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OSS

The Sun gets it wrong, we're here to help.

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OSS

Recently the Sun published an article by Ryan Sabey (@ryansabey), “UNION HACK Jeremy Corbyn’s digital democracy manifesto ‘would let foreign spooks rob UK'”. The post included several criticisms from government officials and pundits challenging the quality and security of open source software, cautioning readers, “sensitive data could be at risk under Labour leader's plans.”

Mr. Corbyn's, “Digital Democracy Manifesto” calls for public bodies in the U.K. to, “encourage publicly funded software and hardware to be released under an Open Source license,” and “financially reward staff technicians who significantly contribute to Open Source projects”.

Neil Doyle, who the Sun simply identified as an expert, warned, “cyber-criminals and foreign intelligence agencies would have a field day” under such an approach while, “private firms or individuals would be reluctant to get involved in public sector projects.”

Adding further criticism was British MP Nigel Adams who said Mr. Corbyn’s initiative, “ignores the issue of Internet abuse” adding, “his shambolic policies could leave us open to malicious attack and put our national security at risk.”

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Also: Open source at the European Broadcasting Union/Eurovision

OSS Leftovers

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OSS

  • Penn software helps to identify course of cancer metastasis, tumor 'evolution'

    Canopy is an open-source software so oncologists will be able to use it to identify potential biomarkers for different cancer cell populations within tumor specimens that are associated with drug resistance and invasive malignancy, among other characteristics.

  • The New Research and Development (R&D) Model - Open Source Projects

    I have written in the past how the International Multimedia Telecommunication Consortium (IMTC) has generated some great use case specifications on Real-Time Media and Software Defined Networking (RTM SDN) and how the Open Network Foundation (ONF) has realized these use cases with a new open source project for RTM SDN called Project Atrium Enterprise. However, what most don’t realize is how open source has changed the world in how we do Research and Development (R&D) as an industry.

    I for one, having been in a closed source world for many years, didn’t realize how innovation is being incubated in a totally different model than the past. I always thought open source projects were what developers did in their spare time and that features were just punted over the wall with no rhyme or reason. Now, I knew that open source Linux was widely used as the operating system of choice for embedded systems; however, what I didn’t understand is how open source projects really worked and how they have been funded.

  • Descent: Underground builds open-source gaming depot

    Descendent Studios, makers of Descent: Underground, announced the open-source release of several Unreal Engine 4 plugins they developed for the game. The studio rolled out their GitHub repository on the heels of last week’s announcement that Descent: Underground won an Open-Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) Fund grant from Razer. Descent: Underground was the first high-end action title to natively support all of the major desktop VR headsets: OSVR, HTC Vive, and Oculus Rift.

  • FRAUDAR: How A New Open Source Algorithm Aims To Kill Social Media Frauds
  • Krita 3.01 Beta Released

    The popular Krita painting program keeps getting even better. This new beta release of 3.01 includes features added from Google Summer of Code programmers. This screencast does a very good job explaining the new features, including new animation tools.

  • Ascensio System SIA's ONLYOFFICE

    Ascensio System SIA boasts that its ONLYOFFICE office and productivity suite combines the best from the MS Office and Google Docs worlds. ONLYOFFICE is a free and open-source solution and is distributed under the AGPL v.3 license.

  • A Semantic Markup Proposal for AsciiDoc

    AsciiDoc is a light-weight markup language that is being adopted at a fast-pace by projects. The Fedora Documentation Project, for example, has decided to migrate its books to AsciiDoc. AsciiDoc excels at being very easy to write with as it doesn’t have a lot of tagging or other extraneous keystrokes. It, like many light-weight markup languages, is known for having sensible defaults.

  • LibreOffice 5.2.1 Open Source Office Suite Released With 105 Bug Fixes
  • V8 JavaScript Engine 5.4 Brings More Performance Improvements

    Version 5.4 of the V8 JavaScript Engine has been released. This is another hefty update to V8 and it brings the favorite kind of work we like talking about: more performance improvements.

    V8 Release 5.4 brings reductions in peak memory usage of on-heap memory up to 40% by tuning the garbage collector for low-memory systems. The off-heap peak memory usage has improved by up to 20% as well thanks to simplifying the V8 JavaScript parser.

Linux/FOSS Events (UbuCon Europe, Node.js Hackathons)

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OSS
Ubuntu
  • You Can Now Register for the First European Ubuntu Conference, c

    Softpedia was informed by Marius Quabeck from UbuntuFun.de that the registration for the upcoming UbuCon Europe conference for Ubuntu Linux users and developers is now open.

