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OSS

Open source as a path to innovation

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OSS

So as technology leaders — as the drivers of innovation — we must always be on the lookout for new ways to ready our organizations for agility. One means to that end is open source. Open source is the ultimate platform for flexibility, right? A platform that affords us the agility we need to quickly adapt as technology evolves, business demands expand and markets mature. A platform that allows us to innovate how we want, when we want — rather than innovating on the path and at the pace of our vendors.

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How open source disrupted the CMS market

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OSS

Open source is increasingly changing the software industry. We can see open source products gaining market share in almost every category today, and this development is continuing at a fast pace.

Although a lot of business people still intuitively think of Linux when it comes to open source software, content management systems played a pivotal role in changing the mindset within corporations. Why? Because the CMS industry was one of the first to largely adopt open source products. Nowadays, the most corporations use open source content management systems for their web platforms. Some of them may not even realize it.

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Also: Open source is about more than cost savings

Open Source Software to Catalogue Cultural Heritage Before a Crisis

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OSS

Cultural heritage management tends to suffer from limited funding and resources, which can make a crisis — whether natural disaster, pipeline construction, or war — that much more catastrophic for assessing what’s in need of protection. An open-source system called Arches is the first online tool designed specifically to inventory heritage sites. It was created through a partnership between the World Monuments Fund (WMF) and the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI), and its third version launched earlier this month.

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OpenStack Getting Big

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Server
OSS

Why your hardware needs an open source debugger

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OSS

Working directly with hardware is hard. Each project brings with it mundane questions of which compiler to use, what communications protocols to work with, and how to load code. Developers also need to figure out how to debug the live system without affecting the program being executed.

In the past this has required expensive and proprietary software, but thanks to commodity hardware and projects such as OpenOCD, developing programs that run directly on embedded hardware is easier than ever before.

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The future of open source in health IT

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OSS

I've known Fred for about 15 years or so, first as a contributor to OpenEMR and later we accidentally met in person at the University of Texas. It's pretty cool to come face-to-face with folks you've only know online and, mostly, from working with their contributed code! Over the years, Fred has hosted a couple of open source healthcare IT conferences and done some great work in the field for ClearHealth/MirrorMed with Dave Ulhman and now focusing on open data.

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Lee Schlesinger: No one nowadays objects to FOSS

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Interviews
OSS

I'm Lee Schlesinger, currently managing editor for the Spiceworks Community. Spiceworks provides a free downloadable help desk and network inventory application, and hosts a community for IT pros to discuss both work and off-topic issues. Though we have a pretty popular Linux group in the community, many of the community members, who we call SpiceHeads, work in Microsoft-centric shops.

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Also: Electronic IDs need open source tools

​Red Hat brings Gluster to OpenStack shared file service

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Red Hat
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OSS

At OpenStack Summit, Red Hat announced it was releasing a technology preview of Red Hat Gluster Storage with integration into OpenStack's new Manila shared file system project.

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Also: OpenStack: Ready for more enterprise adoption?

Huawei launches 10KB LiteOS to power the internet of things

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OS
OSS

Chinese telecoms giant Huawei is preparing to launch an operating system for the internet of things that's just 10 kilobytes in size. The company says that its "LiteOS" is the "lightest" software of its kind and can be used to power a range of smart devices — from wearables to cars. Huawei predicts that by 2025 there will be roughly 100 billion internet-connected devices in the world, with 2 million new sensors deployed every hour. The company also said that the OS would be "opened to all developers" to allow them to quickly create their own smart products — although it's unclear whether this means that LiteOS will be fully open-source. Huawei says LiteOS also supports "zero configuration, auto-discovery, and auto-networking."

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OpenStack Boldly Going Where No Cloud Has Gone Before (Mars)

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Server
OSS

OpenStack's Nova compute project originally began as the Nebula project at NASA. At the OpenStack conference here, Jonathan Chiang, IT Chief Engineer at NASA JPL detailed how the space agency is now using OpenStack in its effort to land humans on Mars.

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Also: OpenStack Debuts App Catalog, Doubles Down on Containers

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Our First Look at Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon

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The subtle art of the Desktop

The history of the Gnome and KDE desktops go a long way back and their competition, for the lack of a better term, is almost as famous in some circles as the religious divide between Emacs and Vi. But is that competition stil relevant in 2016? Are there notable differences between Gnome and KDE that would position each other on a specific segment of users? Having both desktops running on my systems (workstation + laptop) but using really only one of them at all times, I wanted to find out by myself. My workstation and laptop both run ArchLinux, which means I tend to run the latest stable versions of pretty much any desktop software. I will thus be considering the latest stable versions from Gnome and KDE in this post. Historically, the two environments stem from different technical platforms: Gnome relies on the GTK framework while KDE, or more exactly the Plasma desktop environment, relies on Qt. For a long time, that is until well into the development of the Gnome 3.x platform, the major difference was not just technical, it was one of style and experience. KDE used to offer a desktop experience that was built along the lines of Windows, with a start center on the bottom left, a customizable side bar, and desktop widgets. Gnome had its two bars on the top and bottom of the screen, and was seemingly used as the basis for the first design of Mac OS X, with the top bar offering features that were later found in the Apple operating system. Read more