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OSS

OSS: Mozilla, WordPress, FreeBSD, Unifont, CZI

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OSS
  • Mozilla: Microsoft’s Chromium Shift Will Strengthen Google’s Monopoly

    Yesterday, Microsoft made it official that they are bidding bye to EdgeHTML and will redesign a Chromium-based Edge browser. Chromium is an open source web browser project initiated by Google. Microsoft’s shift to Google’s open source platform has been described as bad by Mozilla.

    In an official blog post titled, “Goodbye, EdgeHTML,” Mozilla has criticized Microsoft’s decision. The post says that by adopting Chromium, Microsoft is handing over even more control of our online life to Google.

  • WordPress 5.0 Delivers Block-Based Editing Approach

    The open-source WordPress blogging and content management system (CMS) project on Dec. 6 released a major milestone update—WordPress 5.0.

    WordPress 5.0 is code-named "Bebo," named after Cuban jazz musician Bebo Valdés, following the project's long tradition of naming releases after notable Jazz musicians. WordPress 5.0 boasts a number of improvements, with the biggest user-facing change being the new Project Gutenberg editor. The new editor is the primary interface to how WordPress site administrators create content and define how it is displayed.

    "Our new block-based editor is the first step toward an exciting new future with a streamlined editing experience across your site," Matt Mullenweg, founder of WordPress, wrote in a blog. "You'll have more flexibility with how content is displayed, whether you are building your first site, revamping your blog, or write code for a living."

  • FreeBSD 12 Is Running Great On The Dell PowerEdge R7425 EPYC 2P Server

    AMD EPYC on BSDs has generally worked out well though in the case of motherboards occasionally there are mishaps in the FreeBSD kernel support -- just as we often see with new Intel platforms too when trying out the BSDs. With the Dell PowerEdge R7425 it was hanging during the boot process on the older FreeBSD 11.2 (granted, I didn't spend much time exploring workarounds for that older BSD release), but when testing this week with FreeBSD 12.0-RC3 it has been running well. OpenBSD 6.4 was also tested on this Dell PowerEdge EPYC 2P server and it too has been running without a hitch. Unfortunately, the new DragonFlyBSD 5.4 release isn't panning out yet on the hardware: when booting the USB installer media, the system ends up rebooting during the boot process.

  • Unifont 11.0.03 Released

    Unifont 11.0.03 is now available. Significant changes in this version include the Nushu script contributed by David Corbett, and the Kana Supplement and Kana Supplement-A scripts contributed by Johnnie Weaver.

  • CZI announces funding for open-source software efforts to improve image analysis in biomedicine

    The CZI Imaging Software Fellows work on three critical and widely-used tools: scikit-image, FIJI / ImageJ, and CellProfiler. After several workshops, hackathons, and discussions with the imaging community, these three projects were identified as playing a critical role in the imaging ecosystem, and their developers demonstrated an interest in improving the interoperability and capabilities of their tools.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Blockstream Releases the Open Source Code for Its Bitcoin Block Explorer

    Last month, Blockstream, a leading developer of blockchain technologies, launched a new block explorer that allows users to monitor real-time data for both the Bitcoin (BTC) blockchain and the Liquid Network sidechain.

    After receiving a largely positive response, the company has made the decision to release Esplora, the free and open-source software that powers the site.

  • New opensource VR viewer for OpenSim may be coming soon

    OpenSimulator core developer Melanie Thielker — also known as Melanie Milland in-world — announced that she is releasing her virtual reality OpenSim viewer to the open source community.

    The new viewer uses the Unreal Engine to display OpenSim regions, such as areas from the grid Thielker founded, Avination.

    “We were actually able to walk through those sims with a VR headset on,” she said. “It changed my whole view of the world. I’ve been in virtual worlds for a long time but actually walking through Avination was a new dimension for me. It was like coming home.”

  • Why open source makes sense for cloud deployments

    Instaclustr is a 100% open-source business, using Cassandra ("one of the most scalable databases in the world") for data storage, Spark for analytics, Elasticsearch for search, and Kafka for messaging, among other pieces of software.
    Instaclustr's proposition is that organisations need to be able to massively and reliably scale cloud applications, and if Instaclustr looks after the data layer, its clients can concentrate on their applications, chief executive Peter Nichol told iTWire.

