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OSS

For project safety backup your people, not just your data

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OSS

The FSF was founded in 1985, Perl in 1987 (happy 30th birthday, Perl!), and Linux in 1991. The term open source and the Open Source Initiative both came into being in 1998 (and turn 20 years old in 2018). Since then, free and open source software has grown to become the default choice for software development, enabling incredible innovation.

We, the greater open source community, have come of age. Millions of open source projects exist today, and each year the GitHub Octoverse reports millions of new public repositories. We rely on these projects every day, and many of us could not operate our services or our businesses without them.

So what happens when the leaders of these projects move on? How can we help ease those transitions while ensuring that the projects thrive? By teaching and encouraging succession planning.

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Also:

  • Dear software manager, working in the open for the very first time? Challenges (Sleepy

    When moving from managing software projects/teams in classic corporate environments into Open Source (FOSS) projects, there are several new challenges any front line manager will need to face.

  • Dear software manager, working in the open for the very first time? Face the challenges (II)

    Working in the open involve new challenges that requires a different mindset to be successfully faced by front line managers moving from corporate to Open Source projects. They will need to develop new habits and the most effective way to do so, in my view, is understanding since day one that your focus will need to move towards alignment instead of insisting in autonomy, according to my mental model. With that in mind, my advice is to pay special attention to those habits that will lead you to become a servant for your managees, promoting transparency by example…

  • OSS Leftovers

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    OSS
    • Five Most Popular Open Source Frameworks Used in Machine Learning

      Machine language a branch of artificial intelligence which enables system the ability to learn from data without being programmed. Machine learning got evolved from pattern recognition and computational learning theory in artificial intelligence. It has revolutionized the conventional way through developing algorithms that can learn and make predictions on data. There are innumerable factors that have improved the contribution of machine learning. Open source frameworks are one of the major reasons for the boost in machine learning. A framework is a collection of programs, libraries and languages evolved to use in application development. A library is a collection of objects or methods used by the applications which avoid rewriting of same codes.

      The article lists five most popular frameworks that significantly help data scientists and engineers in their big data analytics journey.

    • FOSS Project Spotlight: Ravada

      Ravada is an open-source project that allows users to connect to a virtual desktop.

      Currently, it supports KVM, but its back end has been designed and implemented in order to allow future hypervisors to be added to the framework. The client's only requirements are a web-browser and a remote viewer supporting the spice protocol.

    • VC Guy Kawasaki contemplates fringe ideas, open source and social

      He also views the open-source community in the same light: a benefit to businesses and society rather than a negative. “I believe in open source. I believe that … the more intelligent people pounding on your stuff, the better it is,” he said.

    • Open Source Election System Certified

      OSI Affiliate Member, The National Association of Voting Officials (NAVO), announced this week the certification of the Prime lll open source election system for the State of Ohio.

      NAVO spokesperson Brent Turner stated the ballot delivery system is, “the first step toward appropriately secure voting systems replacing the ‘secret software‘ systems that have plagued our democracy“. Turner summarized the current proprietary vendor sold U.S. voting systems as, “antiquated, insecure, and a threat to national security,“ and referenced New Hampshire's recent deployment of the “All for One“ open source system based on Prime lll, as further momentum. “We have been focused on Florida, California, and New York to upgrade security and reduce costs as well. Now is the historic moment for all the states to step up and defend our democracy. Paper ballots and audits are a plus, but the essence of vote counting security is the public software.” said Turner.

    • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 2

      We’ve made great progress this week in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.

    • working post-creepy ads, and stuff

      What's next for web advertising after browser privacy improvements and regulatory changes make conventional adtech harder and harder?

      The answer is probably something similar to what's already starting to pop up on niche sites. Here's a list of ad platforms that work more like print, less like spam: list of post-creepy web ad systems. Comments and suggestions welcome (mail me, or do a GitHub pull request from the link at the bottom.)

    • L10N Report: April Edition

      In the past weeks we have completed the migration to Fluent of all XUL panes in Preferences. Today we landed one more major bug, migrating about 150 strings that cover the XUL portion of all the subdialogs (Fonts, Languages, Proxy, Colors, etc.). This leaves out only a few edge cases that require code changes in Fluent itself, and some strings in .properties files used also outside of Preferences. As of today, only 14 strings remain in DTD files, and 115 in .properties.

