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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • In the Depths of the Cloud, Open Source and Proprietary Leviathans Fight to the Death

    When I look at the computers used by the enterprise open source people, I see a lot of Mac screens, with only a scattering of Linux and…. what’s that other operating system? Oh, right. Windows. Yep, It’s still out there, and there are people using it to develop enterprise-level open source applications.

    And here’s question number two, which I’ll leave up to you to answer: Are Red Hat and The Linux Foundation doing the right thing by concentrating on Linux in the enterprise or are they abandoning their traditional user base and strongest supporters, a move that will spell eventual doom for them?

  • Verizon Open Source White Box ‘Coming Soon,’ VP Says

    Hakl would not disclose which vendors’ technologies would be included but said it will be a “mix of traditional and non-traditional suppliers.”

  • Skylane: A Wayland Implementation In Rust, Part of Perceptia Project

    While there have been Rust bindings and other Rust-Wayland projects in the past, they have ended up relying upon C language components. With a new project dubbed "Skylane", there's a full Wayland protocol implementation written within Rust.

  • Lenovo updates its open-source platform with cloud in mind
  • Making open source pay

    Often the discussion around open source veers towards issues around quality control, but the discussion at the roundtable is clear that the issue with software of any kind is less around the software itself than the checks and balances put in place by the vendors concerned.

    Lee comments that inside SUSE, there are rigourous checks and balances before any software makes it out the doors. This is backed up by Fischer, who comments that no CIO would allow software to be deployed without it meeting the required risk and compliance criteria.

  • Exciting GSoC 2017 Projects: Vulkan Software Renderer, Kodi On Wayland, Much More
  • Intel's Clear Linux Switches Over To GCC 7 Compiler

    Just two days ago GCC 7.1 was released as the first stable release of GCC 7 as the annual update to this GNU code compiler. If you are looking for a Linux rolling-release distribution already using GCC 7 by default, Intel's open-source Clear Linux appears to be one of the first.

  • 3 big open data trends in the United States

    The open data community got a surprising piece of news when the Trump Administration recently announced that it would no longer be supporting the Open.whitehouse.gov's Open Data portal. (Open data is the idea that certain data should be freely viewable and usuable without controls.) Their argument is that the information is duplicative and is either already available online or will soon be made available elsewhere.

    The administration also has no plans to continue the practice of making White House visitor logs available to the greater public, a procedure began by the Obama administration. Those records will be kept private for at least five years after Trump leaves office.

  • PGI 17.4 Compiler Tests vs. GCC 6.3 vs. LLVM Clang 4.0

    When NVIDIA-owned PGI released the PGI 17.4 compiler this week there was interest expressed by some Phoronix readers in seeing comparison benchmarks to GCC and Clang.

Mark Collier and Dell on OpenStack

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • The evolution of OpenStack

    Mark Collier has been involved with OpenStack since the beginning, first at Rackspace where the project emerged as a joint partnership with NASA, and soon after as a co-founder and now Chief Operating Officer of the OpenStack Foundation.

    I had the opportunity to speak with Mark a few weeks ago to hear more about what we can expect as OpenStack continues to evolve: from how it is developed, to what it can do, to how it is used. Here's what he shared with me.

  • Dell EMC targets telecom market with OpenStack solutions for scaling applications

    Dell’s acquisition of EMC may have jump-started the hardware titan’s enterprise cloud efforts, but it was open source development platforms that helped pave Dell’s path to customers in new markets, including telecommunications. Many of Dell’s customers were vocal about wanting some sort of open-source cloud platform on which to build those enterprise solutions, said Armughan Ahmad (pictured), senior vice president and general manager of solutions and alliances at Dell EMC.

GStreamer 1.12

Filed under
Linux
Software
Movies
OSS
  • GStreamer 1.12 Release Notes

    GStreamer 1.12.0 was originally released on 4th May 2017.

  • GStreamer 1.12.0 Open-Source Multimedia Framework Hits Stable, Adds Many Changes

    The GStreamer project, through Sebastian Dröge, is pleased to announce today the immediate availability of the GStreamer 1.12.0 stable series of the open-source multimedia framework for GNU/Linux distributions.

    GStreamer 1.12 is a massive release that introduces numerous new features and improvements, but the biggest of them all is support for Intel's Media SDK (Software Development Kit) thanks to the implementation of a new msdk plugin to access the hardware-accelerated video decoding and encoding of various Intel GPUs on GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

  • GStreamer 1.12 Makes Its Stable Debut

    GStreamer 1.12 is now the latest stable release of this widely-used, open-source multimedia framework.

Openwashing

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OSS

Court Upholds Enforceability of Open Source Licenses

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Legal

The District Court for the Northern District of California recently issued an opinion that is being hailed as a victory for open source software. In this case, the court denied a motion to dismiss a lawsuit alleging violation of an open source software license, paving the way for further action enforcing the conditions of the GNU General Public License (“GPL”).

Read more

Google releases DIY open source Raspberry Pi 'Voice Kit' hardware -- here's how to get it

Filed under
Linux
Google
OSS

Google has long been focused on artificial intelligence. Its Google Now and voice assistance projects have used AI to better the lives of users. The Google Home voice-based hardware unit brings its assistant to life, making traditional inputs and displays unnecessary. With just the power of your voice, you can interact with the device -- nothing else is needed.

