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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • An Introduction to Iridium, an Open Source Selenium and Cucumber Testing Tool

    Today I would like to introduce Iridium, an open source web testing tool built around Cucumber and Selenium and designed to make automated testing of web sites easy and accessible.

  • Commission Wants to Throw Out VistA (Again)

    A VistA commission report can be found here. Its text and conclusion are of the 'seen it before' variety multiple times in VistA's long history. Maybe the bureaucrats will finally succeed this time at murdering VistA after so many past attempts.

  • LLVM 3.8.1 Release

    LLVM 3.8.1 is now available! Download it now, or read the release notes.

  • LLVM 3.8.1 Released
  • Beware of Contradictory “Support”

    There are organizations that proclaim support for free software or the GNU Project, and teach classes in use of nonfree software.

    It's possible that they do some other things that really support free software, but those classes certainly don't. On the contrary, they work directly against the free software movement by promoting the use of the nonfree software. That increases the magnitude of the practical problem it is our mission to correct.

    Even worse, that grants nonfree software legitimacy. The basic point of the free software movement is that nonfree software is unjust and should not exist. That's why we need a movement to replace and eliminate it. Teaching how to use it asserts that it isn't a problem; that opposes the free software movement at the deepest level.

  • New release of the CEF Dashboard

    The Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) provides EUR 870 million for the creation of cross-border digital services in Europe, largely through the CEF building block Digital Service Infrastructure (DSI) (eDelivery, eID, eSignature, eTranslation and eInvoicing). Cross-border digital services are a fundamental aspect of the Digital Single Market, which aims to overcome digital barriers, with a projected value of EUR 415 billion to the European economy.

  • Luxembourg adopts the CIMF

    In May, the Government of Luxembourg became the first EU Member State to adopt the CIMF, a framework for Corporate Information Management tailored for the European Public Sector.

  • 10 Reasons Why You Should Learn Java Programming Language

    Why one should learn Java programming language? The answer to this question comprises of multiple reasons like its popularity, ease-to-learn nature, helpful open source tools and libraries etc. Gaining expertise in Java ensures a secure career with fat paychecks and the power to create applications with real-world applications.

Anki Cozmo: AI toy robot gets open-source SDK for programming, hacking

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Hardware
OSS

FOSS Events

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OSS
  • Polyglot – Learn, Share, Collaborate – Hackfest 2016!!

    So for this HACKFEST 2016, wondered how would it be if we could share the learning through a wiki and collaboratively maintain an up-to-date content. I had a hunch that this might be a problem that many would have faced and would be good to solve.

  • How not to get help in open source

    In her lightning talk at Great Wide Open 2016, Emily Dunham shares the most common ways people shoot themselves in the foot while looking for help with an open source project:

    Ask for experts
    Leave IRC after asking your question
    Withholding information
    Asking permission to ask a question
    Going where the experts aren't
    Being offensive

  • Having a Gas at Texas Linux Fest 2016

    Texas Linux Fest 2016 is in the books, safely tucked away in the annals of free open source history, The wonderful folks who make TLF happen were again gracious enough to give Reglue a booth in the expo hall, and for those who are watching from home, space in any TLF expo hall ain’t cheap. Just like last year, Reglue Vice President Carolyn Huxley was gracious enough to work our booth and answer questions like, “What’s a Reglue?” My personal thanks for her help.

Tech Talk: Why Government Software Should Be Open-Source

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OSS

Bulgaria just did something revolutionary, and just a tiny bit crazy; they’ve signed in a few new laws concerning software used by their government that, among other things, stipulate that all government software must be open-source, and must be developed and maintained in public repositories. The new laws are not independent, but instead stand as amendments to their Electronic Governance Act. The law also talks about free and public APIs, easy multi-ecosystem implementation, and a number of other things all targeted at making government software as open, transparent and friendly as possible. While a great number of countries use some open-source software, Bulgaria is the first country to go fully open-source, shutting out closed-source software entirely. While the other sections of Article 58 are important, it’s the open-source bit that really shakes things up and presents a possibility of real positive change in the way government software is created, maintained, used and interacted with, not only in the rule’s homeland of Bulgaria, but throughout the world.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • All the Apache Streaming Projects: An Exploratory Guide

    The speed at which data is generated, consumed, processed, and analyzed is increasing at an unbelievably rapid pace. Social media, the Internet of Things, ad tech, and gaming verticals are struggling to deal with the disproportionate size of data sets. These industries demand data processing and analysis in near real-time. Traditional big data-styled frameworks such as Apache Hadoop is not well-suited for these use cases.

