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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • BusyBox 1.25 Released

    This latest update to the widely-used BusyBox software features a new blkdiscard applet, new options for gunzip/gzip, new nsenter / unshare / ubirename applets, build system changes, fixes for unzip, updates to ntpd, Ash additions, and a wide variety of other changes.

  • Altair Adds Open-Source Licensing to PBS Pro

    One of the problems that continues to hinder HPC is that, by and large, there’s a greater demand for computing cycles than there are CPUs and GPUs available. With researchers and engineers lining up to have their calculations crunched, it’s critical that HPC schemes have effective job management software that can keep track of a queue or jobs and assign the appropriate hardware to each project.

  • ClusterHQ’s Mohit Bhatnagar Talks Flocker, Docker, and the Rise of Open Source

    Container technology remains very big news, and if you bring up the topic almost everyone immediately thinks of Docker. But, there are other tools that can compete with Docker, and tools that can extend it and make it more flexible. CoreOS’s Rkt, for example, is a command-line tool for running app containers. And, ClusterHQ has an open source project called Flocker that allows developers to run their databases inside Docker containers, leveraging persistent storage, and making data highly portable.

  • Running Distributed Applications at Scale on Mesos from Twitter and CloudBees
  • Successful DevOps Deployment Involves Shift in Culture and Processes
  • Finagle, linkerd, and Apache Mesos: Magical Operability Sprinkles for Microservices
  • Hadoop Summit: How to Get Highlights Even if You Can't Attend
  • Dysfunction and Sabotage: Why Large Hospital EHR Costs So Much

    Years ago I read the cannon of the classic medical book "House of God" by Samuel Shem which reads: "...the House of God was sad and sick and cynical...like all our doings in the House..." At first, before I had worked in an actual hospital I thought the book itself was sick and cynical. After working in an actual hospital I re-read the book. I then found it hilarious for its uncomfortable truths, and did not think it was sick or cynical enough. Therein likes the crux of the matter with regard to very expensive large hospital EHR's.

  • ‘Steal My Tool’ showcases open source tools for journalists at IRE conference

    Robert Gebeloff, database projects editor at The New York Times, demonstrated how to use XML Grid to access and interpret a website’s data. Using these tools and techniques, Gebeloff showed how one can find which Trader Joe’s stores sell beer by simply scraping the site’s XML code. Gebeloff has published detailed instructions for web scraping without programming on his GitHub page.

  • The current state of open data in the US government

    The S.2852 OPEN Government Data Act aims to require true open data access at the federal level. In this article I will discuss the importance of open data in government, the current state of open data in government, and what we need to do to implement true open data.

  • 2048 DIY Open Source Game Console Hits Kickstarter (video)

    Anyone looking to learn more about coding and creating video games may be interested in the new DIY open source games console called 2048 which has been created by 2048.

    The name refers to the special screen that the game console is equipped with that is constructed from 2048 individual LED bulbs that are placed in a matrix form offering a 64 x 32 resolution.

    Learn more about what is possible using the open source games console from the developers at Creoqode. Who was taken to Kickstarter this week to raise the £20,000 they require to take the hardware into production. Early bird pledges are available from just $99 with delivery expected to take place during December 2016 with worldwide shipping available if required.

  • Mozilla MOSS 'Mission Partners' makes it rain $385,000 on open source project developers

    Open source is very important nowadays, especially from a privacy and security standpoint. Look, closed source ideology is not inherently bad -- it is a good way to protect a company's code. The problem, however, is that users are increasingly suspicious of software since Edward Snowden's leaks. There is no telling what kind of back doors or other malicious things are hiding in the code.

  • Severe flaws in widely used archive library put many projects at risk

    n a world where any new software project is built in large part on existing third-party code, finding and patching vulnerabilities in popular open-source libraries is vital to creating reliable and secure applications.

    For example, three severe flaws in libarchive, recently found by researchers from Cisco Systems' Talos group, could affect a large number of software products.

    Libarchive is an open-source library first created for FreeBSD, but has since been ported to all major operating systems. It provides real-time access to files compressed with a variety of algorithms, including tar, pax, cpio, ISO9660, zip, lha/lzh, rar, cab and 7-Zip.

Docker and Dockercon

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OSS
  • CI and CD at Scale: Scaling Jenkins with Docker and Apache Mesos
  • Get networking out of the way for app development

    The modern tech business is all about networking infrastructure. For a leading company, the power to communicate effectively with its IT assets is vital. However, that same networking can be a wall to development process; how does a team develop for an environment that is always shifting and changing? Removing the networking concern is a top priority for any business that wants to be efficient and agile.

