OSS

Free/Open Source software (FOSS)

Paying With Your Time

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OSS

Nicole Engard takes that phrase that you Get what you paid for with open source head on at Opensource.com. The phrase is normally used in a derogative fashion, but Nichole accepts the phrase and makes it her own by explaining how everyone benefits when you pay with your time.
In the world of standard economics, nothing is ever truly free of cost. If something is given to you for nothing, someone had to pay for it at some point along the line. In the modern, advertising based economy, If you are not paying with your money, than you are most likely paying with your personal information. Another example of would be public services, which are normally paid for with taxes. In the world of open source, the phrase is normally meant to imply that the program you are obtaining for free is of such low quality that it has little to no value. “Oh, you are having a problem with that open source app? Well, you get what you paid for!” Laughter ensues.

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What would you do with millions of pounds?

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Microsoft
OSS

There’s a lot that you can do with £5.5m. You could employ a couple of hundred people for a year for starters, or set up some small businesses. You could be sensible and invest in technologies, or you could pay for lots of operations. Alternatively, you could buy lots of sweets or several million copies of the Adam Sandler movie of your choice.

The British National Health Service, however, has handed over that amount of money to Microsoft. And in return, it’s getting an extra 15 months of support for a Microsoft product. It’s the kind of thing that doesn’t really take too long to sink in.

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Korea: The government says, “we will break away from OS dependency with open source software by 2020”

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OSS

As the support for the Microsoft (MS) Windows XP service is terminated this year, the government will try and invigorate open source software in order to solve the problem of dependency on certain software. By 2020 when the support of the Windows 7 service is terminated, it is planning to switch to open OS and minimize damages. Industry insiders pointed out that the standard e-document format must be established and shared as an open source before open source software is invigorated.

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SF Parking App Warned By SF City Attorney Open-Sources Its Code

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OSS

Parking app Sweetch has open-sourced its code this morning in an effort to solve the parking crisis in San Francisco. The free, open-source project, called Freetch is open to any developer willing to work on solving parking problems for the city.

City Attorney Dennis Herrera called out Sweetch and other parking apps earlier this week in a cease-and-desist letter it sent to MonkeyParking. The letter specifically warned Sweetch and ParkModo, both of which the city believes “…similarly violate local and state law with mobile app-enabled schemes intended to illegally monetize public parking spaces.”

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Free software for healthcare facilities in need

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GNU
OSS

GNU Health is a free software tool for healthcare facilities in rural areas and developing countries, licensed under the GNU GPL. The project got its start in 2006, and at the time of my interview with Falcon, GNU Health had evolved into a health and hospital information system used by the United Nations, public hospitals and Ministries of Health in countries like Argentina, and private institutions around the globe. Today, GNU Solidario is planting their free software and health administration system into facilities in need in countries all over the world.

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Google Releases Cayley Open-Source Graph Database

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Google
OSS

Google has been using, improving and boosting its Knowledge Graph search services for several years to show users how information can be linked together in graphics form to help find desired results. Now it is again pushing forward in the graph database world through the open-source release of Cayley, which will be used in the continuing development of graph databases.

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'Open file formats must be implementable in open source'

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OSS

To ensure preservation of digital assets, it is essential that specific file formats are implementable in open source software, concludes Björn Lundell, associate professor at the University of Skövde in Sweden. He recommends this should be made a requirement for digital asset strategies of public administrations, thus minimising the risk of losing control over these assets.

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Open source is the fastest way to innovate big data

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OSS

This market is moving so quickly in terms of what's happening. And if you wind back Hadoop, it started as a way of having a scale-out architecture. It allowed you to take your storage out onto the web. And around 2011, the team at Yahoo! Decided that Hadoop was a great technology and realised that it had potential far outside the four walls of Yahoo!

So they decided to take it out to be a general data processing platform, and they founded Hortonworks. We take Apache Hadoop, which is an open source data architecture, and to turn it into an enterprise-class data platform, completely in the open.

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ownCloud 7 Unveils New Open Source Cloud File Sharing Features

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OSS

ownCloud, the open source file sharing and syncing platform, is aiming to provide a "Dropbox-like" experience, in its own words—as well as to blur the line demarcating private from public clouds by letting users share file between ownCloud instances. That's all part of ownCloud 7 Community Edition, the latest version of the platform, which has been released in beta form.

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5 assistive technology open source programs

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OSS

Assistive technology software is any program or operating system feature designed to let a user with cognitive, sensory, or physical impairments use a computer system. Innovations in assistive technology software can make a huge difference in the daily lives of these people.

Most assistive technology software is not cross platform because it is often closely integrated with the operating system and screen display sub-systems. Commercial developers also face the challenge that the potential user base is not large, so prices can be high, which restricts the user base even more. Open source and freeware developers have more freedom in developing assistive technology projects, but to be successful they still need to achieve a critical mass of users. One way to tackle this problem is to expand the user base to include communities across the world that cannot afford the high prices of commercial assistive technology software.

