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OSS

OSS in the Back End

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Server
OSS

Kodi 17 Krypton Open-Source Media Center Officially Released, Here's What's New

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OSS

The Kodi team proudly announced today, February 5, 2017, the general availability of the final release of the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center for Linux, Android, macOS, iOS, and Windows.

Read more

Also: Kodi 17 Released With New Default Skin, Better Live TV Support

LibreELEC 8.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Now Based on Final Kodi 17 "Krypton"

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Opening up ECOMP: Our Network Operating System for SDN

    Harmonizing SDN and NFV technologies benefits all communications industry members. It takes unnecessary friction out of the system. It gives service providers more control of their network services. It also enables both developers and operators to create effective services at speeds never before possible.

  • TM Forum finds lack of ‘glue’ challenging telecom’s open source efforts

    Has the rash of new open source-focused organizations hindered the deployment of open source solutions or is it just a lack of cohesion?

    One issue facing the telecommunication industry’s move towards greater use of open source software platforms is the dizzying array of organizations that have sprung up over the past couple of years focused on trying to help that transition. While the help is appreciated, it would seem that too much help could be confusing the process.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.0 Released and Available via PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Released: The Biggest Release So Far

    Finally after a long waiting. The Document Foundation announced the release of LibreOffice 5.3. Which fairly can be considered a huge release full of updates and new features for the free office suite.

  • Freenas 10 Beta 2 released
  • [Older] [was paywalled] The trouble with FreeBSD

    Benno Rice, a member of the FreeBSD core team, might be expected to feel out of place at linux.conf.au, but it was not his first time there. While at the 2016 event in Geelong, he saw a presentation on Rust community automation [YouTube] by Emily Dunham and wondered: why can't FreeBSD have such nice things? The 2017 conference, held in Hobart, chose "the future of open source" as its theme but, Rice said, he was there to speak about the past; by looking at how FreeBSD ran into trouble, perhaps we can all learn something useful about how we run our projects.

    He got involved with open source in the 1990s; he actually started with Linux, but somebody told him that "Linux is rubbish" and he should use FreeBSD instead. So he bought an iMac computer and got FreeBSD running on it; the project then punished him by giving him commit access. It is a great project, but it does have some problems relating to three factors in particular: FreeBSD is big, it's old, and its leadership can be slow to act.

    How big is FreeBSD? The project's Subversion repository is currently about 3.1GB in size; a checked-out tree takes about 600MB. It consists of 71,100 files, about 32 million lines of code. It takes 20-30 minutes to build the whole thing, which is a big improvement from the old days, when it could take several hours.

  • [Video] Richard Stallman Explains Everything

    Richard Stallman, Founder and Leader of the free software movement, joins David to discuss his creation of the computer operating system "GNU"...

  • From free software to liberal software

    Robert M. "r0ml" Lefkowitz was the fourth and final keynote speaker at linux.conf.au 2017 in Hobart, Tasmania. He immediately served notice that his talk was going to differ from those of his predecessors; they offered "deep insightful questions", while he had answers. Also, the first three were nice people. What followed was an energetic event that left many in the audience wondering what they had just witnessed. The future of free and open-source software is grim, he said, but maybe we can make something better to replace it.

  • OGP unveils catalogue of open government tools

    The Open Government Partnership has published the OGP Toolbox, aggregating the digital tools developed and used by organisations across the globe to improve democracy and promote openness. So far, it lists 1,266 tools, 189 use cases and 515 organisations.

  • New Dataset: Five Years of Longitudinal Data from Scratch

    Scratch is a block-based programming language created by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group (LLK) at the MIT Media Lab. Scratch gives kids the power to use programming to create their own interactive animations and computer games. Since 2007, the online community that allows Scratch programmers to share, remix, and socialize around their projects has drawn more than 16 million users who have shared nearly 20 million projects and more than 100 million comments. It is one of the most popular ways for kids to learn programming and among the larger online communities for kids in general.

  • GitLab.com luckily found lost data on a staging server

    GitLab.com, the wannabe GitHub alternative that yesterday went down hard and reported data loss, has confirmed that some data is gone but that its services are now operational again.

