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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Open source for products in four rules (and 10 slides)
  • Apache Twill: real abstraction is a decoupled algorithm

    To be clearer, this term decoupling arises time & time again in relation to the cloud computing model of service-based processing and storage power.

  • Great Open Source Collaborative Editing Tools

    In a nutshell, collaborative writing is writing done by more than one person. There are benefits and risks of collaborative working. Some of the benefits include a more integrated / co-ordinated approach, better use of existing resources, and a stronger, united voice. For me, the greatest advantage is one of the most transparent. That's when I need to take colleagues' views. Sending files back and forth between colleagues is inefficient, causes unnecessary delays and leaves people (i.e. me) unhappy with the whole notion of collaboration. With good collaborative software, I can share notes, data and files, and use comments to share thoughts in real-time or asynchronously. Working together on documents, images, video, presentations, and tasks is made less of a chore.

  • Parse open sources its SDKs

    Earlier this month, mobile backend-as-a-service provider Parse open sourced its iOS, OS X, and Android SDKs, and will be open sourcing additional SDKs in the future.

    Parse, which was acquired by Facebook in 2013, says that its SDKs are used by more than 800 million active app-device pairs per month. By open sourcing those SDKs, Parse believes it can help developers facing challenges similar to those it faced. Specifically, according to Parse, "We’ve had to figure out a way to make a public-facing API easy to understand and use, but continue shipping features fast without breaking any existing functionality. To solve this, we structured our public API as a facade for internal code and functionality that could be consistently changing."

  • A word to the Wise…

    I have been recently reminded that while it may be hard enough to discuss the role and importance of communities for Free and Open Source Software, it is equally important to understand the complexities and the challenges that a Free and Open Source Software foundation has to meet.

  • Mozilla’s self-destruct course continues: major add-on compatibility changes announced

    Mozilla announced major upcoming changes to Firefox add-ons on the official Add-ons Blog today. These changes affect add-on developers and Firefox users alike, and will have a major effect on add-on compatibility and permissions.

  • Holes found in Pocket Firefox add-on

    Information security man Clint Ruoho has detailed server-side vulnerabilities in the popular Pocket add-on bundled with Firefox that may have allowed user reading lists to be populated with malicious links.

    The since-patched holes were disclosed July 25 and fixed August 17 after a series of botched patches, and gave attackers access to the process running as root on Amazon servers.

    Ruho says the bookmarking app functioned as an internal network proxy and subsequent poor design choices meant he could glean information on users including IP address data and the URLs customers saved for later reading. Adding redirects meant he gained access to the etc/passwd file.

  • Intel and Others Lead Massive New Funding Round for Mirantis

    It was just last October that I put up a post noting that Mirantis, which has steadily remained a nimble player in the OpenStack cloud computing arena, had nailed down a massive $100 million Series B funding round led by Insight Venture Partners. The financing was billed then as the largest Series B open source investment in history.

  • Intel backs OpenStack’s Mirantis with $100 million
  • Intel puts engineering and financial muscle behind OpenStack with $100m Mirantis funding boost

    The OpenStack open-source cloud-computing platform stands to gain more enterprise features thanks to a major financial and engineering deal between Intel and Mirantis.

  • Airbnb’s pricing algorithm and Aerosolve, its open-source machine learning tool

    Dan Hill, product lead at Airbnb, wrote the company’s pricing algorithm after the British-based rival startup he cofounded, Crashpadder, was acquired by Airbnb, the short-term rental giant, a few years ago.

  • Open vSwitch 2.4.0 Available
  • Open source part of Poland’s animal tracking project

    Poland’s Agency for Restructuring and Modernisation of Agriculture (ARMA) wants to modernise its animal identification and tracking system. The new solution is required to use Zabbix, an open source solution for IT security monitoring.

  • DataLook Hosts #openimpact to Encourage Replication of Civic Good Open Source Projects
  • Port of Rotterdam preparing for annual World Port Hackaton

    On September 4-5, the Port of Rotterdam is to hold the third edition of what has now become its annual World Port Hackaton. Hackers, programmers, stakeholders and enthusiasts are invited to attend the two-day event and join the teams. Together they will work on concepts and prototypes that deploy new technologies and (open) data, aiming to strengthen the safety, sustainability and competitiveness of the port.

  • FPGAs get into open source virtual reality eco

    Fully upgradable virtual reality headset, the Open-Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) Hacker Development Kit is now powered by Xilinx FPGAs. Buyers of this kit are provided with modules based platform, positioning and head tracking device, a display, and double lens optics.

  • PHP 7 drops first release candidate

    Faster PHP is approaching. PHP 7.0.0, which has been promoted as a much quicker upgrade to the server-side scripting language, has just gone into a release candidate stage, bringing its general availability even closer to fruition.

  • Infinity

    I’m writing a replacement for libthread_db. It’s called Infinity.

  • We’re still catching up to Perl

    That’s from a great little article by Chromatic about modern Perl in the latest issue of PragPub. The article goes in to discuss a number of other strengths of Perl, such as its strong community dedication to testing across numerous architectures, services for understanding package dependencies (that sound like they go beyond anything presently available for Ruby), and legendary standards of documentation.

