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OSS

GTK+ 3.18.6 Released for GNOME 3.18, Fixes Copy and Paste Issues for Wayland

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Development
OSS

The developers of the GTK+ cross-platform and open-source GUI (Graphical User Interface) toolkit have announced the release of the sixth maintenance release for the GTK+ 3.18 series.

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Group test: Office Suites

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OSS

If we were to build our favourite open source office suite, it would be Writer and Calc from LibreOffice, Sheets and Flow from Calligra and Inkscape from Gnome. However, this is wimping out of making a decision (and would also leave us with a horribly inconsistent user experience).

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It’s actually open source software that’s eating the world

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OSS

At Lightspeed we’ve been investing aggressively in open source software (OSS) businesses for the past 10 years. Recently, we’ve seen a significant increase in entrepreneurs pitching open source startups, and we’ve also seen greater competition for these deals. We pulled together some numbers in an attempt to measure the acceleration in interest in and funding for OSS businesses in the last few years. The results were staggering even to us.

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Implementing an Open Source Private Docker-based PaaS: A Q&A with Rancher Labs CEO Sheng Liang

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Interviews
OSS

Rancher Labs have created RancherOS, a minimalist operating system (OS) built to explicitly run Docker, and also Rancher, an open source platform for building a private container service, much like Engine Yard’s Deis PaaS and VMware’s Photon platform. InfoQ sat down with Rancher Labs CEO, Sheng Liang, and asked about the Rancher platform, common container platform issues such as networking and storage, and how a container platform will fit into a standard development workflow.

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Trusted Analytics Platform: Simplify Big Data Analytics with Open Source Software

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OSS

The Trusted Analytics Platform (TAP) is an open source project that Intel developed to make it easier for developers and data scientists to deploy custom big data analytics solutions in the cloud as well as reduce development costs and time to market. The company disclosed pilots with Penn Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU).

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Intel Open Sources Snap Cloud Telemetry Tool to Promote Cloud for All

    Intel's latest move in its "Cloud for All" initiative -- which it says will accelerate enterprise adoption of public, private and hybrid clouds -- is an open source tool called snap, which helps organizations understand the telemetry of their clouds.

  • Thunderbird 38.4.0 Brings A Bunch Of FIxes Only
  • Advancing Content

    One of the many benefits of the Web is the ability to create unique, personalized experiences for individual users. We believe that this personalization needs to be done with respect for the user – with transparency, choice and control. When the user is at the center of product experiences everyone benefits.

  • What's the Intersection of Docker and OpenStack? [VIDEO]

    OpenStack and Docker are both open source technologies with a lot of excitement and momentum behind them. But where is the intersection between Docker and OpenStack? And why isn't Docker Inc part of the OpenStack Foundation?

    In a video interview, Ben Golub, CEO of Docker Inc. the lead commercial sponsor behind the open source Docker engine, explains where it all fits together.

    At a high-level, OpenStack is a popular widely deployed Infrastructure-as-a-Service open source platform, while Docker provide an open-source container technology to build, deploy and manage containers. Golub noted that organizations are using Docker together with various flavors of OpenStack from different vendors including HP, Red Hat and Mirantis.

  • WordPress.com is Now Open Source, Desktop App Available for Download

    WordPress has updated its fully hosted version WordPress.com with one of the biggest features ever.

    The update, which has been codenamed Calypso, brings all new abilities to this platform.

  • OpenHardware and code signing (update)

    I posted a few weeks ago about the difficulty of providing device-side verification of firmware updates, at the same time remaining OpenHardware and thus easily hackable. The general consensus was that allowing anyone to write any kind of firmware to the device without additional authentication was probably a bad idea, even for OpenHardware devices. I think I’ve come up with an acceptable compromise I can write up as a recommendation, as per usual using the ColorHug+ as an example. For some background, I’ve sold nearly 3,000 original ColorHug devices, and in the last 4 years just three people wanted help writing custom firmware, so I hope you can see the need to protect the majority is so much larger than making the power users happy.

  • How old were you when you started learning how to program?
  • So you think that you know what "hacker"means?

    Given the negative connotation of the term today, I recall my surprise when I first read (alas, the source has long been forgotten) that in the world of mainframe computer in the 1960's, where the principal revenue stream were licensing fees for the hardware, "hacker" referred to a person who was encouraged to tinker with the software to improve its performance. After all, there was no or little money to be made in the software per se, so that any improvements in performance would only serve to enhance the value of the mainframe itself. Hacking appeared to be a beneficial activity in support of the hardware.

Openwashing

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OSS

From Closed Source to Open Source: A Journey

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OSS

Since joining GigaSpaces a few months ago, I thought it would be interesting to write down some thoughts about my experience on the journey from the closed-source, enterprise world to the open source, startup mentality of getting work done, both internally at the office as well as from a client-facing perspective.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 15.11
  • Genode OS Continues Making Progress As A Desktop OS

    Genode OS 15.11 has many desktop-related enhancements, ports over the Intel KMS driver from the Linux kernel, enhanced USB Armory support, support for the Xilinx Zynq 7000, optimized VirtualBox, and more.

  • Non-Linux FOSS: Airsonos
  • Open-source contributor wants to bring healthcare innovation to the masses

    Glucosio is the only open-source diabetes app that does glucose tracking with third-party integrations and crowdsourced research, led by Kerensa himself. It gives open-source developers the ability to use, copy, study or change the source code as a way to contribute to the project. Contributors can find the source code on GitHub, and the team behind Glucosio is always looking for feedback to improve the project.

