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OSS

Back End/Server

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Server
OSS

FOSS at Events

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OSS
  • Volunteering at the 2017 SFBay ACT-W conference

    I had the privilege of volunteering for the Open Source Initiative (OSI) table at the ACT-W conference at Galvanize, San Francisco this last Saturday with Erich Clauer and Zachariah Sherzad. It was an event focused on giving women the best information on advancing in technical careers. Keynotes and talks sounded excellent on paper, but I missed out on them, as I was in the career fair part of the event for the day. There were many volunteering tables set up in the career area. OSI was one of them. Pyladies, Chicktech, Docusign, among others were there to support technical women. I answered questions about OSI and open source. There was a mix of experience levels, but most were just starting their technical careers.

  • How to organize an OpenStack Operators Meetup

    When we started organizing this operators mid-cycle meetup we had no idea what it meant to gather so many people — especially operators. This last cycle, the two last standing competitors to host the Operators Meetup were Milan and Tokyo. Tokyo had already hosted the Summit last year so it was finally our opportunity to bring part of the global OpenStack community to Italy.

  • 5 OpenStack user sessions you can’t miss at the Boston Summit

    OpenStack Summits are a whirl of energy—from session rooms with standing room only, all-day trainings to onboard new Stackers and an expo hall with over 100 companies explaining new products and performing live demos.

Freedom Doesn’t Have to Be Free: Revenue and Open Source

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GNU
OSS

In 1983, Richard Stallman kicked off the free software movement with the launch of the GNU Project. From that point onwards, free software was commonly associated with being free in the monetary sense as well.

Most all open source projects, especially those in the world of Linux are available free of charge. And while this is very nice in itself, it can result in developers not being able to fully commit to their projects.

In turn fantastic open source projects going nowhere in development when the lives of the maintainers catch up to them. But there is another way to go about open source!

Read more

FOSS: Mastodon Social, Richard Stallman Interview, ODF Toolkit and More

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GNU
Interviews
OSS
  • What is GNU social and is Mastodon Social a “Twitter Clone”?

    Mastodon Social is the name of an instance on GNU social which uses the OStatus protocol to connect to a vast variety of servers in what’s known as a federation. Mastodon is also the name of the software being used on that server, which was developed by Eugen “Gargron” Rochko. It was built with Ruby on Rails, Redux, and React.js. I learned the latter from the Wikipedia page, which is about the extent of research given by any of the other articles published this week.

  • "Richard Stallman" - Lunduke Hour - Apr 14, 2017

    In today's episode of the Lunduke Hour, I get the chance to sit down and chat with the one and only Richard Stallman. Founder of the Free Software Foundation. We talk about everything from the W3C's stance on DRM to opinions on the movie "Galaxy Quest".

  • New version of ODF Toolkit released
  • Indian Engineer wins UN Challenge to create open-source tool providing greater visibility into Member State voting patterns

    Unite Ideas is a big data crowd-sourcing platform developed by the Office of Information and Communications Technology, which seeks to provide a platform for collaboration between academia, civil society, and the United Nations.The vast amount of information generated by the UN in at least 6 official languages, and formats e.g. documents, datasets, and multimedia is increasingly being made available to the public as “open data”. At Unite Ideas, the public can access not just these these datasets, but also the source code of the solutions to previously completed challenges and build on them. Solutions and expertise developed can be re-used by governments and civil society to support international peace and security, sustainable development, human rights, international law, and humanitarian aid.

  • Ubuntu ditches Unity, Maryland embraces open textbooks, and more open source news

Events: Linux Plumbers Conference, CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017

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OSS
  • Registration for Linux Plumbers Conference is now open

    The 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference organizing committee is pleased to announce that the registration for this year’s conference is now open. Information on how to register can be found here [1]. Registration prices and cutoff dates are published in the ATTEND [2] page of the web site. A reminder that we are following a quota system to release registration slots. Therefore the early registration rate will remain in effect until early registration closes on June 18 2017, or the quota limit (150) is reached, whatever comes earlier. As usual, contact us [3] if you have questions.

  • CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017: an overview

    CloudNativeCon and KubeCon Europe 2017 took place in Berlin on March 29th and 30th, and they were packed with clever things you can do in, around, and on top of, Kubernetes. It is possible that not every reader of LWN is familiar with Kubernetes, so I'd like to give a brief description of it before I describe any of the talks that I heard there. To do that, I'll have to at least mention tools, containerization, cloud-native computing and microservices, and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).

