Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • What keeps an enterprise from embracing OpenStack adoption?

    Have you ever bought a piece of furniture at IKEA? The price is right, though it comes with a hefty instruction manual, and you have to assemble it yourself.

    The idea is, of course, that you don't need to be a handyman to have that cabinet full of books by Sunday evening. Anyone with a screwdriver and hammer can build it. Isn’t that right?

  • Niryo One is an open-source 6-axis arm robot for your home, school, or business

    Industrial arm robots have been around for years, but similar technology is only just starting to trickle down to the consumer market.

  • Open Source 3D Printing: LulzBot and IC3D Team Up for First-Ever Open Source 3D Printer Filament

    Open source is an ideology important to much of the 3D printing community; the ethos is at the foundation of many companies involved in the scene from the beginning, and it can be a polarizing topic. For some, like Aleph Objects with its open source LulzBot 3D printers and the community built up around the technology, and the RepRap community, sharing is caring. Other entities jealously guard their intellectual property; what’s theirs is theirs, and start to finish the system is proprietary. MakerBot drew some serious flack a few years ago when they changed direction from open source roots and became part of the closed source Stratasys family. For its part, HP’s entry to the 3D printing industry blew some minds when the company, infamous for requiring use of proprietary ink in their gargantuan 2D printing operations, chose an open platform approach to their materials in additive manufacturing.

  • U.S. Broadband Privacy Rules: We will Fight to Protect User Privacy

    In the U.S., Congress voted to overturn rules that the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) created to protect the privacy of broadband customers. Mozilla supported the creation and enactment of these rules because strong rules are necessary to promote transparency, respect user privacy and support user control.

    The Federal Trade Commission has authority over the online industry in general, but these rules were crafted to create a clear policy framework for broadband services where the FTC’s policies don’t apply. They require internet service providers (ISPs) to notify us and get permission from us before any of our information would be collected or shared. ISPs know a lot about us, and this information (which includes your web browsing history) can potentially be shared with third-parties.

  • Yes C is unsafe, but…

    These “you should switch language” remarks are strangely enough from the backseat drivers of the Internet. Those who can tell us with confidence how to run our project but who don’t actually show us any code.

  • We can teach women to code, but that just creates another problem

    Get-girls-to-code initiatives aim to fix tech’s gender imbalance – but they may help reinforce it

    Technology has a gender problem, as everyone knows.

    The underrepresentation of women in technical fields has spawned legions of TED talks, panels, and women-friendly coding boot camps. I’ve participated in some of these get-women-to-code workshops myself, and I sometimes encourage my students to get involved. Recently, though, I’ve noticed something strange: the women who are so assiduously learning to code seem to be devaluing certain tech roles simply by occupying them.

    Conventional wisdom says that the key to reducing gendered inequality in tech is giving women the skills they need to enter particular roles. But in practice, when more women enter a role, its value seems to go down more.

The 6 Best Free Dropbox Alternatives for Linux

Filed under
OSS
Security

SpiderOak is an encrypted cloud storage service that gives access to your data while making use of its integrated group chat and secure file sharing features. Compared to Dropbox, however, it offers only 2 GB to free users and 100 GB to pro.

Read more

Linux Foundation Training and Phoronix Moscow Meetup

Filed under
OSS
  • Linux Foundation offers Hadoop training

    The popular big data program Apache's Hadoop is difficult to use. Indeed, Datanami, an important big data publication, recently found that "the Hadoop dream of unifying data and compute in a distributed manner has all but failed in a smoking heap of cost and complexity". One reason? "It's just a very complicated stack to build on."

  • Phoronix Moscow Meetup - April 2017

    It's been a while since last having any Phoronix meet-ups due to not really traveling in the past few years due to various constraints, but next month on business will be available for a Russian Phoronix reader meet-up.

Openwashing

Filed under
OSS
  • WhiteSource Bolt detects vulnerable open source components [Ed: WhiteSource is connected to Microsoft [1, 2, 3, 4]]
  • Kitware and Collaborators Make 1.0 Release of Materials Tomography Platform
  • Samizdat no more: Old Unix source code opened for study

    After years of lobbying by computer science luminaries, Bell Labs and Alcatel-Lucent (both owned by Nokia) have relented and will allow non-commercial study of the source code for Unix Research Editions 8, 9, and 10.

    It might sound like merely a historical artifact, but it's more than that. Unix source is an important computer science teaching tool, and has been ever since its earliest days.

    The joint statement by Alcatel-Lucent USA and Nokia Bell Laboratories makes it clear this isn't "open-sourcing the source code." Rather, it's a promise not to assert "copyright rights with respect to any non-commercial copying, distribution, performance, display or creation of derivative works of Research Unix Editions 8, 9, and 10."

  • 2 tools for transforming senior management into open leaders

    This is the third article in our "Open Leadership Development" series. In part 1, I shared how we got started with building a leadership development system for our open organization. In part 2, I walked through four stages of leadership development in an open organization. Now, I'd like to share some leadership tools we've created for our open organization and published on GitHub under a Creative Commons license.

Blockchain Project MultiChain

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Source Blockchain Project MultiChain Adds Fourteen New Partners and Enters Beta

    Coin Sciences Ltd has added a whopping fourteen companies to the MultiChain Platform Partner Program, a new collaboration with Seal Software, and the first beta release of MultiChain 1.0.

