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OSS

FUD and Openwashing

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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • NASA Has Just Released Tons Of Free And Open Source Software, Here’s How To Get Them
  • Using open source APM software: InspectIT

    Thus, system failures and poor performance usually have a significant negative impact on a company's reputation and economic success. The discipline of APM (Application Performance Management) comes to the rescue by providing methodologies and tools to ensure a high quality of service. APM tools provide the means to monitor the health of software systems, detect and react on emerging performance anomalies, and allow for the diagnosis of the root causes of performance problems. A set of commercial APM tools (AppDynamics, DynaTrace, NewRelic, etc.) are available that are rich in their scope of functionality and maturity; however, in some cases commercial tools may not be suitable due to license costs, vendor lock-in, or other reasons that can negatively affect companies following an open source strategy.

  • Free Webinar on How To Develop a Winning Speaking Submission from Deb Nicholson and Women in Open Source

    Women in Open Source will kick off a webinar series that will discuss cultivating more diverse viewpoints and voices in open source, including both inspirational ideas and practical tips the community can immediately put into action. The first webinar, “From Abstract to Presentation: How To Develop a Winning Speaking Submission” will be held Thursday, March 9, 2017, at 8 a.m. Pacific Time.

  • Storytelling in the 21st Century

    Some words for thought from this week’s video on nteract: “Open science isn’t truly open and open source isn’t truly open.”

    [...]

    I work as a technologist at a public library and my undergraduate degree is in philosophy. I like it when I hear technologists talking in these kinds of terms. It’s evidence of someone thinking at a very high level.

  • Peer-review activists push psychology journals towards open data

    An editor on the board of a journal published by the prestigious American Psychological Association (APA) has been asked to resign in a controversy over data sharing in peer review.

    Gert Storms — who says he won’t step down — is one of a few hundred scientists who have vowed that, from the start of this year, they will begin rejecting papers if authors won’t publicly share the underlying data, or explain why they can’t.

    The idea, called the Peer Reviewers’ Openness Initiative, was launched by psychologists hoping to increase transparency in a field beset by reports of fraud and dubious research practices. And the APA, which does not ask that data be made available to peer reviewers or shared openly online, seems set to become an early testing ground for the initiative’s influence. With Storms’ situation still unresolved, the society’s council of editors will discuss whether it should change its policies at a meeting in late March.

Docker in the News Today

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Server
OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Open Source Boosts Innovation in Software, Hardware and Beyond

    Many think the development of technology is reserved only for the super-intelligent, and that the average person cannot comprehend it.

    This particular view of technology is a product of a closed-type environment, which hides key information related to the development of technology behind patents, copyrights and trademarks. While it’s debatable how intellectual property rights of inventors must be saved from abuse, traditional modes of doing so can block the flow of information in society.

    This model is primarily driven by commercial interests— where key technological inventions sell at very high prices. But this model increases the divide between the ‘privileged’ class and the ‘under-privileged’ class. The division of the world between developed, developing and under-developed nations is primarily based on the level of technology they possess. This leads to prohibitively expensive technology and an increasing technological divide— we are producing a generation of technology users instead of technology developers.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Adds Google gRPC Project

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) which itself is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project, is expanding its roster of supported projects today with the addition of the gRPC project.

    The gRPC project is an open source, high performance remote procedure call (RPC) framework originally developed by Google. The gRPC project has already been used outside of Google, with CoreOS and Netflix among the technology's adopters.

  • EMC's Joshua Bernstein on When to Deploy Open Source [Ed: When someone who works for a proprietary company software and back doors facilitator tells you when to use FOSS]

    "A lot of people are a little shocked and confused to hear about how EMC is contributing to and supporting open source development," Joshua Bernstein said to open his keynote address at last year's MesosCon conference in Denver. "I think that while many of us already understand the benefit of that, convincing large companies to do this sort of thing is a challenge."

    Berstein became Dell EMC's vice president of technology in 2015, after a four year stint as manager of Siri development and architecture at Apple. At MesosCon, he talked about some of the things that DevOps should consider when deciding whether to deploy open source or proprietary solutions.

