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OSS

Q&A: Why Congress is Jumping on the Open Source Bandwagon

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OSS

Members of the House, committees and staff have officially received the green light to obtain open source software for their offices, and to discuss software code and policy with developers, citizens and other legislators in communities such as GitHub, according to the Congressional Data Coalition advocacy group.

The White House joined open source code repository site GitHub in 2012. But it wasn't until this May a sitting congressman, Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., first joined the site. Connolly used it to make edits to guidance on implementation of the Federal IT Acquisition Reform Act.

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Long live ROS: Why the robotics revolution is being driven by open source development

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Hardware
OSS

The 2015 DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC) wrapped up last month, and while teams from Korea and the U.S. took away $3.5M in prize money, the real winner was the open source robotics movement. Of the 23 teams competing in the DRC, 18 utilized the open-source Robotic Operating System (ROS) and 14 used Gazebo, an open source robot simulator that allows developers to test concepts in robust virtual environments without risking valuable hardware.

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From the Editors: When did open-source software get so scary?

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OSS
Security

When did the use of open-source software become such a worrisome thought? Big names such as VMware, Oracle, Microsoft and Cisco, to name but a few, have been caught infringing on open-source software licenses.

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Kodi 15.0 Release Candidate 1 Arrives

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OSS

The first release candidate for Kodi 15 has arrived.

Kodi 15 is building up many new features from Android 4K@60Hz support to adaptive seeking support to Android H.265 support to many other updates and additions.

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7 stories that make you feel good about open source in 2015 (so far)

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OSS

One of the great things about open source is its reach beyond just the software we use. Open source isn’t just about taking principled stands, it's about making things better for the world around us. It helps spread new ideas by letting anyone with an interest modify and replicate those ideas in their own communities.

In this collection, let’s take a look back at some of the best articles we’ve shared this year about the ways that open source is making an impact on communities and improving the lives of people across the world.

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Exclusive interview with Hans de Raad

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Interviews
OSS

In my daily life (both personal and professional) I use open source for just about anything, from LibreOffice to Drupal, Kolab, Piwik, Apache, KDE, etc.

Being part of the communities of these projects for me is a very special extra dimension that creates a lot of extra motivation and satisfaction.

For me, open source isn’t so much of a choice it is simply the standard.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Q&A: Zipcar founder Robin Chase on open source and the collaboration economy

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Interviews
OSS

Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur known for founding the transportation related companies such as Zipcar, Buzzcar and Veniam. She wears many hats and is an inspiration to women all around the globe. She is also a strong supporter of Open Source and Open Collaborative technologies. She recently authored a book called Peers Inc: How People and Platforms Are Inventing the Collaborative Economy and Reinventing Capitalism. Chase will be delivering a keynote at the upcoming LinuxCon event.

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Open standards lower costs, French IT firms say

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OSS

Mandating open ICT standards and demanding interoperable ICT systems will lower the costs of government ICT systems, while increasing performance, agree one hundred French ICT firms working with open source and open standards. They responded to a poll organised last month by CNLL, a trade group.

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Nominate a free software community contributor in Cascadia

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GNU
Linux
OSS

As the Seattle GNU/Linux conference enters its third year, we decided we could do more to highlight the amazing community in Cascadia (a region on the west coast of the United States that includes Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, and Idaho). This area, especially in Washington, may seem like a haven for proprietary software, but when you take a closer look, you realize people are doing the hard work of helping friends, colleagues, and students embrace free software everywhere.

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More in Tux Machines

ASUS "Tinker Board"

  • Asus takes on Raspberry Pi with 4K-capable Tinker Board
    Tech giant Asus is taking on the Raspberry Pi with its own DIY-friendly single-board computer that's said to offer 4K video playback and 24-bit audio support in exchange for a hefty £55 price tag.
  • ASUS "Tinker Board" Powered By Rockchip ARM SoC, Supports Debian
    Making its rounds this morning as a "Raspberry Pi competitor" is the Tinker Board from ASUS. The Tinker Board is ASUS' take on an ARM SBC similar to what's already offered by a plethora of vendors. The Tinker Board features a quad-core 1.8GHz ARM Cortex-A17 processor with ARM Mali T764 graphics and there is 2GB of DDR3 memory.

Fedora 24 Gnome & HP Pavilion + Nvidia setup review

This was an interesting ordeal. It took me about four hours to finish the configuration and polish the system, the maniacal Fedora update that always runs in the deep hundreds and sometimes even thousands of packages, the graphics stack setup, and finally, all the gloss and trim needed to have a functional machine. All in all, it works well. Fedora proved itself to be an adequate choice for the old HP machine, with decent performance and responsiveness, good hardware compatibility, fine aesthetics and functionality, once the extras are added, and only a small number of issues, some related to my laptop usage legacy. Not bad. Sure, the system could be faster, and Gnome isn't the best choice for olden hardware. But then, for something that was born in 2010, the HP laptop handles this desktop environment with grace, and it looks the part. Just proves that Red Hat makes a lot of sense once you release its essential oils and let the fragrance of extra software and codecs sweep you. It is your time to be enthused about this and commence your own testing. Read more Also: Inkscape 0.92 available in Fedora

Qt 5.9 feature freeze

  • Qt 5.9 feature freeze
  • Qt 5.9 Feature Freeze Soon, Adds Experimental Qt Quick OpenVG Backend
    While Qt 5.8 was just released yesterday, the feature freeze is already upon us for Qt 5.9 due to the v5.8 release having been dragged out from November to this week. The feature freeze for Qt 5.9 development is 2 February, but beginning tomorrow will already be the soft-branching from the "dev" to "5.9" branches. Release manager Jani Heikkinen put out the reminder this morning about feature development drawing to a close.
  • Qt 5.8 Massive Release Lets You Create Devices with Multiple UI Processes, More
    It took the Qt developers more than two and a half months to finish the feature set of Qt 5.8, the next major release of the multiplatform and open-source software development framework for creating modern graphical user interfaces for mobile and desktop platforms. Qt 5.8 is everything you love about Qt, but faster, more powerful, and lighter. It improves the cross-platform compatibility for Linux, Android, macOS, and Microsoft Windows accelerating your development of beautiful products for any device, including Internet of Things (IoT). Qt 5.8 introduces a new way to configure Qt for your needs thanks to a new project codenamed Qt Lite.
  • Qt SCXML and State Chart Support in Qt Creator
    Qt has provided support for state machine based development since introduction of Qt State Machine Framework in Qt 4.6. With the new functionality introduced in Qt 5.8 and Qt Creator 4.2 state machine based development is now easier than ever before.

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