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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • twenty years of free software -- part 4 ikiwiki-hosting
  • Joe Colantonio: ‘Why Recreate the Wheel — Use Open Source’

    Joe Colantonio wants to “show you how to succeed with all your testing efforts.” He says, “Automation testing, like all development efforts, is difficult. Most projects don’t succeed.” Frankly, it’s all a little over our heads.

  • Apache Libcloud, Focused on Cloud Interoperability, Reaches 1.0 Milestone

    Are you familiar with Apache Libcloud? It's an important open source project in the cloud interoperability arena, which provides a Python library for interacting with many of the popular cloud service providers using a unified API.

  • PostgreSQL 9.6 Beta 2 Released

    The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces today that the second beta release of PostgreSQL 9.6 is available for download. This release contains previews of all of the features which will be available in the final release of version 9.6, including fixes to many of the issues found in the first beta. Users are encouraged to begin testing their applications against 9.6 beta 2.

  • PostgreSQL 9.6 Beta 2 Released

    Following last month's PostgreSQL 9.6 Beta 1 release, a second beta is now available for testing.

    As outlined already on Phoronix when looking at the PostgreSQL 9.6 features, this update brings parallel query support, synchronous replication now supports multiple standby servers, full-text search for phrases, support for remote joins/sorts/updates, "substantial" performance improvements (especially for many-core servers), no more repetitive scans of old data by auto vacuum, and much more.

  • LibreOffice 5.1.4 available for download

    The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.1.4, the fourth minor release of the LibreOffice 5.1 family, targeted at individual users and enterprise deployments. Users of previous LibreOffice releases should start planning the update to the new version.

  • 6 New Programming Languages You Need To Learn In 2016

    If you are willing to learn a new programming language, you are at the right place. With changing times and the need for more performance, new programming languages like Swift and Go are gaining ground. So, choose your new weapon and start learning one of these in-demand programming languages.

  • Thursday's security advisories

Open Source and Crowdsourcing Are Not Synonyms

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OSS

OSI Board alumnus Simon Phipps recently provided some clarification to FastCo.Design around common misunderstandings related to "sourcing". We've seen more and more of these, although most often--like this example--innocent enough. However, these do provide great opportunities to remind the public about what open source actually is, and why it is so valuable.

The headline (and resulting slug) of your recent article about Mozilla unfortunately mis-states the nature of the crowdsourcing in which they are engaging by treating "open source" interchangeably with crowdsourcing. Despite sounding the same they are very different; the key difference is the ownership of the outcome.

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Snyk aims to help developers secure use of open source code

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OSS

Developers relying on open source code (or packages) is pretty much the norm these days. As software eats the world, the world is dining out on open source software.

But, regardless of how much time utilising someone else’s code can save you as a developer, it can also mean outsourcing the security of the code you ship, or spending a serious amount of time staying on top of known or newly discovered open source package vulnerabilities.

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Xen 4.7 Open Source Linux Hypervisor Arrives with Non-Disruptive, Live Patching

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Linux
Server
OSS

Today, June 23, 2016, the Xen Project has had the great pleasure of announcing the immediate availability for download of the Xen 4.7 open-source Linux hypervisor software for GNU/Linux operating systems.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • ​Apache Libcloud: The open-source cloud library to link all clouds together

    One of the great problems with cloud has always been interoperability. The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) addresses this problem with the release of Apache Libcloud v1.0, the cloud service interoperability library.

  • Why share / why collaborate? - Some useful sources outside Debian

    I consider that the Golden Rule requires that if I like a program I must share it with other people who like it. Software sellers want to divide the users and conquer them, making each user agree not to share with others. I refuse to break solidarity with other users in this way. I cannot in good conscience sign a nondisclosure agreement or a software license agreement. ... "

  • "But I'm a commercial developer / a government employee"

    Your employer may be willing to negotiate / grant you an opt-out clause to protect your FLOSS expertise / accept an additional non-exclusive licence to your FLOSS code / be prepared to sign an assignment...

  • How to share collaboratively

    Always remember in all of this: just because you understand your code and your working practices doesn't mean that anyone else will.

  • twenty years of free software -- part 3 myrepos

    myrepos is kind of just an elaborated foreach (@myrepos) loop, but its configuration and extension in a sort of hybrid between an .ini file and shell script is quite nice and plenty of other people have found it useful.

    I had to write myrepos when I switched from subversion to git, because git's submodules are too limited to meet my needs, and I needed a tool to check out and update many repositories, not necessarily all using the same version control system.