  • SDN, Blockchain and Beyond: The Spaces Where Open Source Is Thriving Today [Ed: Black Duck is a malicious firm whose goal is to sell proprietary software by attacking FOSS]

    What are the newest frontiers that open source software is conquering? Black Duck's latest open source "Rookies of the Year" report, which highlights areas like blockchain and SDN, provides some interesting insights.

    The report, which Black Duck published Monday, highlights what the company calls "the top new open source projects initiated in 2016." It's the ninth annual report of this type that Black Duck has issued.

  • OpenBSD errata, Mar 1, 2017

    A man-in-the-middle vulnerability has been found in OpenBSD's wireless stack. A malicious access point can trick an OpenBSD client using WPA1 or WPA2 into connecting to this malicious AP instead of the desired AP. When this attack is used successfully the OpenBSD client will send and accept unencrypted frames.

  • Open-source project uses genetic data from viruses to help scientists track outbreaks in real time
  • A new genetic tool maps how deadly viruses spread around the world in real time
  • Open Science Prize Awarded to Software Tool for Tracking Viral Outbreaks
  • Pathogen Surveillance System Wins NIH Open Science Prize
  • Open Science Prize announces epidemic tracking tool as grand prize winner
  • Epidemic tracking tool wins Open Science Prize
  • Government launches UK Digital Strategy to make Britain 'a world-leading digital economy that works for everyone'

    The UK government finally published its Digital Strategy today, outlining its plans for making the country a global capital of the digital economy.

    Culture Secretary Karen Bradley MP launched the strategy by laying out the government's vision of how to develop the requisite infrastructure, regulations and skills to make the UK the ideal place for digital businesses, new technology and advanced research.

    "The Digital Strategy will help to create a world-leading digital economy that works for everyone," she pledged at the Entrepreneur First startup accelerator. The London incubator is housed in a converted Biscuit Factory, a fitting example of the digital transformation the plans intend to support.

  • UK GDS to host first Govt. Data Science conference

    The United Kingdom’s Government Digital Service (GDS) will host the first Government Data Science Conference, in London, on 24 April. “The conference is an opportunity to connect communities interested in the better use of data in government including data scientists, analysts and policymakers”, GDS writes on its site.

  • M5Stack Open-Source Modular Electronic Prototyping Platform (video)

    Developers makers and hobbyists that are looking for a quick way to prototype electronic projects may be interested in an open source modular prototyping toolkit which has been created by M5Stack, based in San Francisco.

    Watch the demonstration video below to learn how the M5Stack prototyping toolkit can help you transform your ideas into working prototypes using a wide variety of different modules.

Openwashing

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OSS

4 open source tools for sharing files

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OSS

There comes a time in your life when you have to share one or more files with someone, whether that someone is a friend, a family member, a colleague or collaborator, or a client. Many people stay true to their open source convictions by doing the job using applications like ownCloud, Nextcloud, or SparkleShare.

All three are solid and flexible, but they're not the only games in town. Maybe your needs lean towards a simpler application. Or maybe you just want a dedicated file sharing tool that puts the power and the data in your hands.

You have a number of open source options which give you all of that and more. Let's look at four additional open source tools that can meet all of your file sharing needs.

Read more

Also: 3 projects successfully using mesh network technology

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Verizon, Atos, CableLabs join ETSI Open Source MANO project

    ETSI Open Source MANO initiative swells to 60 organizations with arrival of Verizon, Atos and CableLabs as new members.

  • Rise of Open Source IoT Picks Up Steam

    The rise of open source Internet of Things (IoT) is inevitable, according to a recent survey by open source software firm Red Hat. The survey found that while enterprises are exploring the potential of IoT, they are not rushing into development and project initiation without caution. In fact, “steady deliberation” seems to be the industry approach to IoT, with a focus on containing development and project costs, overriding the initial excitement around IoT. This indicates a preference for open source development environments going ahead.

  • As the Software Supply Chain Shifts, Enterprise Open Source Programs Ramp Up

    Today’s software supply chain is fundamentally different than it was only a few years ago, and open source programs at large enterprises are helping to drive that trend. According to Sonatype’s 2016 State of the Software Supply Chain enterprises are both turning to existing open source projects to decrease the amount of code they have to write, and increasingly creating their own open source tools.

  • Is it the end of the traditional resume?

