Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

5 open source gift ideas for non-techies

Filed under
OSS

It's getting down to the wire here for the holidays. You know, that time when we all realize that we've completely neglected to get gifts for people. While reading through our very excellent gift guide, a thought occurred to me: Those unfortunate souls with lives devoid of technological wonder... they need presents, too. So what do we get them? What do we present to these people whose interests diverge so greatly from our own? I'm glad you asked. I made a list.

Read more

Top open source creative tools in 2016

Filed under
OSS

A few years ago, I gave a lightning talk at Red Hat Summit that took attendees on a tour of the 2012 open source creative tools landscape. Open source tools have evolved a lot in the past few years, so let's take a tour of 2016 landscape.

Read more

OpenShot 2.2 Open-Source Video Editor Released with 4K Video Editing, More

Filed under
OSS

Just in time for the Christmas holidays that some of you are celebrating around the world, a new stable version of the popular OpenShot open-source video editor software arrived on December 21, 2016, with numerous goodies.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Google Open Up a Cool Collection of Cryptographic Security Tests

    With 2016 closing out, there is no doubt that cloud computing and Big Data analytics would probably come to mind if you had to consider the hot technology categories of the year. However, steady progress has been made in security software as well, and now Google has released Project Wycheproof, a collection of security tests that check cryptographic software libraries for known weaknesses that are used in attacks.

    This newly open sourced project, named for Mount Wycheproof, apparently the smallest mountain in the world, features a code repository on GitHub.

  • Kickstarter Open Sources its Own iOS and Android Apps

    If you're familiar with Kickstarter, you know that it and other crowdsourced funding sites have helped fund numerous open source applications. Kickstarter actually has its own engineering team, though, and now that team has made the announcement that it is open sourcing its own Android and iOS creations.

    You can go to the team's Android or iOS Github pages and find repositories. "The native team at Kickstarter is responsible for building and maintaining features for Android and iOS," the team reports. The open source toolsets may be especially useful for startups to leverage.

  • 2016 Hacktoberfest ignites open source participation

    DigitalOcean launched Hacktoberfest in 2014 to encourage contribution to open source projects. The event was a clear success, and in terms of attendance and participation goals reached, it's also clear that Hacktoberfest has become a powerful force in driving contributions to open source. The lure of a t-shirt and specific, time-limited goals help new contributors get started and encourage existing contributors to rededicate themselves and their efforts.

  • The Document Foundation announces the MUFFIN, a new tasty user interface concept for LibreOffice

    The Document Foundation announces the MUFFIN, a new tasty user interface concept for LibreOffice, based on the joint efforts of the development and the design teams, supported by the marketing team.

  • Oracle is cracking down on Java SE users who think it's free

    ORACLE HAS begun an aggressive campaign of chasing licence fees for use of payable elements of its Java software.

    The company, which acquired Java owner Sun Microsystems in 2010, has already lost a case over the fair use of Java APIs in Google's Android operating system, but as it awaits another appeal hearing, it's going after a myriad of other companies that are using elements of the open source software that aren't actually free.

    Oracle has been hiring a legal team this year to bolster its License Management Services, which in turn has forced companies to hire compliance specialists, as it looks like Oracle has made 2017 the year of kicking ass.

  • Facebook delivers its state of the open source union
  • 77 Projects Open Sourced By Facebook In 2016 [Ed: The Web’s biggest cancer started an openwashing campaign. The key software is entirely proprietary and privacy-violating.]

5 Open Source Network Security Tools SMBs Should Consider

Filed under
OSS
Security

You might think that because your business is small you aren't an attractive target for hackers.

But you would be wrong.

According to the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA), 82 percent of small business owners believe that they are not a target for cyberattacks, but 43 percent of last year's cyberattacks targeted SMBs. And a single attack can cost SMBs up to $99,000.

Cyberattacks of all kinds are on the rise with data breaches increasing 15 percent over the past year, NCSA says. And ransomware, attacks that freeze up organizations' systems until they pay a ransom, has become particularly prevalent; in just the first three months of 2016, U.S. ransomware victims paid out $209 million to attackers, compared to $25 million for all of 2015.

Read more

IRC News, Freenode Update

Filed under
OSS
Security
Web

OECD STI Outlook 2016: more open source in software, hardware and wetware

Filed under
OSS

Open source development practices will create further communities of developers, not only in software but also in hardware (Open Source Hardware, OSH) and "wetware", for example in do-it-yourself synthetic biology. Together with the continued fall in the costs of equipment and computing, this creates greater opportunities for new entrants — including individuals, outsider firms and entrepreneurs — to succeed in new markets.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Op-ed: Why I’m not giving up on PGP

    Every once in a while, a prominent member of the security community publishes an article about how horrible OpenPGP is. Matthew Green wrote one in 2014 and Moxie Marlinspike wrote one in 2015. The most recent was written by Filippo Valsorda, here on the pages of Ars Technica, which Matthew Green says "sums up the main reason I think PGP is so bad and dangerous."

    In this article I want to respond to the points that Filippo raises. In short, Filippo is right about some of the details, but wrong about the big picture. For the record, I work on GnuPG, the most popular OpenPGP implementation.

  • Coopetition: All's fair in love and open source

    PostgreSQL vs. MySQL. MongoDB vs. Cassandra. Solr vs. Elasticsearch. ReactJS vs. AngularJS. If you have an open source project that you are passionate about, chances are a competing project exists and is doing similar things, with users as passionate as yours. Despite the "we're all happily sharing our code" vibe that many individuals in open source love to project, open source business, like any other, is filled with competition. Unlike other business models, however, open source presents unique challenges and opportunities when it comes to competition.