    As a result, multiple open source projects have been started in the last few years to deal with the streaming data. All were designed to process a never-ending sequence of records originating from more than one source. From Kafka to Beam, there are over a dozen Apache projects in various stages of completion.

  • prpl Foundation Unveils the First Open Source Hypervisor for the Internet of Things
  • In the Wake of ownCloud, Here Comes Nextcloud

    The extremely popular ownCloud open source file-sharing and storage platform for building private clouds has been much in the news lately. CTO and founder of ownCloud Frank Karlitschek resigned from the company a few months ago. His open letter announcing the move pointed to possible friction created as ownCloud moved forward as a commercial entity as opposed to a solely community focused, open source project.

    Karlitschek had a plan, though. He is now out with a fork of ownCloud called Nextcloud, and there are strong signs that we can expect good things from this open platform.

  • Getting started with Git

    In the introduction to this series we learned who should use Git, and what it is for. Today we will learn how to clone public Git repositories, and how to extract individual files without cloning the whole works.

    Since Git is so popular, it makes life a lot easier if you're at least familiar with it at a basic level. If you can grasp the basics (and you can, I promise!), then you'll be able to download whatever you need, and maybe even contribute stuff back. And that, after all, is what open source is all about: having access to the code that makes up the software you run, the freedom to share it with others, and the right to change it as you please. Git makes this whole process easy, as long as you're comfortable with Git.

  • Never Discount the Soft Skills for Career Building

    As an open source professional, even if you have the technical chops required for a position, it doesn’t necessarily mean you are a “shoe-in” for the role. Surprisingly, what many don’t know is that what sets you apart from other candidates in the interview process is your soft skills. Finding a professional who has the technical skills to handle a job can be difficult, but finding a professional who has both the technical skills required and the personal attributes that enable collaboration with team members can even more challenging.

    For open source professionals looking to move, improving some of your soft skills is a great way to make yourself indispensable to employers. Focusing on these skills allows you to still grow professionally and attract potential employers without having to go through the formal training methods required to learn some of the more technical skills. In particular, pay specific attention to some of the skills listed below, as they were found to be amongst the top soft skills employers on Dice requested from open source professionals:

  • Why Companies Adopt Microservices And How They Succeed

    This post into delves into the non-technical aspects of adopting microservices within a company. With the world now being driven by technology, companies must learn to adapt, stay agile and continue to increase velocity in their core business.

  • Building a Machine Learning Orchestration Framework on Apache Mesos
  • Managing Large SQL Database Clusters with the Apache Mesos Crate Framework
  • Redis on Apache Mesos, A New Framework - Dhilip Kumar S, Huawei Technologies
  • You've Read Our Open-Source Research Guidebook. Now Let's Use It.

    RuNet Echo has now published eight installments in a guidebook on conducting open-source research on the Russian Internet. This ninth and final entry takes the tools and instructions we've been studying and applies them to a single case study: the wildfires that caused significant damage to the Siberian city of Chita in 2015.

  • Plug-and-play server provides access to millions of digital documents in Africa

    The WiderNet project, which is affiliated with WiderNet@UNC at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, provides resources, coaching, training, computers, and educational materials to schools, clinics, libraries, and homes in underserved areas of the world. In this interview, Cliff Missen, the Director of the WiderNet Project, explains how the non-profit helps improve digital education and communications for international communities.

  • Facebook launches open source cellular system
  • Facebook unveils open-source mobile tech
  • This new Facebook device aims to bring internet to the ends of the earth
  • iPod

    Unfortunately I have found writing to the iPod to be very poor with Rockbox, but it's fine for playback, and booting the iPod in OF or DFU mode is very easy and works reliably.

  • Rcpp now used by over 700 CRAN packages
  • IoT puts assembly language back on the charts

    Let's do the time warp again: according to an outfit that tracks programming languages, the Internet of Things is re-igniting demand for assembly language skills.

