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OSS

FOSS Events

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Open source from a recruiter's perspective

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OSS

Many clients tell me that although they want a candidate who has an exceptional technical mind, the ideal person should also really like this stuff. When you are passionate about something, you find yourself working on it even when you aren't getting paid.

My clients often ask, "Do they code in their spare time?" "Can I find their work anywhere?" "What do they really enjoy?" Open source contributors are often at an advantage because they check these boxes, and not only are their projects out in the open—so is the evidence of their coding proficiency.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Follow Up: Linksys WRT Routers Won't Block Open Source Firmware, Despite FCC Rules

    Is the suggestion that the Doppler weather radar in use at airports is less important than getting cat pictures from the comfort of your couch and not having to run an extra Ethernet cable? Because Delta Flight 191 is why these airport Doppler weather radar systems exist at all. Do we punish before or after the crash? As well I don't think there is an appreciation for just how hard it is to find malfunctioning transmitters: it can be done but with significant amounts of work. The FCC is not funded for this level of enforcement right now. Everyone must share the very finite electromagnetic spectrum. I don't have a problem giving life and safety critical systems priority over cat videos.

    As a quick experiment locate your WiFi router and check the verbiage. I'm sure everyone has seen the part 15 text but probably never paid attention to it. You will find This device may not cause harmful interference as well as this device must accept any interference received. That's because the weather radar, by design, gets to break you but you don't get to break it.

  • Reflections: The ecosystem is moving

    At Open Whisper Systems, we've been developing open source "consumer-facing" software for the past four years. We want to share some of the things we've learned while doing it.

  • The Evolution of Open Source

    For those who entered the IT industry in the late 2000s, open source software is part of the norm. For them, there isn’t a time when open source software was not free and available to everyone, and permeating through almost every facet of technology.

    But those who have been with open source from the beginning know that such was not always the case. As open source stands at the brink of technological breakthroughs, we remember its past and look forward to its promising future.

    [...]

    By the 1990s to 2000s a new kind of movement emerged. Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and because of it, more people were able to use open source operating systems and improve them to a level that was competitive with proprietary platforms.

    Unlike the programmers of Stallman’s time, Torvalds and his peers’ primary motivations for moving open source forward were not moral but functional. They viewed it as the more efficient way to code, and way less expensive than its proprietary counterparts. Despite this industry-aligned motivation and the developments that arose from it, open sourcing was still a much debated issue. Many a programmer had to battle with giants like Microsoft for using open source software.

  • PixelSynth — JavaScript-based Chrome Experiment Converts Your Images Into Music

    Ever imagined how your picture will “sound” if converted into music?

  • In search of a home for Thunderbird

    For fans of Thunderbird, the repeated back-and-forth from Mozilla leadership can be a source of frustration on its own, but it probably does not help that Mozilla has started multiple other non-browser projects (such as ChatZilla, Raindrop, Grendel, and Firefox Hello) over the years while insisting that Thunderbird was a distraction from Firefox. Although it might seem like Mozilla management displays an inconsistent attitude toward messaging and other non-web application projects, each call for Mozilla to rid itself of Thunderbird has also highlighted the difficulty of maintaining Thunderbird and Firefox in the same engineering and release infrastructure.

  • Enterprise NoSQL Database for the IoT Becomes Open Source

    Riak TS, an enterprise-grade NoSQL database optimized for Internet of Things (IoT), recently upgraded to version 1.3. The Riak TS now has a free open source version for IoT developers, in addition to a more robust Riak TS Enterprise version.

  • Why OpenBSD Is Important To Me

    The US government has chosen to attack everyone's privacy, US citizen and world citizen alike, in the name of attacking the privacy of terrorists. The government view is that privacy is an impediment to keeping us safe from physical harm. Tragically, they've thrown the baby out with the bathwater--we want to be safe from physical harm so that we can engage with society as free citizens with the maximum possible liberty...putting us in a digital prison, where all of our communication is subject to the whim of government review is the opposite of keeping us safe, its a devastating attack on our freedom.

