Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

Drupal creator on saving the open web

Filed under
OSS
Drupal

Can we save the open web? Dries Buytaert, creator of Drupal, talked to a group during SxSW Interactive about how he began the content management service (CMS) Drupal in his dorm room in 2001. Today, Drupal powers 1 out of 30 websites in the world. Technology has changed a lot from 2001 to 2016. Back in 2001, only 7% of the population had Internet access, there were only 20 million websites, and text messaging was just introduced. So, when we talk about the open web what we're talking about is people having choice and transparency in their options.

Read more

Open-source microprocessor

Filed under
OSS

Software source codes and hardware designs tend to be closely guarded trade secrets. Not so with open-source products. For instance, the code of open-source software is freely available to all: the best known example is the Linux operating system. Not only are interested developers able to use the software, they can also further develop it and adapt it to their own needs.

Open-source products also exist on the hardware side. Examples are open micro-controller boards such as Arduino or Raspberry Pi, of which blueprints are publicly available. However, these boards are based on commercial chips, whose internal architecture is not open-source. A few days ago, scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Bologna, led by ETH Professor Luca Benini, open sourced the full design of one of their microprocessor systems - in a way that maximises the freedom of other developers to use and change the system, says Benini. "It will now be possible to build open source hardware from the ground up."

Read more

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS

F-Droid, Copperhead, Guardian Project partner to create a security-focused, Android-based ecosystem

Filed under
Android
OSS
  • F-Droid, Copperhead, Guardian Project partner to create a security-focused, Android-based ecosystem

    Google’s Android operating system may be based on open source software, but most Android phones ship with a lot of proprietary apps and services (like Google’s own Gmail, Maps, and Play Store). But there are a number of initiatives designed to make Android more open… and many also claim to make it more secure.

  • Copperhead, F-Droid & Guardian Project start partnership for open, secure mobile ecosystem

    Copperhead, The Guardian Project, and F-Droid have announced a new partnership and proposed a crowdfunding campaign, hoping to raise money to create an "open, verifiably secure mobile ecosystem of software, services and hardware" - or in English, a secure phone anyone can buy and use straight out of the box.

    “Through a future planned crowdfunded and commercial offering, the partnership will provide affordable off-the-shelf solutions, including device hardware and self-hosted app and update distribution servers, for any individual and organizations looking for complete mobile stacks they can trust.” reads the announcement.

  • Open Source CopperheadOS Project Accepts Bitcoin Donations

    There is no denying the Android operating system could use a fair amount of tweaks to make things far more secure for its users. Whether or not CopperheadOS will be the answer, remains to be seen, but the ecosystem has a few things going for it. What is even more interesting is how this collaboration with Guardian Project and F-Droid is accepting Bitcoin donations to fund development as well.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • SxSW panel on the value of open source

    One question I get often is: "How can I build a business around something I'm giving away for free?" So, I wanted to attend the panel at SxSW this year called Don't open source like a n00b, focused on how to make a project or product open source. We've seen many projects successfully do open source—like Linux, Wordpress, and Koha—but how does a company like Booz Allen Hamilton jump from being a proprietary company to open sourcing their first product?

    Project Jellyfish was developed here in Austin by Booz Allen Hamilton; it's software that can be described as a cloud brokering solution. The team there realized that many vendors are open sourcing their applications and that a lot of the new, cool stuff is being developed in the open. So, they made the decision to make Project Jellyfish open source, hoping their developers would more interested in participating. But, they still had to convince their partners to spend money to develop something they were going to give away for free.

  • How Open Source is Changing Data Center Networking

    Last June, AT&T went all-in on this bet, joining with the Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) and the Open Network Operating System (ONOS) Project to form what’s now called Central Office Re-imagined as a Datacenter (CORD, formerly “Re-architected”). Its mission is to make telco infrastructure available as a service in an analogous fashion to IaaS for cloud service providers.

  • Kubernetes 1.2 Offers Rolling Updates, Persistent Volumes

    At the Google GCP Next conference last week in San Francisco, the company demonstrated how it was possible with Kubernetes to update a heavily used distributed application while keeping that app running.

    For a Kubernetes 1.2 on-stage demo, Greg DeMichillie, director of program management for Google Cloud Platform spun up a service and then used load testing software to dispatch 20,000 requests-per-second to the service.

