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OSS

Leftovers: OSS (India, Voting, Education)

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OSS
  • IT sector: Promote open source, bring enabling provisions for Start-up India

    The IT/ITeS sector, one of the largest contributors to exports in the country, has played a vital role in shaping the overall growth story of India. In view of the challenging business environment, the sector has significant expectations from the ensuing Union Budget 2016 on the tax and policy initiatives front.

  • S.F. Officials Push for Adoption of Pioneering Open-Source Voting System [Ed: Beware Microsoft]

    San Francisco could launch a major makeover of its voting systems this year, an effort that supporters say will lead to cheaper, more transparent elections in the city.

    On Tuesday, Supervisor Scott Wiener will call for a Board of Supervisors hearing into the city’s efforts to adopt a voting system that would use off-the-shelf hardware and open-source software. Elections officials, politicians and voter-participation activists have all touted such publicly owned balloting systems as cheaper and more trustworthy than using products supplied by private vendors.

    “We want to set a trend here and around the country toward more open and transparent voting systems,” Wiener said in an interview.

  • Open Source Assignments for Non-Programming Classes

    I’ve been flirting with the idea of asking students in my Educational Game Design module to make their projects “open source”.

    I am wary of the way non-computer scientists use the term “open source”. I often hear people mistakenly refer to free software as “open source”, when its code is not at all open source. I have also heard people in open education talk about how we can learn from open source, but I always felt cautious about this because the contexts are usually different.

Building a culture of more pluggable open source

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OSS

If there is one word that often percolates conversations hailing the benefits of open source, it is choice. We often celebrate many of the 800+ Linux distributions, the countless desktops, applications, frameworks, and more. Choice, it would seem, is a good thing.

Interestingly, choice is also an emotive thing.

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A new frontier for open source: Linux will power our robotic future

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Linux
OSS

"You know, with windows versus Linux, Windows got there first by a long shot. It was the entrenched party. So Linux is the scrappy upstart. In the case of robotics, open source got there first. The community grew up doing things the open source way. There was actually a period in the mid-2000s where Microsoft put a lot of effort into its Windows-based Robotics Developer Studio. It had really good features, but it's never taken off. So yeah, I think robotics are proving to be a different situation than what happened with personal computing."

Long live Linux. Long live ROS. Long live open source.

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An open source fix leads to a new career in IT

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OSS

Today at InterWorx, I write software for Linux for web hosting companies. I got my RHCSA last year, and I'm currently studying for the RHCE. I'd love to say that I got into open source and Linux for philosophical reasons, but to be honest it was just because it let me get stuff done. If it wasn't for Linux and other open source software, I never would have been able to fix that problem all those years ago. With that one opportunity (and a lot of work!), I was able to start a path to a whole new career.

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4 open source tools for Linux system monitoring

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OSS

This article discusses some of the interactive command line interface (CLI) tools that are provided with or which can be easily installed on Red Hat related distributions including Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Fedora, CentOS, and other derivative distributions. Although there are GUI tools available and they offer good information, the CLI tools provide all of the same information and they are always usable because many servers do not have a GUI interface but all Linux systems have a command line interface.

This article concentrates on the tools that I typically use. If I did not cover your favorite tool, please forgive me and let us all know what tools you use and why in the comments section.

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Gnumeric 1.12.27 Open Source Spreadsheet Editor Has ODF Roundtrip Fixes, More

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OSS

The Gnumeric development team had the pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of a new maintenance release in the Gnumeric 1.12 stable series.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open Source DCIM Software Project Combats Spreadsheet-Based Data Center Management

    That free option does exist. openDCIM, an open source project born at one of the data centers supporting the US Department of Energy’s national labs. Its original creator, Scott Milliken, manages the Oak Ridge National Lab data center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  • OpsClarity Extends Monitoring to Open Source Suites

    OpsClarity's intelligent monitoring solution now provides monitoring for a growing and popular suite of open source data processing frameworks, including Apache Kafka, Apache Storm, Apache Spark as well as datastores such as Elasticsearch, Cassandra, MongoDB. The solution is intended to enable DevOps teams to gain visibility into how these technologies are dependent on each other and troubleshoot performance issues.

  • The future of the network is open source and programmability, says industry expert

    Network technology has changed considerably in the last 20 years, but most of the changes have been incremental – particularly as they relate the roles and responsibilities of network engineers and administrators.

  • HFOSS: Reviewing “What is Open Source?”, Steve Weber

    This blog post is part of an assignment for my Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software Development course at the Rochester Institute of Technology. For this assignment, we are tasked with reading Chapter 3 of Steve Weber’s “The Success of Open Source“. The summary of the reading is found below.

  • a lambda is not (necessarily) a closure

    But if you said "it's a closure" -- well you're right in general I guess, like on a semantic what-does-it-mean level, but as far as how Guile represents this thing at run-time, hoo boy are there a number of possibilities, and a closure is just one of them. This article dives into the possibilities, with the goal being to help you update your mental model of "how much do things cost".

