Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

What science fiction technology should be open source?

Filed under
OSS

Science fiction ranges from complete fabrications to some surprisingly accurate visions for the future. What tool, device, object, or other item from your science fiction library do you hope, or even expect, to one day find an open source version of?

Read more

Open source anniversary: How adopting 10 WordPress plugins changed my life

Filed under
OSS

This isn't just a WordPress story, it's really an open source story. WordPress, as you probably know, is a GPL-based open source project. It supports a wide range of plugins and themes that extend and modify its capabilities and customize its look. Each of the plugins and themes is also GPL.

Since plugins are smaller open source projects, most have just one or -- at most -- a few maintainers. That means if the maintainer gets tired of working on the plugin or has life circumstances that make it impossible to keep supporting it, there are two choices: let it wither, or put it up for adoption.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

NY bill would provide tax credit for open source contributors

Filed under
OSS

For many years, the open source software community has made the distinction between "free as in freedom" (the software can be used or modified as the user sees fit) and "free as in beer" (the software is available at no cost). Some have added a third type of free: "free as in puppy". Like a puppy, adopting open source software has ongoing cost.

What many people don't consider is that developing open source software has a cost, too. Many developers purchase extra hardware for testing or pay for code hosting, a website, etc. A pending bill in the New York Senate aims to help offset those costs.

Read more

Open Source Is Killing Us

Filed under
OSS

Garrison is half-right about the fatal nature of open source. Viewed in isolation, these problems are insurmountable.

But if you put them together, the problems solve each other. Service providers overwhelmed by open source can turn to vendors to solve the problem, and pay the vendors to do it.

Sure, it's a tough competitive environment for both service providers and vendors. But that's what disruption looks like.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Slack smackback: There's no IRC in team (software), say open-sourcers

    Open-source software is not possible without collaboration and collaboration is not possible without communication. Collaborative communication in open source projects typically means some form of distributed chat.

    In the past, and indeed the present for most projects, that has meant IRC. IRC has some disadvantages, though, and developers love a shiny new toy, which is part of the reason more than a few projects have moved to Slack, the startup attracting crazy amounts of venture investment and equally crazy valuations.

    [...]

    There are ongoing efforts to improve IRC, notably the IRCv3 project, but if you're looking for a solution right now, IRC comes up short.

    And there's no question that Slack is a very well designed, easy to use chat system. But it's closed source, which makes it a questionable choice for open-source projects. Still, if good old IRC really isn't working any more - and I would suggest your project take some time to really evaluate that question before proceeding - there are open-source Slack imitators that can also solve some of the problems with IRC, but are self-hosted and FOSS licensed.

  • TP-Link blocks open-source router firmware to comply with new FCC rules

    If you're a fan of third-party software that adds functionality to a Wi-Fi router, your options just got smaller. The Federal Communications Commission has new rules designed to make sure routers operate only within their licensed frequencies and power levels. TP-Link is complying by blocking open-source firmware like the Linux-based OpenWRT and DD-WRT from its routers. That’s the easiest way for router manufacturers to comply.

  • 4 projects for building an open source arcade

    You may have heard the news recently that the MAME project has been licensed under the GPL version 2.

    MAME, which originally stood for Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator, is probably the largest and most complete game emulation systems ever created, with the ability to emulate many original gaming systems, largely from the 80s and 90s. While primarily developed for Windows, MAME also compiles easily for Linux, and can be ported to other operating systems as well.

  • 4 open source tools for writing your next screenplay

    While I was putting together slides for my lightning talk at Great Wide Open (happening March 16-17), Not that Weird: Open Source Tools for Creatives, I remembered that in the last half of 2015 we had a bit of a loss from our open source creative toolbox. I think I was little late to the game in realizing this—after all, the last official stable release of Celtx (the open source, desktop version) was in 2012—but for folks paying attention, it's been a long time coming.

  • User Security Relies on Encryption

    Security of users is paramount. Technology companies need to do everything in their power to ensure the security of their users and build products and services with strong security measures in place to do that.

