Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

DRM and Free/Open Source Software Conflict

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • After years of insisting that DRM in HTML wouldn't block open source implementations, Google says it won't support open source implementations

    The absurd figleaf used to justify this was a reference implementation of EME in open source that only worked on video that didn't have the DRM turned on. The only people this impressed were people who weren't paying attention or lacked the technical depth to understand that a tool that only works under conditions that are never seen in the real world was irrelevant to real-world conditions.

  • I tried creating a web browser, and Google blocked me

    The browser I’m building, called Metastream, is an Electron-based (Chromium derived), MIT-licensed browser hosted on GitHub. Its main feature is the ability to playback videos on the web, synchronized with other peers. Each client runs its own instance of the Metastream browser and transmits playback information to keep them in sync—no audio or video content is sent.

    If someone is creating a browser that wants to playback media, they’ll soon discover the requirement of DRM for larger web media services such as Netflix and Hulu. There are a few DRM providers for the web including Widevine, PlayReady, and FairPlay.

O-RAN Alliance starts software group at Linux Foundation

Filed under
Server
OSS

The O-RAN Alliance and the Linux Foundation announced the creation of the O-RAN Software Community (O-RAN SC), to help develop open source software for the O-RAN Alliance's open network architecture. The initial set of software projects may include near-real-time RAN intelligent controller, non-real-time RAN intelligent controller, cloudification and virtualization platforms, open central unit, open distributed unit, and a test and integration effort to provide a working reference implementation.

Working with other adjacent open source networking communities, the O-RAN SC will enable collaborative development across the full operator network stack, the groups said. It will be sponsored at the Linux Foundation by the O-RAN Alliance.

Read more

Anniversary of LF Networking

Filed under
Linux
OSS

  • LF Networking Passes One-Year Mark with Expanded Cross-Community Momentum

    LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across networking projects, today announced continued community momentum, including further collaboration with Standards bodies, evolution of compliance programs, new project milestones, and increased integration with adjacent communities. Formed in January 2018, LFN is focused on nurturing integration, efficiencies and member engagement across FD.io, OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, PNDA, Tungsten Fabric, and SNAS as well as the broader open source networking ecosystem. As the projects are hosted under the same umbrella, LFN builds upon synergies to enable rapid innovation and adoption.
    “We are thrilled to have recently celebrated our first year as an umbrella organization, bringing continued growth across the ecosystem supporting the end-to-end open source networking stack,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Automation, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation. “The LFN community — along with other ecosystem partners, including standards bodies — has truly come together to evolve the future of open source networking.”

  • LF Networking Expands OVP Program for Compliance and Verification, Eases Telco Interoperability & Deployment

    Open Networking Summit North America — April 3, 2019 — LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across networking projects, today announced expansion of its OPNFV Verification Program (OVP) to include Virtual Network Function (VNF) compliance testing. The expanded OVP, created in conjunction with the ONAP testing community, now includes publicly-available VNF compliance test tooling based on requirements developed within ONAP, as well as a Verified Labs Program and the induction of the University of New Hampshire-Interoperability Lab (UNH-IOL) as the first OPNFV Verified Lab.

    Initially developed to simplify validation testing of commercial NFVI/VIM products based on OPNFV, the expanded program now covers interoperability with ONAP-compliant on-boarding requirements using both Heat and TOSCA package validation. The first of its kind, OVP combines open source-based automated compliance and verification testing for multiple parts of the NFV stack specifications established by ONAP, multiple SDOs such as ETSI and GSMA, and the LF Networking End User Advisory Group (EUAG). Demonstrating the readiness and availability of commercial products based on these requirements improves time-to-market, reduces costs, and improves the overall quality of NFVI and VNF deployments.

Best Open Source Tools for Staying on Top of Projects

Filed under
OSS
Reviews

Project management applications for Linux offer an overlapping range of features and user interfaces. I deliberately avoided ranking these Linux products. I also suspended the usual star rating for each one in this roundup.

Project Management software for Linux, much like Time-tracking, Task Management and To-Do List software for Linux, is increasingly overshadowed by cloud services. That is one reason open source applications available for the Linux platform lack many new non-cloud contenders.