  • Physicists ≠ Software Developers

    Nevertheless, I really think that being a physicist is not an excuse for not following good programming style and practise when working with others, especially given the large number of learning resources currently available online. I am especially fond of two non-profit projects that focus on providing resources and organizing events to improve computing skills in scientific research. One is lead by Software Carpentry and the other is lead by Mozilla Science Lab. There you can find some nicely curated lessons on basic software development practices.

systemd.conf and OSCON, Red Hat's Shares

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Linux
OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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  • Day of reckoning arrives for BitKeeper's Larry McVoy

    Eleven years after he rocked the Linux community by withdrawing the non-commercial version of BitKeeper, his source code management system, Larry McVoy has finally been forced to open source the application.

  • Corsa Technology Uses SDN to Traffic-Slice the WAN

    Corsa Technology has been touting its programmable data-plane appliance as a way to implement SDN and OpenFlow. With the introduction of a smaller appliance today, the startup is talking more about a specific use case: virtualization for the metro and WAN networks.

  • Embracing SDN & NFV to Optimize Enterprise Data Center Operations

    Virtualization technologies such as software-defined networking (SDN) and network functions virtualization (NFV) offer new opportunities for how data centers can manage their IT infrastructures. As networks become more programmable, enterprise data centers can achieve greater agility. SDN and NFV are influencing the convergence of IT, data center, and telecommunications. They give data center managers the flexibility and scalability to anticipate changing market demands and stay ahead of customer expectations.

  • What’s the Difference Between Open-O & OSM?

    It’s ridiculously early in the existences of Open-O and Open Source MANO (OSM), two open source NFV management and network orchestration (MANO) efforts that emerged at almost the same time this year. But it’s not too early to spot differences between the two.

    Specifically, each group hopes to solve different problems. OSM will focus on network service orchestration, which fits on the right-hand (MANO) side of the ETSI NFV MANO diagram (see below). Open-O will expand the scope of its work beyond MANO to include orchestration over the entire network.

  • The Zen of Making: 13 Rules for Creating an Open Source Community
  • Evolution or Revolution? The Impact of Open Source on Communication Providers

    The march toward open source is rapidly turning into an all-out race, with research projects and applications extending to new industry sectors, including communication providers. What started out in the software realm has moved into the hardware space, bringing with it significant changes for providers and vendors alike. Most recently, the Open Compute Project (OCP) and its spin-offs, including the Telecom Infra Project (TIP), have not only reinforced this shift toward open source, but have accelerated the trend.

    The open source approach is about more than just lower costs. Improvements in innovation, reliability, security and flexibility are giving providers greater control of their development roadmap. Importantly, the current roster of projects indicates a strong relationship between the shift to open source and the trend toward virtualization. These projects and initiatives set the stage for communications providers to create new differentiated services and to deploy them quickly.

  • Amazon's DSSTNE deep learning software now open source

    Amazon has decided to follow in the footsteps of Google and other technology companies by open-sourcing its deep learning software.

    The company has released its deep learning software DSSTNE (pronounced destiny) on GitHub under an open-source Apache license. Deep learning has gained a lot of traction in recent months and many tech companies are currently developing their own software to help teach computers.

    Around five months ago, Google made its own deep learning library TensorFlow open-source as well. Amazon included a frequently asked questions page along with its library to explain why it has decided to open-source DSSTNE: "We are releasing DSSTNE as open source software so that the promise of deep learning can extend beyond speech and language understanding and object recognition to other areas such as search and recommendations. We hope that researchers around the world can collaborate to improve it. But more importantly, we hope that it spurs innovation in many more areas".

    Amazon’s deep learning software does have its limitations and currently it is unable to support convolutional workloads for image recognition and has limited support for recurrent neural networks. However, the software is able to utilize two graphics processing units (GPUs) simultaneously which other frameworks are unable to do.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation to Support Open Source Prometheus Platform

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation has announced it is adding a second platform to its cloud native technologies initiative. The group’s first hosted project was Kubernetes and now it is adding the Prometheus platform, which offers an open source time series and metrics tool inspired by Google’s internal monitoring tools (Borgmon).

