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OSS

Open source empowers city archive Hospitalet

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OSS

Open source has modernised the archive of the Catalan city of Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain). The software helps manage the administrative records, but also allows easy access to historical records. This facilitates research and education, and enables public information dissemination. For its historical records, the Hospitalet city archive implements ICA-Atom, a web-based and open source archive solution.

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How open source can be a gateway to your next job

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OSS

By my observation, the demand for people in open source is at an all-time high. Open source technologies such as programming languages, libraries, and tools are now mainstream. Participating in an open source community can help you learn those tools, and when you go on job interviews you can not only discuss your shiny new degree, but you can point to things you've actually done that made a difference.

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MBARI testing the waters with open source camera

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OSS

“There is a movement to have open source oceanographic equipment,” said Chad Kecy, lead designer and MBARI engineer. “Anyone could take our designs and modify them for specific needs they have. It’s just a less expensive and easier way of getting cameras in the water.”

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Build Your Own Open-Source SmartWatch

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Hardware
OSS
HowTos

If you’re not up for spending your money on one of the less advanced smart watch models, you may want to check out maker Jonathan Cook’s DIY Open-Source SmartWatch, part of which is 3D printed, something the prognosticators of future tech surely didn’t forecast. Cook shared instructions for making his SmartWatch on the webzine “Make:” and also on his own website, DoNothingBox. You can download the STL files on the DNB site, too. For around $125 or less you can make your own smart phone and you can customize it, something that you wouldn’t be able to do with a store-bought version.

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Your simple guide to Open Source technology

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OSS

What does this mean in practice? First and foremost, it means that unlike traditional software development that is done behind closed doors and with the windows barred and by a small team, Open Source software development by its nature has many eye balls on it all of the time. Anyone can submit bug fixes or improvements and this generally translates into fixes and improvements happening at a much faster rate. Security vulnerabilities and exploits are usually fixed quickly too, which is good for everyone.

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OpenSSL 1.0.2 Branch Release notes

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OSS
Security

The major changes and known issues for the 1.0.2 branch of the OpenSSL toolkit are summarised below. The contents reflect the current state of the NEWS file inside the git repository.

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Open-Xchange Partners with ExtendASP on Open Source SaaS

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OSS

Open source SaaS vendor Open-Xchange gained another partner ally this week in its quest to offer an open source alternative to Microsoft Exchange. The partner, ExtendASP, will integrate the company's OX App Suite into its customer and product manager solutions.

The move, which the companies announced Jan. 21, promises to increase OX App Suite's customer base. In that way, it strengthens the position of Open-Xchange as it competes with entrenched proprietary foes in the office-productivity suite market.

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Federal Agencies Using Open Source Solutions More Satisfied with Cloud Security: MeriTalk

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Red Hat
Server
OSS

Seventy-five percent of federal IT workers want to move more services to the cloud, but are held back by data control concerns, according to a survey released this week by MeriTalk. According to “Cloud Without the Commitment,” only 53 percent of federal IT workers rate their cloud experience as very successful, the same number as are being held back by fear of long-term contracts.

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It's Windows *10*, Because It's 10 Years Behind Open Source

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Microsoft
OSS

I don't write about Microsoft much here. That's largely because, as I noted recently, open source has won. Well, it's won in the field of supercomputers, cloud computing, Web servers, mobile systems, embedded systems and the Internet of Things. Of course, it hasn't won on the desktop - although there are some interesting indications that even there things may be changing. That means Wednesday's launch of Windows 10 is still important, since it affects the daily lives of many people - far too many. Here, I want to focus on a few key aspects that emerged.

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Open Source Haptics Kit Aims to Democratize Force Feedback

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Hardware
OSS

quick terminology dive: a spacial haptic device is a physical manipulator that enables exploration of a virtual space through force feedback. A user grips the “manipulandum” (the handle) and moves it within the work area defined by the physical design of the device. Spacial Haptic Devices have been around for years and serve as excellent tools for telling their users (surgeons) what something (tumor) “feels like.”

In our case, this haptic device is a two-link, two-joint system grounded on a base station and providing force feedback with servo motors and tensioned wire ropes. The manipulator itself supports 3-degree-of-freedom movement of the end-effector (translations, but no rotations) which is tracked with encoders placed on all joints. To enable feedback, joints are engaged with cable-drive transmissions.

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More in Tux Machines

How To Build A Raspberry Pi Smartwatch — The Geekiest Watch Ever Made

In our Getting Started With Raspberry Pi series, we’ve introduced you to the basics of Pi, told you how to get everything you need, and help you boot a basic operating system. But, Raspberry Pi is much more than that. You can use it as a TOR proxy router, build your own PiPhone, and even install Windows 10 IoT. This little device comes with lots of flexibility, that allows it to be used in multiple applications. Well, did you ever think about wearing your Raspberry Pi? If your answer is NO, I won’t be surprised. If you imagine a scenario where Raspberry Pi is used to build a smartwatch, it would look too bulky. Well, that’s the thing about making geeky things that set you apart from the regular crowd, right? Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

  • Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 Released
  • Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" Alpha 2 Released
    Today marks the second alpha release for Ubuntu 16.10 "Yakkety Yak" flavors participating in these early development releases. Participating in today's Yakkety Yak Alpha 2 development milestone are Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Kylin. No Xubuntu or Kubuntu releases to report on this morning.
  • PSA: Ubuntu 15.10 Hits End of Life Today
    It's time to wave a weary goodbye to the Wily Werewolf, as Ubuntu 15.10 support ends today.
  • Jono Bacon on Life After (and Before) GitHub
    Do you want to know what it takes to be a professional community manager? This interview will show you the kind of personality that does well at it, and how Jono Bacon, one of the world’s finest community managers, discovered Linux and later found his way into community management. Bacon is world-famous as the long-time community manager for Ubuntu. He was so good, I sometimes think his mother sang “you’ll be a community manager by and by” to him when he was a baby. In 2014 he went to XPRIZE, not a FOSS company, but important nevertheless. From there he dove back into FOSS as community manager for GitHub. Now Bacon is a freelance, self-employed community manager. One of his major clients is HackerOne, whose CEO is Bacon’s and my mutual friend Mårten Mickos. But HackerOne is far from his only client. In the interview he says he recently got back from visiting a client in China, and that he has more work then he can handle.

I've been Linuxing since before you were born

Once upon a time, there was no Linux. No, really! It did not exist. It was not like today, with Linux everywhere. There were multiple flavors of Unix, there was Apple, and there was Microsoft Windows. When it comes to Windows, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Despite adding 20+ gigabytes of gosh-knows-what, Windows is mostly the same. (Except you can't drop to a DOS prompt to get actual work done.) Hey, who remembers Gorilla.bas, the exploding banana game that came in DOS? Fun times! The Internet never forgets, and you can play a Flash version on Kongregate.com. Apple changed, evolving from a friendly system that encouraged hacking to a sleek, sealed box that you are not supposed to open, and that dictates what hardware interfaces you are allowed to use. 1998: no more floppy disk. 2012: no more optical drive. The 12-inch MacBook has only a single USB Type-C port that supplies power, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, external storage, video output, and accessories. If you want to plug in more than one thing at a time and don't want to tote a herd of dongles and adapters around with you, too bad. Next up: The headphone jack. Yes, the one remaining non-proprietary standard hardware port in Apple-land is doomed. Read more