    Benefits of open source in this context include the absence of expensive licences, and the flexibility to run the same software in any public cloud, on-premises, or in a hybrid environment. Organisations are looking for "cloud independence", he explained. Eventually it will be possible to run a single Cassandra cluster across multiple cloud providers.

  • The Consequences of a Changing Open-Source Software Business Model

    It has been an interesting year for open-source software makers. The primary commercial sponsors and/or individual contributors to projects as game-changing and as popular as Apache Kafka, MongoDB and Redis, among many others, may now be asking themselves if they are being taken advantage of, are using the right open-source licenses, or if they're truly engaged in communities of like-minded people.

    This is happening as some cloud providers and open-source brands are taking code that was written by open-source project "volunteers," lofting it onto their clouds or locking it down and then reselling it. The most recent occurrence happened late last week at Amazon Web Services (AWS) re:Invent conference.

  • We're Building on Hollowed Foundations: Worrying Trends in Open Source and What You Can Actually Do About It

    Heather Miller is Director of the Scala Center at EPFL, Professor at Northeastern University. Heather is a co-founder of and the Executive Director of the Scala Center at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor at Northeastern University in Boston. She obtained her PhD in October 2015 under Martin Odersky at EPFL, and is a longtime member of the Scala team.

  • SD Times news digest: Qt 5.12, Hyperledger Sawtooth 1.1 and Linux’s new open source, Linux and Git courses

    Qt has announced the latest version of its cross-platform software development framework for building apps, user interfaces and embedded devices. Qt 5.12 comes with long-term support, improved performance and quality updates.

    Features included reduced memory consumption support for asset conditioning, TableView, input handling, support for Python, remote objects and WebGL streaming plugin, and updates to its design and developer tools.

  • Open Source Project Allows e-Bike Rentals in Seconds over Bitcoin’s Lightning Network

    Matthias Steinig, a German programmer, has developed a new mechanism that allows e-bikes to be rented in exchange for payments on the bitcoin Lightning Network. A prototype built using a modified bicycle is already fully functional and has been demonstrated in a video posted on Twitter.

Linux Foundation on Compliance and Openwashing Examples

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OSS
Legal
  • A new ACT for open source compliance from The Linux Foundation

    What’s new in the world of open source? The Linux Foundation announced that they are launching a new tooling project for improving open source compliance. This new project’s goal is to ensure that when using open source projects, users understand what they are complying with.

    The Linux Foundation continues to be a leading beacon in the FOSS world, with worldwide events and over one million professionals enrolled in their free training courses. Just some of the successful projects that the Linux Foundation hosts include Rook, Node.js, Kubernetes, and Linkerd (which just got a fancy new UI makeover). You don’t have to look far to see names and noteworthy tools that you’re familiar with!

  • The Linux Foundation forms new Automated Compliance Tooling project

    “There are numerous open source compliance tooling projects but the majority are unfunded and have limited scope to build out robust usability or advanced features,” said Kate Stewart, senior director of strategic programs at The Linux Foundation. “We have also heard from many organizations that the tools that do exist do not meet their current needs. Forming a neutral body under The Linux Foundation to work on these issues will allow us to increase funding and support for the compliance tooling development community.”

    As part of the announcement, ACT is also welcoming two new projects that will be hosted at the Linux Foundation: OpenChain, a project that identifies key recommended processes for open-source management; and the Open Compliance Project, which will educate and help developers and companies better understand license requirements.

  • A Closer Look At Tesla's Open-Source Patent Pledge
  • Why Amazon's customer obsession should make it more open source friendly [Ed: What "customer obsession"? Amazon is a surveillance company whose biggest AWS customer is the CIA (with which it shares tons of data from all around the world).]

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Crossplane

    With the release of open-source multi-cloud management interface Crossplane, cloud services developer Upbound wants to provide an open and consistent way to handle integrations with whichever cloud platforms you throw at it.

