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OSS

Whats New for You This August in Open Source CMS

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OSS

In one corner, we have Hippo CTO Arjé Cahn, expouding the merits of open source CMS.

In the other, we have Bryan Soltis, Technical Evangelist at Kentico Software, a Web Content and Customer Experience Management provider, espousing the virtues of proprietary systems.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Keep Dream of a Free and Open Internet Alive, Black Hat Keynoter Urges

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OSS
Security
Web

Black Hat keynoter Jennifer Granick, director of Civil Liberties at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, discusses the need for legal and policy change to defend Internet freedom.

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India adopts a comprehensive open source policy

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OSS

The Government of India (GOI) has adopted a comprehensive and supportive open source policy. It builds on their earlier efforts to adopt open standards for procurement.

As we've seen in other regions, the adoption of such policies often brings out concerns from some quarters who want to spread 'fear and doubt' about the policy. So, what are the facts about the policy, and how does it fit into India's broader economic development strategy?

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5 Best Practices for Security in Open Source Development

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OSS
Security

Let's look at five best practices for working with security in open source programming. When you write software, there's a high likelihood that you'll have to include some kind of security. Plenty of open source libraries are available to help you add security, but you have to do it right. Otherwise, you'll be asking for big trouble later, which might include your client getting featured on the national news.

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GSA innovation lab 18F pushes style guide for better open-source collaboration

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OSS

18F released last week a style guide for its open-source documentation, in an effort to make communication as clear as possible between the often disparate parties that pitch in on open-source projects.

The organization, which is the in-house innovation lab at the General Services Administration, seeks collaboration from government and nongovernment partners. To that end, the lab saw a need for clearer dialogue between parties when describing projects as well as their purposes, needs and other aspects.

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I love open-source OpenStack. Here’s why you may not.

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OSS

Ultimately open-source OpenStack can provide numerous benefits, including added developer productivity toward business growth and initiatives, plus the ability to create a technology environment that can keep pace with your developer’s desire for progress and innovation. If coupled with the savings of allowing hardware and hypervisor providers to compete for your business, adopting open-source OpenStack almost unfailingly moves your business in a positive direction. This all translates positively to the bottom line and is only one illustration of why open-source OpenStack is a better and ultimately lower-cost option compared to proprietary solutions.

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UK Government Squirming To Escape Being Crushed By Non-FREE Software Licences

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OSS

Finally, bean-counters in the government of the UK have seen the light. Spending by governments on non-Free software licences is obscene, particularly in comparison to the availability of good Free Software like GNU/Linux and Postgresql. It’s not the job of government to route taxpayers’ money towards monopolies. That’s stupid, unwise, wasteful and harmful to the economy.

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Context: UK.gov issues internal 'ditch Oracle NOW' edict to end pricey addiction

Why Should Data Center Operators Care About Open Source?

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OSS

Software developers obviously love open source. They get to collaborate, build on top of work already done by others instead of constantly building from scratch, and add features they need to existing solutions. Innovation often happens faster in open source communities than it does behind closed doors of corporate development departments.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Adobe opens legal style guide and encourages clear writing

    Adobe has made its Legal Department Style Guide available to everyone under a Creative Commons license. This shows that open source principles are illuminating even the foggy world of legal writing. I've taken a pass through the guide, and can affirm that it's generally sound and useful. It could help reduce obscurity in legal documents and foster more effective communication.

  • Ada Initiative Closes Up Shop
  • Ada Initiative organization to end, but its work will continue
  • The Ada Initiative Shuts Down, but Its Programs Will Be Open Source

    After four years of working tirelessly to improve diversity in tech, the Ada Initiative is shutting down. As a nonprofit organization, they led unconferences that brought women in tech together to help them find their feminist identities, they led impostor syndrome workshops, and they even had workshops for allies who want to help women in tech. Their programs and camps were one-of-a-kind, and the industry will be sorely missing their presence.

  • Guest View: How open source can help you break free of the storage Matrix

    The world inside the data center has been changing too, and it is changing fast. The large, status quo storage companies are just as nervous. This group of large legacy system companies has ruled the data center for the past 40 years. They’re the ones selling all that pricey systems hardware—especially in storage found in every organization. They are pushing their brand of reality, and when those companies came knocking, you paid, even as you felt something was not right.

  • University of Toronto Runs on Nexenta Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage Platform Supporting Key Cloud Services
  • A Preview: Oracle Connects the Dots at LinuxCon/CloudOpen/ContainerCon

    I’m really pleased with the lineup of keynote speakers and sessions we have planned for LinuxCon, CloudOpen and ContainerCon taking place in Seattle in just two short weeks. Content is our first priority for these events, and I think developers, SysAdmins and executives will be happy with what they find in the keynote hall, session rooms and workshops.

  • OpenSolaris-Derived Illumos Project Turns Five Years Old

    Today marks five years since the announcement of Illumos, the community-based derivative of OpenSolaris to create a fully open-source operating system.

  • LLVMpipe Tests On Mesa Git With An Intel Core i7 Broadwell
  • Lumina Desktop 0.8.6 Adds New Localization Options & More
  • developing v8 with guix

    This machine runs Debian. It used to run the testing distribution, but somehow in the past I needed something that wasn't in testing so it runs unstable. I've been using Debian for some 16 years now, though not continuously, so although running unstable can be risky, usually it isn't, and I've unborked it enough times that I felt pretty comfortable.

  • Slavery “Necessary” Says Education Department Of Extremadura

    When some bureaucrat tells the world that there are no other options than non-free/slavery software for vocational schools, I know they’re lying. It’s just not true. If businesses want school graduates to use non-free software they should do their own training. It’s not up to government to do what they could do for themselves. It’s not government’s job to preserve the Wintel monopoly. That’s not good for the economy and it’s just wrong to indoctrinate citizens into slavery. Extremadura is cranking out graduates who know GNU/Linux and Free Software. Businesses should accept that and use Free Software too. There’s just no reason that businesses or government should throw money to the wind that could be better spent buying machinery or buildings or hiring people locally.

  • Design electronic circuits with MeowCAD

    MeowCAD is an online free and open source electronic design application tool. Its focus is on schematic and PCB design for electronic circuits. Since MeowCAD is a completely FOSS SaaS, it circumvents the problems with vendor dependence. For example, one can download and run local copies of MeowCAD, thus giving the designer complete control over their own tools.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more