Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Mozilla Steps beyond Open Source with Gigabit Internet Funding in Austin

Filed under
Moz/FF
OSS

Mozilla has built its name on open source software. But its latest Gigabit funding initiative, which piggybacks on Google Fiber, extends the organization's reach into networking and hardware by supporting the development of robotics, big data and Internet of Things (IoT) solutions.

On Wednesday Mozilla announced that, in August, it will expand its National Gigabit Community Fund to Austin, Texas. The fund originated in 2014 in Chattanooga and Kansas City.

Read more

MapD and MapR

Filed under
Server
OSS

The shift in open source: A new kind of platform war

Filed under
OSS

For many years, open source software seemingly lay at the fringe of the tech industry. A subculture that many didn’t understand and that seemingly threatened the broader industry. It is amazing how much has changed.

Today, open source software, especially Linux, is so pervasive that you probably interact with it every day. From supercomputers to GoPros and nearly every data center in the world, open source software is the default platform.

Read more

FOSS Events (OpenPGP.conf, OSCON, and More)

Filed under
OSS
  • OpenPGP.conf: Call for Presentations

    OpenPGP.conf is a conference for users and implementers of the OpenPGP protocol, the popular standard for encrypted email communication and protection of data at rest. The conference shall give users and implementers of OpenPGP based systems an overview of the current state of use and provide in-depth information on technical aspects.

  • OSCON for the Rest of Us Starts Today

    Things get cranked-up for real in Austin, Texas today at OSCON. Although the conference started on Monday, the first two days were reserved for special two day training classes and tutorials. Today the big gate opens wide on the Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey of open source conferences. For the first time ever, the event is taking place deep in the heart of Texas, as OSCON has said goodbye to Portland, Oregon, at least temporarily, to say hello to the land of Tex-Mex vittles.

  • 5 keys to hacking your community. What works?
  • Kindness and Community

    This was all after a weekend of running the Community Leadership Summit, an event that solicited similar levels of kindness. There were volunteers who got out of bed at 5am to help us set up, people who offered to prepare and deliver keynotes and sessions, coordinate evening events, equipment, sponsorship contributions, and help run the event itself. Then, to top things off, there were remarkably generous words and appreciation for the event as a whole when it drew to a close.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • F5’s Latest Updates Give a Nod to Developers

    As virtual appliances become a bigger part of its business, F5 is tweaking some of its products to better fit the concept of developers programming the network.

    The company has separated its orchestration tool from its management tool. The latter, which involves monitoring the network and making sure features such as high availability are viable, is still within the purview of networking people. But orchestration and provisioning of services is becoming more of a programmer’s job.

  • Building a bootstrapped business on open source

    Back in 2009, our day-to-day life at Planio was writing software for clients. Client work is often fun, but there can also be a feeling that you're stuck on a hamster wheel of endlessly churning through projects, always looking for new customers.

  • Getting started with Node-RED

    Node-RED is a browser-based flow editor that lets users wire together hardware devices, APIs, and online services in new and interesting ways.

    Node-RED's nodes are like npm packages, and you can get them the same way. And because Node-RED has a built-in text editor, you can make applications as complex as you like by adding JavaScript functions.

    Because Node-RED is based on Node.js and takes advantage of the event-driven, non-blocking model, it can be run on low-cost hardware like the Raspberry Pi or in the cloud.

  • PyBERT: Open-Source Software for Modeling High-Speed Links

    PyBERT by David Banas frees you from IBIS-AMI models, which have their limitations, for modeling high-speed SerDes devices and systems for signal integrity.

  • Report: Firefox Overtakes IE and Edge For the First Time
  • EFF wants to save Firefox from the W3C and DRM

    THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION (EFF) and web stalwart BoingBoing are fretting about the future of Firefox after moves by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) that they claim threaten competition and liberty.

    A post on the EFF blog and BoingBoing pages warned that the W3C's weakening approach to openness threatens the future of the browser, which once looked like the only thing that could save the internet.

