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Evolution of Apache Hadoop

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The year 2016 will see Americans lining up to elect their new president. While passion and sentiments will dictate the outcome of the elections on the surface, deep down, modern technology will be at play, helping determine who will be the next president. These elections will harness the power of Big Data on a scale never done before. We have already seen the role that Big Data played in 2012 elections, and it’s only going to get bigger. This Big Data revolution is led by, as expected, open source and Apache Hadoop, in particular.

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On OpenStack: Coders to learn how to deploy humanitarian-focused apps on OpenStack

Open Source Storage Joins OpenStack® Foundation, Appoints Patrick Willis as Board Member

FOSS Events

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Being Thoughtful About FOSS History

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Time to saddle up the rant stallion and take him out of the stable: This comes up from time to time on social media — as it did again several days ago — and it’s really about time it stops.

Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs died pretty close to each other, time-wise. That may sound like the start of a joke — “Dennis Ritchie and Steve Jobs meet at the pearly gates, and…” — but we’re not going there today. Many people are under the impression that while Steve Jobs got all the attention as the “messiah of computing” when he died, Dennis Ritchie was completely ignored.

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The EPA Deserves Software Freedom, Too

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The issue of software freedom is, not surprisingly, not mentioned in the mainstream coverage of Volkswagen's recent use of proprietary software to circumvent important regulations that exist for the public good. Given that Volkswagen is an upstream contributor to Linux, it's highly likely that Volkswagen vehicles have Linux in them.

Thus, we have a wonderful example of how much we sacrifice at the altar of “Linux adoption”. While I'm glad for some Free Software to appear in products rather than none, I also believe that, too often, our community happily accepts the idea that we should gratefully laud a company includes a bit of Free Software in their product, and gives a little code back, even if most of what they do is proprietary software.

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Also: VW scandal highlights irony of EPA opposition to vehicle software tinkering

OSS Leftovers

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  • More for Less: How the Open Source Software Revolution Can Mitigate Unnecessary Expenditure

    The board may be reluctant to move away from a big, branded, closed source solution. But the fact is, Open Source Software can now do the same for less.

  • Open Source Code May Unite IoT

    A high profile open source project working on software-defined networks has given birth to what could become an important standard for bringing unity to the fragmented Internet of Things.

  • Google launches Brotli, a new open source compression algorithm to speed up the web

    As websites and online services become ever more demanding, the need for compression increases exponentially. Fans of Silicon Valley will be aware of the Pied Piper compression algorithm, and now Google has a more efficient one of its own.

  • Splunk admits open source challengers can’t be ignored, but says it has advantage

    If you type the words ‘open source Splunk’ into Google, you’ll soon find a bunch of articles that talk up the challenge posed to Splunk by cheaper, open source alternatives. One even used the headline “In a world of open source big data, Splunk should not exist”, whilst another says “Splunk feels the heat from stronger, cheaper open source rivals”.

    And it’s true that when you think about big data and the Internet-of-Things (IoT), a number of open source technologies spring to mind. But is Splunk worried?

  • Get your own cloud and reclaim your data

    Frank Karlitschek founded ownCloud, a personal cloud platform that also happens to be open source, in 2011. Why open source? Frank has some strong opinions about how we host and share our data, and with the recent scrutiny on security and privacy, his thoughts are even more relevant. In this interview, I ask Frank some questions I've been wondering about my own personal data as well as how ownCloud might play a role in a more open, yet secure, data future.

    A little history on Frank: He is a long time open source contributor and former board member of the KDE e.V. After 10 years of managing engineering teams, today he is the project leader and maintainer of ownCloud. Additionally he is the co-founder and CTO of ownCloud Inc. which offers ownCloud for enterprises.

  • Open source is ugly: Improving UI and UX

    For four years, Garth has been working at Adobe on open source projects as a design and code contributor. These projects include Brackets, Topcoat, and Apache Flex. In addition to his work at Adobe, he also speaks at conferences about the power of design, improving designer/developer collaboration, and the benefits of open source. As part of this effort, Garth founded the Open Design Foundation.

  • Facebook takes Relay JavaScript framework open source

    Facebook this week is open-sourcing Relay, which provides data-fetching for React JavaScript applications. The move could open up new possibilities for the technology, Facebook engineers said.

    Accessible on GitHub, Relay is a JavaScript framework for developing data-driven applications with React, Facebook's JavaScript library for building user interfaces. "Relay is actually intended to build and do for data-fetching what React does for the user interface rendering," said Tom Occhino, Facebook engineering manager, in an interview at this week's @scale conference in San Jose, Calif.

Yes, the FCC might ban your operating system

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Over the last few weeks a discussion has flourished over the FCC’s Notification of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) on modular transmitters and electronic labels for wireless devices. Some folks have felt that the phrasing has been too Chicken-Little-like and that the FCC’s proposal doesn’t affect the ability to install free, libre or open source operating system. The FCC in fact says their proposal has no effect on open source operating systems or open source in general. The FCC is undoubtedly wrong.

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OSS Leftovers

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  • GNU/Linux Touted As Safe Replacement For Illegal Software In Bangladesh
  • FOSS the Solution to Piracy, Newspaper Says

    On September 9, a Bangladeshi English language newspaper, Dhaka Tribune, reported that the country’s Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Task Force and Copyright officials had seized 69 laptops with pirated Microsoft software and arrested two high ranking officials at Flora, one of Bangladesh’s largest computer retailers. The raid came after two years of newspaper ads sponsored by the country’s Copyright Office warning about the legal implications of selling pirated goods.

  • AT&T's Chiosi: Unite on Open Source or Suffer

    The telecom industry needs to agree on how it wants the various pieces of open source to come together in a platform for the future, AT&T's Margaret Chiosi said here Thursday. Otherwise, there is the risk of a splintered effort that will ultimately slow critical network transformation.