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Analyst Unveils Open Source Model for NFV-SDN Management

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OSS
  • Analyst Unveils Open Source Model for NFV-SDN Management

    In short, the CIMI Corp. president is essentially trying to provide a path to deployment for NFV and SDN, believing strongly that without high-level orchestration and management and an operations framework, virtualization in the telecom sector could be spinning its wheels for some time to come.

  • Use Software Defined Networking to optimize your IaaS

    Explore Software Defined Networking (SDN) — network management via software abstraction layers — as a method to enhance and optimize your Infrastructure as a Service in the areas of interoperability, user and provider expectation management, developer and administrator requirements, and effective risk mitigation.

What's behind the success of free and open source healthcare?

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OSS

I ask more questions in this survey of free and open source healthcare developers for my thesis project: "The state of open source electronic medical records: An anthropology study." My goal is to better understand the characteristics, motivations, and knowledge background of healthcare developers in order to determine what is behind the success of free/open source software in healthcare.

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Jim Zemlin to Wall Street: Why open source will lead the way

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Linux
OSS

At the invitation only Linux Enterprise End-User Summit held at the Convene Center Financial District, Jim Zemlin, the Linux Foundation's executive director, told an audience of several hundred Wall Street executives and top Linux developers what he sees as the future of technology.

If the combination of Wall Street bears and bulls and Linux programmers seems odd, then you haven't been paying attention. The New York Stock Exchange, New York Mercantile Exchange, and NASDAQ all run on Linux. Indeed, almost all stock exchanges now rely on Linux.

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Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst: No One Knows OpenStack Better Than Us

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Red Hat
Server
OSS

Jim Whitehurst, CEO of Red Hat believes the wait should be over. In a phone conversation over a two-day period following Red Hat's earnings report last week, Whitehurst assured me his company has a stacked deck in that all-important new frontier known as OpenStack. With the sort of confidence you would expect for someone of Whitehurst's pedigree, he proclaimed "no one knows OpenStack better than us." Investors and analysts have no reason to doubt him.
Whitehurst believes his company has an added advantage -- not only from its long history of open source expertise, but he believes very few players actually understand what OpenStack is. He explained that some make the mistake of confusing OpenStack's relationship to the cloud and server virtualization. In other words, having a cluster of virtualized servers does not qualify as a legitimate cloud platform.
Whitehurst envisions OpenStack as the "default choice for next-generation architecture." He does not see a scenario where "Red Hat does not emerge as the leader." He described this as "his mission."

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Swiss to study economic potential of open source

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OSS

The Swiss government is to survey the economic potential of public administrations' use of open source software, and the federal government is to review its 2005 strategy on this type of software solutions, following questions by two members of the Swiss Parliamentarian Group on Digital Sustainability.

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Red Hat, Joyent, and others break down licensing barriers

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Red Hat
OSS

Open source is an environment where no permission is required to use the source code; the flexibility to do as you wish is already provided. The open source license creates this permissionless environment, and developers are able to gather around a source code commons to meet their individual needs without having to seek approval from anywhere. Requiring a CLA to contribute immediately obstructs this goal.

A CLA is a legal agreement that a community member needs to sign before their contributions will be accepted by certain open source projects. Almost all CLAs give expansive rights to the contributor's copyrights to the recipient of the agreement; most grant patent rights as well. As a consequence, contributors from educational and commercial organizations will have to gain management and legal approval before proceeding.

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Review: Open source proxy servers are capable, but a bit rough around the edges

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Server
OSS
Security

Providing a common gateway for web services, caching web requests or providing anonymity are some of the ways organizations use proxy servers. Commercial proxy products, especially cloud offerings, are plentiful, but we wondered if open source or free products could provide enterprise-grade proxy services.

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Open source hindered by OOXML incompatibilities

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LibO
OSS

The mixing of outdated and incompatible versions of OOXML, an XML document format, is hindering implementation in open source office alternatives, according to a study published on the Open Source Observatory and Repository (OSOR) today. The different OOXML versions also pose difficulties for public administrations that use different proprietary office suite versions, and the inconsistencies are causing problems with older documents. The OOXML document format is hindering the interoperability of suites of office productivity tools.

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Democracy and Software Freedom

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OSS
GNOME

It is striking that, despite talking a lot about freedom, and often being interested in the question of who controls power, these five criteria might as well be (Athenian) Greek to most free software communities and participants- the question of liberty begins and ends with source code, and has nothing to say about organizational structure and decision-making – critical questions serious philosophers always address.

Our licensing, of course, means that in theory points #4 and #5 are satisfied, but saying “you can submit a patch” is, for most people, roughly as satisfying as saying “you could buy a TV ad” to an American voter concerned about the impact of wealth on our elections. Yes, we all have the theoretical option to buy a TV ad/edit our code, but for most voters/users of software that option will always remain theoretical. We’re probably even further from satisfying #1, #2, and #3 in most projects, though one could see the Ada Initiative and GNOME OPW as attempts to deal with some aspects of #1, #3, and #4

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