  • Reasons Why Google's Latest AI-TensorFlow is Open Sourced
  • Open Source Will Drive Telecom Innovation: Telestax's Restcomm Is Poised To Set The Precedent

    Smaller, more focused conferences like TADSummit and The Open Networking User Group (ONUG) are bringing significant competition to the larger industry events and tradeshows. These gatherings provide more product and technology insight and better 1:1 networking opportunities. Competitors collaborate and learn, and smaller technology vendors can rise above the noise with direct access to end users and service providers. Please see my colleague John Fruehe’s overview of the ONUG conference here.

  • US regulators propose powers to scrutinise algo traders' source code
  • Execs at Financial Firms Offer Their Take on Containers

    Goldman Sachs and Bank of America Merrill Lynch tech executives talk about how they're using containers and why cost savings is not the primary driver.

  • MINIXCon 2016 Announcement and Call for Talks

    MINIX has been around now for about 30 years so it is (finally) time for the MINIXers to have a conference to get together, just as Linuxers and BSDers have been doing for a long time. The idea is to exchange ideas and experiences among MINIX 3 developers and users as well as discussing possible paths forward now that the ERC funding is over. Future developments will now be done like in any other volunteer-based open-source project. Increasing community involvement is a key issue here. Attend or give a presentation. The schedule will be posted in early January.

  • Standing up clouds

    One thing that is interesting for me is the sheer number of ways of getting your OpenStack cloud to an end product and the way in that no one system has prevailed.

  • Cloudera Deepens Integration of Spark with Hadoop

    Cloudera, focused on big data and Apache Hadoop, has announced that it has further matured Apache Spark integration within Hadoop environments. Spark and Hadoop are both flourishing on the big data scene. To further expand the enterprise capabilities of Spark, Cloudera has added support for Spark SQL and MLlib into Cloudera Enterprise 5.5 and CDH 5.5, which the company launched recently.

  • Open Sourcing Your Website: Automattic Revamps WordPress.com Blogging

    WordPress.com is fully open source and on GitHub as the result of a revamp of the popular blogging website by Automattic, which has rewritten WordPress.com to work like a mobile app rather than a traditional website.

  • ‘This House believes 21st Century skills aren’t being taught – and they should be’

    I’ve no problem with skills per se. In teaching, ‘behaviour management’ is a skill. Coding is a skill. So is searching for things on Google.

    I have some problem though with the notion that there are ‘21st century’ skills, but Allan did a fine job already of demolishing that notion.

  • ARM Cortex-A35 Support Added To LLVM

    The ARM Cortex-A35 processor cores are now supported by upstream LLVM.

    As of this morning, the latest LLVM code adds support for the Cortex-A35 ARMv8-A core.

  • bsdtalk259 - Supporting a BSD Project

    A recording from vBSDCon 2015 of the talk titled "Supporting a BSD Project" with Ed Maste and George Neville-Neil.

  • DHS IT priorities focused on data, agile and open source

    In general:

    Data fusion and integration
    User experience – lessons learned from Healthcare.gov means that there is a need to take a more holistic view of systems and solutions.
    Agile development
    Digital Service
    Open source

  • Take a Tour of Austin's Newest Co-Working Space

    Open Source Co-Working is part of a boom in co-working space in Austin that includes Capital Factory, WeWork, Urban Co-Lab, Vuka, Orange Co-Working and several others. Filipos said Open Source diferentiates by providing a calm and quiet space that's largely dedicated to developers and designers who want a distraction-free work space.

  • Top Chefs Talk Open Source Cooking at ICC
  • New, Open Source Database Compares the Environmental Impacts of Building Products and Materials

    To that end, we launched The Quartz Project, a collaborative open data initiative based on the understanding that data can help lead to better buildings. Data enables designers and builders to take into account all the factors that make performant and sustainable buildings. The four founding partners -- thinkstep, committed to helping clients adopt more sustainable practices, Healthy Building Network, committed to research into the health impact of building materials, Google, a tech leader committed to healthier buildings for their global workforce, and Flux, a technology innovator committed to better processes to improve design – bring perspectives required to make this kind of initiative work.

  • Climate resilient development: New open source index and indicators

    The JRC's new open source index facilitates the ex-ante evaluation of the structural features of the vulnerability to climate change of the target countries of the GCCA+. It covers social, economic and environmental aspects of achieving climate-resilient development by aggregating 34 country-level 'fit-for-purpose indicators'. These have been identified on the basis of their relevance for the EU GCCA+ initiative and their compliance with criteria such as reliability, open source, consistency, scientific robustness, global coverage, and publicly available data.

  • Science for All: How to Make Free, Open Source Laboratory Hardware

    In the not-so-distant future you will read of a scientific breakthrough in an area your daughter was excited about in school. In the journal article you will click on the supplementary materials and be able to download all of the source code needed to replicate the instruments used to do the experiment. You will fire up your home 3-D printer to fabricate the equipment. Then, with a few more clicks, you will order any specialty supplies. By the weekend all the supplies will have arrived and now you and your daughter will have the fun of assembling the experiment and participating in state-of-the-art research for almost no money on a quiet Saturday afternoon.

  • More Details On The Do-It-Yourself ARM64 Laptop

    Last week I wrote about the in-development, build-it-yourself 64-bit ARM open-source laptop. That generated a fair amount of interest by the community in Olimex's work and now some more details have emerged.

Openwashing

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OSS
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Leftovers: Software

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]
    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.
  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities
    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."
  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says
    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer. The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store. "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.
  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices
    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this? Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles. Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.
  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM
    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.