    Chiosi, a Distinguished Network Architect at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) who is also president of the Open Platform for NFV Project Inc. and one of the original players in the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) NFV ISG, explained why open source is critical to AT&T's Integrated Cloud (AIC) architecture -- its converged services platform moving forward -- and outlined the numerous open source groups in which the telecom giant is participating, which span 700 different projects.

  • Google's Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software uses Tesseract

    Google's OCR is probably using dependencies of Tesseract, an OCR engine released as free software, or OCRopus, a free document analysis and optical character recognition (OCR) system that is primarily used in Google Books. Developed as a community project during 1995-2006 and later taken over by Google, Tesseract is considered one of the most accurate OCR engines and works for over 60 languages. The source code is available on GitHub.

  • Modest CEO on open source and acquisition by PayPal

    Professionally, Harper was CTO of Threadless and then CTO of Obama for America. He's currently CEO of Modest, Inc., which was recently acquired by PayPal. I asked him what really drives him and he said, "I like to have fun and do interesting things." Also, in a talk Harper gave in Sweden in 2014, he said that he strives to hire people who looked different from him. In this interview, I ask him more about that and his upcoming All Things Open talk.

  • Google, Twitter Forge Open Source Publishing Partnership

    Google will be coming late to the publishing party, having failed to challenge Facebook with its own social media platforms -- the short-lived Google Buzz and the faltering Google+, noted SEO researcher Joshua J. Bachynski. Google's inability to understand its user base has forced it to form an uneasy partnership with Twitter and others, he suggested.

  • Shopping for a Browser

    I remain deeply suspicious of Chrome, since it has been reported to be snooping on its users and reporting back to Google. And, sadly, the latest news from Firefox is discouraging. It's possible that that adware and snoopware will be left out of Mozilla's SeaMonkey browser, which I have recently installed.

  • The Firefox Is in the Hen House

    For a variety of reasons that nobody outside of Mozilla seems to completely understand, Mozilla ended its relationship with Google late last year to ink a deal with Yahoo. Some pundits are figuring that Yahoo offered better terms and that Mozilla stands to make more money now than before, especially since it’s now selling default search on a country-by-country basis instead of carte blanche for the entire planet. Others say the change in affiliation had little to do with money, but was brought about by ideological reasons, basically revolving around Mozilla’s Do Not Track system, which Google does not support. Reportedly, as part of the new deal, Yahoo has agreed to abide by Do Not Track requests.

    Whether Mozilla receives more income from Yahoo than it did from Google is questionable, even if a majority of Firefox users keep Yahoo instead of flipping the switch to Google search, which is doubtful. Certainly, a recent move by Mozilla might indicate that the new deal with Yahoo isn’t as fruitful as the organization had hoped and that it’s scrambling to create new revenue streams.

  • Forza open-source: Italian military to adopt LibreOffice
  • Age-old question: Can commercial software succeed in an open-source world?

    It became the first $1 billion open source company three years ago and closed its last fiscal year in February at almost $1.8 billion in revenue. That is not chump change, but it’s a far cry from the run rates proprietary software companies tout.

  • VSCO Keys is now an open source project hosted on Github

    VSCO says code for the installer can be found on Github. The company also notes “while the current layout editor has been discontinued, users can continue to edit their layouts with a text editor using resources that have been provided in the source code.”

  • VSCO Keys Lives On By Going Free and Open Source
  • GhostBSD 10.1 Is Now Available for Download with MATE and Xfce Flavors

    GhostBSD's Eric Turgeon has the great pleasure of informing us earlier today, September 13, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of GhostBSD 10.1.

  • Chris Webber talks about Guix in Chicago, September 30th
  • Infinity compiler
  • Apple uses Mesos, 3D printed syringe, and more news
  • SGA looks into open-source textbooks as alternative for UMD students

    On the heels of the University of Maryland University College announcing its plans to eliminate textbooks this fall, the SGA is exploring the viability of open-source textbooks as a cheaper alternative for University of Maryland students.

  • Virtual Reality & Open Source

    OSVR is backed by many major companies, such as Intel, Ubisoft, Valve and GearBox, as well as by a long list of universities. The project also boasts many contributors of software design, sensory support, virtual world design, etc.

  • GitLab raises $4 million for its hugely popular open-source GitHub alternative

    Developer collaboration services are back on investors’ agenda. Two months after leading a $1.5 million round into GitLab Inc., Khosla Ventures is coming back for more and pouring an additional $4 million into the startup’s coffers to help ramp its battle against the better-known and better-funded competition.

  • We are the Knights who code Ni!

AT&T's Chiosi: Unite on Open Source or Suffer

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The telecom industry needs to agree on how it wants the various pieces of open source to come together in a platform for the future, AT&T's Margaret Chiosi said here Thursday. Otherwise, there is the risk of a splintered effort that will ultimately slow critical network transformation.

Chiosi, a Distinguished Network Architect at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) who is also president of the Open Platform for NFV Project Inc. and one of the original players in the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) NFV ISG, explained why open source is critical to AT&T's Integrated Cloud (AIC) architecture -- its converged services platform moving forward -- and outlined the numerous open source groups in which the telecom giant is participating, which span 700 different projects.

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It's Software Freedom Day!

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This Saturday, September 19th, is the twelfth annual Software Freedom Day, an international celebration of our favorite thing: free software!

Software Freedom Day means hundreds of fun, educational events, planned by activists all over the globe using resources provided by the Digital Freedom Foundation. Here's a map where you can find an event near you.

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Open source ‘essential for heritage preservation’

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Working together on open source tools based on open standards is very important for those involved in the preservation of digital information, says Barbara Sierman, board member of the Open Preservation Foundation.

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