    Software consultancy TIOBE's Programming Community Index has turned up the re-emergence of assembly programming in its monthly index (the definition of the index is here).

FOSS in Europe

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OSS
  • Could open source help kill piracy in Romania?

    Open source enthusiast Petru Ratiu stressed that although Linux might be cost-effective, it’s not completely free, as it implies payments like the ones associated with support and training. As for the administration, he emphasised the need for open data and open formats.

  • New European contest to promote IT reuse

    The EC will award EUR 15,000 and EUR 10,000 to the two most-proven IT solutions reused by each of the four levels of public administration: cross-border, national, regional and local.

    Contenders for the ‘Sharing & Reuse Award’ can register their project here. The contest is open until 28 October 2016 and the prizes will be announced in March 2017.

    “We want to award existing IT solutions that have been developed and shared by public administrations, and that can be further reused across Europe”, says Margarida Abecasis, in charge of the ISA² programme, under whose auspices the awards are run.

In mourning for Nano, chap crafts 1k-loc text editor

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GNU
OSS

Ticked off by the news that Nano opted out of GNU, a programmer called Salvatore Sanfilippo has written his own text editor.

What's impressive about it is that it provides a basic code editor with syntax highlighting and search, without ncurses as a dependency, and in a mere 1,000 lines of code (at Github).

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The 10 Coolest Open-Source Products Of 2016 (So Far)

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OSS

Through the first half of 2016, open-source products haven't been a sideshow to the main events from fully proprietary products. Open-source products have been front and center, as a wave of new offerings in storage, containers, networking and other hot areas have been unveiled. And if Red Hat president and CEO Jim Whitehurst is right, this is still the early innings for open source. During the Red Hat Summit in June -- where the theme was "The Power of Participation" -- Whitehurst put his view this way: "Our ability to harness and distill the best ideas will determine human progress for the next century. … Our future depends on participation."

Here are the 10 coolest open-source products we've been tracking through the first half of 2016.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

Emulation or WINE

Fedora: The Latest

  • New "remi-php71" repository
  • PHP on the road to the 7.1.0 release
  • First round of Fedora 24 Updated Lives now available. (torrents expected later this week)
    As noted by my colleague on his blog the first round of F24 Updated Lives are now available and carry the date 20160720, Also as mentioned last week on his blog F23 Respins are not going to be actively made, however we and the rest of the volunteer team will field off-off requests as time and resources permit. We are considering a new/second tracker for the Updated Spins but as of today there are only .ISO files available at https://alt.fedoraproject.org/pub/alt/live-respins [shortlink] F24 Live-Respins . The F24 respins carry the 4.6.4-200 Kernel and roughly ~500M of updates since the Gold ISOs were released just 5 weeks ago. (some ISOs have more updates, some less)

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Snappy Packaging Happenings In The Fedora, Arch Space
    This week Canonical hosted a Snappy Sprint in Heidelberg, Germany where they worked to further their new package management solution originally spearheaded for Ubuntu Touch. This wasn't an Ubuntu-only event, but Canonical did invite other distribution stakeholders. Coming out of this week's event were at least positive moments to share for both Arch and Fedora developers. The Arch snaps package guy made progress on snap confinement on Arch. Currently when using Snaps on Arch, there isn't any confinement support, which defeats some of the purpose. There isn't any confinement support since it relies upon some functionality in the Ubuntu-patched AppArmor with that code not yet being mainlined. Arch's Timothy Redaelli has got those AppArmor patches now running via some AUR packages. Thus it's possible to get snap confinement working on Arch, but it's not yet too pleasant of an experience.
  • PhantomJS 2.1.1 in Ubuntu different from upstream
    At the moment of this writing Vitaly's qtwebkit fork is 28 commits ahead and 39 commits behind qt:dev. I'm surprised Ubuntu's PhantomJS even works.
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS released
    Ubuntu 16.04 is a LTS version of Ubuntu.Now Ubuntu team has announced the release of it's first point release,Ubuntu 16.04.1.This first point release includes many updates containing bug fixes and fixing security issues as well and as always what most of users want from a distribution and most of distributions tries to perform,Stability.This release is also well focoused on stabilty as Ubuntu 16.04.