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OSS

Docker News From DockerCon and Moby

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Server
OSS
  • Docker LinuxKit: Secure Linux containers for Windows, macOS, and clouds

    At Dockercon in Austin, Texas, Docker CEO Solomon Hydes said, Docker "is a bunch of projects not a monolith." One of the newest of these projects is LinuxKit. This is a toolkit for building secure, portable, and lean operating systems for containers.

  • As container adoption grows, Linux community champions open source

    While much of the recent rise in enthusiasm for containers in applications has users closely associating that functionality with Docker Inc., members of the Linux community have been eager to point out how long their systems have been using containers in applications and to encourage users to look into further Linux utility for their needs.

    “Containers aren’t a Docker thing; containers are a Linux thing. … It’s been a core Linux feature for over a decade now,” said Brian Gracely (pictured), director of product strategy at Red Hat Inc.

  • Introducing Moby Project: a new open-source project to advance the software containerization movement

    Since Docker democratized software containers four years ago, a whole ecosystem grew around containerization and in this compressed time period it has gone through two distinct phases of growth. In each of these two phases, the model for producing container systems evolved to adapt to the size and needs of the user community as well as the project and the growing contributor ecosystem.

  • Docker’s new Moby open-source project is the ‘Lego Club of container systems’

    Docker Inc. is launching a new open-source initiative, dubbed the Moby Project, which the San Francisco-based company describes as a new effort to move software container technology further into mainstream use by developers and businesses.

    Moby was announced this morning at the annual DockerCon convention in Austin, Texas. The project includes a library of backend components, a framework for assembling those components into a container platform, and a reference assembly called Moby Origin, explains Docker founder and CTO Solomon Hykes in a post announcing the new project.

  • Docker debuts containerized kit for building Linux distros

    Since its beginning, Docker has been created by synthesizing elements in Linux and repackaging them in useful ways. Docker’s next trick is the reverse: using container elements to synthesize distributions of Linux.

    Today Docker unveiled LinuxKit and the Moby Project, a pair of projects that are intended to allow operating system vendors, do-it-yourselfers, and cutting-edge software creators to create container-native OSes and container-based systems.

  • DockerCon: Docker announces two new collaborative open-source container projects

    Docker wants containers to be the building blocks of interchangeable platforms. The company announced two new open-source projects, the LinuxKit and the Moby Project, at day two of its DockerCon conference in Austin, Texas.

5 Open Source companies to watch in 2017

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OSS

As if getting venture funding themselves isn't exciting enough for open source-oriented startups, seeing an open source-focused company like Deis get snapped up by Microsoft must be a thrill as well.

While it would be more thrilling, perhaps, if Microsoft disclosed how much it paid, I'm sure those in the startup world and their backers have ways of finding out that information. Not that the acquisition path is necessarily the exit route that all of these startups envision for themselves, but such money can obviously talk.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • How to deal with leaving an open source project

    A few months later, I made an even more difficult decision. The decision was to leave an open source project that I'd helped to start and had been active in running for the past 14 years. I'd been working on the project longer than my last five jobs combined. When I announced that I was leaving the project a lot of people were surprised, mostly because up until that point no one in a leadership position had left the project and no one knew what that meant for the project, especially me. Unlike the previous jobs I'd quit, there was no exit strategy in place and I didn't have a plan for what I would do next.

  • Dell EMC takes on streaming storage with open-source solution, Pravega

    Kaitchuck joined theCUBE at the Flink Forward conference last week in San Francisco to talk about Pravega, a new open-source stream storage system that Dell EMC designed and built from the ground up for modern-day stream processors like Apache Flink, an open-source stream processing framework.

  • Equinix CTO: Open Source Critical for Interconnection

    Open Networking Summit – Equinix sees open source as a critical aspect of its ability to be the place where networks and data centers converge, connect and share data, and that view is fueling its efforts to be an early tester of what the Open Compute Project and the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) are developing.

    Equinix CTO Ihab Tarazi tells Light Reading in an interview here earlier this month that the next-generation architecture toward which telecom networks are evolving will require massive scaling of the Equinix interconnection model that will depend on open source approaches to manage the disaggregation of hardware and software that virtualization is enabling.

  • Is Mastodon the new social media star, or imploding black hole?

    Mastodon has exploded onto the social scene in the last week and is gaining users at a phenomenal rate. But is the new network an open source geek's dream or Twitter's ultimate nightmare?

