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OSS

Linux and FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Big Data

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OSS

Free Tech Refresher: OSS Isn’t Always FOSS

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GNU
Linux
OSS

Without a doubt, both Microsoft and Oracle are open source companies. What they are not, and probably can never become, are FOSS companies, because that requires a commitment to the concepts behind software freedom. There’s not a bone in either companies bodies — if corporations can be said to have bodies — that is in any way sympathetic to free tech. Even while obeying the open source precept to “share and share alike,” both companies are only concerned with expanding their bases of power and ownership of tech, and in Microsoft’s case at least, much of their open source software is designed solely for that purpose.

These are distinctions which need articulating, not only so we don’t seem like we’re never happy crybabies, but so that younger users of open source software can come to see the difference between FOSS, on the one hand, and OSS, on the other, and that while one is always the other, the other is not always the one.

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Red Hat’s Open-Source Success Points to Other Investing Options

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Red Hat
OSS

Common sense dictates that making open-source software, where the original code can be modified by anyone and freely distributed, doesn't seem like a sound business decision. After all, competitors could freely use code to create products. The success of Red Hat Software (RHT - Get Report) proves otherwise.

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Open Source in the enterprise: Perspectives for CIOs

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OSS

The proliferation of OSS technologies, libraries, and frameworks in recent years has greatly contributed to the advancement of software development, increased developer productivity, and to the flexibility and customisation of the tools landscape to support different use cases and developers’ preferences.

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A Peek At Upcoming Open Source Enhancements In IBM i

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OSS
Security

It's hard to quantify the value created through open source development of software. Last year, the Linux Foundation released a white paper that found the total value of the development of the Linux operating system amounted to $5 billion. In 2013, IBM itself committed to donating $1 billion in cold hard cash to further development of Linux and other open source projects. When one considers that nearly all of the cutting-edge IT work being done in distributed computing (i.e., the worlds of Hadoop, Spark, Kafka, and NoSQL databases) involves open sharing of source code--mostly through the Apache Software Foundation--then the humongous value that open source brings comes into view.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Celebrating 17 Years of The Apache Software Foundation

    The Foundation's commitment to fostering a collaborative approach to development has long served as a model for producing consistently high quality software and helping advance the future of open development. The ASF's collaborative leadership, robust community, and meritocratic process serve as best practices widely embraced by organizations and individuals alike.

  • OpenToonz
  • OpenToonz Is The Open-Source Version of Toonz, The Software Used For Creating Futurama And Asterix
  • NoScript Beginner’s Guide

    This NoScript Beginner's Guide has been designed to provide new Firefox or NoScript users with information on how the browser add-on works. I have published a guide for regular users in 2014 which you may find useful as well.

    NoScript is a long standing security add-on for Firefox that is rated highly on Mozilla AMO and quite popular with more than 2.3 million users.

    It is often confused with ad-blockers, and while it does that to, it is much more than that and the ad-blocking is more of a side-effect of the extension's functionality than something it has been designed for.

  • Playing with Dalmatiner DB

    Dalmatimer DB is an open source time series database built on top of riak-core and ZFS. It re-uses the logic from riak-core to handle the logic of where data is located but implements its very own database optimised for metrics

  • FreeNAS 9.10-RELEASE is available

    This is an interim release between the 9.3 series and 10 (which is still a few months away), using the same UI and middleware that everyone is used to from 9.3 but with new OS underpinnings, specifically FreeBSD 10.3-RC3.

  • G’MIC 1.7.0 (Standalone Software And GIMP Plugin) Has Been Released

    As you may know, G’MIC (GREYC’s Magic Image Converter) is a editing tool, that can be used with GIMP or as a standalone application, being available for both Linux and Windows. G’MIC provides a window which enables the users to add more than 500 filters over photos and preview the result, in order to give the photos some other flavor.

  • PSPP 0.10.0 has been released

    I'm very pleased to announce the release of a new version of GNU PSPP. PSPP is a program for statistical analysis of sampled data. It is a free replacement for the proprietary program SPSS.

MKVToolNix 9.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation Tool Released with New Features

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OSS

On March 26, 2016, Moritz Bunkus had the pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of MKVToolNix 9.0.0, the newest, most advanced and stable branch of the open-source MKV (Matroska) manipulation software.

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Docker

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Server
OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • 18F pushes for an even more open 'open source' rule

    The government startup that develops all of its code in the open wants the rest of government to follow suit.

    Following the March 10 publication of a new draft Federal Source Code policy, the General Services Administration's 18F penned a response to one of federal CIO Tony Scott's questions.

  • FOSSASIA 2016
  • Containers Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference

    The level of Containers excitement has increased even further this year, with much interplay between Docker, Kubernetes, Rkt, CoreOS, Mesos, LXC, LXD, OpenVZ, systemd, and much else besides. This excitement has led to some interesting new use cases, including even the use of containers on Android.

    Some of these use cases in turn require some interesting new changes to the Linux plumbing, including mounts in unprivileged containers, improvements to cgroups resource management, ever-present security concerns, and interoperability between various sets of tools.

  • CitusDB Releases An Open-Source PostgreSQL Tool That Promises Better Database Performance

    CitusDB, a database analytics startup that is hoping to take on big boys like Oracle, today announced the release of CSTORE, a columnar store extension for PostgreSQL. The open-source tool, which the company says is the first for PostgreSQL, is available for a free download starting today.

  • ignuit 2.24.1 released

    Mostly a maintenance release to keep the package in decent order. A "Category Properties" dialog has also been added to the program.

  • Toonz goes open source, Apple open sources CareKit, and more news
  • Promising use of 3d printing

    A team in China, saved a 9 month old baby with a 3d printed Heart. My first thought was how many poor cancer and kidney / liver sufferers could benefit IF (hopefully only when not if) this becomes something that is the new medical norm, and then the reality of cloning and using this to revive less than desireable individuals (like violent offenders) also came to the forefront. I can only hope a reasonable and sane minded (if that can truly be quantified and agreed on) body can regulate this in a way where everyone wins.

  • Friday's security updates
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More in Tux Machines

Packet radio lives on through open source software

Packet radio is an amateur radio technology from the early 1980s that sends data between computers. Linux has natively supported the packet radio protocol, more formally known as AX.25, since 1993. Despite its age, amateur radio operators continue to use and develop packet radio today. A Linux packet station can be used for mail, chat, and TCP/IP. It also has some unique capabilities, such as tracking the positions of nearby stations or sending short messages via the International Space Station (ISS). Read more

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more

Korora 26 'Bloat' Fedora-based Linux distro available for download -- now 64-bit only

Fedora is my favorite Linux distribution, but I don't always use it. Sometimes I opt for an operating system that is based on it depending on my needs at the moment. Called "Korora," it adds tweaks, repositories, codecs, and packages that aren't found in the normal Fedora operating system. As a result, Korora deviates from Red Hat's strict FOSS focus -- one of the most endearing things about Fedora. While you can add all of these things to Fedora manually, Korora can save you time by doing the work for you. Read more