  • Being open to open source and creating a new business category at VMWare

    In the age of developer-defined infrastructure, where developers have decision making power in application and cloud infrastructure technologies, open source has proven to be a powerful go-to-market and distribution method for both startups and enterprises. Developers are always looking for new technologies to improve their productivity.

  • Rust implementation of GNUnet with GSoC - Mid-term progress

7 open source terminal games for Linux

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OSS
Gaming

Do fancy graphics really make a game better? Can a text-based game for Linux still keep you entertained?

Don't get me wrong, I do occasionally enjoy playing a AAA game release from a major studio. But as I've gotten older, I've found that I really value gameplay (and nostalgia too, admittedly) far more than how photorealistic my gaming experience is.

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Lessons learned for building an open company with transparent collaboration

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OSS

In the first part of this two-part series, Building a business on a solid open source model, I described how an open source business needs to provide a solid ground for all stakeholders, users, contributors, employees, customers, and of course investors. Foundations, licenses, and trademarks can be helpful in building an open ecosystem. Open source communities need supporting organizations to work transparently, otherwise there are barriers to contribution. Code might be public, but code dumps (like Google tends to do with Android) don't always facilitate collaboration. To encourage collaboration, you must go one step further and be proactive. Development in a place like GitHub or GitLab, and having open feature planning meetings and conferences help toward that goal. But still, open source project leaders can do more.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • BusyBox 1.25 Released

    This latest update to the widely-used BusyBox software features a new blkdiscard applet, new options for gunzip/gzip, new nsenter / unshare / ubirename applets, build system changes, fixes for unzip, updates to ntpd, Ash additions, and a wide variety of other changes.

  • Altair Adds Open-Source Licensing to PBS Pro

    One of the problems that continues to hinder HPC is that, by and large, there’s a greater demand for computing cycles than there are CPUs and GPUs available. With researchers and engineers lining up to have their calculations crunched, it’s critical that HPC schemes have effective job management software that can keep track of a queue or jobs and assign the appropriate hardware to each project.

  • ClusterHQ’s Mohit Bhatnagar Talks Flocker, Docker, and the Rise of Open Source

    Container technology remains very big news, and if you bring up the topic almost everyone immediately thinks of Docker. But, there are other tools that can compete with Docker, and tools that can extend it and make it more flexible. CoreOS’s Rkt, for example, is a command-line tool for running app containers. And, ClusterHQ has an open source project called Flocker that allows developers to run their databases inside Docker containers, leveraging persistent storage, and making data highly portable.

  • Running Distributed Applications at Scale on Mesos from Twitter and CloudBees
  • Successful DevOps Deployment Involves Shift in Culture and Processes
  • Finagle, linkerd, and Apache Mesos: Magical Operability Sprinkles for Microservices
  • Hadoop Summit: How to Get Highlights Even if You Can't Attend
  • Dysfunction and Sabotage: Why Large Hospital EHR Costs So Much

    Years ago I read the cannon of the classic medical book "House of God" by Samuel Shem which reads: "...the House of God was sad and sick and cynical...like all our doings in the House..." At first, before I had worked in an actual hospital I thought the book itself was sick and cynical. After working in an actual hospital I re-read the book. I then found it hilarious for its uncomfortable truths, and did not think it was sick or cynical enough. Therein likes the crux of the matter with regard to very expensive large hospital EHR's.

  • ‘Steal My Tool’ showcases open source tools for journalists at IRE conference

    Robert Gebeloff, database projects editor at The New York Times, demonstrated how to use XML Grid to access and interpret a website’s data. Using these tools and techniques, Gebeloff showed how one can find which Trader Joe’s stores sell beer by simply scraping the site’s XML code. Gebeloff has published detailed instructions for web scraping without programming on his GitHub page.

  • The current state of open data in the US government

    The S.2852 OPEN Government Data Act aims to require true open data access at the federal level. In this article I will discuss the importance of open data in government, the current state of open data in government, and what we need to do to implement true open data.

  • 2048 DIY Open Source Game Console Hits Kickstarter (video)

    Anyone looking to learn more about coding and creating video games may be interested in the new DIY open source games console called 2048 which has been created by 2048.

    The name refers to the special screen that the game console is equipped with that is constructed from 2048 individual LED bulbs that are placed in a matrix form offering a 64 x 32 resolution.