    Containers are an elegant way to combine two Linux primitives, control groups and and namespaces, with loopback filesystems to provide isolated structures that in many ways resemble virtual machines (VMs), though they don't have their own kernels. It is important to remember, however, that they are not actually VMs; no less an authority than Jessie Frazelle, who maintained Docker and now hacks on containers for Google when not speaking at KubeCon 2017, says exactly that in her blog. If you treat your containers like VMs, you're using them wrong, and things may not end well if you do that in production.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • 8 new blog posts on how to encourage new contributors
  • New open source router aims to compete with Cisco and Juniper

    Drew Conry-Murray, writing in Packet Pushers, looked into the Free Range Router (FRR), a new open source router offering that is looking to challenge Cisco and Juniper. FRR isn't new; it came about as a result of a split within the Quagga open source community. Contributors such as Cumulus Networks, Big Switch and 6WIND, frustrated by the slow pace of Quagga's development, decided to form their own community, offering FRR as an alternative. The open source router, currently in version 2.0, is designed to run on Linux and Unix operating systems and offers support for a variety of routing protocol daemons, including intermediate system to system, Border Gateway Protocol and Open Shortest Path First.

  • Initiative for Open Citations Takes Alternative Approach To Freeing Up Knowledge

    We've just written about widespread frustration at the slow pace of the shift to open access publishing of academic papers, and about how some major funding organizations are trying to address that. Open access aims to make entire publications publicly available, and that is meeting considerable resistance from traditional publishers who derive their healthy profits from charging for subscriptions. Rather than continue to tackle publishers head-on, an interesting new project seeks instead to liberate only a particular part of each article, albeit an important one. The new Initiative for Open Citations (I4OC) seeks to promote the unrestricted availability of the list of citations that form a key part of most academic articles...

  • Ultimaker unveils next generation of open-source 3D printing

    When Ultimaker, a manufacturer of open-source 3D printers headquartered in Amsterdam with an office in Boston, announced recently the global availability of the next generation of its 3D-printing product line, it promised professionals unprecedented freedom of design. Open-source 3D printing has become popular, particularly in the desktop printing market, according to John Kawola, U.S. President of Ultimaker.

FOSS Events

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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Investigative journalists: "Government lock-in by Microsoft is alarming"

    IT infrastructures at government administrations all over Europe are largely based on proprietary, closed software from Microsoft. With digital systems constantly growing in size as well as importance, countries are becoming increasingly dependent on this single American corporation. Investigate Europe, an international group of journalists, has investigated the current situation and the consequences of this vendor lock-in. The results, they say, are alarming.

  • Microsoft releases ReactXP to open source [Ed: Openwashing, React is not really "open"]
  • Cloudera IPO: An argument against open source business? [Ed: By Mike Pittenger, Vice President, Security Strategy, Black Duck Software. Microsoft proxy is attacking FOSS, as intended all along]
  • Helsinki Metropolitan Transportation Authority's New Journey Planner Showcases Open-Source Software Development

    The Helsinki metropolitan transportation authority, Helsinki Region Transport HSL, has released a new version of its Journey Planner. The service is exceptional among similar trip planners worldwide in that it is based on open-source code. Thus the ongoing development of the Journey Planner can be a collaborative activity joined by developers, the general public, and other cities' transportation authorities. Among others, New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority MTA is testing the source code.

  • Drupal Confessions - An Open Letter [iophk: "CoCs are about controlling tech not producing tech"]

    Larry Garfield, a long-time, veteran contributor to Drupal was ejected from the community, allegedly not for breaking the Code of Conduct, but, to quote your own post on the matter, because “he holds views that are in opposition with the values of the Drupal project."

    [...]

    Our concerns do not make us pro-Larry — we do not endorse his beliefs or his personal life — but we are passionately committed to openness, transparency, due process, fairness, inclusivity, diversity, having personal lives that are none of Drupal’s business, and professionalism in tech; and we are vehemently opposed to discrimination, harassment, intimidation, bullying, doxxing, secret trials, and digging up information on member’s personal lives.

    [...]

  • TDF Team’s Interviews: Christian “Cloph” Lohmaier

    Christian “Cloph” Lohmaier has been LibreOffice’s release manager for quite a long time. We asked him some questions, to not only get better knowledge about his daily activities, but find out his opinions about The Document Foundation and LibreOffice.

  • MariaDB CEO on the open source enterprise – and why good databases are NOT a commodity

    MariaDB’s first annual user conference in New York City found MariaDB CEO Michael Howard in a confident mood. I decided to push issues, like whether “the revenge of relational databases” favors the incumbents, and see if I could find any cracks. I didn’t get those, but I got some spicy/illuminating responses. I also learned why MariaDB thinks its “open source mandate” will carry the day.

  • Encouraging New Contributors in Lima, Peru

    A worldwide enthusiastic representative FLOSS as Stormy is, have public encouraged contributors to share experiences about their communities around the world. So I decided to post about it since I usually have the support of two great communities such as GNOME and Fedora to do Linux events in my local community. Following the suggested structure, here are some experiences that I can make you know. Hope you do not mind to check every single link I pointed out to the words throughout this post because it has more posts of the job we do in Lima, Peru.

  • Un-Masking FD.io – the Open Source Project that Processes Packets

    The Fast Data Project (FD.io) is a networking open source project whose scope includes software-based packet processing, fast Input/Output (IO), and universal data plane management across bare metal, hypervisor, and container environments.

    FD.io, which was open-sourced by the Linux Foundation in February 2016, was garnering quite a lot of attention at the recent Open Networking Summit (ONS) 2017 in Santa Clara, California.