  • Notes for my HTCondor Week talk

    I’m delighted to have a chance to present at HTCondor Week this year and am looking forward to seeing some old friends and collaborators. The thesis of my talk is that HTCondor users who aren’t already leading data science initiatives are well-equipped to start doing so.

  • SQLite 3.13 Released With Session Extension, Postponed I/O For Temp Files

    SQLite 3.13 was released today as the newest version of this widely-used and relied upon embedded SQL database library.

    SQLite 3.13 integrates the Session Extension, which is used for generating change/patch-sets into a file for applying the same set of changes to another database with the same schema. This session extension can be used for merging changes from multiple users working off the same baseline database back into the original database and other use-cases where you may want to mege a "patch" of the changes to an original database. More details on SQLite's Session Extension can be found via this documentation page.

  • Open Source Content Management and Site Analytics Solutions are Flourishing

    Whether you want to run a top-notch website or a blog, or manage content in the cloud, open source content management systems (CMS) and analytics tools have come of age. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla. As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue.

  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup: May 20
  • Full-system Infinity preview coming up

    I’ve released bits and pieces of Infinity over the past year, but nothing that really brings everything together. Right now I’m working on an initial full-system release of everything to do with Infinity so far.

  • The Licensing and Compliance Lab interviews Kees Verruijt of CANboat

    Kees Verruijt is a sailing software engineer from Harlingen, NL. He maintains CANboat, which he describes as "[a] small but effective set of command-line utilities to work with CAN networks on BOATs".

  • 40 governments commit to open contracting to fight corruption

    Forty government organisations have committed to implementing open contracting in an attempt to fight corruption. They did so at the Anti-Corruption Summit 2016, which took place in London last week.

  • Welcome to Academic Torrents!

    We've designed a distributed system for sharing enormous datasets - for researchers, by researchers. The result is a scalable, secure, and fault-tolerant repository for data, with blazing fast download speeds.

  • DevOps model, a profile in CIO leadership, change management

    CTO Alexander Pluim described his company's situation as typical: An enterprise technology system has issues, no one is sure what is going wrong, but each worker is positive it isn't his fault.

Two key open source IoT frameworks get cozy

Filed under
OSS

Two major open source IoT frameworks — the OCF’s “IoTivity” and the AllSeen Alliance’s “AllJoyn” — are moving toward interoperability, and possibly, a merger.

In his keynote address at the Embedded Linux Conference’s OpenIoT Summit, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond discussed the potential for interoperability — and a possible merger — between the two major open source IoT frameworks: the OCF’s IoTivity and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec. “We’ve committed to interoperability between the two,” said Richmond, who went on to explain how much the two Linux Foundation hosted specs had in common.

Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Best Open Source CRM Software Firms Selected for May 2016 by 10 Best CRM
  • LinkedIn open-sources Ambry, an object store for media files [Ed: but it’s still a proprietary surveillance site]

    LinkedIn today announced that it has open-sourced Ambry, a piece of software it built to store and serve up media files like photos, videos, and PDFs. The system is available on GitHub under an open source Apache license.

    LinkedIn previously relied on a complex architecture involving closed source technology that was not cheap to scale, even as user numbers and data have both kept increasing. It wasn’t easy to expand, either.

  • OCBC launches open-source API [Ed: openwashing using API (fake)]
  • OCBC first bank in South-east Asia to launch API platform
  • OCBC is first bank in Singapore to offer banking data in open format to spur app development
  • OCBC opens developer portal for API access
  • OCBC Bank scores an open API first
  • OCBC introduces open API platform to stake claim on growing FinTech ecosystem
  • Why VCs Have Invested More Than $200M in Container Tech

    Last week alone, investors—aiming to profit from the new approach to building, deploying and managing apps—poured $63M into container vendors.
    The evolving market for application containers isn't just about developer adoption anymore; it's now very much about investors, too.

    The week of May 9, in particular, highlights the intense interest that venture capitalists (VCs) have in containers and the potential to profit from the new approach to building, deploying and managing applications at scale.