    “Crossplane presents a declarative management style API that covers a wide range of portable abstractions including databases, message queues, buckets, data pipelines, serverless, clusters, and many more coming,” Upbound CEO Bassam Tabbara wrote in a blog post. “It’s based on the declarative resource model of the popular Kubernetes project, and applies many of the lessons learned in container orchestration to multicloud workload and resource orchestration.”

  • JD.com And Open Source Technology Development

    Currently running the largest Kubernetes cluster in the world, JD.com has demonstrated how companies can use data infrastructures in new and innovative ways. One of the first companies to shift to Kubernetes, Jingdong has since been able to forge partnerships with other companies, including CNCF, to create even stronger relationships with IT developers, users, and software companies. Because of this, open source development has started to become a much bigger aspect of many company’s IT plans.

    Due to its commitment to innovation, Jingdong recently became a platinum end user member of CNCF, meaning the company now has a spot on the governance board. This will now allow Jingdong to have a say in the direction of future Foundation initiatives. As a result, increased efficiency, reduced costs, and higher levels of customer service will be on display in Jingdong and other companies in the years ahead.

    By using Kubernetes clusters, Jingdong and other companies can now support even wider ranges of IT applications, as well as big data and Artificial Intelligence applications. With these expanded technological options, it will now be possible to reduce silos between DevOP teams and operations personnel. By making the process between these teams even more efficient, JD.com has been able to contribute significant code to many important corporate projects, including Prometheus and Vitess.

  • You want some SUSE socks? We know you do; SUSE x KubeCon.

    Looking for socks? How about a nice, juicy, SUSE chameleon? If you’re going to KubeCon, you can get them. Stop by the SUSE booth, G17, and we’ll hook you up. After you’ve got yourself some socks and your very own SUSE chameleon, head on over to see Rob De Canha-Knight, EMEA Technical Strategist at SUSE, for his birds of a feather session on diversity and inclusion.

  • Welcoming WordPress 5.0 And The New Editor

    The major new version of WordPress scheduled for release today is a big deal, both anticipated and feared by those who rely on the world's most popular web publishing platform.

    WordPress is used by everyone from solo bloggers and small businesses to major publishers (including Forbes) and marketing organizations. Thomas Griffin has written here about How To Use WordPress As A SaaS Platform, the foundation of your own cloud software business. WordPress has a corporate backer, a private company called Automattic, but also benefits from open source code contributions from developers around the world.

    Part of what makes WordPress popular is that its open source foundation means you can get started with it "for free" and, equally important, you can extend or tweak its functionality to make it serve your needs. Editing the core software code is not a good idea because then it becomes challenging to preserve those changes if you ever upgrade, but most of the core functionality can be modified with plugins and themes, software modules that hook into a fairly well documented set of function calls. That is what makes WordPress a software platform, not merely a software product.

  • Basque Country open source ICT sector grows 8%

     

    The Basque Country government is sharing much of its software as open source; in 2017 it started doing this through its OpenApps Euskadi directory.

Tor Browser: An Ultimate Web Browser for Anonymous Web Browsing in Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS
Security
Web

Most of us give a considerable time of ours to Internet. The primary Application we require to perform our internet activity is a browser, a web browser to be more perfect. Over Internet most of our’s activity is logged to Server/Client machine which includes IP address, Geographical Location, search/activity trends and a whole lots of Information which can potentially be very harmful, if used intentionally the other way.

Read more

Linaro partners with IIC on upcoming 96Boards Industrial Edition spec

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linaro and the Industrial Internet Consortium announced a partnership to collaborate on open source Arm standards for industrial IoT involving OTA, TSN, and security, as well as develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec.

In September Arm-backed Linaro, which creates open source Linux and Android code for Arm devices and oversees the 96Boards open hardware standard, joined the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC). This week the IIC and Linaro announced a partnership to work on Arm industrial IoT (IIoT) standards.

Of particular interest is a plan to develop a 96Boards Industrial Edition spec. Other projects will include standardization around Over-The-Air (OTA) updates, Time Sensitive Networking (TSN), and trustworthiness (i.e. digital trust security systems).

