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OSS

EnergyTorrent Releases Open-Source Documentation Of Its Solar Concentrators

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OSS

Renewable energy has just become a closer option for everyone. And it is not about the price but rather about the access to the very technology of using solar energy. In this case, it is about solar concentrators — devices allowing you to obtain high-temperature heat (and with some tinkering, electricity). Now one can produce such devices right in their home workshop using open-source blueprints and documentation from the EnergyTorrent project. All of the documentation, with detailed step-by-step manufacturing instructions, can now be downloaded at the EnergyTorrent Wiki.

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Oracle Sales Erode as Startups Embrace Souped-Up Free Software

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OSS

Dan Wagner, the chief executive officer of U.K.-based mobile payments company Powa Technologies Ltd., poses a challenge for database giant Oracle Corp.

Wagner’s company last year began shifting away from pricey products from Oracle and International Business Machines Corp., replacing them with open-source software, which is freely available and can be modified. Now, Wagner said the closely held company is converting virtually all of its operations to free database software.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • LinkedIn Open Sources "Pinot" for Powerful Data Analytics

    When it comes to new open source tools that can make a difference, it's wise to look to some of the tech companies that regularly open source their own in-house platforms and tools. Just witness Netflix, which has open sourced troves of useful cloud utilities. Facebook and Google have release a lot of useful tools as well.

  • CFP Jam & LinuxFest Northwest Goes Hollywood

    Linux and FOSS make cameo appearances throughout the TV and film world, and lately we’ve been treated to the GNOME vs. KDE tête-à-tête in the USA Network’s pilot of a show called “Mr. Robot.” This scene piqued my interest enough to watch the pilot, which was a mix of downright scary and mildly interesting portrayals of tech types at various levels in the overt and covert tech-company hierarchy, wrapped in painfully mediocre dialog (why can’t Aaron Sorkin just write everything? Is that too much to ask?). SPOILER ALERT: The subtext of a psychologically wrecked, socially castrated hacker protagonist — the one using GNOME — is grating enough, but this stereotype is far and away eclipsed by the world domination seemingly at the fingertips of the suit using KDE, which he displayed at the end of the pilot. And we though it was Redmond seeking to take over the world when it’s really…KDE?

  • In Search of SELF in the Queen City

    Right away I ran across Brian Proffitt, whom many of you will remember from his days covering Linux and FOSS for news sites or from the time he spent at Linux Today. These days he’s all but given up journalism for real work, at Red Hat. However, the presentation he’s giving on Sunday here at SELF has a writerly ring to the title: “It’s Metaphors All the Way Down.”

    I also had a chance to talk with Deb Nicholson with the Open Invention Network, who’ll be giving a talk on Saturday about software patent litigation. Funny thing, patents were hardly mentioned in our conversation. Mainly we talked about tech corporations under the headings: the good, the bad and the pure evil. If anyone sees Clint Eastwood, tell him I have a movie idea…

  • Google explains how it will make Chrome suck less battery
  • Get bug squashing, Mozilla increases bounty payments: Linux Wrap

    Mozilla have decided to shake up the way they make payments with regard to bug squashing, in the statement they said “The bounty for valid potentially exploitable critical and high security rated client security vulnerabilities will be between $3000 and $7500 (USD) cash reward. The bounty program encourages the earliest possible reporting of these potentially exploitable bugs. A bounty may be paid for some moderate rated client security bugs at the discretion of the Bug Bounty Committee. If a bounty is paid for a moderate rated security issue, the amount will be between $500 and $2000 (US), depending on the severity of impact for the issue as determined by Bug Bounty Committee.”

  • Securing OpenBSD From Us To You

    I'm going to talk today about signify, a tool I wrote for the OpenBSD project that cryptographically signs and verifies. This allows us to ensure that the releases we ship arrive on your computer in their original, intended form, without tampering.

  • Swift 2.0 is open source, ApacheCon: Big Data, and more open source news
  • 3DPrinterOS Goes Open Source for Their Cloud Client

    If you’re that kind of development monster, you can now find the source code for the cloud client here on GitHub.

    This cloud client already sports support for the majority of desktop 3D printers, and through the GNU Affero General Public License, it’s being shared.

  • Create a 'soft' 3D printer with the open source Circular Knitic

    While the uses for additive manufacturing at home seem to be increasing on a seemingly daily basis, there are still some items in the home that haven’t been able to be created due to the lack of suitable technologies. Among others is the ability to fabricate soft objects using digital fabrication tools.

  • Bristol creatives create an open source, portable, WiFi-enabled Kinect
  • Ouya's potential acquisition, Steam's Summer Sale, and more open gaming news
  • The Citadel reveals open data findings

    The United Nations has proactively researched and promoted open government data across the globe for close to five years now. The Open Data Institute maintains that open data can help "unlock supply, generate demand, and create and disseminate knowledge to address local and global issues." McKinsey & Company report that "seven sectors alone could generate more than $3 trillion a year in additional value as a result of open data."