  • Google Opens Up What it Bills as the World's Best Language Parser
  • Google makes its most powerful language engine ‘Parsey McParseface’ open-source
  • Google Open-Sources Neural Network Framework And Powerful Language Parser For Smarter AI: Meet Parsey McParseface
  • Google Devs Planning Flash's Demise With New "HTML5 by Default" Chrome Setting

    In a Google Groups thread named "Intent to implement: HTML5 by Default," the Google developers announced initial plans to implement a new feature in the Chromium core that will disable the playback of Flash content by default, and use HTML5 instead, if available.

  • All Things Graph: Computing vs. Analytics vs. Transactions
  • Comparing graph with other database technologies

    Today’s cloud applications are intensely multi-faceted where data management is concerned. The data flowing through these applications is complex, ever-changing, large in volume, and highly connected.

    The number of data relationships coupled with the data distribution, scale, performance, volume, and uptime requirements of the application are not a fit for a relational database. However, these requirements are addressed natively by a graph database that possesses scale-out and active-everywhere capabilities.

  • Apache Spark Heavyweights Make Their Next Moves

    Two of the most prominent companies advancing the Apache Spark Big Data toolset are out with new releases. MapR has announced the immediate availability of Apache Spark 1.6.1 on the MapR Converged Data Platform. The company also noted that the free, online Spark On Demand Training (ODT) courses via MapR Academy have achieved the highest course enrollment rate since the ODT program’s initial launch.

  • GCC Plugin Infrastructure Still Being Worked On For The Linux Kernel

    As part of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative, kernel developers continue working on a GCC plugin infrastructure for use by the Linux kernel with this code originally developed by the GrSecurity/PaX maintainers.

    This GCC plugin infrastructure is about providing extra features to the compiler, such as for runtime instrumentation and static analysis. The code they're working on for the Linux kernel supports GCC 4.5 and newer for this feature of adding extra functionality to the kernel.

  • Automotive Linux, 8-bit social, deep learning with Amazon, and more news

Linksys WRT routers and FOSS/Linux

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Tiny $1 STEM-oriented hacker board hits Indiegogo

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Like the tiny BBC Micro:bit board, the “One Dollar Board” is aimed at introducing kids to computer programming and the Internet of Things at a young age.

A team of Brazilian developers has just launched a “One Dollar Board” Indiegogo campaign aimed at funding a tiny, open source microcontroller board so simple and inexpensive that it can be distributed as standard teaching materials to kids in schools the world over.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • ABYSS - the genesis of a fully free streaming software package used at LibrePlanet

    As an FSF intern during the winter and spring of 2016, I had the opportunity to be around FSF's tech team during LibrePlanet preparation, and we spent a lot of time making the streaming and recording work as well as possible so that people who were not in each talk could still watch it (all the recordings are already up on media.libreplanet.org).

    Each room at the LibrePlanet conference has a streaming set-up staffed by a volunteer. There are many skilled volunteers, but we need to minimize the risk of failed recordings due to over-complex or error-prone software systems. So, in order to improve streaming we decided to quickly develop a GPLv3 program to provide a seamless interface for an audio and/or video streaming console.

    As a newcomer to the free software community, I have been looking for ways to contribute by coding. The huge amount of projects in progress have overwhelmed me a bit. So, when it was proposed to create a piece of software to be used directly by the community at the conference, I was full of joy about beginning a project.

  • Network Disaggregation: Opening The Last Black Box

    The third “black box” was the network operating system (NOS). Once proprietary systems that were supplied only by the big networking vendors, these NOS products are now offered by software vendors like Big Switch, Cumulus, and Pica8. The NOS must comply with three key component areas within the device: the CPU and the motherboard (or the BSP), “U-Boot” (or universal boot loader), and the ASIC’s APIs. All three collectively need to be matched to the network OS in order to port a NOS onto that same piece of metal. This is why so-called white-box SDN vendors either sell the complete switch and OS solution or provide a list of pre-qualified switches so you can directly buy the hardware.

