Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

San Francisco sets sights on open source voting by November 2019

Filed under
OSS

Open-source voting systems bring a greater level of transparency and accountability by allowing the public to have access to the source codes of the system, which is used to tabulate the votes. A system owned by The City could also save taxpayers money.

Read more

Linux Foundation Explains a "World without Linux" and Open Source

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

Would the world really be tremendously different if Linux, the open source operating system kernel, did not exist? Would there be no Internet or movies? Those are the questions some viewers of the Linux Foundation's ongoing "World without Linux" video series are asking. Here are some answers.

In case you've missed it, the "World without Linux" series is a collection of quirky short films that depict, well, a world without Linux (and open source software more generally). They have emphasized themes like Linux's role in movie-making and in serving the Internet.

Read more

Also: Understanding Atomic KMS Drivers

My Open Source Thanksgiving List: Wine, Netflix, OpenWrt and More

Filed under
OSS

Running 3.1 miles through my hometown. Consuming unreasonable quantities of simple carbohydrates, fat and sodium. Pretending that the former activity justifies the latter. These are some of my favorite Thanksgiving traditions.

Read more

Supporting Software Freedom Conservancy

Filed under
GNU
OSS

There are a number of important organizations in the Open Source and Free Software world that do tremendously valuable work. This includes groups such as the Linux Foundation, Free Software Foundation, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Apache Software Foundation, and others.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Video: PBS Pro Workload Manager Goes Open Source
  • Turris Omnia: high-security, high-performance, open-source router

    An Indigogo campaign was recently launched for the Turis Omnia, promising backers a high-security, high-performance, open-source router.

    “With powerful hardware, Turris Omnia can handle gigabit traffic and still be able to do much more,” the company said.

    “You can use it as a home server, NAS, printserver, and it even has a virtual server built-in.”

  • IBM SystemML Machine Learning Technology Goes Open-Source
  • PuppetLabs Introduces Application Orchestration

    Everybody loves Puppet! Or at the very least, an awful lot of people USE Puppet and in the IT world, “love” is often best expressed by the opening of one’s wallet. I know, in the FOSS world wallets are unnecessary, and Puppet does indeed have an Open Source version. However, once one gets to enterprise-level computing, a tool designed for enterprise scale is preferable and usually there is a cost associated.

    Puppet was originally started as an open source project by Luke Kanies in 2005, essentially out of frustration with the other configuration management products available at the time. Their first commercial product was released in 2011, and today it is the most widely used configuration management tool in the world with about 30,000 companies running it. According to our own surveys, better than 60% of Linux Journal readers use some form of Puppet already and you must like it too as it regularly finishes at or near the top in Readers’ Choice awards.

Mozilla contributor creates diabetes project for the masses

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

My open source story started in high school as a student. I always considered myself to be a hacker—not the malicious type, but the curious type who liked to tinker with code and hardware. My first encounter with open source was in 2001 when I installed my first Linux distro, Lindows. Of course, I was also an early user of Mozilla Firefox.

Read more

Practical tips for working with OpenStack

Filed under
OSS

To build your own cloud and take advantage of the power of the open source powered OpenStack project takes dedicated resources and a good bit of learning. Due to the size of the project and the pace of development, keeping up can be difficult. The good news is that there are many resources to help, including the official documentation, a variety of OpenStack training and certification programs, as well as community-authored guides.

Read more

Apache Incubator accepts IBM's SystemML for open source development

Filed under
OSS

IBM announced Tuesday that SystemML, a machine learning tool the company created, has been accepted into the Apache Incubator to further develop the tech for open source uses.

The company created Apache SystemML, as it's now called, with the enterprise in mind. It's made up of a declarative algorithm engine and optimizer, and the company said in a blog post that scalability is a core feature for enterprise data analysis. One open source community member who has worked on the project said he's excited for the role the new tech could play for him and other developers.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Clasp 0.4 -- Lisp Over LLVM -- Generates Code 200x Faster

    Clasp is a Common Lisp compiler based on LLVM that also provies seamless interoperation with C++ libraries.