Read more

Events: FOSSASIA 2019, Latin America LibreOffice Conference and 2019 Linux Clusters Institute Workshops

Filed under
OSS
  • Tristan Van Berkom: FOSSASIA 2019 Report

    This was my first visit to Singapore, and I think it is a very nice and interesting place. The city is very clean (sometimes disturbingly so), the food I encountered was mostly Chinese and Indian, and while selling food out of carts on the street has been outlawed some time ago, there is thankfully still a strong culture of street food available in the various “Hawker Centres” (food courts) where the previous street vendors have taken up shop instead.

    From my very limited experience there, I would have to recommend roaming around China Town food street and enjoying beer and food (be warned, beer in Singapore is astoundingly expensive !)… Here is a picture of what it looks like.

  • Announcing the First Latin America LibreOffice Conference

    The Document Foundation announces the LibreOffice Latin America Conference 2019, held at the Facultad Politécnica de Universidad Nactional de Assunción (FPUNA) in Asunción, Paraguay on July 19th (Friday) and 20th (Sat).

    LibreOffice Latin America Conference will be the first event gathering LibreOffice users, advocates and contributors (not only development, but also localization, PR/marketing, documentation, quality assurance, … etc.) from different countries in Latin America, to exchange and share experiences and knowledge.

    An exclusive translation sprint to Guarani will be held in parallel during the event with supervision of LibreOffice volunteer developers.

  • Registration Open for 2019 Linux Clusters Institute Workshops

5 useful open source log analysis tools

Filed under
OSS

Monitoring network activity can be a tedious job, but there are good reasons to do it. For one, it allows you to find and investigate suspicious logins on workstations, devices connected to networks, and servers while identifying sources of administrator abuse. You can also trace software installations and data transfers to identify potential issues in real time rather than after the damage is done.

Those logs also go a long way towards keeping your company in compliance with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that applies to any entity operating within the European Union. If you have a website that is viewable in the EU, you qualify.

Read more

New Announcements From the Linux Foundation: Xen, LF Edge, O-RAN Alliance

Filed under
OSS
  • Xen Project Hypervisor 4.12 Offers Smaller Code Size and Improved Security

    The Xen Project, an open source hypervisor hosted at the Linux Foundation, today announced the release of Xen Project Hypervisor 4.12. This latest release adds impressive feature improvements around security and code size, x86 architectural renewal and additional updates making the technology ideal for embedded and automotive industries.

    The leaner architecture in Xen 4.12 reduces the lines of code and in turn, reducing the potential for security vulnerabilities while making Xen an attractive option for use in mixed-criticality systems. Additionally, improving de-privileged QEMU, through defense-in-depth techniques, as well as improving VMI, reduces exposure to unknown security threats. This version of Xen will be more configurable, significantly reducing integration costs for business and organizations which customize Xen heavily. Additionally, Xen 4.12 continues to build upon previous versions regarding cleaner architecture, improved user experience, and future proofing.

    “Xen Project Hypervisor 4.12 is a clear example of the project delivering on its promise for revamped architecture, a major step forward to unlock market segments such as security products as well as embedded and automotive,” said Lars Kurth, chairperson of the Xen Project Advisory Board. “As we continue to serve the hosting and cloud markets, we will also focus on streamlining the certification process for Xen while helping the security embedded automotive vendors that are invested in Xen continue to build attractive products on top of the hypervisor.”

  • LF Edge Builds Momentum with New Members, Blueprints as Community Works Toward Interoperability for Open Edge Computing

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced growing momentum with new blueprints from Akraino Edge Stack and four new general members including Alef Mobitech Inc., HarmonyCloud Inc., Section, and Marvell Semiconductor, Inc. The Akraino blueprints will debut at the Linux Foundation’s Open Networking Summit (ONS) on April 3-5 in San Jose.

    LF Edge is comprised of projects that will support emerging edge applications in the area of non-traditional video and connected things that require lower latency, faster processing and mobility. Akraino, a project creating an open source software stack that supports high-availability cloud services optimized for edge computing systems and applications, is marking a technical milestone with eight blueprint families with more than 19 under development to support a variety of edge use cases. The Akraino community tests and validates the blueprints on real hardware labs supported by users and community members. The first release of Akraino is scheduled for Q2 2019 and will include several validated blueprints.

    “LF Edge hit the ground running when we launched in January,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, The Linux Foundation. “Our collaboration for edge solutions across multiple industries in IoT, Enterprise, Telecom and Cloud has been very well received by the community.”