The search giant has decided to take artificial intelligence to the maker community with a new initiative called AIY. This initiative (found here) will introduce open source AI projects to the public that makers can leverage in a simple way. Today, Google announces the first-ever AIY project. Called "Voice Kit," it is designed to work with a Raspberry Pi to create a voice-based virtual assistant. Please keep in mind that the Pi itself is not included, so you must bring your own. For this project, you can use a Pi 3 Model B, Pi 2, or Pi Zero. Want a Voice Kit? Here's how to get it. Heck, you might be getting one for free and you don't even know it.

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Open-source chip mimics Linux's path to take on closed x86, ARM CPUs

Filed under
Linux
OSS

If you're buying a PC or server, you've likely considered chips based on x86 or, perhaps less often, the ARM architecture.

But like Linux in software, an open-source chip project is out to break the dominance of proprietary chips offered by Intel, AMD, and ARM.

The RISC-V open-source architecture, created by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, in 2010, is open to all who want to use it. The RISC-V design can be modified for PCs, servers, smartphones, wearables, and other devices.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS

GRUB 2.03, GCC 7.1, and Bareflank Hypervisor 1.1

Filed under
GNU
OSS
  • GRUB 2.03 Begins Development

    With GRUB 2.02 released after five years in development, this GNU bootloader code has now been bumped for GRUB 2.03 as development begins with new features.

    As of today, the version in Git master is now GRUB 2.03 for marking the new development cycle in the eventual road to GRUB 2.04. Since the version bump to GRUB 2.03 a few hours ago, a number of patches have begun landing that were queued until the 2.02 release.

  • GCC 7.1 Released With New Features — Marks 30th Anniversary Of GCC 1.0

    GNU’s Jakub Jelinek has announced the release of GCC 7.1, which is the first stable release of GCC 7. This major release also marks the 30th anniversary of first stable GCC release. Talking about the new features, there’s experimental C++17 support, improvements in optimizers, emitted diagnostics, and Address Sanitizer, etc. You can download GCC 7.1 compiler from GNU servers.

  • Bareflank Hypervisor 1.1 Brings Windows Support

    Bareflank 1.1 is now available as the newest release of this open-source lightweight hypervisor written in C++.

    Bareflank 1.1 introduces its own new build system catered towards its needs, adds Windows 8.1/10 OS support, openSUSE 42.2 support, VMM isolation capabilities, multi-core support, VMCall support, the VMM can now be cross-compiled using LLVM/Clang, various SSE and AVX optimizations, and testing improvements.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • UXCampAMS17 Trip Report

    As always, great people, great networking, interesting talks and workshops, tons of inspiration! Really helps to get perspective on my work + keep up with trends and industry standards. Plus this year I had an extra agenda to promote Red Hat and Fedora by giving a talk and distributing some swag.

  • Upcoming Hacker/FLOSS Events in Switzerland: Debian BSP, LPD, Hackerfunk 10th Anniversary, ZeTeCo
  • NEXmark: A Benchmarking Framework for Processing Data Streams

    ApacheCon North America is only a few weeks away -- happening May 16-18 in Miami. This year, it’s particularly exciting because ApacheCon will be a little different in how it’s set up to showcase the wide variety of Apache topics, technologies, and communities.

  • May Open Source CMS Forecast: Conference Season on the Horizon

    As we greet the month of May, it’s time to take another look at what the free and open source CMS space has in the pipeline.

    In our April forecast, we welcomed the arrival of TYPO3 CMS 8, and anticipated the release of both Drupal 8.3 and Joomla 3.7 before the month expired — a goal realized when both Drupal and Joomla made their respective announcements.

    As for the month ahead, here’s what to expect from the world of open source CMS.

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KDE Leftovers: digikam, KDevelop, Kate, GSoC, and Akademy

  • [digikam] Call to Test the Pre-Release of 5.6.0
    Once again a lot has been going on behind the scenes since the last release. The HTML gallery tool is back, database shrinking (e.g. purging stale thumbnails) is also supported on MySQL, grouping has been improved and additional sidecars can now be specified. Therefore the release of 5.6.0 will be (is already) delayed, as we would like to invite you to test all these features. As usual they are available in the pre-release bundles or obviously directly from the git repository. Please report any dysfunctions, unexpected behaviour or suggestions for improvement to our bug tracker.
  • KDevelop runtimes: Docker and Flatpak integration
    On my last blog post I discussed about how some assumptions such as the platform developed on can affect our development. We need to minimize it by empowering the developers with good tools so that they can develop properly. To that end, I introduced runtimes in our IDE to abstract platforms (much like on Gnome’s Builder or Qt Creator).
  • Kate 17.04.1 available for Windows
  • GSoC - Community Bonding Period with Krita
  • First month report: my feelings about gsoc
  • My Akademy Plans
    The Akademy programme (saturday, sunday) is actually pretty long; the conference days stretch into feels-like-evening to me. Of course, the Dutch are infamous for being “6pm at the dinner table, and eat potatoes” so my notion of evening may not match what works on the Mediterranean coast. Actually, I know it doesn’t since way back when at a Ubuntu Developer Summit in Sevilla it took some internal-clock-resetting to adjust to dinner closer to midnight than 18:00.

Gaming News: Shogun, SteamOS, Dawn Of War III