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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Tax Your Brain: Open Source Takes on Government Black Box Economics

    Thanks to the Open Source Policy Center, however, the citizens of this great nation may now get a glimpse into the data, and the methods used to derive and analyze that data, that drive public policy and the creation of new laws. In short, this DC-based nonprofit organization seeks to let a little open source sunshine into the black box of government data modeling. Part of the American Enterprise Institute, the OPSC launched in April 2016 with the mission of making public policy analysis transparent, or at least a bit more accessible.

  • Why open source is like a team sport

    As director for Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) — a role she alternatively describes as coach, nerd matchmaker and diplomat — she oversees and provides guidance for all aspects of the project, from technology to community and marketing. At the recent Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit, she headed up a session titled “Open Source as a Team Sport” with and OPNFV’s Chris Price and OpenStack’s Jonathan Bryce.

  • Open Source Solutions for Your Automotive Projects and Prototypes

    The Macchina M2 board was announced on February 21st as the newest addition the Arduino’s AtHeart program, an initiative for companies and organizations to use the Arduino platform for their products. The Macchina M2 allows the user to read their vehicle’s electronic signals and reverse engineer them.

    Embedded systems are now an essential part of the modern car, and the Macchina M2's aim is to allow users to do more than play with the mechanics; the device will let the user get down into the software and electronics. Not only is this sort of access invaluable for tuning and diagnostics, but it opens up a wide range of possibilities for projects or products through customization and prototyping.

    [...]

    AGL is an open-source project which focuses on utilizing the Linux kernel to develop open-source software for automotives. Currently, it can be used for development of in-vehicle-infotainment systems, but there are plans to continue developing it for use with telematics and instrument clusters. The project strives to provide a way for developers, hobbyists, and entrepreneurs to take advantage of onboard electronics and create better software.

  • How to make release notes count
  • Flatpak at SCaLE 15x

    A decade ago I lived on the west side of Los Angeles. One of my favorite conferences was Southern California Linux Expo. Much like Karen, this is the conference where I performed my first technical talk. It’s also where I met and became friends with great people like Jono, Ted, Jeff, the fantastic organizing staff, and so many more.

  • foss-north 2017: Call for Papers

    The Call for Papers for foss-north is open for another week (until the 12th). This gives you an opportunity to speak in front of a great crowd. Looking at the results from last year’s questionnaire, more than 90% are users of open source software and more than 50% are contributors. One thing that surprised me, is that more people actually contribute as a part of their profession than as hobbyists. Looking at the professional vs hobbyist proportions, 45% of the visitors stated that they had their ticket paid by their employer/school, while 42% paid them out of their own pocket.

  • Linux: Is Chrome the fastest web browser?

    Linux offers a great range of choices when it comes to web browsers, there really is a browser out there for everybody. But which Linux browser is the fastest?

  • Firefox 52.0 Released as ESR Branch, Will Receive Security Updates Until 2018

    Back in January, we told you that the development of the Mozilla Firefox 52.0 kicked off with the first Beta release and promised to let users send and open tabs from one device to another, among numerous other improvements and new features.

    Nine Beta builds later, Mozilla has pushed today, March 7, 2016, the final binary and source packages of the Mozilla Firefox 52.0 web browser for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows. The good news is that Firefox 52 is an ESR (Extended Support Release) branch that will be supported until March-April 2018.

  • Mozilla Statement on Immigration Executive Order

    These restrictions are significant and have created a negative impact to Mozilla and our operations, especially as a mission-based organization and global community with international scope and influence over the health of the internet.

  • What If Mesos Metrics Collection Was a Snap?
  • Google’s microservices protocol joins Kubernetes in cloud foundation

    Google’s gRPC protocol was originally developed to speed up data transfer between microservices, proving faster and more efficient than passing around data encoded in JSON.

    Yesterday the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), which oversees the development of Kubernetes, announced it would also become the home for gRPC’s development.

  • 'Baby, I know your database needs upgrades tonight'

    And now, here's MongoDB's effort. Yep, that's MongoDB as in the company that ships its wares in less-than-optimally-secured configurations and therefore keeps finding itself at the centre of incidents like enabling the leak of data that kids generate when talking to their Bluetooth teddy bears.