  • Docker launches a new marketplace for containerized software

    At its developer conference in Seattle, Docker today announced the private beta of the Docker Store, a new marketplace for trusted and validated dockerized software.

    The idea behind the store is to create a self-service portal for Docker’s ecosystem partners to publish and distribute their software through Docker images — and for users to make it easier to deploy these applications.

  • Docker 1.12 Orchestration Features Mean Fewer Channel Partner Options

    Docker's partner relationships are likely to change following the announcement this week of Docker Engine 1.12, which builds more orchestration features into the core Docker container platform.

  • Docker Store Announced @dockercon / So What Happens to Hub? #dockercon

    Docker announced a new beta effort for Docker container images at Dockercon today, called the Docker Store.

  • Docker Tunes Up Engine Orchestration

    Docker on Monday announced Docker Engine 1.12 with built-in orchestration, which allows automated deployment and management of Dockerized distributed applications and microservices at scale in production.

  • Docker and OpenStack are Grabbing the Headlines This Week

    Containers and cloud services remain much in the news, and open source tools such as Docker and OpenStack remain red hot at organizations of all sizes. Docker is running its developer conference in Seattle this week and there are many container tools being shown there.

    Meanwhile, Bright Computing, focused on vendor-independent cluster and cloud management software, is coming out with Version 7.3 of Bright Cluster Manager and Bright OpenStack, scheduled for release in July.

    Microsoft has been increasing its focus on Docker and is even building support for it into Windows Server. The effort is part of the company's focus on incorporating more open source technologies. This week, the company is showing off the upcoming Linux version of SQL Server that can run in containers on Ubuntu.

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS
  • openSUSE Conference 2016 Day 1

    The first day of this year’s openSUSE Conference went well and the keynote speaker team of SaltStack Chief Technical Officer and technical founder Thomas Hatch along with Senior SaltStack Engineer David Boucha and SUSE’s Joe Werner showed how powerful Salt is for IT automation.

    Boucha gave a live demo and Hatch talked about the evolution of Salt and even talked a little about Salt’s Thorium Reactor, which was added to Salt as an experimental feature in the 2016.3.0 release. Werner discussed how SUSE uses Salt with SUSE Manager.

  • Building a better LibrePlanet: What we learned from the conference surveys

    Our samples are usually about sixty to seventy respondents, and self-selecting -- from their responses, we can say with confidence that LibrePlanet attendees feel we're doing a decent job organizing the conference. The questions "How much did you enjoy the sessions you attended, compared to those at other conferences you have attended?" and "How likely is it that you will return to LibrePlanet next year?" received an average of about 3.5 out of 4 each of the last three years.

  • Do you GNU? Attend the GNU Hackers' Meeting in France this summer!

    The GNU Hackers' Meeting is a friendly, semi-formal forum to discuss technical, social, and organizational issues concerning free software and GNU. This is a great opportunity to meet GNU maintainers and active contributors.

3 Indian women among finalists of Red Hat’s 2016 open source awards

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OSS

Three Indian women made it to the list of finalists after taking part in the 2016 ‘Women in Open Source' competition, organised by Red hat.

The finalists in the academic category include three women from India who are full-time students pursuing computer science and engineering degrees.

Now in its second year, the ‘Women in Open Source Award’ was created to honor women who make important contributions to open source projects and communities, or make innovative use of open source methodologies.

Read more

Why I must use Free Software - and why I tell others to do so

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OSS

My work colleagues know me well as a Free/Libre software zealot, constantly pointing out to them how people should behave, how FLOSS software trumps commercial software and how this is the only way forward. This for the last 20 odd years. It's a strain to argue this repeatedly: at various times, I have been asked to set out more clearly why I use FLOSS, what the advantages are, why and how to contribute to FLOSS software.

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Building a business on a solid open source model

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OSS

Since we announced Nextcloud, an ownCloud fork, many people have asked me how we plan to build a sustainable, healthy open source business. My short answer is that it requires a strong focus on maintaining a careful balance between the needs of all stakeholders: users, contributors, employees, customers, and—of course—investors. Building a solid open source business requires that management has confidence in the abilities of your company, stakeholders must be on board with the business model, and everyone must understand that balance is important for the ecosystem. Like a rising tide lifts all boats, a strong ecosystem benefits all stakeholders.