    Learn more about what is possible using the open source games console from the developers at Creoqode. Who was taken to Kickstarter this week to raise the £20,000 they require to take the hardware into production. Early bird pledges are available from just $99 with delivery expected to take place during December 2016 with worldwide shipping available if required.

  • Mozilla MOSS 'Mission Partners' makes it rain $385,000 on open source project developers

    Open source is very important nowadays, especially from a privacy and security standpoint. Look, closed source ideology is not inherently bad -- it is a good way to protect a company's code. The problem, however, is that users are increasingly suspicious of software since Edward Snowden's leaks. There is no telling what kind of back doors or other malicious things are hiding in the code.

  • Severe flaws in widely used archive library put many projects at risk

    n a world where any new software project is built in large part on existing third-party code, finding and patching vulnerabilities in popular open-source libraries is vital to creating reliable and secure applications.

    For example, three severe flaws in libarchive, recently found by researchers from Cisco Systems' Talos group, could affect a large number of software products.

    Libarchive is an open-source library first created for FreeBSD, but has since been ported to all major operating systems. It provides real-time access to files compressed with a variety of algorithms, including tar, pax, cpio, ISO9660, zip, lha/lzh, rar, cab and 7-Zip.

Docker and Dockercon

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OSS
  • CI and CD at Scale: Scaling Jenkins with Docker and Apache Mesos
  • Get networking out of the way for app development

    The modern tech business is all about networking infrastructure. For a leading company, the power to communicate effectively with its IT assets is vital. However, that same networking can be a wall to development process; how does a team develop for an environment that is always shifting and changing? Removing the networking concern is a top priority for any business that wants to be efficient and agile.

  • Docker launches a new marketplace for containerized software

    At its developer conference in Seattle, Docker today announced the private beta of the Docker Store, a new marketplace for trusted and validated dockerized software.

    The idea behind the store is to create a self-service portal for Docker’s ecosystem partners to publish and distribute their software through Docker images — and for users to make it easier to deploy these applications.

  • Docker 1.12 Orchestration Features Mean Fewer Channel Partner Options

    Docker's partner relationships are likely to change following the announcement this week of Docker Engine 1.12, which builds more orchestration features into the core Docker container platform.

  • Docker Store Announced @dockercon / So What Happens to Hub? #dockercon

    Docker announced a new beta effort for Docker container images at Dockercon today, called the Docker Store.

  • Docker Tunes Up Engine Orchestration

    Docker on Monday announced Docker Engine 1.12 with built-in orchestration, which allows automated deployment and management of Dockerized distributed applications and microservices at scale in production.

  • Docker and OpenStack are Grabbing the Headlines This Week

    Containers and cloud services remain much in the news, and open source tools such as Docker and OpenStack remain red hot at organizations of all sizes. Docker is running its developer conference in Seattle this week and there are many container tools being shown there.

    Meanwhile, Bright Computing, focused on vendor-independent cluster and cloud management software, is coming out with Version 7.3 of Bright Cluster Manager and Bright OpenStack, scheduled for release in July.

    Microsoft has been increasing its focus on Docker and is even building support for it into Windows Server. The effort is part of the company's focus on incorporating more open source technologies. This week, the company is showing off the upcoming Linux version of SQL Server that can run in containers on Ubuntu.

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS
  • openSUSE Conference 2016 Day 1

    The first day of this year’s openSUSE Conference went well and the keynote speaker team of SaltStack Chief Technical Officer and technical founder Thomas Hatch along with Senior SaltStack Engineer David Boucha and SUSE’s Joe Werner showed how powerful Salt is for IT automation.

    Boucha gave a live demo and Hatch talked about the evolution of Salt and even talked a little about Salt’s Thorium Reactor, which was added to Salt as an experimental feature in the 2016.3.0 release. Werner discussed how SUSE uses Salt with SUSE Manager.

  • Building a better LibrePlanet: What we learned from the conference surveys

    Our samples are usually about sixty to seventy respondents, and self-selecting -- from their responses, we can say with confidence that LibrePlanet attendees feel we're doing a decent job organizing the conference. The questions "How much did you enjoy the sessions you attended, compared to those at other conferences you have attended?" and "How likely is it that you will return to LibrePlanet next year?" received an average of about 3.5 out of 4 each of the last three years.

  • Do you GNU? Attend the GNU Hackers' Meeting in France this summer!

    The GNU Hackers' Meeting is a friendly, semi-formal forum to discuss technical, social, and organizational issues concerning free software and GNU. This is a great opportunity to meet GNU maintainers and active contributors.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.