    We informed our readers about UbuCon Europe, which is the very first European Ubuntu conference put together by a group of Ubuntu members, earlier this year, and told them that it would take place between November 18-20, at the Unperfekthaus in Essen, Germany.

  • Bloomberg to Hold Weekend Node.js Hackathons in New York and London

    In 2014 Bloomberg hosted its first "Open Source Day" event, which was an experiment to see if we could combine the company's long history of volunteerism with open source collaboration. We brought one of the Git project's core developers to New York City, got about 30 employees signed up, and they spent the day learning how to build, test, and improve Git. The event was such a success that we've held a half-dozen more, and they've grown into weekend events with attendees from our Engineering team, local universities and colleges, and of course the open source community.

May the Fork Be with You: A Short History of Open Source Forks

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Debian is one of the oldest Linux-based distributions that became the base of many distros. One of the most popular Debian forks is Ubuntu. Ubuntu takes Debian packages and builds its own packages. It has its own software repository, it’s own kernel. Though many would argue whether Ubuntu is a fork or not, even Mark Shuttleworth is not fully sure.

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darktable 2.0.6 Open-Source RAW Image Editor Supports Canon EOS-1D X Mark II

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OSS

A new stable version of the open-source and cross-platform darktable RAW image editor has been released, namely version 2.0.6, which brings support for new digital cameras, as well as a bunch of improvements over the previous maintenance update.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Abbott: Success with Interns

    Laura Abbott marks the end of the latest round of open-source internships at Outreachy with a blog post reflecting on "what makes an internship successful," especially as seen in the kernel team's internships.

  • Keeping DOS alive with FreeDOS

    I wanted to share a recent interview with OpenSource.com about the FreeDOS Project, an open source software project that's been close to me since 1994. Jason Baker from Red Hat interviewed me about FreeDOS, why we started it, and what to expect in FreeDOS 1.2 (out later this year).

  • Open source technology gains steam in data center, but challenges loom

    Despite new developments with the Open Compute Project and other groups, challenges remain when it comes to open source implementation in the data center. Explore them with these FAQs.

  • What you need to know about PostgresOpen 2016

    PostgresOpen is the longest running PostgreSQL conference in the United States. This week I had the pleasure of chatting with Stephen Frost, who is the program committee chair and a main organizer of PostgresOpen, which takes place this year in Dallas, TX from September 13-15. We talked about who goes, what sessions to look for, and their charity event which will be helping a cause near and dear to my heart: diversity in tech.

  • Open Source InfluxDB 1.0 Time-Series Database Released

    InfluxData Inc. said its new open source InfluxDB time-series database -- just moved to version 1.0 -- was almost three years in the making.

    Written in the Go programming language, InfluxDB 1.0 was designed to process time-series data with high availability and high performance requirements, the company said.

    Although most popular in Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data analytics development, time-series databases have many other use cases, according to InfluxData.

  • The rise of the shareable document

    Higher education is increasingly embracing different concepts of openness, from open access to open education resources (OER). But where does that other open concept—open source—fit into this model? Open source represents the best way to ensure these materials can be easily modified, without risk of material suddenly becoming unchangeable or inaccessible.

  • [Older] Is the GPL the right way to force IoT standardization?

    The Internet of Things has tremendous potential, but remains a mishmash of conflicting “standards” that don’t talk to each other. As various vendors erect data silos in the sky, what is actually needed is increased developer communication between disparate IoT projects.

    I’ve argued before that this is one reason IoT needs to be open sourced, providing neutral territory for developers to focus on code, not business models. But there’s still an open question as to what kind of open source best facilitates developer-to-developer sharing. In Cessanta CTO and co-founder Sergey Lyubka’s view, the restrictive GNU General Public License (GPLv2) is the right way to license IoT, at least for now.

Open source Cortex-M3 board supports Arduino and FreeRTOS

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OSS

The USB-enabled 55 x 25mm “Explore M3” board is based on NXP’s LPC1768 Cortex-M3 MCU, and supports Arduino IDE, FreeRTOS, and bare metal development.

Bangalore India-based startup Explore Embedded has soared past its exceptionally modest $700 CrowdSupply funding goal for its Explore M3 development board. Early bird packages are gone, but you can still buy in for $19 through Oct. 13, with volume discounts. The Explore M3 is also available with a $20 Soda Debug Adapter and a $49 ARM Starter Kit. Shipments are due Nov. 15.

