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OSS

3 open source log aggregation tools

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OSS

How is metrics aggregation different from log aggregation? Can’t logs include metrics? Can’t log aggregation systems do the same things as metrics aggregation systems?

These are questions I hear often. I’ve also seen vendors pitching their log aggregation system as the solution to all observability problems. Log aggregation is a valuable tool, but it isn’t normally a good tool for time-series data.

A couple of valuable features in a time-series metrics aggregation system are the regular interval and the storage system customized specifically for time-series data. The regular interval allows a user to derive real mathematical results consistently. If a log aggregation system is collecting metrics in a regular interval, it can potentially work the same way. However, the storage system isn’t optimized for the types of queries that are typical in a metrics aggregation system. These queries will take more resources and time to process using storage systems found in log aggregation tools.

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Solving the storage dilemma: Is open source the key?

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OSS

For CIOs, storage systems that are able to provide greater flexibility and choice, as well as the capability to better identify unstructured data in order to categorise, utilise and automate the management of it throughout its lifecycle are seen as the ideal solution.

One answer to solving the storage issue is software-defined storage (SDS) which separates the physical storage hardware (data plane) from the data storage management logic or ‘intelligence’ (control plane). Needing no proprietary hardware components, SDS is the perfect cost-effective solution for enterprises as IT can use off-the-shelf, low-cost commodity hardware which is robust and flexible.

A research paper by SUSE entitled Managing the Data Explosion Challenge with Open Source Storage found that rising storage costs consistently ranks at the top of business concerns across the industry, but data growth is only one part of a more complex equation. The greatest ongoing cost for IT usually lies in system support and management.

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Open Hardware/Modding/Hacking

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Hardware
Software
OSS
  • Libre Computer's Tritium Is A Line Of Low-Cost Allwinner ARM Boards

    In addition to Le Potato and Renegade, another line-up of ARM boards being offered by Libre Computer is Tritium. The Libre Computer Tritium boards are Allwinner-based boards with options from the H2+ for IoT use-cases, the H3 as a mid-range offering, or H5 for a better-performing ARM board that is well supported by the open-source Linux community.

  • See Binary On Your Breadboard

    When you’re debugging a board which has an ESP32, Raspberry Pi, or Arduino, it’s easy to slap on a small LCD display or connect via WiFi to see what’s wrong. At least, that’s what the kids are doing. But what if you’re old-school or you don’t have one of those pimped-out, steroid-filled boards? A resistor and an LED will often suffice. Powering the LED means one thing and not powering it means another. And with seven more LEDs you can even display 0-256 in binary.

    [Miguel] is clearly in the latter camp. To make debugging-with-LEDs easy, he’s come up with an 8-LED board complete with resistors. He’s even included the Gerber files needed for you to make your own. One row of pins are all connected together and the other row are not. So whether you’re using common cathode or common anode depends on how you orient the LEDs when you solder them in place. You might perhaps have one board of each type at the ready.

  • Ancient Hardware I Have Hacked: Back to Basics!

    My return to the IBM mainframe was delayed by my high school's acquisition of a a teletype connected via a 110-baud serial line to a timesharing system featuring the BASIC language. I was quite impressed with this teletype because it could type quite a bit faster than I could. But this is not as good as it might sound, given that I came in dead last in every test of manual dexterity that the school ever ran us through. In fact, on a good day, I might have been able to type 20 words a minute, and it took decades of constant practice to eventually get above 70 words a minute. In contrast, one of the teachers could type 160 words a minute, more than half again faster than the teletype could!

    Aside from output speed, I remained unimpressed with computers compared to paper and pencil, let alone compared to my pocket calculator. And given that this was old-school BASIC, there was much to be unimpressed about. You could name your arrays anything you wanted, as long as that name was a single upper-case character. Similarly, you could name your scalar variables anything you wanted, as long as that name was either a single upper-case character or a single upper-case character followed by a single digit. This allowed you to use up to 286 variables, up to 26 of which could be arrays. If you felt that GOTO was harmful, too bad. If you wanted a while loop, you could make one out of IF statements. Not only did IF statements have no else clause, the only thing that could be in the THEN clause was the number of the line to which control would transfer when the IF condition evaluated to true. And each line had to be numbered, and the numbers had to be monotonically increasing, that is, in the absence of control-flow statements, the program would execute the lines of code in numerical order, regardless of the order in which you typed those lines of code. Definitely a step down, even from FORTRAN.

  • Guile-CV version 0.2.0

    This is a 'milestone' release, which introduces image texture measures. In addition (a) the default installation locations have changed; (Cool there is a new configure option; (c) some new interfaces; (d) matrix multiplication performances have been greatly improved; (d) a few interface (name) have changed.

