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OSS

Is Open Source an Open Invitation to Hack Webmail Encryption?

Filed under
OSS
Security

While the open source approach to software development has proven its value over and over again, the idea of opening up the code for security features to anyone with eyeballs still creates anxiety in some circles. Such worries are ill-founded, though.

One concern about opening up security code to anyone is that anyone will include the NSA, which has a habit of discovering vulnerabilities and sitting on them so it can exploit them at a later time. Such discoveries shouldn't be a cause of concern, argued Phil Zimmermann, creator of PGP, the encryption scheme Yahoo and Google will be using for their webmail.

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Open source software: The question of security

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OSS
Security

The logic is understandable - how can a software with source code that can easily be viewed, accessed and changed have even a modicum of security?

opensource-security-question
Open source software is safer than many believe.
But with organizations around the globe deploying open source solutions in even some of the most mission-critical and security-sensitive environments, there is clearly something unaccounted for by that logic. According to a November 28 2013 Financial News article, some of the world's largest banks and exchanges, including Deutsche Bank and the New York Stock Exchange, have been active in open source projects and are operating their infrastructure on Linux, Apache and similar systems.

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Beer and open source with Untappd

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Greg Avola loves beer and coding. He loves beer so much that he made an app, Untappd, where users track their favorite brews. He loves coding so much that he wrote a book about mobile web development. According to him, if it weren't for open source software, his app—and the projects of many other developers—simply wouldn't exist.

Read more in my interview with Greg about his open source journey, his favorite beer, and why check-in apps are still relevant.

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What is Docker, Really? Founder Solomon Hykes Explains

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OSS

Docker has quickly become one of the most popular open source projects in cloud computing. With millions of Docker Engine downloads, hundreds of meetup groups in 40 countries and dozens upon dozens of companies announcing Docker integration, it's no wonder the less-than-two-year-old project ranked No. 2 overall behind OpenStack in Linux.com and The New Stack's top open cloud project survey.

This meteoric rise is still puzzling, and somewhat problematic, however, for Docker, which is “just trying to keep up” with all of the attention and contributions it's receiving, said founder Solomon Hykes in his keynote at LinuxCon and CloudOpen on Thursday. Most people today who are aware of Docker don't necessarily understand how it works or even why it exists, he said, because they haven't actually used it.

“Docker is very popular, it became popular very fast, and we're not really sure why,” Hykes said. “My personal theory … is that it was in the right place at the right time for a trend that's much bigger than Docker, and that is very important for all of us, that has to do with how applications are built.”

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Orca 3.14 Beta 1 Features Major Changes and Improvements

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OSS

Orca 3.13.90, a free, open source, flexible, and extensible screen reader that provides access to the graphical desktop via speech and refreshable Braille, is now available for download and testing.

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Mesa 10.3 release candidate 1

Filed under
Software
OSS

Mesa 10.3 release candidate 1 is now available for testing. The current
plan is to have an additional release candidate each Friday until the
eventual 10.3 release, (Ian can follow up to state what the planned date
is for that).

The tag in the git repository for Mesa 10.3-rc1 is 'mesa-10.3-rc1'.

I have also pushed a tag '10.3-branchpoint' to mark the point where
master and 10.3 diverge. This should make git-describe a bit more
useful.

As a reminder, with the 10.3 branch now created, patches nominated with:

CC:

will now be candidates only for the new 10.3 branch. To nominate patches
for the older 10.2 branch as well, please use:

CC: "10.2 10.3"

The expectation is that the 10.2 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly
releases until after 10.3.1 release.

Mesa 10.3 release candidate 1 is available for download from
ftp://freedesktop.org/pub/mesa/10.3

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Local Motors: Cars Should be Open Source Hardware

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OSS

There are several open source initiatives already underway to enable open source software in cars, including the Linux Foundation's Automotive Grade Linux group. But so far those projects have been mostly focused on the in-vehicle infotainment centers, which provide the user interface for the car and its entertainment system but not to the car's internal systems. That's not enough to fully transform the industry, Rogers said.

