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OSS

Rebuilding tech in Afghanistan with open source

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OSS

The Center for International and Intercultural Communication (ZiiK) at the Technical University of Berlin (TU Berlin) has been helping with the reconstruction of academic organizations in Afghanistan since 2002. Under the supervision of the Berlin IT lecturer, Dr. Nazir Peroz, Director of the ZiiK, computer centers have been established at five college locations in Afghanistan.

Through the project, many students and college employees have been trained in the use of the computers. A new curriculum tailored to the requirements and prerequisites of Afghan students has been developed and Afghan IT students and future lecturers have been trained for Masters degrees in Germany.

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[ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.16.99.901

Filed under
Server
OSS

Here's the first RC for X server 1.17. We're a bit behind, due to my
travel schedule and illness, but I don't see any particular reason to
change the rest of the schedule at this point:

Non-critical bugs 2014-10-16 - 2014-11-30
Critical-bugs 2014-12-1 - 2014-12-31

Some high points that I know of:

* Adam continues to strip out stale code and clean up the
server. Thousands of lines of unnecessary code have disappeared yet
again.

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Survey indicates four out of five developers now use open source

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OSS

Why? The majority of them have switched to open source because they perceive open source development programs as having better performance and reliability. This, as Hammond observed, is a change. "Open source used to be popular because of the lower cost. Now the cost of tools is the least important element for developers."

This popularity, said Hammond, means that "open source is taking over. This is a golden age for developers." A consequence from this is that "We are now seeing open source tech compete with open source tech; it's no longer open-source software vs proprietary."

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Digium Debuts Asterisk 13 Open Source Communications Software

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OSS

Digium, the Asterisk Company, announced the release of Asterisk 13, a production-ready Long Term Support (LTS) release that builds upon the changes made in the previous development release, Asterisk 12.

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Organizations are Rallying Behind an Open Source Internet of Things

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OSS

If you've been reading about the Internet of Things (IoT) market, you may be noticing that it is picking up steam with powerful partnerships and big name companies launching initiatives. Red Hat put up an extensive post recently illustrating that it is very focused on the concept of networking objects of all types, and we've covered the backing that organizations ranging from The Linux Foundation to Microsoft are putting behind the IoT market.

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Hybrid cloud – the future is open source

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OSS

Among respondents to Computing’s recent data centre research programme, the hybrid cloud model is generating a lot of interest. Indeed, moving towards a hybrid model was the aim of 41 per cent of them (see figure 1).

Hybrid cloud implies a close interconnectivity between a private cloud (i.e. a collection of physical and virtual systems used exclusively by one company) and the multi-tenant public cloud services exemplified by Google, Amazon and Microsoft Azure. This seamlessly integrated whole allows data, services and workloads to be moved between public and private clouds at will, with the administrator able to monitor and manage the whole system via a single dashboard.

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How 'open' changes products

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OSS

'Open' products work a bit more like Ikea—you have all the right pieces and instructions but you have to make something out of it—a table or chair or whatever it may be. Ikea products are toolkits to make things. When we’re talking about software most buyers are thinking about what they get out of the box, so a toolkit is not a product to our consumers.

Open Atrium is a product that Phase2 produces and people say often that it is like "an intranet in a box." But, in reality it’s a toolkit. People use it a lot of different ways—some do what you’d expect them to do, others use it completely differently. This is the great thing about open source, but this causes a problem for the open source community. Karen says, "The very thing that makes open source awesome is what makes our product hard to define."

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Catalyst to lead Mahara open source ePortfolio project

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OSS

Catalyst, an open source software specialist based in Christchurch, New Zealand, has taken ownership of ePortfolio project Mahara's trademark and will also lead the its partner programme, it announced overnight.

"The transfer of the trademark and a new model for community engagement through support companies heralds an exciting new phase in the Mahara project," Catalyst said.

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Wipro to deploy 10,000 strong team for open source initiatives on non-proprietary software

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OSS

Wipro's open source practice has been made under its Business Application Services division, under which the company intends to build open source platforms that enable online services on a large scale.

The company will shift its focus to applications, infrastructure, including operating systems, databases, cloud technologies and software defined infrastructure. Significantly, in the Product Engineering space, Wipro believes licensable IP blocks will help shrink product development timelines.

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Pondering FOSS foundations

Filed under
LibO
OSS

In the case of the Document Foundation, the LibreOffice project needed an independent, solid and meritocratic entity dedicated to support it. In other terms, the OpenOffice.org community wanted to be its own boss and stop relying on corporate – or even third party – good will. If you attend the Community Track on the 31st you will be able to learn more about the Document Foundation and the other entities, but my message here is that while there is no silver bullet in these matters, forcing a community be hosted or to bend to a software vendor never works. It bends if it wants to; it goes whereever it wishes to go. In the case of the Document Foundation, independence and community rule prevailed over convenience; today the results do not need to be proven anymore. But it does not mean we hold the truth more than anybody else: we just ensured the community was in charge.

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More in Tux Machines

Five reasons to switch from Windows to Linux

Linux has been in the ascendancy ever since the open source operating system was released, and has been improved and refined over time so that a typical distribution is now a polished and complete package comprising virtually everything the user needs, whether for a server or personal system. Much of the web runs on Linux, and a great many smartphones, and numerous other systems, from the Raspberry Pi to the most powerful supercomputers. So is it time to switch from Windows to Linux? Here are five reasons why. Read more

today's leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Chrome vulnerability lets attackers steal movies from streaming services
    A significant security vulnerability in Google technology that is supposed to protect videos streamed via Google Chrome has been discovered by researchers from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC) in collaboration with a security researcher from Telekom Innovation Laboratories in Berlin, Germany.
  • Large botnet of CCTV devices knock the snot out of jewelry website
    Researchers have encountered a denial-of-service botnet that's made up of more than 25,000 Internet-connected closed circuit TV devices. The researchers with Security firm Sucuri came across the malicious network while defending a small brick-and-mortar jewelry shop against a distributed denial-of-service attack. The unnamed site was choking on an assault that delivered almost 35,000 HTTP requests per second, making it unreachable to legitimate users. When Sucuri used a network addressing and routing system known as Anycast to neutralize the attack, the assailants increased the number of HTTP requests to 50,000 per second.
  • Study finds Password Misuse in Hospitals a Steaming Hot Mess
    Hospitals are pretty hygienic places – except when it comes to passwords, it seems. That’s the conclusion of a recent study by researchers at Dartmouth College, the University of Pennsylvania and USC, which found that efforts to circumvent password protections are “endemic” in healthcare environments and mostly go unnoticed by hospital IT staff. The report describes what can only be described as wholesale abandonment of security best practices at hospitals and other clinical environments – with the bad behavior being driven by necessity rather than malice.
  • Why are hackers increasingly targeting the healthcare industry?
    Cyber-attacks in the healthcare environment are on the rise, with recent research suggesting that critical healthcare systems could be vulnerable to attack. In general, the healthcare industry is proving lucrative for cybercriminals because medical data can be used in multiple ways, for example fraud or identify theft. This personal data often contains information regarding a patient’s medical history, which could be used in targeted spear-phishing attacks.
  • Making the internet more secure
  • Beyond Monocultures
  • Dodging Raindrops Escaping the Public Cloud