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The 7 Dimensions of Good Open Source Management

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Organizations use open source software to gain competitive advantage in many ways: to speed up software delivery, save money on development, to stay flexible, and to stay on the leading edge of technology.

But using open source software, and especially integrating and redistributing it in products and services, carries with it added complexity and risk. Code coming in from multiple sources, under different licenses and with varied quality and maturity levels, can expose organizations to issues with security, integration, support and management -- not to mention legal action -- if the code is not properly managed.

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Why Your Open Source Project Is Not A Product

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I’ve spent a good bit of time explaining the ins and outs of open source products: what they are, how to make money with them, and what they are not. Namely, products are products, no matter the source code license they are published under. But there’s a journey that a software project must undergo before it can be accurately labeled with the moniker “product.” This journey includes, but is not limited to, the open source supply chain going from upstream bits to downstream product, as well as a bit of special sauce branding, complete with trademark, that applies only to the supported product. But, I can feel a bit of grousing bubbling just under the surface: Why does it have to be so complicated?

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open source algorithm helps spot social media shams

    Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University say they have developed an open source algorithm that can help spot social media frauds trying to sway valuable community influence.

    “Given the rise in popularity of social networks and other web services in recent years, fraudsters have strong incentives to manipulate these services. On several shady websites, anyone can buy fake Facebook page-likes or Twitter followers by the thousands. Yelp, Amazon and TripAdvisor fake reviews are also available for sale, misleading consumers about restaurants, hotels, and other services and products. Detecting and neutralizing these actions is important for companies and consumers alike,” the researchers wrote in a paper outlining their algorithm known as FRAUDAR.

    According to Carnegie Mellon researchers the new algorithm makes it possible to see through camouflage fraudsters use to make themselves look legitimate.

    According to Christos Faloutsos, professor of machine learning and computer at Carnegie Mellon the state-of-the-art for detecting fraudsters, with tools such as NetProbe, is to find a pattern known as a “bipartite core.” These are groups of users who have many transactions with members of a second group, but no transactions with each other. This suggests a group of fraudsters, whose only purpose is to inflate the reputations of others by following them, by having fake interactions with them, or by posting flattering or unflattering reviews of products and businesses, he said in a statement.

  • Destroy to create: How one CEO innovates in object storage, open source

    While VMworld 2016 is now in the rearview mirror, some major partnership announcements emerged from within the conference halls. One such announcement partnered cloud and object storage company Scality, Inc. with hosting and Internet infrastructure provider OVH. This new go-to-market team-up will provide enterprises large and small a solution to handle large-scale storage needs.

    This partnership is just latest in a string of pioneering ventures at Scality since it opened its doors in 2008. To explore the company’s impressive growth and market strategies, SiliconANGLE recently spoke to Jérôme Lecat, CEO of Scality.

  • Open Source Software & Security Are Key To 5G

    Open source software and security will be fundamental elements of 5G, according to top executives at the 2016 CTIA Super Mobility conference here.

    During yesterday’s opening keynote session, CTIA chairman and AT&T mobility president and CEO Glenn Lurie highlighted the role of open source software in the 5G roadmap. “We have to embrace open source, software-centric solutions. We know this drives flexibility and scalability with the growth of the network. It makes everything faster, better, and cheaper,” Lurie said.

  • Yahoo's New Pulsar: A Kafka Competitor?
  • Yahoo opens Pulsar 'pub-sub' messaging system
  • Project Malmo available as Open Source: Use Minecraft for AI research [Ed: Microsoft is, as usual, openwashing the proprietary Minecraft]
  • Open licenses don't work for uncopyrightable subjects: 3D printing edition

    Michael Weinberg (who has written seminal stories on 3D printing and copyright) writes, "We are seeing widespread adoption of copyright-based open licenses in 3D printing and open source hardware. This is great in that it shows that the culture of openness has really permeated the culture. It is not so great because a significant number of the things nominally licensed in these communities aren't actually protected by copyright."

    "This could create problems by 1) undermining long term confidence in open licenses when people find out that they are not enforceable when a copyright isn't involved and/or 2) creating a constituency of people who want to expand the scope of copyright protection in order to make their open licenses enforceable."

  • Report: Students Can Save Thousands By Using 'Digital, Open-source Textbooks'

    A report related to a state pilot program has declared that college and university students from Vernon and across the state can save thousands with the use of "digital, open-source textbooks."

    The results of the pilot program were published last month.

    See the report here.

    The pilot program was created through Special Act No. 15-18, "An Act Concerning the Use of Digital Open Source Textbooks in Higher Education."

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