Read more

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • Wipro expands global partnership with open source software provider Alfresco
  • Crypto Giant Bitmain Open Sources KYC Software Tool ‘Coconut’
  • Crypto Giant Bitmain Open Sources KYC Software Tool ‘Coconut’
  • Comcast Leads Trellis, an Open Source Data Center Switching Fabric

    At the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) Connect event this week, Ron Howald, VP of network architecture at Comcast, copped to the fact that Google forced service providers such as Comcast to find ways to deliver faster internet speeds. “Google had quite a bit to do with setting the bar when they started with Google Fiber,” said Howald.

  • Open source: a slow rise to the top

    Is the debate over? Are we no longer fighting over open source versus propriety software?

    Thomas Lee, CEO, Wingu: If we look inside our customer base, we are seeing widespread adoption of open source technology. But I think it's also clear that propriety is not going away. I've seen a company recently take out all its open source software in favour of propriety. Clearly, the debate isn't going away.

    Wilhelm Strydom, relationship manager, Obsidian Systems: Is there room for proprietary stuff? Clearly there is if you look at the success of the most propriety vendors out there, in terms of not only software, but hardware as well.

    But if you talk back-end, what happens behind that interface, I don't think there's much of a battle going on. The battle has mostly been won by open source. This can be seen in some of the propriety guys adopting open source principals. In this respect, open source has clearly been the winner.

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces release FIVE, 5G ready

    ETSI is excited to announce the availability of OSM Release FIVE. This new Release is a huge step towards 5G network deployments and their end-to-end orchestration by telecom operators. In Release FIVE, OSM extends its orchestration capabilities beyond virtual domains, expanding them across transport networks; as well as physical and hybrid network elements.

    [...]

    Thus, among a large number of new features, the OSM Release FIVE stands out by bringing complete support of 5G Network Slices; dynamic creation of inter-datacentre connections across heterogeneous Wide Area Networks (WAN), extended support of Service Function Chaining (SFC); policy-based closed loop control, extended monitoring capabilities, including VNF metrics collection; and support of physical and hybrid network functions, (PNFs and HNFs respectively).

    In addition, Release FIVE includes significant enhancements in terms of user experience, such as a brand new GUI-based Composer for network functions and services, an improved dashboard for logs, metrics and alarms, and much faster start-up and responsiveness.

  • FOSSID Establishes First Independent Mirror of World's Largest Source Code Archive

    FOSSID and Software Heritage today announced that they have signed an agreement to establish the first independent mirror of the largest source code archive in the world.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Preview – Your Personal Prelude to Kubecon/Seattle

    Over 100+ companies will be in attending next week’s OpenShift Commons Gathering which is co-located with KubeCon and CloudNativeCon in Seattle at the Washington State Convention Center. The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss real implementations of container technologies, best practices for cloud native infrastructure and the upstream projects that make up the OpenShift ecosystem.

  • Multi-model databases are more juicy

    It sounds like a brand of orange juice… and its community edition is written in C++, but actually ArangoDB is a native multi-model database.

    ArangoDB Community Edition is available under open-source license… but news this week focuses on the release of core version 3.4 as a transactional database for developers.

  • Open-source discovery of chemical leads for next-generation chemoprotective antimalarials
  • CZI announces support for open-source software efforts to improve biomedical imaging

    Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced funding for open-source software efforts to improve image analysis and visualization in biomedicine. Microscopy -- critical to modern cell biology -- generates large volumes of complex data that pose significant challenges for analysis and visualization. The funding will support developers ("Imaging Software Fellows") from three projects to develop and maintain software tools, and begin collaborating to help create a cohesive, shared ecosystem of resources that can accelerate basic research and benefit the entire field.

  • A Closer Look at Tesla’s Open-Source Patent Pledge
  • Ground Breaking Decision In Open Source Software: The Versata Software Case

    An Open Source Software is a type of software with a source code which can be modified, enhanced and inspected by ANYONE. Source code is that part of a particular software program which empowers a person to alter how the software works or improve it by adding features or fixing parts that do not work properly. Differing from closed software, whereby only the person/organization that created the software has the capacity to alter it, OSS is preferred more and is a better option for the users than the former, granting them more freedom in relation to the software. Some prime examples of OSS are the Apache HTTP Server, the e-commerce platform osCommerce, internet browsers Mozilla Firefox and Chromium. Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn all release OSS so developers can share knowledge, create solutions, and contribute to stable and functional products. There are certain landmark cases in the field of open source software that hold paramount importance in deciding the future of the same as well as opening legal floodgates in its respect, one of which has been discussed at length below.