    • Five Questions for Cloudera

      On Monday and Tuesday of this week, Cloudera held its annual gathering for industry analysts. The setting was lovely Santa Monica, though the packed schedule didn’t exactly accommodate time at the beach just outside. Over the course of two days, a room full of analysts covering the company were walked through the past, present and future of Cloudera the business.

      The timing of the event was probably less than ideal from the company’s perspective, given that the market dropped a hammer on it last week – a subject we’ll come back to momentarily. But the show must go on, and to Cloudera’s credit, just as with the reduced guidance that precipitated the drop, the company was candid about what it perceived the issues to be as well as plans for their mitigation.

    • Coming up: the Month of LibreOffice, May 2018!
    • How to set up an open source scholarship at your university

      Have you ever considered helping the next generation of developers take their first steps into the wonderful world of open source?

      By offering a scholarship or award, you can help students—some of whom may have never considered sharing their work—join the open source community. Whether these students are aspiring open source software developers or enthusiasts of music, movies, beehives, or buildings, sharing a little upfront can help foster the open source talent of tomorrow.

    • 3 enterprise GitHub projects from Microsoft
    • Pivotal Software IPO: Successful Offering May Trigger More Open Source Software IPOs

      Pivotal, the cloud software company spun out of Dell-EMC and VMware, plans to go public next week. At the high-end of its price range, Pivotal’s IPO would net $700 million at a $4 billion valuation. It would be the second largest IPO of 2018 behind Dropbox. (We excluded Spotify from this analysis because its IPO did not include any primary share sales.) Pivotal’s IPO could pave the way to a public offering from other Unicorns with open source software business models such as Docker and SugarCRM. Or, it could inspire SaaS firms such Palantir to also consider a large public offering.

    • Private Internet Access: VPNs, education, and software freedom

      Private Internet Access (PIA) was a generous supporter of LibrePlanet 2018 and the Free Software Foundation as a patron. As one of the largest VPN services available, they have customers all around the world. Their VPN works with free software VPN clients like OpenVPN. They recently announced their intention to release some of the software they produce under a free license.

    • Xiaomi promises to release kernel sources for its devices but there's a catch

      Xiaomi has a terrible history with releasing kernel sources—a direct violation of the General Public License. The company looks to have seen the light, with a company spokesperson declaring that devices will now have their sources released to the public, albeit with a slight caveat.

    • Open Source Brain

      With the inspiring tagline “Modeling the brain, together” largely displayed on the homepage, the Open Source Brain (OSB) resource embodies the collaborative scientific spirit. OSB comprises a number of (you guessed it) open-source projects consisting of computational models of neurons or circuits. The site interfaces with GitHub, which houses the models themselves in its repositories. OSB contains information about how to create projects and write project documentation, and it also gives users the ability to explore current projects and run simulations with specific models. The homepage provides site visitors with suggested models to explore, including a Hodgkin–Huxley neuron and a primary auditory cortex network. Alternatively, users can browse all projects (totaling 81 at the time of this writing), which are organized by organism and brain region. Primary citations for each dataset are also provided.

    • Turris MOX Modular, Open Source Router $149

      If your router could do with a upgrade you may be interested in the new Turris MOX router, which builds on the company’s first open source router the Turris Omnia. Offering a high performance modular router which can be configured to your exact requirements. The company has created and developed four modules for the open source router which can be combined to meet your needs and requirements. Watch the demonstration video below to learn more about the Turris MOX router.

    • The Future of Open Source Desktop 3D Printers
    • RISC-V 8th Workshop Agenda

      The RISC-V 8th Workshop is happening in Barcelona next month and the agenda and speakers have been announced...

    • W3C WebAuthn to Advance FIDO Protocols for Strong Authentication

      The new WebAuthn standard is coming to the web as the W3C is working to bring the latest generation of the FIDO strong authentication specifications forward into the standards realm.

      The FIDO (Fast Identity Online) Alliance has been building strong authentication specifications including the Universal Second Factor (U2) and Universal Authentication Framework (UAF) since 2012. With the W3C, FIDO is evolving its FIDO2 specification to become an official web standard that will be supported by all the major web browsers.

    Events: Digital Born Media Carnival, SCaLE16x, NZ Open Source Awards and More

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    OSS
    • Digital Born Media Carnival July 2017

      As described in their website, Digital Born Media Carnival was a gathering of hundred of online media representatives, information explorers and digital rights enthusiasts. The event took place on 14 – 18 July in Kotor, Montenegro. I found out about it as one of the members of Open Labs Hackerspace shared the news on our forum. While struggling if I should attend or not because of a very busy period at work and at the University, the whole thing sounded very interesting and intriguing at the same time, so I decided to join the group of people who were also planning to go and apply with a workshop session too. No regrets at all! This turned out to be one of the greatest events I’ve attended so far and had a great impact in what I somehow decided to do next, regarding my work as a hacktivist and as a digital rights enthusiast.