    At Mozilla, it’s part of our mission to safeguard the Web and to take a stand on issues that threaten the health of the Internet. People need to understand and engage with encryption as a core technology that keeps our everyday transactions and conversations secure. That’s why, just days before the Apple story broke, we launched an awareness campaign to educate users on the importance of encryption.

  • Crate Built a Distributed SQL Database System To Run Within Containers

    Crate Technology has designed a database system for supporting Docker containers and microservices. The technology stresses ease of use, speed and scalability while retaining the ability to use SQL against very large data sets.

    Crate was built to run in ephemeral environments, said Christian Lutz, Crate CEO. It was the ninth official Docker image in the Docker Registry and has been downloaded more than 350,000 times in the past six months. It can be managed with Docker tools, or with Kubernetes or Mesos.

  • Tips for LibreOffice newbies

    Li Haoyi has written an excellent blog post entitled "Diving Into Other People's Code" about diving into an unfamilar codebase (HN discussion here).

    I think this is really very helpful for anyone who wants to look at the LibreOffice source for the first time. Many of the things he mentions are directly relatable to LibreOffice - in particular getting your dev environment setup is particularly relatable.

  • Shopify plugin for WordPress launched
  • WooCommerce Gets Competition From Shopify
  • Shopify Launches Ecommerce Plugin for WordPress
  • Shopify for WordPress Unveiled With Three, Free Themes
  • What's New in Open Source CMS In March '16
  • Share your Insights in the 2016 Future of Open Source Survey

    The interesting thing will be to see if the results continue to accelerate at the same rate or even faster. You can see results of last year's survey here. Follow the 2016 Future of Open Source Survey on Twitter at #FutureOSS and @FutureOfOSS, and stay tuned to Linux.com for future updates and results.

  • Obama Administration’s Draft Source Code Policy Requires Free Software

    The Obama administration last week published a draft software source code policy that requires all government agencies to publish their custom-build software as free software for public use, according to the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE).

  • Open Source Learning

    The U.S. Department of Education’s #GoOpen program is an initiative to use openly licensed educational resources in the classroom. Chesterfield schools have a national reputation as a pioneer in the use of these programs, and is one of six school districts nationwide to be named a #GoOpen Ambassador District, to mentor other school systems in implementing the program.

  • The Deep Roots of Javascript Fatigue

    When I was more active in the frontend community, the changes seemed minor. We’d occasionally make switches in packaging (RequireJS → Browserify), or frameworks (Backbone → Components). And sometimes we’d take advantage of new Node/v8 features. But for the most part, the updates were all incremental.

    [...]

    On the other hand, Brendan Eich, now the Mozilla CTO, argued for the changes. In an open letter to Chris Wilson, he objected to the fact that Microsoft was just now withdrawing support for a spec which had been in the works for years.

Linux and FOSS Events

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source is center stage at Open Networking Summit

    Open Networking Summit (ONS) kicked off in Santa Clara this week, the first event since becoming part of the Linux Foundation.

    Guru Parulkar, Nick McKeown and Dan Pitt started the Open Networking summit back in 2011. Yesterday, Parulkar said in his keynote that they started the summit as a small event to highlight the latest developments in software defined networking (SDN), and to accelerate SDN adoption by network operators and service providers.

    But as almost everything is become software defined and adoption is increasing, ONS became an important event for the industry and community. The immense adoption of open source led the team to increase focus on open source and open source platforms.

  • Debian SunCamp 2016 Is Taking Place May 26-29 in the Province of Girona, Spain

    The Debian community is preparing yet another awesome event for the of spring 2016, where you can meet new people, share knowledge, relax, plan cool features for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system, and have a good time while at it.

  • Great Wide Open Day One in Twitter Pics
  • AsiaBSDCon OpenBSD papers

    This year's AsiaBSDCon has come to an end, with a number of OpenBSD-related talks being presented. Two developers were also invited to the smaller "bhyvecon" event to discuss vmm(4) and future plans.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • DreamHost replaces VMware SDN with open source for big savings

    In a convincing example of the viability of open source networking, cloud provider DreamHost saved 70% in capital and 40% in operational costs by replacing VMware’s NSX SDN with open source alternatives.

