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OSS

France's environmental agency deployed Pydio to increase collaboration

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OSS

France’s Environment and Energy Management ADEME (Agence de l’Environnement et de la maîtrise de l’énergie), has deployed the open source file sharing solution Pydio (Put Your Data in Orbit ) for its one thousand employees. Implemented in March 2013, the solution now serves as a basis of the Partage ADEME Portal. The agency is also contributing to the project some of the specific developments that were made for integrating Pydio to the existing agency’s system.

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The power of Docker and open source ecosystems

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OSS

Reading through the latest list of top 10 open source projects on Opensource.com has been a reminder of what a great year 2014 has been for open source. Established projects like OpenStack and Mongo have continued to break new records in adoption and usage. We’ve seen incredible momentum from newer projects like Apache Mesos, Kubernetes, and Deis. And we’ve also seen that open source companies like Cloudera, Hortonworks, and Ceph can reach meaningful business milestones while remaining true to their open source roots. Virtually everywhere you look in the IT stack—from storage to networking, compute, mobile, and virtualization—the most exciting innovations are being led by open source.

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How to explain open source to the in-laws

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OSS

No, I said, though some community people can and will do that. My job is to make it easier for people to use the software (how to read the book best) and write the software (by helping with getting procedures and tools together to write books more efficiently). Because there needs to be some sort of organization about the creation of the software. So, I get people with an interest in building the software well together with people who have an interest in running the software. And, because there is commercial interest in the software, someone pays me to do this.

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Open Source Databases Keep Chipping Away at Oracle’s Empire

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Server
OSS

The three fastest growing databases of 2014 were all open source, according to a new report from DB-Engines, a site that tracks popularity in the rapidly changing database marketplace.

The ever popular new-age database MongoDB topped the list again this year, with Redis, a tool for managing data, and ElasticSearch, which provides the foundations for building your own search engine, as runners up.

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One decade on, gvSIG offers powerful GIS tools

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OSS

Ten years after gvSIG’s start by the government of Valencia (Spain), the open source geographic information system offers a broad range of GIS solutions. The software tools are used in sectors such as town planning, public transport, health care and environment management.

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Twitter AnomalyDetection tool goes open source

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OSS

The social media giant said on Tuesday the tool, dubbed AnomalyDetection, is used by the firm's team to detect unusual traffic events including traffic spikes and surges, as well as the presence of spam bots. In the world of Big Data, such spikes on a company's networks can negatively impact service by flooding Internet lanes, causing denial-of-service problems and website crashes, as well as irritating users on an individual level -- if spam levels are not kept under control, for example.

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2015: To Ensure an Open Cloud, IT History has to Repeat Itself

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Server
OSS

In the last 30 years we’ve witnessed countless IT and PC revolutions: circular battles where centralized vs. decentralized, open vs. proprietary forces captured, then lost, ground only to gain ground once again.

Computers existed before of course, but only in the last few decades have consumers and office workers had regular access to computers. A huge industry around hardware, operating systems, applications and services arose. As with every other revolution and huge new market we saw power struggles where the different players were fighting about the rules of this new market. Everybody wants to have the biggest part of the fish.

But users demanded interoperability. Word needed to work on my personal Mac and my office PC. Websites needed to work on all browsers. So, despite wanting to lock people in, vendors had to find a way to play nice – at least semi-nice.

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Open Source Software List: 2015 Ultimate List

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OSS

We have compiled those lists into one ultimate open source software list. The following list spotlights 1,211 noteworthy open source projects that have been featured on our website. We added one new category this year—Internet of Things—as well as dozens of new projects. And several older projects that have appeared on earlier open source software lists in the past but are no longer actively maintained have been retired from the list.

Please note that this is not a ranking; projects are organized into categories and arranged alphabetically within each category.

As always, feel free to note any open source projects that we may have missed in the comments section below.

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2015: The year the UN resets the count

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OSS

Yet while openness and open data are repeatedly trumpeted, the UN report doesn’t mention open source once. I recently asked the report’s lead author Claire Melamed why, and she said she didn't feel it was within the scope of the report. But "A World That Counts" calls for a variety of things to happen in 2015, all of which could easily become mired in bureaucracy or outdated forms of collaboration without a dose of open source values.

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MatchStick Hands-On: A Cheap Open Source Chromecast? Yes Please.

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Movies
Moz/FF
OSS

Chromecast has largely caught on as a way to easily use services like Netflix on your computer. MatchStick is an open source HDMI stick for everyone who wants to use there TV for more than just watching movies.

There's no problem with Chromecast per se it's just that Chromecast is a closed ecosystem that doesn't lend itself very well to experimentation. MatchStick runs Flint, an OS built on Mozilla's Fire OS. The platform is completely open so that developers can write their own applications for the hardware.