    • SCaLE16x with Ubuntu, CI/CD and more!

      Saturday and Sunday brought a duo of keynotes that I wouldn’t have expected at an open source conference five years ago, from Microsoft and Amazon. In both these keynotes the speaker recognized the importance of open source today in the industry, which has fueled the shift in perspective and direction regarding open source for these companies. There’s certainly a celebration to be had around this, when companies are contributing to open source because it makes business sense to do so, we all benefit from the increased opportunities that presents. On the other hand, it has caused disruption in the older open source communities, and some have struggled to continue to find personal value and meaning in this new open source world. I’ve been thinking a lot about this since the conference and have started putting together a talk about it, nicely timed for the 20th anniversary of the “open source” term. I want to explore how veteran contributors stay passionate and engaged, and how we can bring this same feeling to new contributors who came down different paths to join open source communities.

    • Nominate your pick now for the NZ Open Source Awards

      Nominations have opened for the seventh New Zealand Open Source Awards.

      The awards began in 2007 as a way to formally celebrate New Zealand's contribution and advocacy for free and open source software and to raise the awareness of its very broad and deep benefits.

    • JFrog Artifactory and Canonical’s Distribution of Kubernetes

    Lights, camera, Actian! Open-source database biz sold for $300m

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    OSS

    HCL Technologies and Sumeru Equity Partners have slurped privately-owned database (DB) supplier Actian for £330m from current owner Garnett Helfrich Capital.

    Indian-based IT services biz HCL, will own 80 per cent ($264mn) of Actian with SEP having the other 20 per cent ($66m). Actian will operate as a separate entity, led by current CEO and President, Rohit De Souza.

    Actian's tech assets include Vector, which it claimed is the world’s fastest columnar DB; hybrid cloud data integration platform DataConnect; and hybrid DB, X, which merges Ingres relational and Vector analytics.

    Read more

    Five benefits of open source software

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    OSS

    The telecommunications industry and beyond is increasingly embracing open source software. Just this year, for example, the Linux Foundation established the LF Networking Fund (LFN) in an effort to host its many open source projects focused on developing an open telecom ecosystem under a single umbrella. These sorts of projects enable participants to make changes and potentially improve software code through a process known as upstreaming. This article explores the reasons several enterprises are adopting open source software.

    Read more

    3 open source apps for Windows

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    OSS

    When switching from one kind of computer to another, use open source tools to continue working with ease.

    For me, I worked on a Mac for many years, and now I have to work on a Windows machine at my job. I really miss a few of the MacOS features, so I set out to find open source solutions to these and other Windows conundra. Here are three to get you started.

    Read more

    Events: OpenStack, DebConf18, Percona

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    OSS
    • Lessons from OpenStack Telemetry: Incubation

      The rigidity of the process discouraged anyone to start a new project for anything related to telemetry. Therefore, everyone went ahead and started dumping its idea in Ceilometer itself. With more than ten companies interested, the frictions were high, and the project was at some point pulled apart in all directions. This phenomenon was happening to every OpenStack projects anyway.

      On the one hand, many contributions brought marvelous pieces of technology to Ceilometer. We implemented several features you still don't find any metering system. Dynamically sharded, automatic horizontally scalable polling? Ceilometer has that for years, whereas you can't have it in, e.g., Prometheus.

      On the other hand, there were tons of crappy features. Half-baked code merged because somebody needed to ship something. As the project grew further, some of us developers started to feel that this was getting out of control and could be disastrous. The technical debt was growing as fast as the project was.

    • Bursary applications for DebConf18 are closing in 48 hours!

      If you intend to apply for a DebConf18 bursary and have not yet done so, please proceed as soon as possible!

    • Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018 Keynotes Tackle Open Source in the Enterprise, Future of Databases, Cloud Adoption and More

      Percona, the company that delivers enterprise-class MySQL®, MariaDB® and MongoDB® and other open source database solutions and services, today announced the keynote addresses for the seventh annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018, taking place April 23-25, 2018 at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, Calif. Limited sponsorship opportunities for the conference are still available.