    For a list of changes since the previous version, visit the NEWS file. For a complete description, consult the git summary and git log

Microsoft-Connected Black Duck and Salil Deshpande With Their Attacks on Copyleft

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OSS
Legal
  • The Big Legal Issue Blockchain Developers Rarely Discuss [Ed: The latest FUD from Black Duck]
  • Commons Clause stops open-source abuse [Ed: Salil Deshpande trying to rationalise his attack on Free as in freedom software]

    There are two key reasons to not use AGPL in this scenario, an open-source license that says that you must release to the public any modifications you make when you run AGPL-licensed code as a service.

    First, AGPL makes it inconvenient but does not prevent cloud infrastructure providers from engaging in the abusive behavior described above. It simply says that they must release any modifications they make while engaging in such behavior. Second, AGPL contains language about software patents that is unnecessary and disliked by a number of enterprises.

    Many of our portfolio companies with AGPL projects have received requests from large enterprises to move to a more permissive license, since the use of AGPL is against their company’s policy.

WordPress Gutenberg will be the end of WordPress

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OSS
Web

WordPress is the most popular Content Management System (CMS) and blogging platform in the world. There are a lot of good reasons for that. It is accessible, simple and intuitive to use, and highly flexible, with a bewildering range of professional plugins and themes. Over the years, it has asserted itself as the dominant choice for those looking to create dynamic, responsive websites. I am a happy user, too. I've been using it myself since 2012, on my book writing blog. Unfortunately, all this goodness is poised to go down the drain.

WordPress 5.0, the next major release, is going to feature a revised UI (the backend) using a framework called Gutenberg. This new UI looks like it's going to take away all the good things that made WordPress so cool, and destroy the beautiful elegance, efficiency and simplicity with something that feels like an abstract, touch-optimized experiment. Let's discuss.

[...]

Unholy Crusade against the desktop

Ever since mobile (touch) became the prevalent consumer platform, there's been a lot of focus on developing mobile solutions. This is fine. Except these mobile solutions are also pushed onto the desktop, where they utterly fail. Touch software does not work on the desktop. It just does not.

Moreover, there's a bigger problem here. While most of the content is consumed on the mobile, most of the content is created on the desktop. It makes sense. The desktop is an infinitely superior platform for writing and image processing. The full keyboard + mouse combo and the multi-application usability beat all and any touch solution.

I do not consider social media "updates" content. I consider content to be meaningful articles that provide new and unique information, of which there is less and less every day. I am extremely confident than the vast majority of actually valuable articles and posts are made using the classic desktop formula. Just imagine writing 500 words on a keyboard versus touch.

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FOSSCON 2018: Where Open Source and LEGO Collide

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OSS

During the recent FOSSCON 2018 in Philadelphia, Daniel Pikora gave attendees a comprehensive look at the intersection of open source development and the world’s most popular brand of construction toys. A software developer with a penchant for open source code by trade, he’s also an avid member of what’s known as the Adult Fan of LEGO (AFOL) community who’s exhibited his creations at shows across the United States and Canada. Such a unique perspective, with a foot in both the FOSS and LEGO camps, makes Daniel an ideal tour guide for this particular microcosm of toys and tech.

In a whirlwind presentation that took attendees through 49 slides in about as many minutes, Daniel covered LEGO’s beginnings in the 1930s to the rise of 3D printed custom bricks, and everything in between. Some of the engineering-centric product lines, such as Technic and Mindstorms, were already fairly well known to the types of folk who spent a beautiful Saturday in Philadelphia at an open source conference. But Daniel’s deep-dive into the long history of open source LEGO projects brought to light the work of so many dedicated developers that everyone walked away with a newfound respect for the amount of work the AFOL community has put into elevating LEGO from a child’s toy to a legitimate tool. Join me below for a look at the particulars of that deep dive.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Finetune

    Enterprise AI solution provider Indico has announced a new open-source project for machine learning and natural language processing. Finetune is a “scikit-learn style model finetuning for NLP,” according to its GitHub page.

    Finetuning refers to a transfer learning approach that is meant to take a model that is trained on one task and adapt it to be able to solve a different, but related, task.

    “Most organizations have natural language processing problems, but few have the labeled data they need to solve them with machine learning,” said Madison May, Indico machine learning architect and cofounder. “Finetune lets them do more with less labeled training data. And it only requires a base level of IT experience.”

  • Why your company needs an open source program office [Ed: Mac Asay and Microsoft again. Claiming they’re “open source” because they buy (to destroy) “open” things doesn’t make them “open”.]

