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OSS

Jeremy Allison: Learning the craft

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OSS

tuxdeluxe.org: I went out to dinner with an old programming friend the other night, and as all old programmers do, over our Chillis burgers we started swapping war stories about the systems and projects we'd worked on. Neither of us had a formal computer science education, and as we ended up comparing great computer related books we'd both read, it started me wondering, “How did we learn this stuff ?”

Can open source survive Congress?

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OSS

gcn.com/blog: If the House's proposed 2009 Defense Department budget is any indication, Congress may want to see more open-source software (OSS) in defense systems.

Source for the goose should be source for the gander

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OSS

ft.com: Jamie Boyle’s sensible defence of open-source software starts in a disarming way, by suggesting that the Federal Circuit’s decision in Jacobsen v Katzer, which upheld the validity of an open-source copyright claim, was one of those dry-as-dust decisions that only intellectual property geeks could love.

Strong line-up for second open source awards

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OSS

computerworld.co.nz: The awards received close to 100 nominations this year. Open source shop Catalyst IT, which is organising the awards, to be held in Wellington in the end of September, says it is pleased to see so many new projects.

Ars on Google at 10 years old

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Google
OSS

arstechnica.com: Just 10 years ago, most tech analysts believed that the future was Microsoft’s. Not only that, but on many editorial pages, Microsoft already owned the present. Google has proven that competitors can come out of nowhere and change the game.

Avoid the Managed Extensibility Framework

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OSS

Miguel de Icaza: As a .NET developer, you should avoid using the newly released Managed Extensibility Framework as its license prevents its use beyond the Windows platform. This will prevent your .NET software from running on Linux or MacOS in the future.

Reject Closed Source Mathematical and Scientific Programs

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OSS

kdubois.net: The modern scientific and mathematical community relies heavily on mathematical software for research and computations of pretty much everything. Unfortunately, from what I’ve seen, most of these tools seem to be closed source.

New startups explore new niches for open source

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OSS

Matt Asay: Over the weekend two new open-source startups caught my eye (and my inbox): OrecX and Transverse. The first is notable for its demonstration that open source is ready for niche applications. The second? Well, the second is notable because after reading through its website I still have no idea what it does.

Who’s going to pay for open source software?

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OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: This week theme has been "who's going to pay for open source?" It's shown up in a number of blogs, like Matt Asay's. In several blog posts he's said things like "Who will pay for open source in the future?" and "Someone has to pay for this stuff, and it's not going to be governments." Roberto Gallopini's post quotes Larry Augustine saying that customers need to be educated on the value of open source. I'm sorry, it's just not the simple.

How free software makes money

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OSS

brajeshwar.com: Many big corps support Free and Open Source Software in different ways. Everything’s strictly business, just that the company doesn’t need to burn down half the Amazon Rainforest to do it.

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