    OSS Leftovers

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    OSS
    • Tap Systems Releases Open Source Software Development Kit

      Tap Systems, Inc., the company behind the Tap wearable keyboard and mouse, announced today they have released a developer SDK. The released software kit enables interested developers to design applications that incorporate and/or include the Tap wearable and its functionality. The Tap device is a comfortable wearable that sits at the base of your fingers and senses finger taps as input. Connecting to any Bluetooth enabled device, Tap users can currently compose text, play games, point, click and scroll using just about any available surface.

    • If You’re Interested In Open Source Development, Wingify’s Paras Chopra Is Ready To Fund Your Projects

      After leading Wingify to success, founder Paras Chopra has been constantly tweeting about his interest in open source and his willingness to support open source development in India.

    • GitLab now offers native integration into Google Kubernetes
    • Google, Netflix launch new IT risk analysis tool Kayenta
    • Kayenta: An Open Source Canary Analysis Tool from Netflix and Google
    • Google, Netflix Team Up To Launch New Open Source Canary Analysis Tool
    • 4 enterprise GitHub projects from Google

      Open source is everywhere, and is quickly becoming the new norm for how companies approach software development. Here, we take at a look at some of the open source projects on GitHub created by Google that can help make life easier for IT teams in organizations.

    • Idera Acquires Webyog to Enable the Open Source Relational Database Systems

      Idera, Inc. recently announced that it has acquired Webyog - a company that provides database management and administration tools for MySQL. It will be Idera's second acquisition in under a year that will join the latter's Database Management Tools business that currently includes AquaFold and IDERA.

      Webyog delivers MySQL management and monitoring offerings and serves customers in a wide range of industries. SQLyog, its flagship MySQL GUI and administration product, delivers migration tools, query profiling tools, backup, synchronization tools, scheduling and reporting tools, as well as several other power tools that enhance developer, data architect, and DBA productivity.

    • LibreOffice certification for FSF members

      The FSF and The Document Foundation have worked together to offer LibreOffice Certification to FSF Members, for developers, migrators, and trainers. This session will provide all of the relevant information about LibreOffice Certification, in order to make it easier for FSF Members to apply and prepare for the certification review.

    • Promote Drupal Initiative Announced at DrupalCon

      Yesterday's Keynote from Drupal project founder, Dries Buytaert, kicked off the annual North American gathering of Drupalists from around the world, and also kicked off a new Drupal community initiative aimed at promoting the Drupal platform through a coordinated marketing effort using funds raised within the community.

      The Drupal Association hopes to raise $100,000 to enable a global group of staff and volunteers to complete the first two phases of a four-phase plan to create consistent and reusable marketing materials to allow agencies and other Drupal promoters to communicate Drupal's benefits to organizations and potential customers quickly and effectively.

    • Algorithmic bias: Where it comes from and what to do about it

      Slides from Andy Oram's talk from LibrePlanet 2017: Algorithmic bias: Where it comes from and what to do about it.

    • Xiaomi to Release Kernel Sources ‘Within 3 Months’ Of Launching New Phones

      Xiaomi may have grown leaps and bounds as a tech company over the past decade, but it still receives a lot of flak for its failure to abide by the GNU General Public License v2 license, which governs open source software such as Android. The company has often either completely failed to release kernel sources for its smartphones and tablets, or released them long after the release of the device, both of which are an outright violation of the GNU GPL license, which mandates that all software licensed under its terms must have its source code available publicly.

    • Difference between various open-source software licenses

      An open-source license is a computer software license that allows the source code, blueprint or design to be used, modified and/or shared under defined terms and conditions. This license allows end users and commercial companies to review and modify the source code, blueprint or design for their own customization, curiosity or troubleshooting needs.

    • MIT students create and circulate open source, covert RFID rings to subvert campus tracking system

      A reader writes, "A couple years ago MIT changed their dorm security/student tracking policy. They hired security contractors to work in dorms and required everyone to tap their RFID cards upon entry (no vouching for friends/guests). Most students complied. Some moved out. Some got in trouble ;)"

      "Fast forward to this week. There was a student-run 'ring delivery' event on campus where roughly 100 students received programmable RFID capable devices. Most of these were rings that could be mistaken for class rings. Students also received documentation on 125 kHz RFID systems, how to make inexpensive reader/writer devices, and how to produce more rings.

    • This open source viewer that runs on Raspberry Pi can share city’s geospatial data

      At GITA 2018 in Phoenix, Bob Basques, GIS Systems Developer at the City of St Paul, described a system called COMPASS he and his team have developed that provides a shared, easy to use tool that allows city employees and the public access to all of the city’s spatial and associated data including, for example, scans of surveyors’ notebooks, 2.2 million street level photos, and permitting and licensing information from 200 different applications. Based completely on open source components the system is compact and efficient enough to run on a Raspberry Pi.