    In a presentation at the Open Networking Summit here, suppliers Cumulus Networks and Akanda – a DreamHost spin-out NFV business -- said the cloud provider replaced NSX due to scaling and Layer 3 support issues. DreamHost did not speak and was not present during the presentation, but posted a blog entry on the project here last Friday.

  • Google’s Open-Source AGI is Disruptive

    The DeepMind Challenge victory demonstrates that Google’s open-source “artificial general intelligence” has just launched a new era of disruptive technology.

  • Mossberg: The False Debate Between Open and Closed in Tech

    Just as in politics, there are passionate, long-running disputes in tech. And, in one such never-ending argument, the weapons used are the words “open” and “closed.” Open is usually considered good, and closed is bad. But it turns out these words, which once really meant something, now have very loose definitions and surprising contradictions.

    In my mind, that often renders the debate phony.

    For instance, would you believe that Apple, which is most often accused of being “closed,” supports and uses open software in some of its most recognizable products? Or that Google, often viewed as a champion of openness, uses closed, proprietary software in some of its most familiar products?

  • Open Sourcers Race to Build Better Versions of Slack

    That’s why the open source community has been racing to build better versions of Slack, even though countless open source chat apps exist already. In fact, Slack alternative Mattermost and Rocket.chat topped the Black Duck Rookies of the Year report, an annual list of new open source projects that attract the most developers and produce the most code. Along with other open source chat apps such as Friends and Let’s Chat, these projects are hoping to provide not just a more open alternative to Slack, but beat the company at its own game by providing features Slack doesn’t yet have.

  • What do open-source software development and entrepreneurship have in common?

    Around 23 percent of Kuwait's total workforce works in small and medium enterprises (SMEs), according to the World Bank. However, these companies only contribute about 3.1 percent to the national GDP.

    In an attempt to diversify its income sources, which rely mainly on oil, the Kuwaiti government launched the Kuwait National Fund for SME Development in 2013, which supports startups and SMEs.

    Nuwait had a chat with Kuwaiti entrepreneur Mohammad AlMarzouq, cofounder of web development company KBSoft about the three things that helped him venture into entrepreneurship.

  • Welcome New OSI Board Directors: 2016 Election Results

    We would also like to thank our outgoing Board Directors, Bruno Souza, Simon Phipps and Tony Wasserman. Through their dedication and insights the OSI has grown in size and purpose, and matured as an organization.

    We would be remiss if we did not also recognize the special role of Simon Phipps who, in addition to serving several terms as Board President, also shepherded the OSI's transition to a member-led organization, which made these elections possible.

  • TP-Link Promises Ban on Open Source Wireless Router Firmware

    In a sign that device manufacturers are taking seriously the FCC's new restrictions on open source firmware, TP-Link has announced that it will no longer sell wireless routers in the U.S. that support Linux-based firmwares like DD-WRT.

  • Registration Now Open for Free Cloud Technologies Course
  • V8 Release 5.0

    The first step in the V8 release process is a new branch from the git master immediately before Chromium branches for a Chrome Beta milestone (roughly every six weeks). Our newest release branch is V8 5.0, which will remain in beta until we release a stable build in conjunction with Chrome 50 Stable. Here’s a highlight of the new developer-facing features in this version of V8.

  • Google's V8 JavaScript Engine Hits Version 5.0

    The Chrome 50 web-browser will usher in the stable build of V8 5.0 as its JavaScript engine.

    Version 5.0 of the V8 JavaScript engine features improved ECMAScript 2015 support with regexp unicode flags and regexp customization hooks, performance improvements for ES2015 and ES5 features, and changes to the V8 API.