  • S4i Systems Embraces Open Source Project

    Open source development on IBM i bodes well for the platform and all those who look to the future as well as recognizing the value of the past. RPG development isn’t threatened by open source options. It’s stimulated by open source. The modernization of RPG, C, or COBOL investments gets a boost from open source. There are people writing applications on IBM i that would not be within shouting distance of the platform if open source language options were not available.

  • Free Webinar: Why and How To Publish Your Work and Opinions

    As part of its goal to cultivate more diverse thoughts and opinions in open source, the April Women in Open Source webinar will discuss why publishing your own research, technical work and industry commentary is a smart move for your career and incredibly beneficial to the industry at large.

  • SPACK: A Package Manager for Supercomputers, Linux, and MacOS

    In this video from Switzerland HPC Conference, Massimiliano Culpo from EPFL presents: SPACK – A Package Manager for Supercomputers, Linux and MacOS.

  • Palemoon Looking forward in 2017

    This is a general announcement to lay down our rough plans for 2017, since there will be some big changes coming in the Mozilla landscape.

  • Intel Pulls OSIC Funding, Rackspace Cuts 45 Workers

    Intel pulled funding for the OpenStack Innovation Center (OSIC), which it co-founded with Rackspace in 2015.

  • Intel cuts funds for OpenStack at Rackspace
  • Report: Intel pulls the plug on OpenStack support

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  • Using SlideWiki for OpenCourseWare

    Open source is about much more than free (as in beer and speech) software and hardware designs. It’s being harnessed to do things like bring free or affordable health care to undeveloped nations, and as the underpinning for free education.

  • Z80 Fuzix Is Like Old Fashioned Unix

    Of course, 1980 Unix was a lot different from modern-day Linux, but it is still closer to a modern system than CP/M. Fuzix also adds several modern features like 30 character file names and up-to-date APIs. The kernel isn’t just for the Z80, by the way. It can target a variety of older processors including the 6502, the 6809, the 8086, and others. As you might expect, the system can fit in a pretty small system.

  • Why don't you just rewrite it in X?

    Recently there has been movement to convert tooling used by various software projects in the Gnome stack from a mishmash of shell, Awk and Perl into Python 3. The main reasoning for this is that having only one "scripting" dependency to a modern, well maintained project makes it simple to compile applications using Gnome technologies on platforms such as Windows. Moving between projects also becomes easier.

Back End/Server

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Server
OSS

FOSS at Events

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OSS
  • Volunteering at the 2017 SFBay ACT-W conference

    I had the privilege of volunteering for the Open Source Initiative (OSI) table at the ACT-W conference at Galvanize, San Francisco this last Saturday with Erich Clauer and Zachariah Sherzad. It was an event focused on giving women the best information on advancing in technical careers. Keynotes and talks sounded excellent on paper, but I missed out on them, as I was in the career fair part of the event for the day. There were many volunteering tables set up in the career area. OSI was one of them. Pyladies, Chicktech, Docusign, among others were there to support technical women. I answered questions about OSI and open source. There was a mix of experience levels, but most were just starting their technical careers.

  • How to organize an OpenStack Operators Meetup

    When we started organizing this operators mid-cycle meetup we had no idea what it meant to gather so many people — especially operators. This last cycle, the two last standing competitors to host the Operators Meetup were Milan and Tokyo. Tokyo had already hosted the Summit last year so it was finally our opportunity to bring part of the global OpenStack community to Italy.

  • 5 OpenStack user sessions you can’t miss at the Boston Summit

    OpenStack Summits are a whirl of energy—from session rooms with standing room only, all-day trainings to onboard new Stackers and an expo hall with over 100 companies explaining new products and performing live demos.

Freedom Doesn’t Have to Be Free: Revenue and Open Source

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GNU
OSS

In 1983, Richard Stallman kicked off the free software movement with the launch of the GNU Project. From that point onwards, free software was commonly associated with being free in the monetary sense as well.

Most all open source projects, especially those in the world of Linux are available free of charge. And while this is very nice in itself, it can result in developers not being able to fully commit to their projects.

In turn fantastic open source projects going nowhere in development when the lives of the maintainers catch up to them. But there is another way to go about open source!

Read more

FOSS: Mastodon Social, Richard Stallman Interview, ODF Toolkit and More

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GNU
Interviews
OSS
  • What is GNU social and is Mastodon Social a “Twitter Clone”?