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VR Care is Frog's open source VR headset for hospital patients

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OSS

VR is pretty good at distracting us from the outside world - take off the headset you've been wearing and you'll see that it's gone dark/everyone has left/you really need to shower.

Frog and Stanford are putting this to good use with VR Care, a low cost, open source virtual reality headset and Epione, the accompanying game concept. Both are designed for a very specific purpose - distracting burns patients from pain during ongoing treatments, over weeks/months, in hospitals.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Elon Musk's open source OpenAI: We're working on a robot for your household chores

    OpenAI, the artificial-intelligence non-profit backed by Elon Musk, Amazon Web Services, and others to the tune of $1bn, is working on a physical robot that does household chores.

    The robot OpenAI is targeting would be as reliable, flexible, and intelligent as Rosie the maid from TV cartoon comedy The Jetsons.

    OpenAI leaders Musk, Sam Altman, Ilya Sutskever, and Greg Brockton explain in a blogpost that they don't want to manufacture the robot itself, but "enable a physical robot ... to perform basic housework".

  • Is Open Source Right for You? Maybe, But Cost Should Be the Last Consideration

    Without a doubt, open source is making the software business better. But, if you’re considering going the open source route for software that’s critical to your company, keep in mind that “open” doesn’t mean “free.” It’s understandable that cost would be a major factor in the decision to go open source, as it’s free to license and allows you to spin up unlimited instances. However, there are a number of hidden expenses associated with using open source software that in many cases can drive up the price tag way past commercial software. The real differentiating factors in open source have less to do with cost than they do with your objectives, and the capabilities of your team.

  • Community-powered marketing succeeds where traditional marketing fails

    It's time for us B2B marketers to stop being so transactional and impersonal—to stop believing that buyers' purchase decisions are completely rational. Buyers, after all, are people, not cogs in a wheel spinning inside their companies.

    Traditional B2B marketing tactics are expensive and increasingly ineffective. You know them well: online banners, emails from random salespeople, sponsored golf outings, airport advertising, billboards, radio ads. Our customers are swimming in messages about why our product is better than the next guy's. They're messages designed to promote, persuade, and convince, and they speak to the part of us hungry for just one more tiny bit of data that might help with an important decision.

  • Understanding Ceph and Its Place in the Market

    I see a strong and promising future for Ceph. Sure, like any other data storage solution it doesn't address all data storage needs, but it's here, and it's yet another contender in the software-defined storage arena.

  • twenty years of free software

    I'm forty years old. I've been developing free software for twenty years.

    A decade ago, I wrote a series of posts about my first ten years of free software, looking back over projects I'd developed. These retrospectives seem even more valuable in retrospect; there are things in the old posts that jog my memory, and other details I've forgotten by now.

  • OpenStack Summit Barcelona: Call for Speakers
  • Platform9’s Managed Kubernetes Available in Beta

    Platform9 uses a fork of the OpenStack cloud platform. The startup’s product allows companies to turn private servers into in-house versions of public cloud services like Amazon‘s. Last year the company debuted a virtual appliance that integrates its OpenStack controller service with VMware vSphere services.

  • OpenStack And Storage -- Flowing Downstream With Openness

    Nobody likes being locked out. Locked out of their home, locked out of their car, locked out of their corporate network. It feels helpless.

    Nobody likes being locked in either. Locked into a contract, locked into a relationship, locked in by a proprietary network operating system or a particular platform. Can’t take advantage of great new developments from other platform companies. It feels helpless.

  • Crash reporting for LibreOffice

    Starting with LibreOffice 5.2 the LibreOffice project will have an automated crash reporting tool with server side analysis of the reports. This has been active in the builds since 5.0.0.0.beta1 and was really working since beta 2.

  • The State of Open Source Security in Commercial Applications [Ed: The mouthpieces from Black Duck with more marketing placements/spam as ‘article’]
  • FreeBSD Is Trying To Figure Out If Anyone Uses Its VGL Graphics Library

    FreeBSD VGL provides a library for accessing graphics modes and carrying out basic drawing operations atop its syscons console driver. Not only is basic graphics output on a virtual console supported by libvgl, but mouse input is too handled. However, not many people seem to be using this library.

  • EU Rejection of Secret Service and EU Partial Adoption of Open Source: Two "Op Eds"

    I respectfully draw the community's attention to two "Op Eds" that explore missed opportunities for the EU in relation to open source everything.