    For the past five years, I've been unreasonably excited about a metadata standard known as Open Badges. In October 2016, as part of Mozilla Foundation's plans to transition the maintenance of the standard to the non-profit IMS Global Consortium, the Open Badges website was relaunched with perhaps the most concise definition I've seen: "Connected, verifiable credentials represented in portable image files." We're now at the stage where additional standards are being built upon Open Badges, whether blockchain-related or, as I will outline in this article, relating to ways badges tell stories through learning pathways.

  • Haiku OS Begins Prepping For Ryzen, Subpixel Rendering

    The open-source Haiku OS inspired by BeOS has made much progress this month on several fronts.

    Haiku OS has been working on real sub-pixel rendering support now that Microsoft patents pertaining to sub-pixel rendering are expiring. There have also been improvements to Haiku's JSON API, work underway to make Haiku build under GCC 6, and prep support for upcoming AMD Ryzen CPU coverage.

  • Keynote: Community Software Powers the Machine by Mark Atwood
  • Community Software, Science Fiction, and The Machine

    Not many presentations can start with a video co-promoting a new computer and the latest Star Trek movie, but Mark Atwood, Director of Open Source Engagement at HP Enterprise, started his LinuxCon Europe keynote with a video about The Machine and Star Trek Beyond.

    The Machine uses a new kind of physics for computation and data storage allowing it to be very fast, energy efficient, and agile. The Machine runs Linux, and Atwood says that “the best way to promote the use of any sort of new technology is to make it open source.”

  • Mozilla Acquires Pocket Developer Read It Later

    Mozilla makes its first acquisition, adding online bookmarking and sharing service Pocket to its roster.

    On Feb. 27, Mozilla announced its first ever acquisition, announcing that it has acquired Read It Later Inc, which is best known for its Pocket technology that enables users to save, share and discover online links.

Software in the Back End/Server

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Server
OSS

Open source web servers | NGINX, Apache, Lighttpd and more

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OSS
Web

Web servers have come a long way since the CERN httpd was developed by Tim Berners-Lee in 1990 as part of the same project that resulted in the first ever web browser.

Some of the leading suppliers of web servers today provide closed source enterprise-level options for enterprises, but many others retain the open values embodied by Tim Berners-Lee and the decision to release the source code for CERN httpd into the public domain in 1993.

Computerworld UK looks at the best open source web servers currently available for enterprises.

Read more

FOSS Licensing: ZFS in Debian and Creative Commons

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OSS
Legal
  • On ZFS in Debian

    I’m currently over at FOSDEM, and have been asked by a couple of people about the state of ZFS and Debian. So, I thought I’d give a quick post to explain what Debian’s current plan is (which has come together with a lot of discussion with the FTP Masters and others around what we should do).

    [...]

    Debian has always prided itself in providing the unequivocally correct solution to our users and downstream distributions. This also includes licenses – we make sure that Debian will contain 100% free software. This means that if you install Debian, you are guaranteed freedoms offered under the DFSG and our social contract.

  • Complying with Creative Commons license attribution requirements in slides and powerpoint