  • [LibreOffice] Live from CeBIT
  • Crate Raises $4M for New Container Database Technology

    The founder of Docker Inc. invests in new technology that provides a very different and very distributed way to build a container database.
    As Docker container use continues to grow, there is a need for a distributed database technology that is built for the container era, which is precisely what Crate Technology is now aiming to deliver.

    Crate Technology today announced a $4 million seed funding round to help build, develop and extend its open-source-based container database technology. Among Crate Technology's investors is Solomon Hykes, the founder of Docker Inc.

  • Interested in a powerful, free software friendly workstation?
  • White House requires agencies to share custom code with open-source community

    The White House has released for public comment a draft of its Source Code Policy, which establishes rules for sharing customized software between federal agencies, in the hopes of improving government access to applications and reducing development costs.

  • Yes, You Can Reconcile The Wide Sharing Of Personal Medical Research Data With Greater Participant Control

    Although the benefits of sharing big datasets are well-known, so are the privacy issues that can arise as a result. The tension between a desire to share information widely and the need to respect the wishes of those to whom it refers is probably most acute in the medical world. Although the hope is that aggregating health data on a large scale can provide new insights into diseases and their treatments, doing so makes issues of consent even trickier to deal with. A new study of Parkinson's disease from Sage Bionetworks, which describes itself as a "non-profit biomedical research organization," takes a particularly interesting approach.

  • Enourmous Git Repositories

    One thing you probably wouldn’t do is import the whole thing into a single Git repo, it’s pretty well known that Git isn’t designed for that. But, you know, Git does have some tools that let you pretend it’s a centralised version control system, and, huge monolithic repos are cool, and it works in Mercurial… evidence is worth more than hearsay, so I decided to create a Git repo with 10GB of text files to see what happened. I did get told in #git on Freenode that Git will not cope with a repo that’s larger than available RAM, but I was a little suspicious given the number of multi-gigabyte Git repos in existance.

  • WebAssembly Support Begins Materializing In Multiple Browsers

    WebAssembly, the year-old effort for creating a low-level programming language for in-browser client-side scripting with cross-browser support is making more progress.

OpenStack and Servers

Filed under
OSS

FOSS Databases

Filed under
OSS
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Licensing: Facebook Responds to Licence Complaints, Cloud Native Open Source License Choices Analysed

  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announced that the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to the MIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" license previously applied to those projects.
  • Relicensing React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js
    Next week, we are going to relicense our open source projects React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js under the MIT license. We're relicensing these projects because React is the foundation of a broad ecosystem of open source software for the web, and we don't want to hold back forward progress for nontechnical reasons. This decision comes after several weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Although we still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to users of our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince this community.
  • Cloud Native Open Source License Choices
    One of the most common questions regarding open source licensing today concerns trajectories. Specifically, what are the current directions of travel both for specific licenses as well as license types more broadly. Or put more simply, what licenses are projects using today, and how is that changing? We’ve examined this data several times, most recently in this January look at the state of licensing based on Black Duck’s dataset. That data suggested major growth for permissive licenses, primarily at the expense of reciprocal alternatives. The Apache and MIT licenses, for example, were up 10% and 21% respectively, while the GPL was down 27%. All of this is on a relative share basis, of course: the “drop” doesn’t reflect relicensing of existing projects, but less usage relative to its peers. [...] One such community with enough of a sample size to be relevant is the one currently forming around the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Founded in 2015 with the Kubernetes project as its first asset, the Foundation has added eleven more open source projects, all of which are licensed under the same Apache 2 license. But as a successful Foundation is only a part of the broader ecosystem, the real question is what are the licensing preferences of the Cloud Native projects and products outside of the CNCF itself. [...] Unsurprisingly, perhaps, given the influence of the CNCF itself, Apache strongly outperforms all other licenses, showing far greater relative adoption than it has in more generalized datasets such as the Black Duck survey. Overall in this dataset, approximately 64% of projects are covered by the Apache license. No other project has greater than a 12% share. The only other licenses above 10%, in fact, are the GPL at 12% and MIT at 11%. After that, the other projects are all 5% or less.

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?