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Report Card on Federal Openness

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OSS
  • Report Card on Federal Openness
  • Open Source for America Wants To Give An Openness Report Card

Geek Of The Week: Richard Stallman

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OSS

geektrio.net: Many of you are probably asking… who is Richard Stallman? In a nutshell, he is the reason we have freeware today. He is largely responsible for the popularity of the Linux operating system (including Linux-based derivatives like Android), and the open source community.

The Ransbotham FUD attack on open source fisks itself

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zdnet.com: You don’t expect misleading FUD about open source from MIT’s Technology Review. But here it is.

What's the Worst That the FSF Could Have Done to Apple? Nothing.

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boycott-boycottnovell.com: In discussions on the implications of the recent FSF enforcement action against Apple's iTunes App Store, there's been a sort of recurring theme that's come up: what the GPL "requires" or "obligates" anyone to do. There's a strong strain of fantasy in these comments, and it's important to make clear what's actually the case here.

Why does the Open Source Community love Apple?

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networkworld.com: Attend any computer conference these days and you can expect that almost every giveaway is an iPad. In fact, I recently attended a conference for a Microsoft oriented customer group and the talk of the attendees was Apple and how excited they were to possibly win an iPad from the vendors in the exhibit hall. It makes me wonder, why isn’t the open source community in a complete uproar against Apple the same way that they are against Microsoft?

Mueller calls OIN a scam

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OSS

zdnet.com: Florian “Floyd” Mueller of Fosspatents has found a new windmill to tilt at — the Open Invention Network.

Sourceforge eats its open-source dogfood

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OSS

news.cnet.com: You might not recognize the name Geeknet, but you probably know its popular tech sites such as Sourceforge, Slashdot, Ohloh, Think Geek, Freshmeat, and the recently acquired Geek.com.

Open source marks a new era for African independence

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news.bbc.co.uk: Now, a wave of homegrown programmers, developers and software makers claim to be heralding a new era of African independence.

Chronicling the open source movement - one person at a time

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networkworld.com: Ideas are nothing without people to give them life. That's why a Boston woman has set out to write about the people, not the software.

Icons and the FOSS desktop

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OSS

linux-magazine.com: Icons have always intimidated me. Except for the mouseover help, two-thirds of the time I would have no idea what function they represent. Shrink them so that they fit on a toolbar, and the obscurity is compounded by illegibility.

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Kodi 14.0 Helix Unwinds

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KaOS ISO 2014.12

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Old FOSS Friend & Foe Represents Sony in Hack

Boies, along with three attorneys representing the States, brought Microsoft to it’s knees — or so it seemed at the time. On November 5, 1999, Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson found that Windows dominance on the PC made the company a monopoly and that the company had taken illegal actions against Apple, Java, Netscape, Lotus Notes, RealNetworks, Linux, and others in order to maintain that monopoly. He ordered Microsoft broken in two, with one company producing Windows and another handling all other Microsoft software. As we all know, Judge Jackson’s solution was never implemented. Although an appeals court upheld the verdict against Redmond, the breakup of the company was overturned and sent back to the lower court for a review by a new judge. Two years later, in September, 2001, under the Bush Administration, the DOJ announced that it was no longer seeking the breakup of Microsoft, and in November reached a settlement which California, Connecticut, Iowa, Florida, Kansas, Minnesota, Utah, Virginia and Massachusetts opposed. The settlement basically required Microsoft to share its APIs and appoint a three person panel that would have complete access to Microsoft’s systems, records, and source code for five years. The settlement didn’t require Microsoft to change any code or stop the company from tying additional software with Windows. Additionally, the DOJ did not require Microsoft to change any of its code. Read more

Study: ‘European Parliament should use open source’

The European Parliament should use free software and open standards for all of its ICT systems and data, concludes a study by the EP’s Greens/European Free Alliance: “That is the most appropriate way for the Parliament to meet its own standard of ‘utmost transparency’.” Read more