  • EU Catalogue of ICT Standards: draft contents and consultation launched

    The European Commission is happy to launch a public consultation to improve the draft contents of the Catalogue. At this stage, the consultation aims at collecting feedback on the contents, and at receiving advices on possible catalogue structure improvements.

  • ISA² reveals Sharing & Reuse Awards shortlist

    The European Commission has published a list of 17 digital government projects that are shortlisted for its ‘Sharing and Reuse Award’. Of these projects, 8 will win a total of EUR 100,000. The winners will be announced at the Sharing & Reuse Conference in Lisbon (Portugal) on 29 March.

  • City of Malaga shares open data portal extensions

    The city of Malaga (Spain) has announced that it is making available several extensions that it developed for the town’s open data portal, which is based on CKAN. The extensions include one to create a corporate look and feel, a contact-module, and another that makes it easy for the CKAN portal to be federated to Spain’s central open data portal.

  • W3C Completes Bridge between HTML/Micro-fomats and Semantic Web

    The World Wide Web Consortium completed an important link between Semantic Web and microformats communities. With 'Gleaning Resource Descriptions from Dialects of Languages', or GRDDL (pronounced "griddle"), software can automatically extract information from structured Web pages to make it part of the Semantic Web. Those accustomed to expressing structured data with microformats in XHTML can thus increase the value of their existing data by porting it to the Semantic Web, at very low cost.

9 Reasons to Contribute to an Open Source Project

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OSS

More individuals and organizations than ever before are contributing to open source projects. According to the Black Duck 10th Annual Future of Open Source Survey, "65 percent of companies are contributing to open source projects, up from 63 percent in 2015." In addition, 67 percent of enterprises actively encourage their staff to work on open source projects.

Similarly, the most recent report on Who Writes Linux found that 5,062 developers had contributed to the open source operating system in the past 15 months, and since 2005, 13,594 developers have written code for the project.

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UK GDS: ‘Give IT staff time to work on open source’

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OSS

Public administrations that want to maintain open source software solutions should give their IT staff time to work on these and other open source projects, recommends Anna Shipman, the Open Source Lead at the UK’s Government Digital Service (GDS). Developers can then apply patches, look at outstanding issues, or deal with pull requests, all tasks that “don’t necessarily fit in the schedule of work you have for your team”, said Shipman, speaking at the GOTO conference in Berlin last November.

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Greenland’s public records system will be open source

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OSS

Greenland’s next generation public records system is being built as open source. Last autumn, a contract was awarded to Denmark’s Magenta, an open source IT specialist, the company announced in January.

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Collabora's Focus on Advancing the Performance of Open Source Graphics in Linux

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Linux
OSS

Collabora's Mark Filion is informing Softpedia about some of the latest developments the company has been working on to improve graphics support in the open source Mesa 3D Graphics Library, as well as the Wayland and Weston technologies.

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Also: Mesa 17.0.1 Adds Better Support for "The Binding of Isaac: Rebirth," Other Games

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Automotive supply chain and Open Source: a personal view

    The automotive industry has treated software like any other component, as part of the traditional, well structured and highly controlled supply chain. Tier-1's has been providing software to car auto-makers for some years now and both together have done what they have could to prevent consumers or downstream players in the supply chain from manipulating it, improving it, customising it nor from adapting it. It didn't matter if the software was Open Source or not, they have treated it as if it was proprietary, promoting locked-in practices. Only very few stakeholders with the right kind of agreement could manipulate it in a very limited way. Consumers and third parties didn't have a say.

    [...]

    I do not believe automakers will be able to achieve that same level of control being only a Open Source consumers in a connected world, by restricting access to your platform to anybody but those who are part of your supply chain. not even if they become Open Source contributors. And no, the Android model does not apply to a single hardware (car) vendor.