  • SDN Manages the Electric Grid, Too

    Today, the California Independent System Operator announced it is using Dispersive Technologies for software defined networking (SDN) to control the flow of electricity on its power grid.

  • What is open source software? [Ed: weak article on facts]

    Some people prefer open source software because they see it to be more secure in terms of virus attacks and stable as a support platform for other software. Others may prefer open source because they genuinely cannot afford to buy proprietary software. But as you explore any form of software, please remember they are all vulnerable in their own ways and need protection from attacks. Good Luck!

  • Why the Aam Aadmi Party is like Android and Linux: it's an Open Source movement

    The rapid success of the party lies in the sharing and collaborative approach used by open source computer software.

  • NFV and SDN - A Comcast Perspective

    Embracing open source has seen Comcast transform from a cable company to a networking company and now to a software company, highlighted Nagesh Nandiraju, Director of Next Gen Network Architecture, Comcast in his plenary talk at Open Networking Summit 2016.

  • From Containers to Container Orchestration

    While the CLI meets the needs of managing one container on one host, it falls short when it comes to managing multiple containers deployed on multiple hosts. To go beyond the management of individual containers, we must turn to orchestration tools.

  • 5 Questions About the Open Source Spark Connector for Cloudant Data

    Connectors make all our lives easier. In the case of the Spark-Cloudant connector, using Spark analytics on data stored in Cloudant is simplified with the easy-to-use syntax of the connector. With the large Spark ecosystem, one can now conduct federated analytics across Cloudant and other disparate data sources. And we all know that the days of analyzing just your own company data are long gone. Piping in more data is essential these days.

  • Government Analytics Forum: Handling Big Data With Apache Spark

    When you’re talking big data analysis, you’re almost always talking open source. Apache Hadoop is what often comes to mind as a valuable big data analysis tool. But do you know the advantages that Apache Spark has to offer? This May 5 presentation from IBM’s Government Analytics Forum in Washington, DC does a nice job of explaining the advantages.

  • RightScale Survey Sheds Light on DevOps and Docker Trends

    RightScale came out with its 2016 State of the Cloud Report recently, always one of the more definitive barometers for the state of cloud computing. The findings showed that hybrid clouds are growing briskly, enterprise cloud workloads are on the upswing, and private cloud adoption is growing across all providers. Now, the company has announced the results of the RightScale 2016 State of the Cloud Survey: DevOps Trends.

  • PostgreSQL 9.6 Now In Beta With Parallel Queries

    PostgreSQL 9.6 is now up to its beta stage with a number of new features.

    Recently I provided an early look at PostgreSQL 9.6 features. PostgreSQL 9.6 brings parallel query support, synchronous replication now supports multiple standby servers, full-text search for phrases, support for remote joins/sorts/updates, "substantial" performance improvements (especially for many-core servers), no more repetitive scans of old data by auto vacuum, and much more.

  • Facebook Open-Sources Its Capture the Flag Competition Platform
  • Weaveworks Raises $15M to Grow its Container Networking Business

    The new funding will help Weaveworks build out its container networking platform as competition heats up in this emerging market.
    Container networking vendor Weaveworks revealed on May 11 that it has raised $15 million in a Series B round of funding, led by GV (formerly known as Google Ventures) and including the participation of Accel.

  • FreeBSD Is Pursuing A Compatibility Layer To Make It Easier To Run Linux DRM Drivers

    While for years developers working on FreeBSD have been porting DRM/KMS driver changes from the Linux kernel over to their kernel, they have trailed greatly behind the mainline Linux kernel driver state due to the amount of changes they have been making to the driver when re-basing it against a new Linux kernel release. Now they are pursuing a new approach of using a compatibility layer where they hope to be able to more closely follow the upstream Linux DRM/KMS drivers.