    New members of the Platform Partner Program include three multinational consulting companies: Boston Consulting Group, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and Worldline. Eleven other smaller companies have also joined: Auxesis Group, Crossword Cybersecurity, Cryptologic, Enuke Software, Enuma Technologies, InfoCorp Technologies, Kunstmaan, Minddeft Technologies, Primechain Technologies, RecordsKeeper and Satoshi Citadel Industries. This brings the total number of program members to 27, which includes founding partners Accenture, D+H and Mphasis. A full list is now available here.

  • Blockchain Platform MultiChain Enters Beta with 15 New Partners

Google FOSS Includes Google Earth

Filed under
Google
OSS

5 open source RSS feed readers

Filed under
OSS

When Google Reader was discontinued four years ago, many "technology experts" called it the end of RSS feeds.

And it's true that for some people, social media and other aggregation tools are filling a need that feed readers for RSS, Atom, and other syndication formats once served. But old technologies never really die just because new technologies come along, particularly if the new technology does not perfectly replicate all of the use cases of the old one. The target audience for a technology might change a bit, and the tools people use to consume the technology might change, too.

Read more

Leftovers: Software and OSS

Filed under
Software
OSS
  • 10 Portable Apps Every Linux User Should Use

    Portable apps are great invention that not many people talk about. The ability to take any program to any PC, and continue using it is very handy. This is especially true for those that need to get work done, and don’t have anything with you but a flash drive.

    In this article, we’ll go over some of the best portable Linux apps to take with you. From secure internet browsing, to eBooks, graphic editing and even voice chat!

    Note: a lot of the portable apps in this article are traditional apps made portable thanks to AppImage technology. AppImage makes it possible to run an app instantly, from anywhere without the need to install. Learn more here.

  • Linux Watch Command, To Monitor a Command Activity

    Recently i came to know about watch command, from one of my friend when i have a different requirement. I got good benefit from watch command and i want to share with you people to get more benefit on it, when you have a problem on Linux system.

  • Gammu 1.38.2

    Yesterday Gammu 1.38.2 has been released. This is bugfix release fixing for example USSD or MMS decoding in some situations.

    The Windows binaries are available as well. These are built using AppVeyor and will help bring Windows users back to latest versions.

  • How a lifecycle management tool uses metrics

    Greg Sutcliffe is a long-time member and now community lead of the Foreman community. Foreman is a lifecycle management tool for physical and virtual servers. He's been studying how the real-world application of community metrics gives insight into its effectiveness and discovering the gap that exists between the ideal and the practical. He shares what insights he's found behind the numbers and how he is using them to help the community grow.

    In this interview, Sutcliffe spoke with me about the metrics they are using, how they relate to the community's goals, and which ones work best for them. He also talks about his favorite tooling and advice for other community managers looking to up their metrics game.

  • Build a private blockchain ecosystem in minutes with this open source project Join our daily free Newsletter
  • Becoming an Agile Leader, Part 5: Learning to Learn

    As an Agile leader, you learn in at least two ways: observing and measuring what happens in the organization (I have any number of posts about qualitative and quantitative measurement); and just as importantly, you learn by thinking, discussing with others, and working with others. The people in the organization learn in these ways, too.

  • Is Scratch today like the Logo of the '80s for teaching kids to code?

    Leave it to technology to take an everyday word (especially in the English language) and give it a whole new meaning. Words such as the web, viral, text, cloud, apple, java, spam, server, and tablets come to mind as great examples of how the general public's understanding of the meaning of a word can change in a relatively short amount of time.

    Hence, this article is about a turtle and a cat who have changed the lives of many people over the years, including mine.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • Keynote: State of the Union - Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

    As the open source community continues to grow, Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, says the Foundation’s goal remains the same: to create a sustainable ecosystem for open source technology through good governance and innovation.

  • Open Source for Science + Innovation

    We are bringing together open source and open science specialists to talk about the “how and why” of open source and open science. Members of these communities will give brief talks which are followed by open and lively discussions open to the audience. Talks will highlight the role of openness in stimulating innovation but may also touch upon how openness appears to some to conflict with intellectual property interests.

  • Announcing the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge Winners

    Six months ago, we created the Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to add an additional dimension to the important work Mozilla has been leading around the concept of “Equal Rating.” In addition to policy and research, we wanted to push the boundaries and find news ways to provide affordable access to the Internet while preserving net neutrality. An open call for new ideas was the ideal vehicle.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux and Linux Foundation

KDE and GNOME

Debian Family

  • Devuan GNU/Linux 1.0.0 "Jessie" Just Around the Corner, Release Candidate Out
    It's been five almost five months since the developers behind the Debian-based Devuan GNU/Linux operating system launched the second Beta version towards the first stable release of the OS, and they now announced the Release Candidate. The Devuan project continues its vision of providing a libre Debian fork without using the systemd init system, and the Release Candidate (RC) version brings the GNU/Linux distribution closer to a final release. The interesting fact is that this RC appears to be stable enough to be used for production work.
  • Budgie 10.3 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu
    A new version of the Budgie desktop is available to install on Ubuntu. Budgie 10.3 adds a new Alt+Tab switcher, and brings a stack of bug fixes to the table.
  • Ubuntu 17.10 Codename Released "Artful Aardvark"
  • openHAB
    Partners Canonical, openHAB Foundation and Azul Systems have collaborated hard to drive development of the new openHAB 2.0 smart-home platform as a snap package. An alternative to Apple Homekit and Samsung SmartThings, openHAB from openHAB Foundation is completely free and open source, and acts as a control hub for home IoT setups.