    In Guile, a lambda expression can be one of the following things at run-time:

    Gone

    Inlined

    Contified

    Code pointer

    Closure

    Let's look into these one-by-one.

  • IBM Provides New Analytics Tools, and Big Datasets for Testing

    IBM has already made many big commitments to data analytics and the cloud. It is committing huge finanical resources to Apache Spark for example, and expanding its cloud portfolio. Now IBM has announced four new data services: Analytics Exchange, Compose Enterprise, Graph, and Predictive Analytics.

  • Free RightScale Tool Lets You Compare Public Clouds
  • Eclipse Che Open Source Cloud IDE Now Available in Beta

    Eclipse Che, an open source cloud IDE with RESTful workspaces and Docker-based machines, is now available in beta.

    Che offers a workspace that is composed of projects and its associated runtimes, making its state distributable, portable and versionable. The platform use VMs, containers, and Web services to bring repeatability, consistency, and performance to workspaces.

Apache Spark rises to become most active open source project in big data

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A healthy interest is not a surprise. In Apache Spark's relatively short life, there's been much discussion of its ascendancy. In September, Databricks, the company behind Spark, released results from a survey showing that Spark is the most active open source project in big data with more than 600 contributors within the past year, which is up from 315 in 2014. Plus, Spark is in use not just in the IT industry, but areas like finance, retail, advertising, education, health care, and more. That survey also showed that 51% of Spark users are using three or more Spark components.

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WandBoard.org spins Brillo-on-iMX6UL IoT hacker board

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Android
OSS

Wandboard.org launched a sandwich-style “HobbitBoard” that runs Brillo on an i.MX6 UltraLite, and offers Intel Edison, Wandboard, and MikroBus expansion.

The HobbitBoard, which is available for pre-order at $69 for March shipment, is the first hacker board to come out of Wandboard.org since the original i.MX6-based Wandboard debuted back in 2012. The Wandboard, which stepped up to a quad-core version in 2013, was one of the very first community-backed, open spec boards following the BeagleBoard. It came out about the same time as the original Raspberry Pi Model B.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Dispatches from FOSDEM, new survey data, and more OpenStack news
  • Open Source and .NET — Why It's Not Picking Up

    Open-source in .NET is not picking up. Despite good efforts from many good people and companies, it seems as if the Microsoft developers scene is far from embracing open-source. Why is this happening, and is there still hope for change?

    [...]

    But, this doesn't seem to be enough. OSS projects in .NET are not striving; there is not much innovation happening in this space; and OSS communities aren't being formed. It is all left as a dream we keep dreaming, but never actually getting to fulfil.

  • LLVM Clang 3.8 Compiler Optimization Benchmarks With -Ofast

    A few days ago I posted a number of LLVM Clang optimization level benchmarks using the latest code for the upcoming Clang 3.8 release. Those tests went from -O0 to -O3 -march=native, but many Phoronix readers wanted -Ofast so here are those results too.

    I didn't include -Ofast in the original tests since I don't know of many using this optimization level within a production capacity considering it has the potential of doing unsafe math as it disregards standards compliance in the name of performance. However, since several readers requested it and I still had this LLVM/Clang 3.8 build around in the same system configuration, I added in extra runs with -Ofast and -Ofast -march=native.

  • Texinfo 6.1 released

    We have released version 6.1 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.

  • A Simple Hangman Game Implemented In 3 Lines Of Python

    Today I’m sharing a clever implementation of Hangman in python by programmer Danver Braganza. Take a look at this 3-lines-long program and try to make it more compact.

  • GitHub is undergoing a full-blown overhaul as execs and employees depart — and we have the full inside story

    We've been hearing about a lot of drama going on at $2 billion startup GitHub, the hugely important and popular site used by millions of computer programmers where 10 or more executives have departed in recent months.

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More in Tux Machines

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Security: Updates, Intel, Torvalds

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Intel: We've found severe bugs in secretive Management Engine, affecting millions
    Thanks to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel's hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers. The flaws affect Management Engine (ME), Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Server Platform Services (SPS).
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 71 - GitHub's Security Scanner
    Josh and Kurt talk about GitHub's security scanner and Linus' security email. We clarify the esoteric difference between security bugs and non security bugs.
  • Linus Torvalds 'sorry' for swearing, blames popularity of Linux itself
    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has apologised – a bit – for calling some security-centric kernel contributors “f*cking morons”. Torvalds unleashed a profanity-laden rant at Google developer Kees Cook, over the latter's proposal to harden the kernel. Another Google security chap, Matthew Garret, asked Torvalds “ Can you clarify a little with regard to how you'd have liked this patchset to look?” To which Torvalds responded that “I think the actual status of the patches is fairly good with the default warning.”

Benchmarks: Linux Power Use, Sabrent EC-SS31, Phoronix Test Suite 7.6 M3