  • Way to Go, FCC. Now Manufacturers Are Locking Down Routers

    Hey, remember when the FCC reassured us last year that it wasn’t going to lock down Wi-Fi routers? And everyone breathed a sigh of relief, because custom router firmware is actually a really good thing? Sure, it’s fun to improve your router by extending the range or making your network friendlier for guests. But open firmware is important for other reasons: it enables critical infrastructure, from emergency communications for disaster relief and building free community access points to beefing up personal security.

Are you legally open source compliant?

Filed under
OSS
Legal

Meeting legal requirements is one of the key elements that large software companies factor in to their release cycles. They have teams that check for software patents that may impact their code, make sure that every copyright is acknowledged and look at the detailed usage clauses in any third-party software that they use.

One of the reasons for doing this is to avoid expensive litigation from companies often referred to as patent trolls. These are companies that have purchased large software patent libraries. Their business model is to then use those libraries to bring lawsuits against developers and over the last decade we’ve seen a number of high profile lawsuits against companies such as IBM, Microsoft, Google and others. Some of these have been dismissed by the courts but others have been upheld costing hundreds of millions of dollars in both fines and costs.

While open source developers might think that they are immune from this type of issue they are not. It may be that a piece of software that has been released as open source is later alleged to have infringed a software patent. This would mean that anyone using that software could be found guilty of an infringement.

To help reduce the impact of patent claims Google, IBM, Red Hat, SUSE, NEC, Philips and Sony created the Open Innovation Network. The goal was to create a pool of defensive patents that could be used to protect Linux and developers using Linux. This has been successful with over 1946 companies signing up to the OIN to use their patents to defend themselves from attack.

Read more

qBittorrent 3.3.4 Free BitTorrent Client Adds a "Hide Zero Values" Option, More

Filed under
OSS

The development team behind the popular qBittorrent free open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client software announced today, March 29, 2016, the release of qBittorrent 3.3.4.

Read more

FFmpeg 3.0 "Einstein" Free Multimedia Backend Gets Its First Point Release

Filed under
OSS

Today, March 29, 2016, the major FFmpeg 3.0 "Einstein" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework received its first maintenance release, version 3.0.1.

Read more

Linux Foundation and Open Source Blockchain

Filed under
Linux
OSS

The TODO Group and the Linux Foundation: Marrying open source and the enterprise

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Using open-source software is easy, getting your company to integrate open-source development is hard. The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group aim to change this.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE

  • KDE's Project Neon Begins Publishing Daily Wayland Images
    KDE -- KDE's Project Neon has begun publishing daily images of the latest KDE Plasma stack powered atop Wayland rather than the X.Org Server. Jonathan Riddell passed along word that daily ISOs are now being spun of the freshest KDE development code with KWin acting as a Wayland compositor. The OS base is still Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.
  • The Qt Company's Qt Start-Up
    The Qt Company is proud to offer a new version of the Qt for Application Development package called Qt Start-Up, the company's C++-based framework of libraries and tools that enables the development of powerful, interactive and cross-platform applications and devices. Now used by around one million developers worldwide, the Qt Company seeks to expand its user base by targeting smaller enterprises.

Linux 4.5.3

I'm announcing the release of the 4.5.3 kernel. All users of the 4.5 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.5.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.5.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st... thanks, greg k-h Read more Also: Linux 4.4.9 Linux 3.14.68

Open source near ubiquitous in IoT, report finds

Open source is increasingly standard operating procedure in software, but nowhere is this more true than Internet of Things development. According to a new VisionMobile survey of 3,700 IoT developers, 91% of respondents use open source software in at least one area of their software stack. This is good news for IoT because only open source promises to reduce or eliminate the potential for lock-in imposed by proprietary “standards.” What’s perhaps most interesting in this affection for open source, however, is that even as enterprise developers have eschewed the politics of open source licensing, IoT developers seem to favor open source because “it’s free as in freedom.” Read more

Ubuntu 16.04 – My Experience so Far and Customization

While I earnestly anticipated the release of Unity 8 with Xenial Xerus (after watching a couple of videos that showcased its function), I was utterly disappointed that Canonical was going to further push its release — even though it was originally meant to debut with Ubuntu 14.04. Back to the point at hand, I immediately went ahead and installed Unity Tweak Tool, moved my dash to the bottom (very important) and then proceeded to replace Nautilus with the extensive Nemo file manager which is native to Linux Mint and by far superior to the former (my opinion). Read more