Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Why there’s no open-source standard-bearer for the network

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software plays an increasingly prominent role in many areas of modern business IT – it’s in servers, databases and even the cloud. Vendors like Red Hat, Canonical and others have managed to graft open-source principles onto a profitable business model. The former company became the first open-source-centered business with $1 billion in annual revenue in 2012.

Read more

Nginx 1.7.8 Updates Open-Source Web Server

Filed under
OSS

Today a new incremental version of nginx was released with the 1.7.8 milestone update.

Read more

Stephen Hawking unveils 'life changing' new voice technology in London

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

Intel said they planned to make the system open-source and free for users.

Read more

8 ways to contribute to open source without writing code

Filed under
OSS

Talking to developers and reading about open source I often get the feeling that the general notion is that open source is just about code and commits. Put another way, "If you don't make commits for a project you are not contributing to it." Or so they say. That notion is far from the truth in my eyes. Let me tell you why.

Read more

Changing Limerick’s government services boosts open source

Filed under
OSS

The overhaul of government service delivery in Limerick, Ireland's third-largest city, proceeds in concert with the introduction of free and and open source software, says Bilauca Mihai, part of the change management team for Limerick, both the city and the county.

Read more

Open Cloud Alliance Rallies Open Source Community

Filed under
OSS

To assist with maintaining the interoperability of open source software, IBM and Univention have formed the Open Cloud Alliance (OCA), a consortium that is dedicated to reducing the cost of open source interoperability of open source software deployed in cloud computing environments.

Read more

India's offline mobile internet is going open source

Filed under
OSS

"By giving away the source code, we can ignite the creative energies of the entire developer community and fuel unprecedented levels of innovation in the SMS market. Customers can benefit from world-class technology advancements, the development community gains access to a whole new market opportunity and Innoz core businesses benefit from licensing it with telecom operators."

Read more

Docker: Sorry, you're just going to have to learn about it. Today we begin

Filed under
Server
OSS

Containers aren't a new idea, and Docker isn't remotely the only company working on productising containers. It is, however, the one that has captured hearts and minds.

Docker started out with the standard LXC containers that are part of virtually every Linux distribution out there, but eventually transitioned to libcontainer, its own creation. Normally, nobody would have cared about libcontainer, but as we'll dig into later, it was exactly the right move at the right time.

Read more

‘Where is the nearest?’: Spain shares code for web map-tool

Filed under
OSS

The government of Spain is making available as open source the code for Ciudadania Europea, a web site that pointed citizens to the nearest embassies and consular services in European countries. That service was closed this summer, but the code is now freely available for other similar projects.

Read more

GenodeOS 14.11 Now Supports Intel's Wireless Hardware

Filed under
OS
OSS

Released today was version 14.11 of the Genode OS Framework, an interesting open-source OS research project we've been following for a few years now.

The big addition to Genode OS 14.11 is the addition of an Intel wireless stack. The latest Intel WiFi hardware is now supported by Genode thanks to its developers porting the Intel WiFi driver from Linux (iwlwifi) along with WPA supplicant application support to enable WiFi WPA access.

Genode OS 14.11 also brings an implementation of a trading scheme for CPU resources. There's also a new dynamic linker, Raspberry Pi networking support, new GUI components, and other changes.

More details on the new release of Genode OS 14.11 can be found at Genode.org.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Feral Interactive Ports Life Is Strange to Linux and Mac, Episode 1 Is Now Free

Feral Interactive has recently announced that they have managed to successfully port the popular, award-winning Life Is Strange game to GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems. Read more

Introduction to Modularity

Modularity is an exciting, new initiative aimed at resolving the issue of diverging (and occasionally conflicting) lifecycles of different “components” within Fedora. A great example of a diverging and conflicting lifecycle is the Ruby on Rails (RoR) lifecycle, whereby Fedora stipulates that itself can only have one version of RoR at any point in time – but that doesn’t mean Fedora’s version of RoR won’t conflict with another version of RoR used in an application. Therefore, we want to avoid having “components”, like RoR, conflict with other existing components within Fedora. Read more

Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

Now that I’ve had about a week to play around in Mint 18, I find a lot to like and have no major complaints. While Cinnamon probably isn’t destined to become my desktop of choice, I don’t dislike it and find it, hands down, the best of the GNOME based desktops I’ve tried so far. Anybody looking for a powerful, all purpose distro that’s designed to work smoothly and which can be mastered with ease would be hard pressed to find anything better. Read more

The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more