    The incident did not result in Git repos disappearing. Which may be why the company's PR reps characterised the lost data as “peripheral metadata that was written during a 6-hour window”. But in a a prose account of the incident, GitLab says “issues, merge requests, users, comments, snippets, etc.” were lost. The Register imagines many developers may not be entirely happy with those data types being considered peripheral to their efforts.

Events: WikiToLearn India, FOSDEM 2017, MesosCon

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OSS
  • A look back at the WikiToLearn India conference, 2017

    The first ever WikiToLearn India conference was a 2 day single track event held on the 18th and 19th of January, 2017 in Jaipur, India. The event welcomed talks from all domains of technology, but admittedly, talks around KDE and MediaWiki were preferred.

  • Almost at FOSDEM. Video volunteers?

    The Desktops DevRoom will be a blast again this year. While I have been in charge of it for 6? years already, the last two (since my twins) were born I had organized remotely and local duties were carried on by the Desktops DevRoom team (thank you Christophe Fergeau, Philippe Caseiro and others!).

  • Kube at FOSDEM 2017

    I haven’t talked about it much, but the last few months we’ve been busy working on Kube and we’re slowly closing in on a first tech preview.

  • Share Apache Mesos Best Practices, Lessons Learned, and More at MesosCon Events in 2017

    MesosCon is an annual conference held in three locations around the globe and organized by the Apache Mesos community in partnership with The Linux Foundation. The events bring together users and developers of the open source orchestration framework to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem.

    The MesosCon program committee is now seeking proposals from speakers with fresh ideas, enlightening case studies, best practices, or deep technical knowledge to share with the Apache Mesos community at MesosCon North America, Asia, and Europe in 2017.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Report: SDN, NFV, and open source: the operator’s view

    Our library of 1700 research reports is available only to our subscribers. We occasionally release ones for our larger audience to benefit from. This is one such report. If you would like access to our entire library, please subscribe here. Subscribers will have access to our 2017 editorial calendar, archived reports and video coverage from our 2016 and 2017 events.

  • NFV Interoperability Testing Needs to Accelerate

    Plus, vendors that have made major investments in MANO platforms for NFV environments are also validating NFV interoperability across their platforms. HPE, for example, has an OpenNFV partner program through which it tests and validates NFV interoperability.

  • Update on San Francisco's Open Source Voting System!

    As many may know, the OSI has been involved in supporting the adoption of an open source elections system in San Francisco, California. The following is an update from Chris Jerdonek, Elections Commissioner & President of the San Francisco Elections Commission.

    We'd like to thank Chris for all of his hard work in raising awareness of open source software and its value for elections as well as keeping all of us up to date on the latest developments. If you'd like to learn more about the project, please contact Chris directly.

  • 4 questions to answer when choosing community metrics to measure

    Thus far in the Community Metrics Playbook column, I've discussed the importance of setting goals to guide the metrics process, outlined the general types of metrics that are useful for studying your community, and reviewed technical details of available tools. As you are deciding which metrics to track for your community, having a deeper understanding of each area is important so you not only choose good metrics, but also understand and plan for what to do when the numbers don't line up with expectations.

  • a2k17 hackathon report: Patrick Wildt on the arm64 port
  • House Bill Would Curb Open Data on Race, Affordable Housing

    Open data supporters have expressed trepidation over a new House bill that states Federal agencies will no longer be able to use geospatial information to create open databases on racial disparities and affordable housing.

    HR 482, or the Local Zoning Decisions Protection Act of 2017, moved to the House Committee on Financial Services on Jan. 12. Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, sponsored the bill, which would render Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) ineffective. AFFH, a 2015 ruling of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), requires certain HUD grantees to conduct an Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH) planning process.

  • Wallonia claims success for its Digital Strategy

    Wallonia wants to modernise government service delivery and make it ‘digital by default’. It has created a online enterprise portal, aggregating 18 existing services. It has also made the first 150 government data sets publicly available on its open data portal and overhauled its geoportal, providing access to all of the region’s geodata.