  • Mozilla Expands Its National Gigabit Project to Austin, TX

    When you couple lightning-fast Internet with innovative projects in the realms of education and workforce development, amazing things can happen.

    That’s the philosophy behind the Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund, our joint initiative with the National Science Foundation and US Ignite. The Mozilla Gigabit Community Fund brings funding and staffing to U.S. cities equipped with gigabit connectivity, the next-generation Internet that’s 250-times faster than most other connections. Our goal: Spark the creation of groundbreaking, gigabit-enabled educational technologies so that more people of all ages and backgrounds can read, write, and participate on this next-generation Web.

  • Google faces record three billion euro EU antitrust fine: Telegraph [Ed: Microsoft started this case]

    The Commission can fine firms up to 10 percent of their annual sales, which in Google's case would be a maximum possible sanction of more than 6 billion euros. The biggest antitrust fine to date was a 1.1 billion-euro fine imposed on chip-maker Intel (INTC.O) in 2009.

  • Smartphone-based Robotic Rover Project goes Open Source

    The chassis is made to cradle a smartphone. Fire up your favorite videoconferencing software and you have a way to see where you’re going as well as hear (and speak to) your surroundings. Bluetooth communications between the phone and the chassis provides wireless control. That being said, this unit is clearly designed to be able to deal with far more challenging terrain than the average office environment, and has been designed to not only be attractive, but to be as accessible and open to repurposing and modification as possible.

  • "Participatory budgeting: a silent democratic revolution"

    Citizens with a say — or even a vote — in their municipal budgets are part of a silent democratic revolution. Participatory budgeting started 25 years ago in Brazil and, since then, has been spreading slowly but steadily from South America to cities all over the world. At the moment, more than 1,500 municipalities involve their citizens in the budget-making process, according to an article on participatory budgeting recently published in the Dutch online newspaper 'De Correspondent'.

  • Fifty shades of open

    Open source. Open access. Open society. Open knowledge. Open government. Even open food. Until quite recently, the word “open” had a fairly constant meaning. The over-use of the word “open” has led to its meaning becoming increasingly ambiguous. This presents a critical problem for this important word, as ambiguity leads to misinterpretation.

  • "Panama Papers pushing open government"

    The publication of the so-called Panama Papers will only help to further the discussion on open government. "Things like hidden company ownership and strict secrecy have fuelled questions on links between world leaders and offshore jurisdictions," write Koen Roovers, and Henri Makkonen, EU Advocacy Lead and EU Advocacy Intern, respectively, at the Financial Transparency Coalition (FTC).

  • "Governments need to enable the data-driven economy"

    Big Data is a game changer for businesses, Alla Morrison, International Development Specialist, Digital Economy and Solutions at the World Bank, recently wrote in a blog posting. She quoted Harvard professor Michael Porter, a globally recognised authority on competitiveness, who said: "Data now stands on par with people, technology, and capital as a core asset of the corporation and in many businesses is perhaps becoming the decisive asset."

  • Open Government Research Exchange (OGRX) launched

    Earlier this month, the Open Government Research Exchange (OGRX) was launched. The portal brings together research on on government innovation, and already indexes hundreds of publications (though many of them are only available for purchase).

  • Central Greece creates dashboard to increase citizen awareness

    Basically, Smart Sterea can be seen as a set of technological tools. Central Greece deployed a data visualisation portal, which mixes data for budgets, political projects and public consultations. This “Open Dashboard of Central Greece” makes use of Open Data to allow citizens to monitor public revenue and expenditure, political programs and their progress, and allocations – among other types of information. Data are updated in real-time.

  • A call for open source textbooks

    Ninety dollars, sometimes over a hundred, even. Walking away from the bookstore with a full set of math textbooks for a calculus course can easily set a student back by over two hundred. Add in online components, and that number only grows. The College Board estimates that the average full-time student would have to spend $1,200 alone in books and materials. The textbook industry costs already financially overburdened students massive amounts of money, and the solution is clear: Open source textbooks must become commonplace in De Anza classrooms.