  • How O-RAN SC Completes the Open Source Networking Telecommunications Stack

    As network traffic continues to increase with the advent of 5G, mobile networks and the equipment they run on need to evolve quickly to become more agile, flexible, intelligent, energy-efficient and software-defined.

    Broad efforts to bring agility and speed to the telecom industry started about six years ago with open source Software Defined Networking (SDN), then on to Network Functions Virtualization (NFV), then to orchestration of NFV. Open source projects like OpenDaylight, OPNFV, OpenStack, CORD, ONAP, and others have enabled more rapid innovation across telco components and the network stack.

    However, the last piece of the puzzle — Radio Access Networks (RANs), which are at the edge of the network allowing physical access to devices — has a long history in full, proprietary solutions from the hardware on up to the application layer (e.g., full cell tower solutions). That makes it incredibly difficult to innovate at the same pace as the rest of the market.

  • The O-RAN Alliance and Linux Foundation Launch Industry-Leading O-RAN Open Source Community

    Today, the O-RAN Alliance (www.o-ran.org) and the Linux Foundation (https://www.linuxfoundation.org) jointly announced the creation of the O-RAN Software Community (O-RAN SC) (www.o-ran-sc.org).

    The telecom industry is experiencing a profound transformation and 5G is expected to radically change how we live, work, and play. This means it’s critical to make network infrastructure commercially available as quickly as possible to ensure business success for operators. It’s time to turn to open source, as it is one of the most efficient ways to accelerate product development in a collaborative and cost-efficient way.

    The O-RAN SC will provide open software aligned with the O-RAN Alliance’s open architecture. As a new open source community under the Linux Foundation, the O-RAN SC is sponsored by the O-RAN Alliance, and together they will develop open source software enabling modular, open, intelligent, efficient, and agile disaggregated radio access networks. The initial set of software projects may include: near-real-time RAN intelligent controller (nRT RIC), non-real-time RAN intelligent controller (NRT RIC), cloudification and virtualization platforms, open central unit (O-CU), open distributed unit (O-DU), and a test and integration effort to provide a working reference implementation. Working with other adjacent open source networking communities, the O-RAN SC will enable collaborative development across the full operator network stack.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Iris by Lowe’s is gone, but here’s the open source code to keep your smart devices alive

    For those still holding on to Iris products — and are a bit comfortable around coding — Lowe's released open source code to support its former line of smart home devices. As promised, Lowe's put the code up on GitHub, renaming the line Arcus. (While Iris is the Greek goddess of rainbow, Arcus is her Roman name.)

  • March 2019 License-Discuss Summary

    The CAL has provisions that ensure user's access to their data, which goes in a similar direction as the EU's GDPR – it even references the GDPR in an interpretation clause. The CAL defines a concept of Lawful Interest as the trigger for user access rights.

    Henrik Ingo notes that this grants rights to third parties, which is fairly novel and could raise OSD issues. Van Lindberg says these are just third party beneficiaries that receive no rights other than access to the Source and to their own User Data. The data protection in the CAL is not a grant of rights to third parties, but a limitation on the grant to the licensee, similar to the GPLv3's anti-Tivoization clause.

    Henrik Ingo [1,2] dives a bit deeper into the CAL ↔ GDPR relationship, and finds CAL User Data to be inconsistent the GDPR personal data concept.

    Van Lindberg responds that the CAL and GDPR have different angles: GDPR is primarily concerned about privacy, the CAL primarily about User Autonomy. Lawful Interest is intended to not only capture rights through ownership or the GDPR, but also things like the right to an ebook the user possesses or has licensed. The CAL's User Data concept is more broad than the GDPR's Personal Data. Based on Ingo's feedback, Lindberg updates the wording of the CAL to clarify its relationship with the GDPR.

    [...]

    Bruce Perens thinks that restricting the license grant to copyright and patents may be too narrow for jurisdictions that recognize additional rights. Perens suggests the license should grant all necessary rights, and only exclude trademarks. Van Lindberg considers broadening the grant.

  • March 2019 License-Review Summary

    In March, the License-Review mailing list saw the retraction of the SSPL from review, and discussed a set of GPLv3 Additional Terms.

    The License-Discuss list (summarized at https://opensource.org/LicenseDiscuss032019) was far more active. Among other things, it discussed Van Lindberg's upcoming Cryptographic Autonomy License, and saw extensive discussion about the license review process: whether the conduct of the list is appropriate, whether there might be alternatives to using email, and whether PEP-style summaries would help.