  • Like Twitter but Hate the Trolls? Try Mastodon

    Users choose for themselves which instance they want to join and select from a host of privacy and anti-harassment settings. Oh, and the character limit is 500, not 140. In essence, Mastodon is an experiment in whether individually moderated communities can make a social network like Twitter more civil.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Indian wins top prize at United Nations challenge for open source tool

    An Indian software engineer has won the top prize at a global challenge for an open-source tool that enables users to interactively view UN General Assembly resolutions and gain a deeper understanding of the voting patterns of member states. Abdulqadir Rashik, also an entrepreneur, won the ‘Unite Ideas #UNGAViz Textual Analysis and Visualisation Challenge’ for his ‘Global Policy’, an open-source tool that enables users to search and interactively view General Assembly resolutions to gain a deeper understanding of the voting patterns and decisions made by United Nations Member States.

  • A10 adapts to companies using open source load balancers

    A10 Networks Inc. has integrated its application delivery controller with a second open source load balancer, as enterprises turn to free software for services provided by ADC vendors.

    The vendor announced this week integration between the Harmony Controller and HAProxy, one of several widely used open source load balancers for applications running on Linux. Harmony also supports NGINX, which developers also use with Linux software.

  • Scaling Mastodon : What it takes to house 43,000 users

    My instance mastodon.social has recently surpassed 43,000 users. I have closed registrations both to have more time to investigate the infrastructure and ensure a good experience for existing users, and to encourage more decentralization in the network (with a wonderful effect — the Mastodon fediverse now hosts over 161,000 people spread out over more than 500 independent instances!)

    But providing a smooth and swift service to 43,000 users takes some doing, and as some of the other instances are approaching large sizes themselves, it is a good time to share the tips & tricks I learned from doing it.

  • Alibaba on open source and cloud business in China – live from the MariaDB user conference

    One of the best things about MariaDB’s first annual user conference (M|17) was hearing from open source advocates who flew in from APAC countries to tell their stories. Alibaba presented on how they use open source at monster cloud scale. I also got some interesting views on why some open source database projects are a lot better than others.

  • Portugal building new services on national interoperability platforms

    Last month, the Portuguese Ministry of Health started a pilot to make it easier for citizens to get 'proof of fitness', a requirement to obtain or renew a driving licence. For this purpose, the Portuguese National Broker (PNB) platform was extended to include the exchange of Driving Licence Certificates between the Ministry and the Portuguese Institute for Mobility and Transport (IMT, I.P.).

    The PNB platform is the national eHealth message exchange, providing technical, semantic and legal interoperability between all health-related entities in the country. Its role is to facilitate the exchange of messages (services/interfaces) while at the same time implementing security mechanisms for authentication and access control. The infrastructure currently processes an average of 300,000 messages per day.

  • Sharing and reuse ‘a government paradigm shift’

    Sharing and reuse of IT solutions should become the default for the EU’s public administrations, said Mário Campolargo, Deputy Director General for the Directorate General of Informatics (DIGIT) of the European Commission at the Sharing & Reuse Conference 2017 in Lisbon, Portugal, last week. “This is the key for open modern government”, he said.

3 open source boilerplate web design templates

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OSS
Web

In the olden days, creating a website from scratch was easy.

With a basic understanding of HTML, and maybe a little CSS, you could put together a pretty functional web page with very little effort. Throw it onto your web server, and you were good to go.

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GNOME News

  • Desk Changer is a Wallpaper Slideshow Extension for GNOME
    Have you been looking for a GNOME wallpaper slideshow extension? If so, you can stop. In the comments to our recent post on the way GNOME handles wallpapers a number of readers asked whether GNOME had an image slideshow feature built in, without the need for third-party apps and the like. The answer is yes, GNOME does. Sort of.
  • Minwaita: A Compact Version of Theme Adwaita for Gnome Desktop
    As you may already know that Ubuntu is switching back to Gnome, this is the transition time for Ubuntu to switch back. Some creators are motivated and creating themes for Gnome desktop, which is a good thing and hopefully we shall see plenty of Gnome themes and icons around soon. As its name shows "Minwaita" it is minimal/compact version of Adwaita theme, the theme is available after some enhancements to make Gnome more sleek and more vanilla Gnome experience without moving to away from Adwaita's design. This theme is compatible with Gnome 3.20 and up versions. This theme was released back in November, 2016 and still in continuous development that means if you find any problem or bug in the theme then report it to get it fixed in the next update. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshots.
  • Gnome Pomodoro Timer Can Help You Increase Productivity
    If you are struggling with focus on something, it could be your work or study then try Pomodoro technique, this method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. You can read more about Pomodoro here.
  • Widget hierarchies in GTK+ 4.0
    In GTK+3, only GtkContainer subclasses can have child widgets. This makes a lot of sense for “public” container children like we know them, e.g. GtkBox — i.e. the developer can add, remove and reorder child widgets arbitrarily and the container just does layout.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian