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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Mirantis shifts again, will offer managed solutions based on open-source technologies

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OSS

Mirantis is (or, as we will see, was) known as the pure play OpenStack vendor. The company focused on offering large organizations products and services that helped them leverage the open-source, OpenStack cloud computing platform to build their own clouds for internal or external use.

Over time, however, there has been some doubt cast upon how much of a market opportunity there is for these sort of OpenStack service providers. The OpenStack ecosystem has been the source of much angst as consolidation, rationalization and unrealized hopes and dreams too their toll.

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How to grow healthy open source project infrastructures

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OSS

In 2013 I joined the OpenStack Infrastructure team. In the four years I spent with the team, I learned a considerable amount about the value of hosting an infrastructure for an open source project in the open itself.

In 2014 I gave a talk at All Things Open and was interviewed by Jason Baker about how we'd done our systems administration in the open. My involvement on this team led me to advocate for systems administrators to use revision control and learn about tools for working with a distributed team. At the OpenStack Summit in Austin in 2016, our team did a talk on navigating the open source OpenStack Infrastructure.

The leadership of the OpenStack project in the space of open source infrastructures inevitably led us to encounter other open source projects that were similarly open sourcing their entire, or portions of, the infrastructure used in their project. In February of 2016, I launched OpenSourceInfra.org to begin tracking these infrastructures. The source for this site is hosted on GitLab, and we've seen a steady increase in merge proposals to add new projects over the past several months.

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FOSS Funding

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OSS
  • GNU Toolchain now accepting donations with the support of the Free Software Foundation

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is now accepting donations to support the GNU Toolchain, a collection of foundational freely licensed software development tools. Many pieces of software depend upon the GNU Toolchain, including the GNU/Linux family of operating systems which runs the majority of Web servers, millions of personal devices and the most advanced supercomputers.

  • SPI Inc Ended 2016 Managing 2.48 Million USD For Open-Source Projects

    For those curious, here is how much various open-source projects have in the bank.

    SPI Inc, Software in the Public Interest, is the non-profit organization serving as the organizational steward for many open-source projects from Arch Linux and Debian to recently X.Org. SPI Inc also manages the finances for smaller projects like Drizzle, GNUstep, YafaRay, HeliOS, Fluxbox, and many others. Those that somehow never heard of SPI Inc can learn more about their efforts via SPI-Inc.org.

Linux/FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Your freedoms are eroding as technology becomes more closed

    We’re not doing a good job of keeping the Internet and related technologies as open and egalitarian as they used to be, allowing a dangerous oligopoly to reemerge. How can we reverse the trend? And by we, I actually mean you.

  • Senlin for VMware Integrated OpenStack brings open source up to speed

    The Senlin clustering service delivers a one-two punch, enabling developer productivity while proving VMware's commitment to improving open source technology.

  • Open Source Couchbase Mobile Now Scales on Demand

    The open source Couchbase Mobile platform comprises: the Couchbase Lite NoSQL embedded database for mobile and Internet of Things (IoT) devices; the Couchbase Server that stores and manages data in the cloud; and the Couchbase Sync Gateway that synchronizes data between the two.

  • Inertia Slows Evolution For Open Scientists

    It is still a long way to a new generation of “open scientists”, German open data researcher Christian Heise found out in his just-published PhD thesis. Heise not only investigated drivers and barriers for what he expects to be an evolution from open access to open science by theory and a survey of over 1100 scientists. He tried the concept open science the hard way, opening up the writing of his thesis paper on the net.

  • Open Source textbooks could save students a bundle

    As the cost of college has skyrocketed, students and parents could soon get relief on expensive textbooks under the Textbook Cost Savings Act of 2017 that would provide funding to develop free open source learning materials.

    “The state is moving rapidly towards free textbooks online,” said the bill’s sponsor Sen. Jim Rosapepe, D-Prince George’s, in an interview. “If the bill passes it will be state policy that we want to move in that direction as much as possible.”