    [...]

    The decisions arrived at these cases are important in a number of ways, primarily because it confirmed the working of the GPLv2 structure. Mark Radcliffe, a licensing expert and partner at law firm DLA Piper has rightly exclaimed that "The days of open source software free lunches are rapidly coming to an end, and that means enterprises that fail to stick to the terms of open source licenses can expect to be sued."

  • Intake for Cataloging Spark
  • 6 Lessons from Learning to Code
  • Auto incrementing IDs for MongoDB
  • Mozilla Future Releases Blog: Firefox Coming to the Windows 10 on Qualcomm Snapdragon Devices Ecosystem

    At Mozilla, we’ve been building browsers for 20 years and we’ve learned a thing or two over those decades. One of the most important lessons is putting people at the center of the web experience. We pioneered user-centric features like tabbed browsing, automatic pop-up blocking, integrated web search, and browser extensions for the ultimate in personalization. All of these innovations support real users’ needs first, putting business demands in the back seat.

    Mozilla is uniquely positioned to build browsers that act as the user’s agent on the web and not simply as the top of an advertising funnel. Our mission not only allows us to put privacy and security at the forefront of our product strategy, it demands that we do so. You can see examples of this with Firefox’s Facebook Container extension, Firefox Monitor, and its private by design browser data syncing features. This will become even more apparent in upcoming releases of Firefox that will block certain cross-site and third-party tracking by default while delivering a fast, personal, and highly mobile experience.

Is open source wealth distribution fair?

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OSS

If wealth is the abundance of valuable possessions, open source has a wealth of software. While no one “owns” open source, some are better than others at converting this communal wealth to personal wealth.

Many open source project maintainers who produce free open source software do not have a model for deriving income from the assets they have created. However, companies that use open source software to enhance their products and services convert this valuable asset into income.

Read more

Microsoft's Latest Attempt at Stopping People From Using Chrome

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
OSS
Web
  • Microsoft is building Edge on top of Chromium (open source version of Google Chrome

    It is official now. Microsoft is throwing away old code base of Edge browser and making next version of Edge browser on top of Chromium. The open source project behind Google Chrome is known as Chromium. Microsoft is building a Chromium browser to replace Edge on Windows 10 on both x86 and ARM-based systems.

  • Microsoft Edge: Making the web better through more open source collaboration [Ed: This is Microsoft. Whose browser was always proprietary. Whose abuses on the WWW are well documented. Yeah, lecture us now on "open source collaboration" (not freedom).]
  • Microsoft's Edge browser moving to Chromium
  • Microsoft Confirms Edge will use Chromium Rendering Engine, Launches Insider Program
  • Goodbye, EdgeHTML

    Microsoft is officially giving up on an independent shared platform for the internet. By adopting Chromium, Microsoft hands over control of even more of online life to Google.

    This may sound melodramatic, but it’s not. The “browser engines” — Chromium from Google and Gecko Quantum from Mozilla — are “inside baseball” pieces of software that actually determine a great deal of what each of us can do online. They determine core capabilities such as which content we as consumers can see, how secure we are when we watch content, and how much control we have over what websites and services can do to us. Microsoft’s decision gives Google more ability to single-handedly decide what possibilities are available to each one of us.

The Road Ahead for Open Source

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OSS

Linux and the open source business model are far different today than many of the early developers might have hoped. Neither can claim a rags-to-riches story. Rather, their growth cycles have been a series of hit-or-miss milestones.

The Linux desktop has yet to find a home on the majority of consumer and enterprise computers. However, Linux-powered technology has long ruled the Internet and conquered the cloud and Internet of Things deployments. Both Linux and free open source licensing have dominated in other ways.

Read more

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Debian Installer Buster Alpha 4 release

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