantage of this untapped potential, operators are looking to interconnect different parts of their network with open source solutions and systems from various suppliers.

  • Microsoft to Reward Hackers for Finding Bugs in Open Source Election Software [Ed: This clearly spreads Microsoft propaganda. Microsoft puts back doors in election systems, so at the same time it tries to spin itself as the solution to security with its proprietary software

    Fair elections are the lifelines of democracy, but in recent years election hacking has become a hot topic worldwide.

  • Sotabench: Benchmarking Open Source Models Directly From GitHub [Ed: No, you cannot do proper studies with only data from Microsoft because it is biased by design; many FOSS projects reject proprietary software such as GitHub]

    Machine learning research resource Papers with Code last week introduced Sotabench, a free and open website created to benchmark and rate the performance of state-of-the-art open source models from GitHub. Papers with Code is an open platform that aggregates ML papers, code, and evaluation tables and metrics from sources such as arXiv and GitHub.

  • Kansai University Research: Kansai University Researcher is Awarded Prestigious Prize for the Development and Advancement of Open Source Data Mining Technology for Business and Product Marketing
  • Alfresco Named a Leader in Worldwide SaaS and Cloud-Enabled Content Applications, According to IDC MarketScape
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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Security Update for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS

Affecting both the Linux 4.15 kernel used in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04.6 LTS (Xenial Xerus) systems, the new security patch fixed an improperly implemented Spectre mitigation in the ptrace susbsystem (CVE-2019-15902), which could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. It also addresses a buffer overread (CVE-2019-15918) discovered that the SMB networking file system implementation, which could allow an attacker to expose sensitive information (kernel memory), two flaws (CVE-2019-15117 and CVE-2019-15118) discovered in the USB audio driver that may allow a physically proximate attacker to crash the system, and a flaw (CVE-2019-14821) in the KVM hypervisor implementation that let a local attacker to crash the system. Read more

Leftovers: MX-19, Versalogic and Security

  • MX-19 “patito feo” released!

    We are pleased to offer MX-19 for your use. As usual, this iso includes the latest updates from debian 10.1 (buster), antiX and MX repos.

  • Compact Apollo Lake SBC aims sky high

    Versalogic’s Linux-ready, sandwich-style “Harrier” SBC has an Apollo Lake processor and a compact 95 x 55mm footprint, ECC RAM support, and ruggedization features designed for high altitude UAVs. Versalogic announced a Harrier SBC due in Q1 2020 that revises the compact, COM-and-carrier design of its three-year-old, Intel Bay Trail based Osprey, but advances to the newer Intel Apollo Lake. The Osprey is similarly bereft of real-world ports to enable easier real-world deployments in constrained environments.

  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (jss and kernel), Debian (libpcap, openjdk-8, and tcpdump), Fedora (java-11-openjdk), openSUSE (libreoffice), Oracle (java-1.7.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.7.0-openjdk, python, and wget), Scientific Linux (java-1.7.0-openjdk), SUSE (ceph, ceph-iscsi, ses-manual_en, dhcp, openconnect, and procps), and Ubuntu (exiv2, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-gke-5.0, linux-snapdragon, and uw-imap).

  • Password lessons: Longer is better, so is salt

    Infosec pros who had no idea of how easily a stolen list of hashed passwords could be cracked got a sobering lesson at this month’s SecTor security conference in Toronto. There, Will Hunt, co-founder of the U.K. based In.security consulting firm, casually talked of systems that can be built around a common (about $1,500) Nvidea GTX 2080 graphics card that could make 100 billion guesses a second in a brute force attack.

Unix Celebrates 50 Years

Today and tomorrow Nokia Bell Labs is hosting a two-day event celebrating 50 years of the Unix operating system, reflecting on Unix’s past and exploring the future of computing. Speakers and panelists include many of the original team that built Unix and designed the C programming language. Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

  • How we brought JavaScript to life for Command Line Heroes

    Animators within Red Hat?s Open Studio help bring Command Line Heroes? artwork more to life. All throughout Season 3, they?ve added movement to our episode pages and created eye-catching trailers for social and Red Hat?s YouTube channel. This post highlights their important contributions to the Command Line Heroes? creative process by looking at their work for Episode 3 of Season 4: Creating JavaScript. Also, designer Karen Crowson talks about the easter eggs in that episode?s artwork.

  • Red Hat Ceph Storage RGW deployment strategies and sizing guidance

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