  • Mathematics for Computer Science: a free, CC-licensed MIT textbook

    This is indeed an up-to-the-minute text [PDF], dated Mar 7, 2017. It's written by Googler/MIT prof Eric Lehman, MIT/Akamai scientist F Thomson Leighton and MIT AI researcher Albert R Meyer, as a companion to their Mathematics for Computer Science open course.

  • The Open Source Toolkit – meet the Channel Editors

    The Open Source Toolkit features articles and online projects describing hardware and software that can be used in a research and/or science education setting across different fields, from basic to applied research. The Channel Editors aim to showcase how Open Source tools can lead to innovation, democratisation and increased reproducibility.

  • Vulkan 1.0.43 Adds Two New Extensions

    The Khronos Group has done a Friday evening update to the Vulkan 1.0 API specification.

    Vulkan 1.0.43 includes a number of GitHub and internal-Khronos issues around document clarifications and other minor behavior differences.

Linux and FOSS Events: LibrePlanet 2017, foss-north 2017, Strata+Hadoop World 2017, UCLA Linux User Group

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OSS

How open source has taken over our lives

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OSS
Gaming

The next time you play Uncharted 4 on PlayStation 4, The Legend of Zelda on Nintendo Switch, or tell Alexa to turn the lights off, bear in mind it’s all running on open source.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Open Source Vs. Commercial BI Software [Ed: False dichotomy right from the get-go (headline). FOSS can definitely be - and often is - commercial]
  • GAPID: Google Has A New Graphics Debugger For Vulkan & OpenGL ES

    GAPID is short for the Graphics API Debugger and is a new open-source project out of Google.

    Adding to the list of available open-source debuggers is GAPID. GAPID allows inspecting, tweaking, and replaying calls to OpenGL ES and Vulkan. GAPID is primarily geared for debugging GLES/VLK Android applications but the user-interface runs on Windows, Linux, and macOS. The tracer is able to run on those host operating systems as well as Android.

  • Bouncing Back To Private Clouds With OpenStack

    There is an adage, not quite yet old, suggesting that compute is free but storage is not. Perhaps a more accurate and, as far as public clouds are concerned, apt adaptation of this saying might be that computing and storage are free, and so are inbound networking within a region, but moving data across regions in a public cloud is brutally expensive, and it is even more costly spanning regions.

  • Blockchain for Supply Chain: Enormous Potential Down the Road
  • Open source project management can be risky business[Ed: Correction to this article; Netflix not "openly developed." DRM and proprietary.]

    Our digital lives are powered by programming philosophers who choose to develop their code out in the open.

    All programs begin with lines of instruction. When ready for execution these lines of instruction are converted to a binary format that the computer can execute. Open source programs are programs where the human readable code is accessible to anyone. This philosophy of openness and freedom has allowed these projects to impact the lives of everyone.

    The Linux kernel is the core of all Android devices, and nearly a third of all Internet traffic rides on just one openly developed project, Netflix. (Read the excellent article in Time magazine about this.) How does the choice of using open source software as part of a project plan affect the amount and type of risk to a project within an organization?

  • Teradata open sources Kylo data lake management software
  • Teradata debuts open-source Kylo to Quickly Build, manage data pipelines
  • Teradata debuts IntelliCloud to blend data and analytic software as a service with expanded deployment choice
  • HTC Will Open Source Full-Body Tracking For Vive With Tracker

    Speaking to UploadVR at MWC, Alvin Graylin, President of Vive in China, said that HTC had been working on a “similar system” for full body tracking in its China research lab, and would be open sourcing it for all developers to implement into their experiences for free.

  • Social Commerce: Encouraging African Start-ups To Lean On Open Source

    The internet is evolving and there is a lot of excitement because no one is quite sure what it will look like in the next five years. However one thing that is sure about its evolution is that it will keep getting more social.

    Open Source software is currently being leveraged on by developers across the globe not just for blogging and publishing but also for designing feature rich and secure internal process systems and enterprise resource tools.