  • Bulgarian ‘Future is Code’ school project ongoing

    Bulgaria’s ‘Future is Code’ initiative - where volunteers visit schools to introduce students and teachers to software development - which started in April, is continuing at least until the end of this month. The project has already introduced a handful of schools to open source. The volunteer-led project is supported by Bulgaria’s Ministry of Education.

  • Why viral licensing is a ghost

    According to an historical and widely shared distinction, present on Wikipedia and generally supported by too many free software advocates including some lawyers, “Strong copyleft” (sometimes renamed “viral licensing”) refers to licences governing a copyrighted work to the extent that their copyleft provisions can be efficiently imposed on all kinds of derived works, including linked works: the same copyleft licence becomes applicable to the combination. At the contrary, "Weak copyleft" would refer to licenses (that are generally used for the creation of software libraries) where not all derived works inherit the copyleft license, depending on the manner in which it was derived: copies and changes to the covered software itself become subject to the copyleft provisions of such a license, but not the software that links to it. This allows programs covered by any license (even proprietary) to be compiled and linked against copylefted libraries such as glibc (the GNU project's implementation of the C standard library), and then redistributed without any re-licensing required.

  • The Current State Of Pyston As An Open-Source, High Performance Python

    A status update concerning the Dropbox-sponsored Pyston project was presented earlier this month.

    A status update on the open-source Python high-performance JIT project was shared at a Pyston meet-up two weeks ago. For those interested, the Pyston blog shared today that this interesting video has now been uploaded.

  • Apple’s Swift iOS Programming Language Could Soon Be in Data Centers
  • Apple’s Swift programming language heads to the data centre
  • Server-Side Swift Unveiled: It's Perfect

GTK+ 3.20 Gets Another Milestone with Theming Improvements and Bugfixes

Filed under
OSS

After only three days from the announcement of GTK+ 3.19.2, the GTK+ developers have announced the release and immediate availability for download and testing of the third milestone towards GTK+ 3.20.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

UKSM Is Still Around For Data Deduplication Of The Linux Kernel

Several years back we wrote about Ultra Kernel Samepage Merging (UKSM) for data de-duplication within the Linux kernel for transparently scanning all application memory and de-duping it where possible. While the original developer is no longer active, a new developer has been maintaining the work and continues to support it on the latest Linux kernel releases. Read more

Why Dell’s gamble on Linux laptops has paid off

The whole juggernaut that is now Linux on Dell started as the brainchild of two core individuals, Barton George (Senior Principal Engineer) and Jared Dominguez (OS Architect and Linux Engineer). It was their vision that began it all back in 2012. It was long hours, uncertain futures and sheer belief that people really did want Linux laptops that sustained them. Here is the untold story of how Dell gained the top spot in preinstalled Linux on laptops. Where do you start when no one has ever really even touched such a concept? The duo did have some experience of the area before. George explained that the XPS and M3800 Linux developer’s laptops weren’t Dell’s first foray into Linux laptops. Those with long memories may remember Dell testing the waters for a brief while by having a Linux offering alongside Windows laptops. By their own admission it didn’t work out. “We misread the market,” commented George. Read more Also: New Entroware Aether Laptop for Linux Powered with Ubuntu

A Short MATE Desktop 1.17 Review in February 2017

MATE 1.17 is a testing release, it has no official announcement like 1.16 stable release (odd = unstable, even = stable). But what made me interested is because Ubuntu MATE 17.04 includes it by default so I write this short review. The most fundamental news is about MATE Desktop is now completely ported to GTK+3 leaving behind GTK+2. You may be interested seeing few changes and I have tried Ubuntu MATE 17.04 Alpha 2 to review MATE 1.17 below. Enjoy MATE 1.17! Read more Also: What's up with the hate towards Freedesktop?

Linux Graphics