    There is no doubt that open data is an important public policy area—one that is here to stay. Yet, for all the grand promises, scratch beneath the surface and one finds a remarkable paucity of hard empirical facts about what is and isn't happening on the ground—in the real world of cities where most of us increasingly live and work.

  • "Dutch government hampers re-use of Chamber of Commerce data"

    The Dutch government has prepared a new Trade Register Law that will effectively forbid free re-use of the register data of its Chamber of Commerce (Kamer van Koophandel, KvK). In response to an internet consultation, Stefan de Konink, open data proponent and founder of the OpenGeo Foundation, wrote an open letter to the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Ministry of Security and Justice, asking the Dutch government to reconsider its new policy.

  • Spark Update Leverages the Super Powerful R Statistical Language

    Folks in the Big Data and Hadoop communities are becoming increasingly interested in Apache Spark, an open source data analytics cluster computing framework originally developed in the AMPLab at UC Berkeley. We've covered Spark before, including the momentum surrounding it and backing for it from players like Cloudera.

  • The War Against Deadlocks, part 1: The story of our new thread-safe mixing elements implementation
  • Perl SIG: Perl 5.20 rebuild finished
  • PHP version 5.4.42, 5.5.26 and 5.6.10

    RPM of PHP version 5.6.10 are available in remi repository for Fedora ≥ 21 and remi-php56 repository for Fedora ≤ 20 and Enterprise Linux (RHEL, CentOS).

Los Angeles County voting to shift from inkblots to open source

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OSS

As an alternative to electronic systems, an open source framework will likely offer a more adaptable and affordable model for procuring voting equipment. Traditionally, counties sign end-to-end agreements with private vendors, wherein one company provides the software, hardware, and support for a voting system, offering little flexibility in pricing, use, and design. By managing its own software, LA becomes independent from the single-vendor schema, and it has relative control over the types of hardware it invests in and the amount of money it spends.

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We Is Us — OPNFV & ETSI Accelerate NFV Adoption

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OSS

One question increasingly raised throughout the SDN/NFV community is, “Why are there so many groups associated with NFV/SDN?” While the answer is subject to debate, no one should be surprised that NFV and SDN are far too pervasive for any single organization and/or industry body to control.

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Also: How OPNFV and ETSI NFV are Advancing NFV Adoption

A Peek Inside the Life of Open Source Code Developers

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OSS

When your business uses open source code, but you aren’t a coder yourself the process of creating original, modifying or contributing to code might seem complicated. But, whether you’re the CEO or CFO, you understand that your organizations’ IT workers adopted open source software for sound reasons such as cost efficiency, security and quality.

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Oracle's rising open source problem

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OSS

While a number of factors are at play in Oracle's stumbles, one of the most persistent is the rise of open-source databases, both relational and non-relational (NoSQL), as a recent Bloomberg article posits. As Powa Technologies CEO says, "They scale and operate extremely well, and they don't cost anything."

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3DPrinterOS Goes Open Source for Their Cloud Client

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OS
OSS

If you’re that kind of development monster, you can now find the source code for the cloud client here on GitHub.

This cloud client already sports support for the majority of desktop 3D printers, and through the GNU Affero General Public License, it’s being shared.

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Enterprises Flocking to Open Source Software

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OSS

Open source software is not a trend; it is here to stay. Debating the value of open source software (OSS) on technical considerations is a moving target. Determining the costs of implementing and using open source makes for a more stable argument. The initial software may be free, but learning, implementing, improving, connecting to, and operating it is not free. When you acquire OSS you will have more responsibilities than if you acquired closed product software from a vendor.

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Top 5 Open Source Alternatives to Microsoft Exchange

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OSS

Choosing an open source messaging server can save you money and admin time without losing out on features. Take a look at what our favorite alternatives to Microsoft Exchange have to offer.

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Red Hat and Fedora

FOSS Events: LCA and systemd.conf

  • 5 great linux.conf.au talks (that aren't about Linux)
    linux.conf.au, otherwise known as LCA, is one of the world's longest-running open source events. LCA has been held in a different city around Australia and New Zealand almost every year since 1999. Despite the name, linux.conf.au is a generalist open source conference. LCA hasn't been just about Linux for a long time. Rather, the conference focuses on everything to do with open source: the software, hardware, and network protocols that underly it. LCA also has a strong track on free and open culture, exploring how open source interacts with science, government, and the law.
  • FINAL REMINDER! systemd.conf 2016 CfP Ends on Monday!
    Please note that the systemd.conf 2016 Call for Participation ends on Monday, on Aug. 1st! Please send in your talk proposal by then! We’ve already got a good number of excellent submissions, but we are very interested in yours, too!

OSS Leftovers

Programming