  • Illinois Turns Its Eye Toward Blockchain for Statewide Innovation

    Blockchain technology is the poster child for innovation in the financial tech space, but Illinois is taking an ambitious step forward by attempting to boldly adopt distributed ledger technology into several of its state agencies.

    The state announced last month at the Blockchain Conference Chicago that it was forming the Illinois Blockchain Initiative, a private-public partnership dedicated to exploring and utilizing blockchain in real-world and compelling ways, reports StateScoop.

    Blockchain technology “is a shared digital ledger, or a continually updated list of all transactions. This decentralized ledger keeps a record of each transaction that occurs across a fully distributed or peer-to-peer network, either public or private,” according to an article from international auditing firm PricewaterhouseCoopers.

  • Blockchain and the public sector - What happened in 2016

    Blockchain, also known as Distributed Ledger Technology (DLT), was the technology buzzword of 2016. The technology has been around since 2008. It underpins the digital cryptocurrency, Bitcoin and was conceptualised as a solution to the problem of making a database both secure and not requiring a trusted administrator.

  • Kickstarter Apps Go Open Source on iOS and Android Apps to Help Startups

    Kickstarter is known for giving startups the boost they need to get going. And independent developers will now get similar help by getting access to the functional programming used to create the app.

    Kickstarter announced recently the company had released open source iOS and Android. The announcement was made on the company’s official company blog.

    Kickstarter launched in 2009, but an official mobile app didn’t come around for some time. The site now has an Android and iOS version, and the company is doing one better by open sourcing the code for these native apps.

  • Open Source, Free Riders and Crowdfunding

    Until about ten years ago, "free as in speech, not as in beer," was an often repeated expression heard in open source circles. These days, the same sentiment is usually phrased as "free as in freedom." Even though it's fallen out of favor, I prefer the former. I think it more clearly explains the philosophy behind the open source development model. At the same time, it explains a problem that many essential open source projects face finding funding.

    Open source software is free to use, but as another old expression points out, there's no such thing as a free lunch. Open source or not, software doesn't get written for free -- nor can it be maintained without cash flow. Another old saying that fits here: If you're going to dance, you have to pay the piper.

  • 5 Essential LibreOffice Writer Tips to Improve Your Productivity

    LibreOffice is the frugal (or Linux) person’s choice of office suite, offering all the robustness of Microsoft’s dominant software while being fully open-source and not costing you a penny.

    While even the latest version of the word-processing part of LibreOffice, Writer, looks a little old-hat without the fancy ribboned interface of Microsoft office or WPS, don’t be fooled. It has all the tools you need to create quality documents quickly. Here are a bunch of tips to hone your LibreOffice craft.

  • Databricks $60 Million in New Funding to Advance its Spark Efforts

    People in the Big Data and Hadoop communities have been becoming increasingly interested in Apache Spark, an open source data analytics cluster computing framework originally developed in the AMPLab at UC Berkeley. IBM has made a huge financial commitment to advancing Spark, and companies like Databricks are focused on it as well.

  • France And Germany Get Free/Libre Open Source Software
  • Seeking Open Access Deal, 60 German Academic Institutions Ditch All Subscriptions With Elsevier

    In the struggle to provide open access to academic research, one company name keeps cropping up as a problem: Elsevier. Techdirt has written numerous stories about efforts to rein in the considerable -- and vastly profitable -- power that Elsevier wields in the world of academic publishing. These include boycotts of various kinds, mass resignations of journal editors, as well as access to millions of publicly-funded papers in ways that bypass Elsevier altogether.

Coreboot News

Filed under
OSS
  • Google "Poppy" Kabylake Board Added To Coreboot

    While Chromebook / ChromeOS fans have been looking forward to the Kabylake-based "Eve" device, it looks like another device is possibly forthcoming making use of these latest-generation Intel CPUs.

    A new board for "Poppy" was added yesterday to Coreboot Git. This Google Poppy board is indeed making use of an Intel Kabylake processor.

  • 100% Of The 289 Coreboot Images Are Now Built Reproducible

    Reproducible builds have been a big theme in particularly the last year or two with being able to verify the binaries offered by open-source projects are bit-for-bit the same against the same set of sources. With the latest Coreboot work, all of their generated images are now reproducible from source.

Open source challenger takes on Google Translate

Filed under
Google
OSS

Researchers have released an open source neural network system for performing language translations that could be an alternative to proprietary, black-box translation services.

Open Source Neural Machine Translation (OpenNMT) merges work from researchers at Harvard with contributions from long-time machine-translation software creator Systran. It runs on the Torch scientific computing framework, which is also used by Facebook for its machine learning projects.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Epiphany Browser to Add New "Copy Image" Context Menu Item, Support IDN URLs

Even if it might not become your everyday web browser, Epiphany is getting much-deserved attention from the GNOME Project, which plans on implementing many new features for the next major release, Epiphany 3.24. Read more

Oracle Continues to Improve Linux 4.10 Kernel Support in New VirtualBox Releases

Oracle today, January 17, 2017, announced the release of VirtualBox 5.1.14 and 5.0.32, the seventh and sixteenth maintenance updates to the VirtualBox 5.1 and VirtualBox 5.0 stable series respectively. Read more

Meet the new Week view

This morning, I had some free hours to spend on my baby Calendar, and of course I’d spend on what matters the most: the Week view. I’ve been working on and off in this feature for quite a while, and the last missing piece was proper drag n’ drop support. Fear no more!, and say hello to the new Week view in GNOME Calendar Read more

Mycroft AI Intelligent Personal Assistant Now Available as a Raspberry Pi Image

It's been very quiet lately for the Mycroft project, an open-source initiative to bring a full-featured intelligent personal assistant to Linux desktops, but it looks like it's still alive and kicking, and it's now available as a Raspberry Pi image. Read more