  • Moja Global: Creating Open Source Tools to Help the Environment

    To understand and address issues such as land degradation, deforestation, food security, and greenhouse gas emissions, countries need access to high-quality and timely information. As these challenges have become more urgent over the past decade, the need for more information has also increased. At the recent 2016 Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, we introduced a new open source project called moja global, supported by the Clinton Foundation and the governments of Australia, Canada and Kenya, that aims to provide the tools necessary to help address these issues.

  • Open-Source Fabbing Gives Plastic Waste New Life

DevOps Hype

Filed under
Development
Server
OSS

OpenStack Roundup

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • OSOps Gives Operators a Powerful Tool to Poke OpenStack Developers

    For JJ Asghar, senior partner engineer of OpenStack at Chef, there is one issue that continues to hamper OpenStack’s success: Operations. It’s no secret in the Ops community that there is a large barrier to entry involved in becoming a part of the OpenStack community. When it comes to submitting bugs, reporting issues, and ensuring one’s OpenStack cloud runs smoothly, operations teams find themselves facing an uphill battle.

  • Cisco's Embrace of OpenStack Pays Network Dividends [VIDEO]

    When Lew Tucker, vice-president and CTO of cloud computing at Cisco first got Cisco involved with OpenStack, networking wasn't even a separate project, it was just part of the Nova compute project. OpenStack has since evolved with the Neutron networking project and more recently, a large focus on Network Function Virtualization (NFV) with some of the world's largest carriers supporting the effort.

  • OpenStack Player Platform9 Rolls Out Channel Partner Program

    As the OpenStack arena consolidates, there are still many business models evolving around it, and OpenStack-as-a-Service is emerging as an interesting choice. Platform9, which focuses on OpenStack-based private clouds, has announced a new release of its Platform9 Managed OpenStack, which is a SaaS-based solution with integration for single sign-on (SSO) solutions. The company also updated its private-cloud-as-a service offering from OpenStack Juno to OpenStack Liberty.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

FreeBSD-Based TrueOS 17.12 Released

The FreeBSD-based operating system TrueOS that's formerly known as PC-BSD has put out their last stable update of 2017. TrueOS 17.12 is now available as the latest six-month stable update for this desktop-focused FreeBSD distribution that also offers a server flavor. TrueOS continues using OpenRC as its init system and this cycle they have continued improving their Qt5-based Lumina desktop environment, the Bhyve hypervisor is now supported in the TrueOS server install, improved removable device support, and more. Read more

An introduction to Joplin, an open source Evernote alternative

Joplin is an open source cross-platform note-taking and to-do application. It can handle a large number of notes, organized into notebooks, and can synchronize them across multiple devices. The notes can be edited in Markdown, either from within the app or with your own text editor, and each application has an option to render Markdown with formatting, images, URLs, and more. Any number of files, such as images and PDFs, can be attached to a note, and notes can also be tagged. I started developing Joplin when Evernote changed its pricing model and because I wanted my 4,000+ notes to be stored in a more open format, free of any proprietary solution. To that end, I have developed three Joplin applications, all under the MIT License: for desktop (Windows, MacOS, and Linux), for mobile (Android and iOS), and for the terminal (Windows, MacOS, and Linux). All the applications have similar user interfaces and can synchronize with each other. They are based on open standards and technologies including SQLite and JavaScript for the backend, and Terminal Kit (Node.js), Electron, and React Native for the three front ends. Read more

Open Source OS Still supporting 32-bit Architecture and Why it’s Important

One after the other, Linux distributions are dropping 32-bit support. Or, to be accurate, they drop support for the Intel x86 32-bit architecture (IA-32). Indeed, computers based on x86_64 hardware (IA-64) are superior in every way to their 32-bits counterpart: they are more powerful, run faster, are more compact, and more energy efficient. Not mentioning their price has considerably decreased in just a few years. If you have the opportunity to switch to 64 bits, do it. But, to quote a mail I received recently from Peter Tribble, author of Tribblix: “[… ] in the developed world we assume that we can replace things; in some parts of the developing world older IA-32 systems are still the norm, with 64-bit being rare.” Read more