“You need to know how to hack the hardware in the car, because that's what defines how you can drive it and how you can run it.”

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Open Source Okavango14: The Heartbeat of the Delta

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Misc

We can hear this heartbeat by listening to what the environment tells us through sensors and testing. I proposed that we build low cost sensors using open source hardware and software. In recent years there has been quite a disruption in computing ability as a result of the prevalence of smartphones. Increasingly small and powerful components and processors have created an opportunities that we would have never thought possible. One of the results of that is the single-board Raspberry Pi computer. Originally, the Raspberry Pi was created to enable students to learn hardware and software development. For the Okavango Wilderness Project, we are using them to take environmental readings and send those to us for inclusion into the Into The Okavango website. Jer will cover this more in his expedition post. We are using them to measure water temperature, pH, conductivity, total dissolved solids, salinity, and specific gravity.

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Alfresco Raises A Fresh $45M To Fuel Open-Source Enterprise Content Management

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OSS

Alfresco, an open source, enterprise content management startup, is today announcing a new round of funding of $45 million — a Series D round that is more than twice as big as all of its previous rounds put together.

The UK-based company competes against legacy services like Documentum (which was co-founded by one of Alfresco’s co-founders, John Newton) and Sharepoint to help large organisations manage their disparate document storage both in the cloud and on-premises, and also offer versioning control and other compliance requirements across mobile, PC and other devices. Alfresco will use the new funding to step its business up a gear, with new sales and marketing efforts, and moves into more cloud-based services that could see it competing more directly also against the likes of Dropbox, Box and Huddle.

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NHS open-source Spine 2 platform to go live next week

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OSS

Last year, the NHS said open source would be a key feature of the new approach to healthcare IT. It hopes embracing open source will both cut the upfront costs of implementing new IT systems and take advantage of using the best brains from different areas of healthcare to develop collaborative solutions.

Meyer said the Spine switchover team has “picked up the gauntlet around open-source software”.

The HSCIC and BJSS have collaborated to build the core services of Spine 2, such as electronic prescriptions and care records, “in a series of iterative developments”.

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Quod Libet 3.2.1 Review – An Almost Perfect Music Player

It's a mystery why Quod Libet is not a more popular media player. It's been around for years and the developers have constantly worked on it. The last major update was done back in May 2014, and the software is stable and full of goodies. Quodlibet is a Latin phrase that means "what pleases" and it's used in music to describe a piece that's a combination of multiple melodies. The name seems to relate very well to the media player and it's actually quite catchy. Read more

Making Fedora work better [For me]

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Canonical Has Yet To Land X.Org Server 1.16 For Ubuntu 14.10

The Canonical X PPA offers the "X staging" packages with the new package versions providing the support. Besides the upgraded xserver package there's also version bumps to xserver-xorg-input-evdev, xserver-xorg-video-ati, xserver-xorg-video-intel, and xserver-xorg-video-nouveau that are built against the X.Org Server 1.16 ABI. Those wishing to upgrade to the X.Org Server 1.16 code can run sudo apt-add-repository ppa:canonical-x/x-staging; sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get dist-upgrade for trying out these packages on Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic. Canonical sadly hasn't done any updates to these packages since the end of July per the Launchpad package details. Read more

Getting Involved With The New Raspberry Pi Graphics Driver

Eric Anholt, formerly a lead developer on Intel's Linux graphics driver, has been quickly working away at the VC4 Gallium3D driver and related code now being a Broadcom employee tasked with making an open-source driver for the Raspberry Pi. If you're looking to try out his in-development driver or help him out in the driver creation process, he's published a brief guide to lower the barrier to entry. Eric published a blog post on Friday that covers the steps for building a Linux kernel that has the VC4 driver, building mainline Mesa with the VC4 driver, and also building Piglit for carrying out regression tests. Read more