    I am obviously no guru so take all this as nothing but a personal opinion from an Open Source geek. But if you think it is feasable for an automaker to achive similar levels of control with Open Source based platforms than Google or Apple has over their ecosystems in the mobile industry, I think you are at least as crazy as you claim I am.

  • The OpenStack Summit is returning to Vancouver in May 2018

    Back by popular demand, the OpenStack Summit is returning to Vancouver, Canada from May 21-24, 2018. Registration, sponsorship opportunities and more information for the 17th OpenStack Summit will be available in the upcoming months.

  • Speed of GNU/Linux Web Browsers

    The reason I gave up on Chrome was that it got a big share of its speed by preloading pages.

  • Bouncing Back To Private Clouds With OpenStack

    There is an adage, not quite yet old, suggesting that compute is free but storage is not. Perhaps a more accurate and, as far as public clouds are concerned, apt adaptation of this saying might be that computing and storage are free, and so are inbound networking within a region, but moving data across regions in a public cloud is brutally expensive, and it is even more costly spanning regions.

  • Reflections on the first OpenStack Project Teams Gathering
  • Improved container support, PTG recap, and more OpenStack news

    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

  • A WebAssembly Back-End For The GNU Toolchain

    The WebAssembly efforts so far have been centered around making use of the LLVM compiler infrastructure, but now there are patches for providing partial WASM support atop the GNU toolchain.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open source branding

    But the problem is this: you've added an extra "brand" to your project. When new users find your project, they are confused. Is it Wibbler, or is it ChartZen? How does ChartZen connect to Wibbler? Do I need to get Wibbler if I just want to use ChartZen? Do I need to run two different servers, one to run Wibbler and another for ChartZen?

    By adding the second name, you've confused the original project.

  • Google Invites Open Source Devs to Give E2EMail Encryption a Go

    Google last week released its E2EMail encryption code to open source as a way of pushing development of the technology.

    "Google has been criticized over the amount of time and seeming lack of progress it has made in E2EMail encryption, so open sourcing the code could help the project proceed more quickly," said Charles King, principal analyst at Pund-IT.

    That will not stop critics, as reactions to the decision have shown, he told LinuxInsider.

Talks and FOSS Events

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OSS
Security
  • Me at the RSA Conference

    This is my talk at the RSA Conference last month. It's on regulation and the Internet of Things, along the lines of this essay.

  • How to handle conflict like a boss

    I was initially afraid that a talk about conflict management would be touchy-feely to the point of uselessness, but found that every time Deb Nicholson described a scenario, I could remember a project that I'd been involved in where just such a problem had arisen. In the end, her "Handle conflict like a boss" presentation may turn out to have been one of the more rewarding talks I heard at FOSDEM 2017.

    Nicholson's first contention was that conflict happens because some people are missing some information. She related a story about a shared apartment where the resident who was responsible for dividing up the electricity bill was getting quite annoyed at the resident who had got behind on his share, until Nicholson pointed out that the latter resident was away at his grandmother's funeral. Instantly, the person who'd been angry was calm and concerned, through no change other than coming into possession of all the facts. Conflict is natural, said Nicholson, but it doesn't have to be the end of the world.

  • Principled free-software license enforcement

    Issues of when and how to enforce free-software licenses, and who should do it, have been on some people's minds recently, and Richard Fontana from Red Hat decided to continue the discussion at FOSDEM. This was a fairly lawyerly talk; phrases like "alleged violation" and "I think that..." were scattered throughout it to a degree not normally found in talks by developers. This is because Fontana is a lawyer at Red Hat, and he was talking about ideas which, while they are not official Red Hat positions, were developed following discussions between him and other members of the legal team at Red Hat.

    To his mind, GPL enforcement has always been an important element of free-software law; not that we should all be doing it, all the time, but like it or not, litigation is part of a legal system. Awareness of its possibility, however, was making some Red Hat customers and partners worried about the prospect. There has not, in fact, been much actual litigation around free-software licenses — certainly not compared to the amount of litigation software companies are capable of generating in the normal course of business — thus Fontana felt their fears were unreasonable.