  • How the University of Hawaii is solving today's higher ed problems

    Openness invites greater participation and it takes advantage of the shared energy of collaborators. The strength of openly created educational resources comes paradoxically from the vulnerability of the shared experience of that creation process.

    One of the leaders in Open Educational Resources (OER) is Billy Meinke, educational technologist at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. The University's open creation model uses Pressbooks, which Billy tells me more about in this interview.

  • Hitchhiker's Guide to Serverless JavaScript

    Although Serverless has become a bit of a buzzword recently, Steven Faulkner, Director of Platform Engineering at Bustle, disagrees that it is just a fad. In his talk at Node.js Interactive, he points out that much of the faults that people find in Serverless -- that it doesn't scale, that it is not production ready, that it’s too slow and expensive -- are provenly false.

  • Hitchhiker's Guide to"'Serverless" Javascript by Steven Faulkner, Bustle

    This talk from Node.js Interactive provides concrete knowledge of what going serverless really means, so you can decide if it makes sense for your own infrastructure.

WordPress Addons

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OSS
Web
  • 8 Essential WordPress Plugins Your Website Must Have

    WordPress, what a CMS right? So many available plugins, themes, and tutorials. More than 27% of world websites are powered by a WordPress CMS. A staggering statistic which kinda indicates the level of functionality and flexibility it offers to webmasters. A complete website solution with an easy-to-use aura surrounding it.

    Chances are that while you are reading this another WordPress website has been launched into the vast ocean of information we call the Internet. Hell, you’ve probably reached this article by researching about WordPress after hearing that Joe from high school is making tons of money with his WordPress sites.

  • WordPress Updates in CentOS 7 + Apache + SELinux

    A couple of weeks ago I moved my WordPress blogs from a trivial shared hosting to a more sophisticated VPS running CentOS 7 since I was in search of more flexibility from my server.

    During these days, I learned a lot about managing a web server on my own and I’m still currently learning a ton of interesting things about this topic.

    One of the most annoying problems I faced a couple of days ago concerned, in particular, my WordPress installation. Everytime I was trying to update its core and plugins, the dashboard showed me a message similar to this...

Open Source ECOMP

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OSS
  • Why Open Source ECOMP? AT&T Needs the Help

    AT&T’s ECOMP platform is in production but needs more maturation. Without that progression, the carrier won’t be able to make its goal of virtualizing 75 percent of its network functions by 2020.

  • AT&T ECOMP released to open source community through The Linux Foundation

    AT&T made good on its plans to release its ECOMP SDN and NFV platform into the open source community through The Linux Foundation.

    AT&T officially moved on its plans to migrate its enhanced control, orchestration, management and policy platform into the open source community through The Linux Foundation.

    The carrier said the move includes the release of source code, documentation, educational videos and a pair of sample use cases – one on virtual firewall and one on virtual domain name servers – into a public cloud for access to users and covered by the Apache 2.0 license. The code itself is said to use a continuous integration and continuous development environment and include 11 different modules set up as separate virtual machines with code in at least one container.

Events: DevConf 2017, FOSDEM 2017, and FOSS Wave

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS
  • DevConf 2017

    Thorsten Leemhuis gave a talk about What's up in Kernel Land. This was a general overview about new features and patches that are coming into the Linux kernel targeted at non-kernel developers. I was not the target audience but the talk was fantastic. It was easy to follow and gave a good picture of what the kernel community is doing. I appreciate when non-kernel developers give talks about the kernel since kernel developers can be a bit myopic in our topics (myself included).

  • Fedora speakers at FOSDEM 2017

    Excited for FOSDEM 2017? FOSDEM, or the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting, is held every year in late January or early February. This year, FOSDEM is taking place on February 4th and 5th. At this year’s conference, an estimated 8,000 or more attendees are expected. As one of the largest open source conferences in Europe, there are many Fedora Project developers and representatives attending the event. In addition to our community stand, you will find 24 speakers from the community giving talks over the weekend. This post gives a quick way for you to find out who is speaking and where to find them in FOSDEM!

  • Find Fedora at FOSDEM 2017!