  • LibreOffice at the Chemnitzer Linux-Tage 2019

    Free software projects, such as LibreOffice and GNU/Linux, are developed by communities spread across the world. Most of the work takes place online, but there are many events for developers and supporters to meet face-to-face. One such event is the Chemnitzer Linux-Tage (Chemnitz Linux Days), in Saxony, which took place this year on 16 and 17 March. And the LibreOffice community was there!

  • Making computer science curricula as adaptable as our code

    Educators in elementary computer science face a lack of adaptable curricula. Calls for more modifiable, non-rigid curricula are therefore enticing—assuming that such curricula could benefit teachers by increasing their ability to mold resources for individual classrooms and, ultimately, produce better teaching experiences and learning outcomes.

  • InMotion Hosting Launches Industry-First Website Solution Based on Open Source and Ensuring Ownership of Digital Assets
  • GnuCash 3.5

    GnuCash is a personal and small business finance application, freely licensed under the GNU GPL and available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. It’s designed to be easy to use, yet powerful and flexible. GnuCash allows you to track your income and expenses, reconcile bank accounts, monitor stock portfolios and manage your small business finances. It is based on professional accounting principles to ensure balanced books and accurate reports.

Openness, Open Data and Open Hardware

Filed under
OSS
  • Open-source seeds: protecting new crops from privitisation

    From the green grass of England to the tropical forests of the Amazon basin and the semi-arid plains of North Africa, when it comes to food, no one crop can suit every soil type, or withstand the challenges of climate change. It is therefore vitally important that humans seek to preserve and increase the biological diversity of crops.

    In pursuit of this goal, Dr Johannes Kotschi from the Association for AgriCulture and Ecology, along with researchers from the University of Göttingen, has developed an open-source seed (OSS) licence that can be applied to new crop varieties. The OSS licence prevents seeds and their derivatives from being privatised, patented or otherwise protected in a way that would limit their sale or further modification. In doing so, it ensures that new varieties are available to everyone. Alongside the licence, the organisation OpenSourceSeeds supports breeders and seed producers who use it.

  • Aptiv Releases Comprehensive Open-Source Automated Vehicle Data Set

    Aptiv has released a comprehensive set of automated driving training data including camera, radar and lidar signals that has been fully annotated and labeled.

  • Aptiv Releases Comprehensive Open-Source Dataset for Autonomous Driving

    Global auto parts supplier Aptiv, formally known as Delphi Automotive, announced today the full release of nuScenes, an open-source autonomous vehicle (AV) dataset. The dataset will help developers improve the safety of autonomous vehicles.

  • MIPS R6 Architecture Now Available for Open Use

    Asked if any other MIPS cores – beyond R6 – will be available in the future, Swift said additional announcements are in the offing, indicating that Thursday’s offering is only the first set of MIPS Open’s release.  

    “Remember, this is a journey, not a destination,” Swift reminded.

    Other pending announcements include MIPS Open’s certification partners and MIPS Open Advisory Board. Names of individuals or companies for those initiatives are not yet public.

  • Wave Computing launches MIPS Open, provides royalty-free access to chip design data

    A few months after announcing plans to “open source its MIPS instruction set architecture,” the folks at Wave Computing are following through. Mostly.

    The company has launched the MIPS Open program and released the first components, offering developers royalty and license fee-free access to the latest versions of its 32-bit and 64-bit MIPS architecture.

    But it’s questionable whether this is truly an “open source” initiative, so much as an “open use” project designed encourage developers to work with the company’s chips.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Shows: mintCast 307 and LINUX Unplugged 298

  • mintCast 307 – Encryption Part 1
    This is Leo and with me I have Joe, Moss, and the return of Rob for this episode! We’re recording on Sunday April 21st 2019. First up, in our Wanderings, I talk Kernel 5.0 and transfer speed, Joe reformats and loses Windows but gains NVidia peace of mind, and finally Moss digests more distros and has some success with migrating Kodi Then, our news is filled with updates from top to bottom. In our Innards section, we dive into file and disk encryption.
  • Blame Joe | LINUX Unplugged 298
    This week we discover the good word of Xfce and admit Joe was right all along. And share our tips for making Xfce more modern. Plus a new Debian leader, the end of Scientific Linux, and behind the scenes of Librem 5 apps.

Android Leftovers

Today in Techrights