    Mastodon Social is the name of an instance on GNU social which uses the OStatus protocol to connect to a vast variety of servers in what’s known as a federation. Mastodon is also the name of the software being used on that server, which was developed by Eugen “Gargron” Rochko. It was built with Ruby on Rails, Redux, and React.js. I learned the latter from the Wikipedia page, which is about the extent of research given by any of the other articles published this week.

  • "Richard Stallman" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 14, 2017

    In today's episode of the Lunduke Hour, I get the chance to sit down and chat with the one and only Richard Stallman. Founder of the Free Software Foundation. We talk about everything from the W3C's stance on DRM to opinions on the movie "Galaxy Quest".

  • New version of ODF Toolkit released
  • Indian Engineer wins UN Challenge to create open-source tool providing greater visibility into Member State voting patterns

    Unite Ideas is a big data crowd-sourcing platform developed by the Office of Information and Communications Technology, which seeks to provide a platform for collaboration between academia, civil society, and the United Nations.The vast amount of information generated by the UN in at least 6 official languages, and formats e.g. documents, datasets, and multimedia is increasingly being made available to the public as “open data”. At Unite Ideas, the public can access not just these these datasets, but also the source code of the solutions to previously completed challenges and build on them. Solutions and expertise developed can be re-used by governments and civil society to support international peace and security, sustainable development, human rights, international law, and humanitarian aid.

  • Ubuntu ditches Unity, Maryland embraces open textbooks, and more open source news

Events: Linux Plumbers Conference, CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017

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OSS
  • Registration for Linux Plumbers Conference is now open

    The 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference organizing committee is pleased to announce that the registration for this year’s conference is now open. Information on how to register can be found here [1]. Registration prices and cutoff dates are published in the ATTEND [2] page of the web site. A reminder that we are following a quota system to release registration slots. Therefore the early registration rate will remain in effect until early registration closes on June 18 2017, or the quota limit (150) is reached, whatever comes earlier. As usual, contact us [3] if you have questions.

  • CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017: an overview

    CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017 took place in Berlin on March 29th and 30th, and they were packed with clever things you can do in, around, and on top of, Kubernetes. It is possible that not every reader of LWN is familiar with Kubernetes, so I'd like to give a brief description of it before I describe any of the talks that I heard there. To do that, I'll have to at least mention tools, containerization, cloud-native computing and microservices, and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

    Containers are an elegant way to combine two Linux primitives, control groups and and namespaces, with loopback filesystems to provide isolated structures that in many ways resemble virtual machines (VMs), though they don't have their own kernels. It is important to remember, however, that they are not actually VMs; no less an authority than Jessie Frazelle, who maintained Docker and now hacks on containers for Google when not speaking at KubeCon 2017, says exactly that in her blog. If you treat your containers like VMs, you're using them wrong, and things may not end well if you do that in production.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • 8 new blog posts on how to encourage new contributors
  • New open source router aims to compete with Cisco and Juniper

    Drew Conry-Murray, writing in Packet Pushers, looked into the Free Range Router (FRR), a new open source router offering that is looking to challenge Cisco and Juniper. FRR isn't new; it came about as a result of a split within the Quagga open source community. Contributors such as Cumulus Networks, Big Switch and 6WIND, frustrated by the slow pace of Quagga's development, decided to form their own community, offering FRR as an alternative. The open source router, currently in version 2.0, is designed to run on Linux and Unix operating systems and offers support for a variety of routing protocol daemons, including intermediate system to system, Border Gateway Protocol and Open Shortest Path First.

  • Initiative for Open Citations Takes Alternative Approach To Freeing Up Knowledge

    We've just written about widespread frustration at the slow pace of the shift to open access publishing of academic papers, and about how some major funding organizations are trying to address that. Open access aims to make entire publications publicly available, and that is meeting considerable resistance from traditional publishers who derive their healthy profits from charging for subscriptions. Rather than continue to tackle publishers head-on, an interesting new project seeks instead to liberate only a particular part of each article, albeit an important one. The new Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC) seeks to promote the unrestricted availability of the list of citations that form a key part of most academic articles...

  • Ultimaker unveils next generation of open-source 3D printing

    When Ultimaker, a manufacturer of open-source 3D printers headquartered in Amsterdam with an office in Boston, announced recently the global availability of the next generation of its 3D-printing product line, it promised professionals unprecedented freedom of design. Open-source 3D printing has become popular, particularly in the desktop printing market, according to John Kawola, U.S. President of Ultimaker.

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