OSS and Sharing/Standards Leftovers

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OSS
  • Matrix Voice Open Source Voice Recognition Platform (video)

    Makers, hobbyists and developers that are looking to create projects or control projects using voice recognition, may be interested in a new open source voice recognition platform called, Matrix Voice which has been designed by a small development team based in Miami Florida.

    The voice recognition platform consists of a small development board which measures 3.4 inches in diameter and is equipped with a radial array of 7 MEMS microphones connected to a Xilinx Spartan6 FPGA & 64 Mbit SDRAM with 18 RGBW LED’s & 64 GPIO pins.

  • Video: Why News Corp and Energy Australia went open source

    Not only do open source technologies offer greater flexibility and lower cost, they make user organisations more attractive to the best IT talent on the market, according to the three finalists in the Utilities/Media category of this year's iTnews Benchmark Awards.

    Lengthy and expensive lock-in contracts are no longer the way many businesses - like News Corp and Energy Australia, alongside fellow finalist Tabcorp - want to operate.

  • ‘Open Source Solutions will Promote SMEs Devt’

    The Country representative for Daydah Concepts, Mr. Adebayo Adeniyi, has advocated the the adoption of open source solutions for Small and Medium Entrepreneurs (SMEs) in the face of increasing cost of software in Africa’s emerging economy
    According to Adeniyi, who is a known software developer, arrangement has been concluded with Google, Mozila, Joomila, WordPress, Typo3, Magen,and Grav to brainstorm on content management system.

    He said the high cost of software purchase remains a problem for many small and medium scale companies in Africa’s emerging economy and inexpensive as open source solution holds the key to more meaningful and far-reaching adoption of technology for them.

  • Finance and artificial intelligence are going 'fintech' and open source

    It makes sense for large technology companies like Google and Microsoft to open source AI and machine learning solutions because they have overlapping vertical interests in providing vast cloud services. These come into play when a certain machine learning library becomes popular and users deploy it on the cloud and so forth. It is less clear why financial services companies, which play a much more directly correlated zero sum game, would open up code that they paid the engineering team to create.

  • Top hedge fund Python coder talks open source burnout

    If you’re a Python coder who wants to work for a hedge fund and you don’t know Wes McKinney, you might want to familiarize yourself with the name. McKinney started working for Two Sigma, the huge quant hedge fund with around $40bn under management, in August 2016. He’s best known, however, in the world of open source programming.

  • Open Source in the IoT world

    When it comes to the Open Source opportunity within the potential of Internet of Things Mark Marlier, the director of ISV programs and partners for Red Hat suggests “follow the data.”

    How does Open Source fit into the close to $20 trillion IoT business opportunity today? During Marlier’s keynote presentation to the board of director of the Canadian Channel Chiefs Council, he said there are literally millions upon millions of open source projects in the world and all of those need to run on a server somewhere or in the cloud. “We are not out there alone,” Marlier added.

  • Top 10 Social Media Plugins for WordPress

    In order to drive more social media traffic to your WordPress blog, you will love these WordPress social media plugins. These plugins will let you add a beautiful set of social share buttons on your posts which will encourage your visitors to share your content on their social networks. This will help your website get better exposure and it will increase the user engagement.

  • NASA grants free access to its technologies in latest software release [Ed: Not FOSS, as some sites erroneously suggested]
  • With its new book, OpenNews wants to help more newsrooms adopt open source projects
  • IKEA's DIY grow room, US DoD launches Code.mil, and more open source news
  • Open Source Data: Fact Or Fiction

    At the recent Data & Technology in Clinical Trials conference, I had the pleasure of listening to Aneesh Chopra speak. Chopra is the president of NavHealth and formerly served as assistant to President Barack Obama and Chief Technology Officer of the United States. His speech was electrifying, dynamic, and set the room abuzz.

  • Open-Source Ultimaker Files Its First Patent - But Don't Panic, the 3D Printer Manufacturer Says [Ed: Unless they put this patent under some "no lawsuit" sort of legally-binding commitment, it's not benign]

FUD and Openwashing

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OSS
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Microsoft v GNU/Linux

  • Illinois residents sue Microsoft over forced Windows 10 upgrades

    The lawyers who have acted on behalf of the trio are looking to have the case expanded to a class action covering every person who has been affected by a forced upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. They allege that there are thousands of such cases.