    It’s that time of year again for a new iteration of FOSDEM! FOSDEM, or the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting, is held every year in late January or early February in Brussels, Belgium. FOSDEM 2017 is taking place over this coming weekend on February 4th and 5th. At this year’s conference, an estimated 8,000 or more attendees are expected. Several open source contributors, communities, and projects are represented at this event.

    As one of the largest open source conferences in Europe, there are many Fedora Project developers and representatives attending the event. In addition to our community stand, you will find 24 speakers from the community giving talks over the weekend. If you’re getting ready to make it into Brussels, here’s how to keep Fedora a part of your weekend.

  • FOSS Wave: FOSS Camp SJCE in Mysore

    A couple of weekends ago, Kanika Murarka and I (Sumantro Mukherjee) went down to the Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering (SJCE) in Mysore, India to give a talk on GitHub and web virtual reality (VR) on their annual open source fest, FOSS Camp.

GIMP 2.8.20 Open-Source Image Editor Released for Linux, macOS, and Windows

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OSS

A new stable release of the open-source and cross-platform GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program) image editor and viewer arrived recently for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

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Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Haiku OS Still Working Towards Beta Release, Adds 1360 x 768 Mode Support

    The folks working on the Haiku operating system that continues striving towards BeOS compatibility is advancing for 2017. While the first alpha of Haiku OS came in 2009, in 2017 they are working towards hopefully getting the beta shipped.

    Some recent accomplishments for Haiku OS development included the continued work on UEFI system support, adding 1360x768 video mode support, the Atheros813x wireless driver was ported over from FreeBSD 11, packages were updated, there is continued work on system internals, and a range of other happenings.

  • Automating Software Testing on Linux SBCs

    Demand is increasing for embedded software projects to support a variety of Linux hacker boards -- and that requires time consuming hardware testing to prove that your software works reliably. Fortunately, you can integrate test automation tools into your software development process to streamline the task, as explained by release engineer Paweł Wieczorek at last October’s Embedded Linux Conference Europe.

  • LibreOffice Update Offers Fresh Experience

    Dubbed "5.3 Fresh," this latest release takes the development of LibreOffice in a new direction with a focus on updating the user experience, according to Italo Vignoli of the Document Foundation. The 3.x Family centered on code cleanup, while the 4.x Family focused on code Refactoring.

    LibreOffice 5.3 extends the User Interface with an experimental Notebookbar. It also provides a new UI option. The experimental UI offers a choice of two toolbars: the Single Toolbar UI and the Sidebar with a Single Toolbar.

    Each UI layout targets a different cluster of LibreOffice users. The new focus should appeal both to early adopters and power users.

  • Hippo, Magento, OroCommerce & More: Keeping Up With Open Source CMS

    Open source CMS projects hit the ground running in January, barely pausing after the end-of-the-year break.

    A Forrester web content management Wave was released, summits were held and words of digital war were declared.

    If you missed out on any of last month’s action, here are the latest open source CMS headlines.

  • The 7 Elements of an Open Source Management Program: Strategy and Process

    An open source compliance policy is a set of rules that govern the management of open source software (both use of and contribution to). Processes are detailed specifications as to how a company will implement these rules on a daily basis.

    Compliance policies and processes govern the various aspects of using, contributing, auditing, and distribution of open source software. See the figure below for a sample compliance process, with the various steps each software component will go through as part of the due diligence.

  • Agile Is More Than Scrum

    On the developer level, there are myriad engineering practices (DevOps, Continuous Delivery, XP, Pair Programming). XP fits very well within Agile, as engineers are motivated to develop features based on customer value (and even to not develop things until it’s clear that they are needed). XP encourages code reviews on a continuous basis in order to improve software quality. Pair Programming is encouraged, as two brains can solve problems faster and better than one brain.

  • Facebook Just Launched A New Open Source Tool For Recovering Passwords Easily
  • Facebook launches new open source account recovery tool: Delegated Recovery
  • Security advisories for Wednesday
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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya
    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.
  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]
    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.
  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download
    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download
    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

FOSS Policies

Leftovers: BSD