    We seem to be very confused about what constitutes an "open source company." Tobie Langel has asked if Mozilla and Microsoft are open source companies. The majority (78%) think Mozilla is, and an almost equivalent percentage (67%) think Microsoft is not. Yet, Microsoft contributes orders of magnitude more open source code than Mozilla. The reality is that both organizations qualify as "open source companies." Hopefully yours does, too.

  • Future of OMEMO

    OMEMO is an XMPP extension protocol, which specifies end-to-end encryption for XMPP clients using the double ratchet algorithm of the Signal protocol. Introduced back in 2015 by GSoC student Andreas Straub in the Conversations client, OMEMO had a lot of press coverage and many privacy and security oriented websites praise XMPP clients that do support it. Its beyond debate, that OMEMO brought many new faces to XMPP. For many users, having end-to-end encryption built into their chat client is a must. Today OMEMO is implemented in a range of clients on different platforms. While Conversations, ChatSecure and Dino support it out of the box, there is a series of plugins that teach OMEMO to other clients such as Gajim, Pidgin and Miranda NG.

    However, there is quite a lot of controversy around OMEMO. Part of it are technical discussions, others are more or less of a political nature. Let me list some of them for you.

    Some users and client developers see no value in OMEMOs forward secrecy (the fact, that messages can only be decrypted once per device, so new devices do not have access to the chat history of the user). That is a fair point. Especially webclients have a hard time implementing OMEMO in a sensible way. Also the average user is probably having a hard time understanding what exactly forward secrecy is and what the consequences are. Communicating to the user, that not having access to past messages is actually a feature might be a hard task for a client developer.

  • Mozilla B-Team: Bugzilla on Mojolicious Talk @ Mojoconf
  • Developer Tools support for Web Components in Firefox 63

    Shadow DOM and Web Components are enabled by default in Firefox 63 and the Developer Tools are ready for them ! If you are using Web Components in your project, or want to experiment, download Nightly, and check out how we integrated these new technologies into the Inspector and Debugger

  • Best Coding Kits for Curious Kids

    Coding isn’t just for kids who want to become programmers. It’s great for growing brains because it encourages abstract thinking and problem solving. In this coding kit roundup, you’ll find something for all ages and abilities to help get your child started today.

    Whether your child shows interest in creating video games, solving puzzles, creating music, playing games, or thinking logically, any one of these kits will be sure to spark an interesting in coding and, more importantly, set them up to engage in deep and fun problem solving.  These fantastic kits help you not only gift your child an interesting and educational toy but equip them with tools so that they can bring their innovations and ideas to life.

Open Source EHR Association to release international version of VA's VistA EHR

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OSS

Open Source EHR Association launched an initiative to create an international version of VistA, the Department of Veterans Affairs' homegrown EHR.

Former VA Secretary David Shulkin, MD, released the agency's plan to scrap VistA for a systemwide Cerner EHR during a news briefing in mid-2017. However, providers outside the VA have also implemented the VA's legacy system — VistA has periodically been released to the public, and developers in the Open Source EHR Association build on these updates to create an open-source product.

The Open Source EHR Association, a nonprofit that hosts software repositories to help government agencies manage IT applications, aims to expand VistA's capabilities under an international effort dubbed Plan VI. The project focuses on developing an EHR capable of displaying information in any language using Unicode, including Korean, German, Arabic and Chinese dialects.

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Open Hardware: DIY Blynk Board and More Code From SiFive HiFive RISC-V Developers

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Hardware
OSS
  • Program an IoT pushbutton with a DIY Blynk Board

    In my previous article, I explained how to set up a DIY Blynk Board using an ESP8266 based microcontroller. Blynk is an easy way to start creating Internet of Things projects. It's not tied to any specific board, so you can use the platform to control Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and other hardware of your choice over the internet.

    The DIY Blynk Board comes with more than 10 preconfigured projects. My earlier article showed how to set up the DIY Blynk Board and test the first project: using the button widget to receive a digital input and produce a digital output. Specifically, pressing a button on the Blynk app toggled a physical LED attached to the board.

  • SiFive Releases HiFive Unleashed RISC-V Open-Source Boot Loader With DDR Initialization

    Back in June we brought up how some of the SiFive HiFive Unleashed initialization code was closed-source for this developer board built around the RISC-V open-source processor ISA. One of the pain points was the DDR memory initialization code being closed-source but then SiFive announced they would allow for a fully open-source boot process. They've now made good on their word with their new open-source project.

    On Thursday the company announced the open-source release of the Freedom U540-C000's Bootloader. This open-source bootloader allows for booting this first Linux-compatible RISC-V developer board without relying upon closed-source bits -- including the DDR init code being open. They have also posted the contents of the mask ROM as well for reference.

Openwashing and FUD

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Microsoft
OSS
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