  • Friday the 13th Free Software Directory IRC meetup: May 13th
  • Have a Drink and Talk Open Source with Nextgov

    The White House open source software policy quickly grabbed headlines when officials from various agencies voiced conflicting opinions. While parties appear to be on the same page now, open source software has undoubtedly been thrust into the spotlight.

  • UPSat, an open-source Greek satellite

    With the contribution of scientists, engineers and programmers, UPSat is developed to participate in the QB50 international thermosphere research mission. UPSat is also the first satellite that its mechanical designs, software, and the vast majority of its components are freely available under open hardware and open software licenses.

  • Open wireless standards could chop city costs by nearly a third

    Smart cities may look towards open wireless standards to save billions in Internet of Things (IoT) deployment costs. Choosing open standards could cut costs by 30 percent and promote more cities to utilize IoT, according to Machina Research.

Node.js Community

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OSS
  • The fork? Node.js: Code showdown re-opens Open Source wounds

    Open source software rarely receives the kind of attention that the press lavishes on the latest hot new thing blessed by Silicon Valley venture capitalists. Yet these projects are the foundations of the web world.

    Without open source there would be no Slack, no Medium, no Github. Nor would there be Google, Facebook, or much of anything else.

    Without open source projects like Apache, Nginx, OpenSSL, OpenSSH and others (to say nothing of GNU/Linux, which does get some attention), the latest hot new thing would likely not exist. More fundamentally, the web as we know it would not exist.

  • Growing a contributor base in modern open source

    The focus of Node.js over the last year has been to increase the number of contributors working on the project. Node.js has seen sustained 100% year-over-year user growth for several years, but the number of contributors was, at one point, actually on the decline.

    After a year+ of community building and iteration we're now healthier than ever. The project has reorganized itself divided into many components and sits at 400 members. Across most repos, which now make up the project as a whole, we're seeing that ~50% of the contributors in a given month are new to that repository. That means our conversion of users into contributors is six times higher than the growth of our user community. Contributors are essential to the health and longevity of an open source project.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 Update Introduces Wireless Display Support to Ubuntu Phones

We promised to keep you guys informed about the development progress of the Ubuntu Touch OTA-11 software for Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu Tablet devices, and today we have some great news. Canonical's Łukasz Zemczak is back from a long weekend away to let us know that everything looks good for the OTA-11 update, and the Ubuntu Touch release team should push it to supported Ubuntu Phone and Tablet devices in the next couple of days as a phased upgrade during a 24-hour period. Read more

Canonical Announces Snapcraft 2.9 Tool for Creating Snaps for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Canonical today released the Snapcraft 2.9 update of the tool used for creating Snappy package (also known as Snaps) for the Snappy Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Desktop, and Ubuntu Server 16.04 LTS operating systems. Snapcraft 2.9 is an important milestone because it's the first release since the launch of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) on April 21, 2016, bringing brand-new features like support for the "confinement" YAML property, allowing users to choose if their Snap package should be installed with the devmode option in confined mode or functional. Read more

Mesa Development

  • Mesa Branched, Mesa 12.0 RC1 Released
  • The Next Mesa Version Is Turning Into A Monstrous Release
    With the main Mesa drivers (Intel, RadeonSI, NVC0) jumping ahead to OpenGL 4.3 and mostly done with OpenGL 4.4/4.5, plus Intel adding their Vulkan driver, and many other improvements over the past three months, the next stable release of Mesa is going to be massive. This next version of Mesa is still referred to as Mesa 11.3-dev in Git, with no patches yet proposed for bumping it to Mesa 12.0 considering the new OGL milestones. Anyhow, with the crazy amount of new features I was interested in running some statistics on the code-base to see how its size and evolution compares to earlier Mesa releases. This article provides those numbers.

ZFS Fault Management Daemon Added To FreeBSD

The latest FreeBSD development code has integrated the zfsd daemon. ZFSD is the ZFS Fault Management Daemon. ZFSD deals with situations like drive faults in ZFS pools with hot-spares and replacements. This comes as the ZFS file-system support in FreeBSD continues to mature and is in quite a good state for ZFS outside of Oracle. Read more