  • Selecting an Open Source License for Your Project

    Selecting an open source license is not actually as easy as you might think. This article provides links to some valuable resources for anyone faced with choosing from the sea of open source licenses currently available.

  • OStatic's Guide to Open Source Licensing and the Law
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More in Tux Machines

Windows 'Upgrade'

  • When A Computer Is Ready for the Junk Pile
    To that point, there was a report that a mail server failure in a large business office remained a mystery for two days until someone found an old Pentium II back in the corner of some obscure closet with a burned out power supply. It is reported that the Slackware/Debian/Red Hat machine had been plugging away as a mail server for a number of years, completely unattended. That’s feasible I suppose, but I further suppose that it’s a modern day parable about how open source can indeed, carry the day.
  • Microsoft draws flak for pushing Windows 10 on PC users
    With about a month left for many PC users to upgrade to Windows 10 at no charge, Microsoft is being criticized for its aggressive — some say too aggressive — campaign to get people to install the new operating system.
  • Microsoft forks out thousands over forced Windows 10 upgrade
    Microsoft has had to pay a Windows user in California US$10,000 over a forced upgrade to Windows 10, according to a report in the Seattle Times. The user, Teri Goldstein, runs a travel agency in Sausalito, a San Francisco Bay Area city in Marin County, California.
  • A lawsuit over an unwanted Windows 10 upgrade just cost Microsoft $10,000
    Microsoft recently paid a (very small) price for its Windows 10 upgrade tactics, and that was before they became increasingly aggressive.
  • Updategate: California woman awarded $10,000 for borked Windows 10 upgrade
    A CALIFORNIA woman has set a precedent after a court ruled that she was entitled to damages over the installation of Windows 10 on her machine. Teri Goldstein, a travel agent, testified that the new operating system had auto-downloaded, started to install, failed, and left her Windows 7 computer running painfully slowly and often unusable for days. "I had never heard of Windows 10," Goldstein told reporters. "Nobody ever asked me if I wanted to update."
  • Microsoft pays out $10,000 for automatic Windows 10 installation
    Company withdraws appeal leaving it liable for $10,000 compensation judgment after botched automatic upgrade of travel agent’s computer
  • Microsoft Pays Woman $10,000 Over Its Forced Windows 10 Upgrade
    As a result of a legal suit, Microsoft has paid a woman $10,000 over the forced Windows 10 upgrade.
  • 'I urge everyone to fight back' – woman wins $10k from Microsoft over Windows 10 misery
    A California woman has won $10,000 from Microsoft after a sneaky Windows 10 update wrecked the computer she used to run her business. Now she's urging everyone to follow suit and "fight back." Teri Goldstein – who manages a travel agency in Sausalito, just north of San Francisco – told The Register she landed the compensation by taking Microsoft to a small claims court. Rather than pursue a regular lawsuit, she chose the smaller court because it was better suited to sorting out consumer complaints. Crucially, it meant Microsoft couldn't send one of its top-gun lawyers – or any lawyer in fact: small claims courts are informal and attorneys are generally not allowed. Instead, Redmond-based Microsoft had to send a consumer complaints rep to argue its case.

Canonical Releases New Kernel Update for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

We reported the other day that Canonical released a major kernel update for its Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, and it appears that it also affected users of the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) distribution. Read more

This programmable, open source outlet can do things that off-the-shelf smart plugs can't

Excited by the idea of an open-source, Arduino-based outlet, capable of remotely controlling your various household devices? If so, you’ll definitely want to check out the Portlet: a versatile portmanteau of “portable” and “outlet,” which — despite only consisting of 4 buttons and a simple 2×15 character LCD screen — can be programmed to do everything from switching your lights on at a certain time to keeping your coffee heated at the perfect temperature. Read more

How I welcomed an immigrant family with a Linux laptop

From the LibriVox website, I downloaded the free, public domain audio reading of Helen Keller’s amazing autobiography, The Story of My Life, which is an excellent book that was first published in 1903. Then, I downloaded the text of the book (it's in the public domain) from Project Gutenberg and imported the text into Calibre, the free ebook reading software. Using my favorite Linux screencasting software, SimpleScreenRecorder, I married the text (in a large font) to the audio recording. I created the first 11 chapters of the book as video files in this way, and uploaded them to YouTube. I also copied these onto the Dell Inspiron 9400, so these video files could be viewed offline. Read more