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OSS

Why Does FOSS Development Lag the Innovation Curve?

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OSS

ostatic.com: Are open source developers on the ball about delivering alternatives to cutting-edge proprietary products and services, or do they lag the proprietary innovators? That topic came up at this week's OSCON conference in Portland, and there is a case to be made for the idea that open source developers don't deliver key products in key categories fast enough.

The Open Source Software That Runs Facebook

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OSS
Web

developer.com: If anyone tells you open source can't run a large business or scale, remind them that Facebook is serving a half billion people with a network built on open source code. Quite a bit of it, as Developer.com notes, much of what runs Facebook is open source languages and software.

O'Reilly Open Source Awards announced

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OSS

h-online.com: At the OSCON 2010 open source convention taking place in Portland, Oregon, O'Reilly Media's Edd Dumbill has announced the winners of this years O'Reilly Open Source Awards.

Linux Outlaws 159

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KDE
Linux
OSS
  • Linux Outlaws 159 - The Beginning of the Conversation
  • KDE and the Masters of the Universe – 2010-07-22
  • FLOSS Weekly 128: OpenStack
  • The Linux Link Tech Show #363 7/21/10
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 2 Episode 13

Can one sponsor sustain a FOSS project on the long term?

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OSS

fossbazaar.org: These days I am receiving quite a number of mails that ask the same question: If a FOSS project is sponsored by only one company or entity, do you think it's a healthy project?

Open source software. The gateway drug to Linux.

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Linux
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: Some of the best open source software (OSS) around is multiple platform. You can run the exact same software with the same look and feel (I can understand the look part but how do you feel a program? Do a Vulcan mind meld with it?) no matter what operating system you use.

How infectious is the GPL? Battle of words between WordPress and Thesis

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OSS

itwriting.com/blog: The issue boils down to this. WordPress is licensed under the GPL, which provides that if you derive a new work from an existing GPL-licensed work, the GPL applies to your new work as well.

Two Problems with Free

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OSS
  • Two Problems with Free
  • The Open source legal maze: an open trap?
  • Open Source Cornerstones
  • Portugal: Nearly all school children getting familiar with open source
  • Net Neutrality is a double edged sword
  • Is open source ready for business prime time?
  • Open-source hardware standards formally issued
  • Open Source Hardware (OSHW) Draft Definition version 0.3

Get ready for a whole new forge

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OSS
Web

sourceforge.net: Today SourceForge is announcing an open beta period for a new set of tools for developers. Specifically, our engineers have begun work on new and better tools for project members who want to use our tracker, wiki, and source code management.

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Linux vs Windows

I've been working with both Linux and MS Windows 7 lately. Yes, I have a good excuse for using MS Windows: I have started working on Ruby video tutorials, and I needed to demonstrate installation of ruby, notepad++, and configuration thereof in the MS Windows environment. Well, it's been illuminating, switching back and forth between Kubuntu 14.10 and Microsoft Windows 7. The desktops are pretty much equal. However, Linux KDE has stolen a march on the Windows 7 desktop regarding configurability of the desktop experience--of course, I'm vastly more experienced with Linux and the KDE desktop. Also, Linux is better on multitasking. Often, MS Windows 7 would almost freeze a few moments when working on several tasks. I also had some issues getting my sound card working well with Windows 7--which is an older sound-blaster (5.1) card. But, I've had similar problems with getting audio in the Linux environment working too. However, the online help and assistance you can get with Linux seems much better. Purchasing a screen recorder and a basic video editor with MS Windows 7 was also interesting. Although reading countless reviews, I had a difficult time getting a cheap screen recorder that was good on both the video and audio portions of screen recording, and would work properly on 1920x1080 recordings. And all the "free stuff" you download for Microsoft Windows is cripple ware. The Windows software environment is based on deception: "It's Free!". After downloading and installing, you find it won't do nearly what you wanted until you send them $xx.xx! I almost bought "Camtasia Studio", which, by all accounts, is good screen recording and editing software. But I couldn't justify spending $299.99 on software I was only going to use for producing 10 minutes of video demonstration. I know the preceding paragraph seems somewhat naive, but after using only Linux for so long, I haven't faced anything like this for many years. The one good thing to say about MS Windows 7 is that Notepad++ is a good "totally freeware" text editor. The remainder of the video tutorial series will be done solely in Linux--with Kdenlive 0.9.10 (where I finally learned to do "Pan and Zoom") and SimpleScreenRecorder 0.3.3. I'm going to send both of them a few $$. It's good to be back.