    Social commerce is a one of this new concepts which is relatively new especially in the Africa web space hence the need to train start-ups on how to tap into and fully explore this new innovation.

  • Klaxon, an open-source tool from The Marshall Project, helps journalists track newsworthy changes to websites

    The Marshall Project, a non-profit news organisation that covers the criminal justice system in the United States, has developed a free and open-source tool that allows reporters and editors to track websites of interest and receive notifications via Slack or email when newsworthy changes happen.

  • Growing Up Node: Lessons for Successful Platform Migration

    Switching from one technology to another is always going to be hard, and, despite the popularity of Node.js, it does come with its own set of complexities, and the advantages are not always apparent to management, says Trevor Livingston, principal architect at HomeAway, speaking at Node.js Interactive.

  • SunCamp happening again this May!

    As I announced in mailing lists a few days ago, the Debian SunCamp (DSC2017) is happening again this May.

    SunCamp different to most other Debian events. Instead of a busy schedule of talks, SunCamp focuses on the hacking and socialising aspect, without making it just a Debian party/vacation.

  • Making Drupal upgrades easy forever

    After a lot of discussion among the Drupal core committers and developers, and studying projects like Symfony, we believe that the advantages of Drupal's minor upgrade model (e.g. from Drupal 8.2 to Drupal 8.3) can be translated to major upgrades (e.g. from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9). We see a way to keep innovating while providing a smooth upgrade path and learning curve from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9.

  • ScyllaDB Secures $16M in Series B Funding
  • Israeli app builder co ScyllaDB raises $16m
  • ScyllaDB raises $16 million to facilitate app building

The Companies That Support Linux and Open Source: Hart

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Linux
Interviews
OSS

Hart is a medical software technology company that improves the ways in which people inside and outside of the industry access and engage with health data.

Founded in 2012, the startup develops HartOS, an API platform that allows healthcare providers and their vendors and partners to use health data from multiple computer systems in a HIPAA-compliant manner in a range of digital formats. These may include medical records, hospital information, radiology information, laboratory information, picture archiving, emergency department, and other systems.

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GNOME News

  • Hurrah! Dash to Dock Now Supports GNOME 3.24
    The Dash to Dock GNOME Shell Extension has been updated to support GNOME 3.24, and improves its app launch keyboard shortcut feature.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed Is the First to Offer the GNOME 3.24 Desktop Environment
    openSUSE Project's Dominique Leuenberger was proud to announce the availability of the recently released GNOME 3.24 desktop environment into the software repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling release. According to the developer, and to our knowledge, openSUSE Tumbleweed is now the first GNU/Linux distributions to offer the GNOME 3.24 packages to their users. We know that openSUSE is a distro mostly oriented towards the KDE Plasma desktop, but support for GNOME is provided at the same level of quality.

Linux Action Show ends after 10-year run

This past Sunday, Jupiter Broadcasting announced the Linux Action Show—one of the longest-running podcasts in the Linux world, which has aired almost continuously since June 10, 2006—is coming to an end and closing down production. Over a decade. That is a seriously good run for any show—podcast, TV, radio or otherwise. When I and my co-host created the Linux Action Show (typically abbreviated as LAS) nearly 11 years ago, we had no idea it would last this long. Nor did we have any idea of how far it would grow. Read more

Red Hat News

Samsung Z4 gets WiFi Certified with Tizen 3.0 onboard, Launching soon

Today, the next Tizen smartphone, which should be the named the Samsung Z4, has received its WiFi certification (certification ID: WFA70348) – Model number SM-Z400F/DS with firmware Z400F.001 on the 2.4Ghz band. WiFi certification is usually one of the last steps before a mobile device gets released and means a launch is coming real soon as we have already seen the Z4 make its debut appearance at the FCC. For the previous model, the Samsung Z2, we saw it get WIFi certified on 7 July and then launched on 23 August, a mere 6 weeks. Read more