    The trio claim that Microsoft uses various tactics to get users to upgrade and does not give them a chance to refuse.

  • New Windows 10 courts govt deals

    The system was developed by its joint venture with China Electronics Technology Group Corp, a State-owned company. Equipped with tailor-made security {sic} features, it is expected to allow the US tech giant to regain access to China's lucrative government software procurement market.

  • Microsoft One Drive Bug In Chrome OS And Linux Fixed

Linux Mint KDE Review: Easy And Beautiful

Linux mint, the most popular Linux distribution is recommended by almost all Linux users for newbies. By default, Linux mint is released with cinnamon. But thanks to the Kubuntu team, we now have a KDE edition. Well, new users are probably wondering what all this KDE thing is? KDE is a community. KDE is a compilation of software. We will look at it in more detail on the way. Mint is a whole distro, so we will look at some specific aspects, But KDE is more than just a DE and we cannot review all of its features here. I will try to cover as much as possible in limited space. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Wins Best DevOps Tool for Open Source at the 2017 DevOps Excellence Awards
  • The goal of HP's radical The Machine: Reshaping computing around memory
    Not every computer owner would be as pleased as Andrew Wheeler that their new machine could run "all weekend" without crashing. But not everyone's machine is "The Machine," an attempt to redefine a relationship between memory and processor that has held since the earliest days of parallel computing. Wheeler is a vice president and deputy labs director at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He's at the Cebit trade show in Hanover, Germany, to tell people about The Machine, a key part of which is on display in HPE's booth. [...] HPE has tweaked the Linux operating system and other software to take advantage of The Machine's unusual architecture, and released its changes under open source licenses, making it possible for others to simulate the performance of their applications in the new memory fabric.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    Welcome to another very semi-irregular update from the Eudyptula Challenge.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    The Eudyptula Challenge is a series of programming exercises for the Linux kernel. It starts from a very basic "Hello world" kernel module, moves up in complexity to getting patches accepted into the main kernel. The challenge will be closed to new participants in a few months, when 20,000 people have signed up.
  • Daimler Jumps on Linux Bandwagon
    Not long ago, if a major corporation were to take out membership in an open source project, that would be big news -- doubly so for a company whose primary business isn't tech related. Times have changed. These days the corporate world's involvement in open source is taken for granted, even for companies whose business isn't computer related. Actually, there's really no such thing anymore. One way or another, computer technology is at the core of nearly every product on the market. So it wasn't surprising that hardly anyone noticed earlier this month when Daimler AG, maker of Mercedes-Benz and the world's largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles, announced it had joined the Open Invention Network (OIN), an organization that seeks to protect open source projects from patent litigation. According to a quick and unscientific search of Google, only one tech site covered the news, and that didn't come until a full 10 days after the announcement was made.
  • ONAP: Raising the Standard for NFV/SDN Telecom Networks [Ed: Amdocs pays the Linux Foundation for editorial control and puff pieces]
    This article is paid for by Amdocs...
  • Plamo 6.2 リリース
    Plamo 6.2 をリリースしました。
  • Dominique Leuenberger: [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/12
    What a week! Tumbleweed once again is the first (to my knowledge) to ship the just released GNOME 3.24.0 as part of its main repository. Being shipped to the users in less than 48 hours since the official release announcement is something we can only do thanks to all the automatic building and testing AND the efforts put into the packages! If packagers would not be at the ball the whole time, this would not be possible. Even though the week has seen ‘only’ 4 snapshots (0317, 0318, 0320 and 0322) the changes delivered to the user base is enormous.
  • VMware Workstation 12.x.x for latest openSUSE Tumbleweed
  • Zero Terminal Mini Linux Laptop Created Using Raspberry Pi Zero W And Smartphone Keyboard
  • Zero Terminal: A DIY handheld Linux PC made from a Raspberry Pi and a cheap iPhone keyboard accessory