    When I was at Mozilla and WMF, I frequently got asked how to give proper credit when using Creative Commons-licensed images in slideshows. I got the question again last week, and am working on slides right now, so here’s a quick guide.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • [Video] Linux Audio Programs Compared 2017
    I made this video for those that are new to, or just interested in making music on the Linux OS. I go over the features, goods and bads of Rosegarden, LMMS, Ardour, Mixbus, and EnergyXT, as well as touch on Qtractor. I don't don't go much into details of the particular versions I am using, but the video was made in the early part of 2017 and I'm running Ubuntu 16.04LTS.
  • Green Recorder: A Simple Desktop/Screen Recorder for Linux
    Green Recorder is a simple, open source desktop recorder developed for Linux systems built using Python, GTK and FFmpeg. It supports most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. Recently it has been updated to work with Wayland too in Gnome session.
  • Komorebi: A New Way To Enhance Your Desktop Using Animated/Parallax Wallpapers
    In past there were applications that allowed us to run videos/Gif as wallpaper on the desktop and make desktop look much cooler but than all of sudden the development of such Apps stopped and I can't name any App that exist for this purpose. Komorebi is fairly new application designed to make your desktop experience much better and make desktop cool as well, we can say it is kind of 'live wallpaper' situation here or 3D wallpaper. It is developed by Abe Masri and available under GPL license for free.
  • Stacer Sytem Optimizer: A Must Have Application For Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    There are multiple ways to optimize your Linux, the most geeky way is using Terminal, there are also applications available that performs such actions like Bleachbit, Ubuntu cleaner and so on. Stacer is simple, open-source, quick and new application designed to offer you all-in-one optimizer for your Ubuntu/Linux Mint (It's alternative to CCleaner but only for Linux).
  • Qtox: Open Source and Fully Secure Skype Replacement for Linux
    Long years ago, we've talked about a Skype alternative called Tox which was still in its early developmental stages. Tox was supposed to become the anti-thesis of Skype by being a fully open-source video and voice chat client that placed user privacy and security at its center. Well, guess what, there are now fully active and well-maintained chat clients that are built on top of Tox protocol. qTox is one of them.
  • Rclone 1.36 Released With SFTP And Local Symlinks Support, More
    Rclone 1.36 was released recently, bringing support for SFTP, local symbolic links support, mount improvements, along with many other new features and bug fixes. For those not familiar with Rclone, this is a cross-platform command line tool for synchronizing files and folders to multiple cloud storages, which supports Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon S3, Amazon Drive, Microsoft One Drive, Yandex Disk, and more. It can be used to sync files either from your machine or from one cloud storage to another.
  • Streamlink Twitch GUI 1.2.0 Adds Support For Communities And Team Pages, Basic Hotkeys
    Streamlink Twitch GUI (previously Livestreamer Twitch GUI) is a multi-platform Twitch.tv browser. The application is powered by Node.js, Chromium and Streamlink, though it can still use Livestreamer (which is no longer maintained) too.
  • Code Editor `Brackets` 1.9 Released, Available In PPA
    Brackets is a free, open source code editor focused on front-end web development (HTML, CSS and JavaScript).
  • Terminix Terminal Emulator Renamed To Tilix, Sees New Bugfix Release
    [Quick update] Terminix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator, has been renamed to Tilix due to some trademark issues.

today's howtos

Games and CodeWeavers/Wine

  • A Snapshot of Linux Gamers, Just One Year Ago
    It’s about time we share the analysis of that Q1 2016 survey (fielding occured in March last year), especially as we are about to launch the Q1 2017 one pretty, pretty soon. That way we will be able to compare how things have changed over the course of 12 months. As usual, the whole disclaimer about online surveys is valid here (data is only as good as your n size, the appropriateness of your sampling, and the quality of the responses, etc…), but assuming it’s not all that bad and all that unreliable, let’s dig in the results. As a reminder, most of the respondents for this survey were recruited through the r/linux and r/linux_gaming subreddits, as well as the readership of BoilingSteam. This is not our first survey, and you can see our previous ones done in the second quarter of 2015, and the following one in the last quarter of 2015.
  • Slime-san Coming To PC, Mac and Linux
    Headup Games and Fabraz proudly announce their upcoming action-platformer Slime-san for PC, Mac and Linux via Steam & Humble Bundle. Console releases will follow soon after. Jump and slime your way through 100 levels in a unique 5-colored, pixelated world and escape from a giant worm’s innards. Get your shopping done in Slumptown, a town full of survivors within the worm. Unlock different play styles, outfits, shaders and even multiplayer mini-games! Slime-san is developed by Fabraz, an independent development studio that also released the critically-acclaimed games Cannon Crasha and Planet Diver. Slime-san was minding his own business, sliming around in a peaceful forest when suddenly…A giant worm appeared and gobbled him up! Now deep within the worm’s belly, Slime-san has to face a decision: Be digested by the incoming wall of stomach acid... Or jump, slide and slime his way through the worm's intestines and back out its mouth!
  • CodeWeavers Announces CrossOver 16.2.0
  • The Wine Revolution is ON!
    As you know Codeweavers (and other WINE contributors) have been working on DX11 support for a while – they were supposed to have DX11 support by the end of 2016, but as with all complex projects, timelines tend to slip and only very DX11 titles could run a few months ago. Since then, there was no major announcement, but it seems that the progress has been very significant in the recent WINE versions (2.3 is already out).

Leftovers: KDE