Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Red Hat, Chilean government hold talks on open source initiative

Filed under
Red Hat
OSS

The head of Chilean regulator Pedro Huichalaf agreed to pass information regarding the benefits of open source software to the ministerial committee for digital development

Read more

IT teams are choosing open source - but not just for the cost savings

Filed under
OSS

IT decision makers are increasingly turning to open source over proprietary software because they believe it offers them better business continuity and control

Read more

Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes

Filed under
OSS
Legal

Via James Bessen, we learn of how a patent trolling operation by StreamScale has resulted in an open source project completely shutting down, despite the fact that the patent in question (US Patent 8,683,296 for an "Accelerated erasure coding system and method") is almost certainly ineligible for patent protection as an abstract idea, following the Supreme Court's Alice ruling and plenty of prior art. Erasure codes are used regularly today in cloud computing data storage and are considered to be rather important. Not surprisingly, companies and lawyers are starting to pop out of the woodwork to claim patents on key pieces. I won't pretend to understand the fundamental details of erasure codes, but the link above provides all the details. It goes through the specific claims in the patents, breaking down what they actually say (basically an erasure code on a computer using SIMD instructions), and how that's clearly an abstract idea and thus not patent-eligible.

Read more

SUSE invests in software-defined storage

Filed under
OSS
SUSE

SUSE, the enterprise Linux company, is working on its own storage solution using open-source Ceph: SUSE Storage.

Read more

Open Source Code Contains Fewer Defects, But There's a Catch

Filed under
Development
OSS
Security

Research suggests that software developed using open source code contains fewer defects than that built with proprietary code. The catch is that open source code rarely benefits from security teams specifically tasked with looking for bugs.

Read more

Gngr: A New Web Browser Focused On Privacy

Filed under
OSS
Security
Web

A group of developers have started writing their own open-source web browser that primarily is designed to increase web privacy and greater security.

Gngr is the new web browser under development and its conservative defaults mean no cookies, JavaScript, HTTP referring support, third-party frames, and a minimalistic user-agent string.

Gngr is written in Java to make use of the Java runtime's sandboxing abilities but ultimately they plan to switch over to some other JVM-based language.

While the code has yet to drop on Gngr, it's said to be coming after the initial release.

Those interested in more information on this privacy-focused web-browser can visit Gngr.info.

Read more

With Assembly, anyone can contribute to open-source software and actually get paid

Filed under
Development
OSS

The open-source movement has produced some of the most widely utilized software in the world, a huge economic value driven by a widely dispersed community who believe contributing good work is often its own reward. Outside of the world of computer science, however, these strategies are still relatively niche. A San Francisco startup called Assembly is trying to change all that, by evolving the open-source model to easily incorporate disciplines outside coding and to include a shared profit motive as well. Today the company is announcing a $2.9 million round of funding it will use to help expand its platform.

Read more

A price to pay – the Free Software column

Filed under
OSS

Open source is everywhere, but the term is often applied loosely. Free and open source software is attractive to hardware and software companies because it seems to be the cheap and efficient option and gives access to communities of users and developers who bring cost reductions and opportunities for high quality input from a variety of sources. Corporate involvement in open source software development works for developers as it pays their wages and, if properly managed, allows them the freedom to work on the code. But open source’s success is not without its drawbacks.

Read more

OPNFV Adds Chinese Telecom to Open Source NFV/SDN Partnership

Filed under
OSS

The Linux Foundation's OPNFV project won a significant endorsement this week from China-based ZTE Corporation, which stands to increase the global reach of the open source network functions virtualization (NFV) and software-defined networking (SDN) initiative.

Based in Shenzen, China, ZTE is a major manufacturer of telecom...

Read more

FLOSS Works – Now It Has Salesmen

Filed under
LibO
OSS

Canonical claimed 20 million PCs had shipped from OEMs in 2013/2014 with Ubuntu GNU/Linux.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Why leading DevOps may get you a promotion
    Gene Kim, author of The Phoenix Project and leading DevOps proponent, seems to think so. In a recent interview with TechBeacon's Mike Perrow, Kim notes that of "the nearly 100 speakers at DevOps Enterprise Summits over the last two years, about one in three have been promoted."
  • Cloud Vendors, The Great Disruptors, Face Disruption From Blockchain
  • SWORDY, a local party brawler could come to Linux if Microsoft allow it
    SWORDY is a rather fun looking local party brawler that has just released on Steam in Early Access. It could see a Linux release too, if Microsoft allow it.
  • System Shock remake has blasted past the Linux stretch goal, officially coming to Linux
    The Linux stretch goal was $1.1 million and it's pleasing to see it hit the goal, so we won't miss out now. I am hoping they don't let anyone down, as they have shown they can do it already by providing the demo. There should be no reason to see a delay with Linux now.
  • GammaRay 2.5 release
    GammaRay 2.5 has been released, the biggest feature release yet of our Qt introspection tool. Besides support for Qt 5.7 and in particular the newly added Qt 3D module a slew of new features awaits you, such as access to QML context property chains and type information, object instance statistics, support for inspecting networking and SSL classes, and runtime switchable logging categories.
  • GammaRay 2.5 Released For Qt Introspection
    KDAB has announced the release of GammaRay 2.5, what they say is their "biggest feature release yet", the popular introspection tool for Qt developers.
  • The new Keyboard panel
    After implementing the new redesigned Shell of GNOME Control Center, it’s now time to move the panels to a bright new future. And the Keyboard panel just walked this step.
  • Debian on Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS
    The majority of NAS devices supported in Debian are based on Debian's Kirkwood platform. This platform is quite dated now and can only run Debian's armel port. Debian now supports the Seagate Personal Cloud and Seagate NAS devices. They are based on Marvell's Armada 370, a platform which can run Debian's armhf port. Unfortunately, even the Armada 370 is a bit dated now, so I would not recommend these devices for new purchases. If you have one already, however, you now have the option to run native Debian.

OSS Leftovers