  • Government seeks open standards feedback

    The government has launched a consultation on how best to proceed with several open standards proposals that will support inter-connected systems and more cost efficient digital transformation across Whitehall.

  • UK launches its next OGP Action Plan

    Open policy making, Open Data and international cooperation are three pillars that UK Minister for the Cabinet Office Matt Hancock wants to be included in the 2015 UK Action Plan, according to a speech given by the minister to mark the launch of a new Open Government Partnership (OGP) action plan (Transcript is accessible on the gov.uk website).

  • Flash is dying a death by 1,000 cuts, and that's a good thing

    Adobe’s Flash, hated the world over for slowing down computers, containing more holes in security than swiss cheese and stubbornly being the video carrier of choice until recently, is dying.

    Video players are migrating to other systems, even if Microsoft’s Silverlight isn’t much better. HTML5-based video and animations are becoming mainstream, and uploaders and other more advanced web-based features can now be replaced with code that doesn’t rely on Flash.

  • Kill Flash? Be careful what you wish for

    Back when Steve Jobs launched the first salvo in the war against Adobe Flash, declaring in no uncertain terms that the iPhone would never support the ubiquitous Web media framework, the anti-Apple crowd was much amused. No one is laughing now -- least of all the many IT vendors that have built their management interfaces in Flash, for whom the death of Flash poses huge challenges.

    At the time, Jobs seemed to be climbing out on a limb. But eventually, everyone came to see how painful it was to support Flash on mobile devices, and how much better HTML5 was at delivering the same basic functionality. Developers began skipping over Flash and going with alternative technologies so that they could support mobile and desktop clients with the same codebase.

IBM adds Java to Bluemix for open source agility

Filed under
Server
OSS

Why is Linux So Great? Because It’s Open Source!

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

What can’t Linux do? Nowadays you hear Linux powering just about any device imaginable — all the way from dime-sized computers via the Raspberry Pi all the way to most of the top 100 supercomputers in the world. We interact with it daily, whether it be on our personal computers, Android devices, Steam boxes (gaming), flight entertainment systems, web servers that power behemoths such as Google, Facebook, and Wikipedia, or more.

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The open source movement needs folk songs

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OSS

So if you have a musical bent, try composing an open source folk song. It's fine to be silly, too. Surprise us with what you make. Share your story and your song(s) right here on Opensource.com

If you compose the right song, you'll move the open source movement forward. School children may sing your song from coast to coast. Uhm, that might not happen too much with my own songs, but it could well happen for YOUR song.

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Open source part of Poland’s animal tracking project

Filed under
OSS

Poland’s Agency for Restructuring and Modernisation of Agriculture (ARMA) wants to modernise its animal identification and tracking system. The new solution is required to use Zabbix, an open source solution for IT security monitoring.

Read more

For open source legend Eric S. Raymond, user-centric design is long overdue

Filed under
OSS

It took a while for Eric S. Raymond, one of the founding fathers of the open source movement, to prioritize the end user. But now that he has, he wants you to know how easy it can be.

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Enlightenment 0.19.9 Open-Source Desktop Environment Is Out with 28 Bugfixes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

The developers of the Enlightenment open-source desktop environment used in numerous GNU/Linux operating systems have announced the release and immediate availability of the ninth maintenance version of Enlightenment DR 0.19.

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OpenSSH 7.1 Fixes Root Access Authentication Issue, Adds Better Support for WinSCP

Filed under
OSS
BSD

OpenBSD, through Dave Wreski, announced the immediate availability for download of the first point release of the OpenSSH 7 and Portable OpenSSH 7 open-source SSH (Secure Shell) protocol 2.0 implementations.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Culture

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OSS

Five open source Big Data projects to watch

Filed under
OSS

There are a lot of open source projects out there, and keeping track of them all is next to impossible. Here are five important ones in the Big Data space that you may not know about.

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Mozilla and Add-ons

  • Firefox 40.0.3 Brings Bug-Fixes Only
  • Reactions to Mozilla’s announcement about upcoming Firefox add-on changes
  • Mixed Feelings Greet Mozilla's Add-ons Overhaul
    Also new is a requirement for add-ons to be reviewed and signed by Mozilla before their deployment. Back in April, Mozilla's security lead Daniel Veditz published The Case for Extension Signing, addressing the volume of feedback their announcement had generated from the developer community. Veditz said the internet browsing experience for tens of thousands of people was being shaped by "third party add-ons in ways they did not choose and that benefit third parties, not the user."
  • Please, God, Don't Let Mozilla Ruin Firefox
    A week ago, Mozilla shed some light on its future, laying out a plan on how the browser is going to dramatically change in the upcoming months. While most of us understood "Chrome extensions were coming to Firefox," it is not as simple as we all thought.
  • The future of Firefox Add-ons - Nope
    Once in a while, I must give my sermons, to help you figure out how things work. Why this is not going to be good for us, the users, and why we must duly prepare, in advance. As it happens, Mozilla does not fully understand the market. It truly does not. When you make decisions based on incorrect data, you are bound to make a disastrous choice. Let's try to amend this, if possible.

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