      One of the problems that hampers efficient operations at municipalities is accessing geospatial data originating from multiple sources such as infrastructure maintenance, planning and zoning, property ownership, engineering, permitting, licensing and code enforcement. Spatial data is generated by CAD drafters, GIS users, surveyors and even users with smart phone apps. Imagery data can come from a variety of sources including earth observation satellites, aerial overflights, street photography, and drones. This data is constantly changing which means that any process that involves making copies such as converting it to a common format creates a bigger problem than it solves.

    • Using Open Source Designs to Create More Specialized Chips

      The open source movement changed how companies build software. Facebook, Twitter, and Yahoo employees pitched in during the early days of the data-crunching software Hadoop. Even after the relationship between Apple and Google soured, the companies' coders kept working together on an obscure but important piece of software called LLVM. Microsoft now uses and contributes to the Linux operating system, even though it competes with Windows.

      The embrace of open source isn't about altruism. Facebook started using Hadoop because there was no commercial off-the-shelf software that met the company's needs as it grew. Because Hadoop is open source, Facebook could customize and extend it to solve its specific problems; sharing its changes allowed others to innovate further, making the software better for Facebook and all other users. Collaborating on freely available code enables companies and programmers to pool resources to solve common problems and avoid reinventing the wheel. Companies build competing products and services from these open source foundations that they might never have been able to build otherwise.

    Changing Healthcare with Blockchain Technology

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    Server
    OSS

    He also emphasized that open source efforts, such as The Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger Project, are driving blockchain forward and are essential. He said that openness ensures scalability, accessibility, resiliency, and innovation. “Participating in The Hyperledger Project has made a lot of sense for us,” Symanski noted. “It protects protocol governance, node management, consensus mechanisms, and more and these are all very important in the healthcare industry.”

    Read more

    OSS Leftovers

    Filed under
    OSS
    • Google and Netflix open-source Kayenta, a software release management tool

      These days companies often issue new releases and updates of their software several times a day to millions of users in the cloud, and no matter how much they try to make sure it will run flawlessly, it’s nearly impossible to guarantee it.

    • Luxoft releases PELUX 1.0 automotive software starter-kit on Open Source

      The automotive division of Luxoft has launched PELUX 1.0, a base development platform designed to provide the building blocks for automotive software development projects, which is now available on Open Source.

      PELUX 1.0 was developed from Luxoft’s PELUX software suite which, for over four years, has helped carmakers and tier one suppliers to develop converged automotive systems for infotainment, autonomous driving, body control and communication.

    •  

    • DragonFly BSD 5.2 Released with Meltdown & Spectre Mitigations, Better Graphics

      The DragonFly BSD developers announced today the release and immediate availability for download of version 5.2 of their FreeBSD-based open source Unix-like operating system.

      Packed with mitigations for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities unearthed earlier this year and discovered to put billions of devices at risk of attacks, DragonFly BSD 5.2 is here to make sure you're running a secure and safe Unix-like operating system on your personal computer or server.

    • Exclusive Interview: UnionTech Discusses New 3D Printers, Open Source Philosophy

      UnionTech is a long-established company, having been founded in China in 2000 and then expanding to the United States in 2016. The company is a leader in stereolithography (SLA/SL) 3D printing, and part of what sets it apart from other SLA providers is its firm belief in open source technology. UnionTech is proof that patents aren’t necessary for a company to remain competitive, and that open source can, in fact, be an advantage for both the company and the overall market. UnionTech has been busy introducing new 3D printers lately, including the large-format RSPro 1400 and the PILOT Commercial series.

      We recently spoke with General Manager Jim Reitz about the new machines, the company’s open source philosophy, and the overall 3D printing industry, as well as UnionTech’s place in it.

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    More in Tux Machines

    today's leftovers

    • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
      Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
    • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
      Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
    • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

      The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

    • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
      Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
    • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
      Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
    • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
      Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
    • Installed nvidia driver
    • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
    • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
      The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
    • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
      We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
    • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
      Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

    OSS Leftovers

    • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
      OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
    • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

      Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

    • Gui development is broken

      Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

    OpenBSD and NetBSD

    Security: Twitter and Facebook

    • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
       

      Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

    • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
       

      A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

    • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
       

      In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

    • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
       

      If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.