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Also: Matchstick Launches The Flint Open Source Streaming Platform With New Hardware Partnerships

Kickstarter-Success Matchstick Launches The Flint Open Source Streaming Platform With New Hardware Partnerships

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Thunderbird 45 Finally Lands in the Main Ubuntu Linux Repositories

After a long wait, Canonical has finally decided that it was time to upgrade the Mozilla Thunderbird software on all of its supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, where it is used as the default email and news client. Read more

KDE Leftovers

  • Double Post – Lakademy and Randa 2016
    I Have a few favorites kde conventions that I really love to participate. Randa and Lakademy are always awesome, both are focused on hacking, and I surely do love to hack. On LaKademy I spend my days working on subsurface, reworking on the interface, trying to make it more pleasant to the eye, In Randa I worked on KDevelop and Marble, but oh my…
  • Plasma’s Publictransport applet’s porting status
    You might remember that I spoke about Plasma’s Publictransport applet getting some reworking during the summer. It’s been over a month since I made that announcement on my blog and while ideally, I’d have liked to have blogged every week about my work, I haven’t really been able to. This is largely down to the fact that I was occupied with work on a project back at my university and I shifted back to home from my hostel as well, after finishing four years of undergraduate studies.
  • KDE Community Working Group 2016
  • KDE Brasil Telegram group and IRC United
    That’s why the KDE Irc channel now has a bot that will forward all messages to our Telegram Channel and vice-versa, this way all the new cool kids can talk to all the old geeks around and continue to make the KDE awesome in their platform of choice.
  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 7)
    Tears followed by joy and happiness, discussions followed by great moments all together, problems followed by their solution and enthusiasm. Am I talking about my family? More or less, because actually I am talking about a family: the WikiToLearn community!
  • Kubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Update Out
    The first point release update to our LTS release 16.04 is out now. This contains all the bugfixes added to 16.04 since its first release in April. Users of 16.04 can run the normal update procedure to get these bugfixes.
  • Kubuntu Podcast #14 – UbPorts interview with Marius Gripsgard
  • KDStateMachineEditor 1.1.0 released
    KDStateMachineEditor is a Qt-based framework for creating Qt State Machine metacode using a graphical user interface. It works on all major platforms and is now available as part of the Qt Auto suite.
  • KDAB contributions to Qt 5.7
    The star of Qt 5.7 is the first stable release of Qt 3D 2.0. The new version of Qt 3D is a total redesign of its architecture into a modern and streamlined 3D engine, exploiting modern design patterns such as entity-component systems, and capable to scale due to the heavily threaded design. This important milestone was the result of a massive effort done by KDAB in coordination with The Qt Company.
  • Krita 3.0.1 Development Builds
    Because of unforeseen circumstances, we had to rejig our release schedule, there was no release last week. Still, we wanted to bring you a foretaste of some of the goodies that are going to be in the 3.0.1 release, which is now planned for September 5th. There’s lots to play with, here, from bug fixes (the double dot in file names is gone, the crash with cheap tablets is gone, a big issue with memory leaks in the graphics card is solved), to features (soft-proofing, among others). There may also be new bugs, and not all new features may be working correctly. Export to animated gif or video clips is still in development, and probably will not work well outside the developers’ computer.
  • KDE blowing out candles on FISL 17!
    My talk was the next. Its title was “20 anos de KDE: de Desktop a Guarda-Chuva de Projetos” (20 years of KDE: From Desktop to Project Umbrella). I presented the evolution process of our community, which led it from a desktop project to a incubator community. For those who did not attend the event the talk was recorded and it is available here. Below I also make available the slides of my presentation:
  • LabPlot 2.3.0 released
    Less then four months after the last release and after a lot of activity in our repository during this time, we’re happy to announce the next release of LabPlot with a lot of new features. So, be prepared for a long post.

Ubuntu tablet and smartphone: a personal "mini" review

So when Ubuntu and Canonical revealed they were partnering with actual, big manufacturers for Ubuntu mobile devices, a spark of hope was rekindled in my heart. Let it be clear, I am by no means an Ubuntu user, not even a fan. I left the fold nearly a decade ago, after having spent quite some time using and contributing to Kubuntu (to the point of becoming a certified “member” even, though I never ascended to the Council). In terms of loyalties and usage, I am a KDE user (and “helper”) foremost. I use Fedora because it just works for me, for now. So, yes, an Ubuntu Touch device would be another compromise for me, but it would be the smallest one. Or so I hoped. Read more

Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released for Desktop, Server, and Cloud with All Flavors

Canonical has announced the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, finally allowing users of Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (Trusty Tahr) to upgrade their installations. Read more