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Linux/FOSS Events/Conferences

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  • Manchester GNOME 3.22 Release Party – Friday 23rd Sept. @ MADLab [Ed: we're planning to be there.]
  • LAS (Libre Application Summit) GNOME Conference Takes Place September 19-23

    Today, September 19, 2016, was the first day of the first-ever LAS (Libre Application Summit) GNOME open source conference for GNU/Linux application developers.

    As you might have guessed already, the event is being organized by the GNOME Project, the same non-profit organization that's behind the popular GNOME desktop environment used in numerous Linux kernel-based operating systems around the globe, and an important part of the Free Software ecosystem.

    LAS (Libre Application Summit) GNOME conference's main goal is to encourage the growth of the Linux application ecosystem among small and medium-sized businesses, as well as various educational institutions. It also aims to expand the collaboration between the Linux kernel and major GNU/Linux operating systems.

  • Headed to LAS GNOME!

    By the time this gets posted on the blog, I will be headed to LAS GNOME. I'm really looking forward to being there!

    I'm on the schedule to talk about usability testing. Specifically, I'll discuss how you can do usability testing for your own open source software projects. Maybe you think usability testing is hard—it's not! Anyone can do usability testing! It only takes a little prep work and about five testers to get enough useful feedback that you can improve your interface.

  • Fedora 24 release party in Paris
  • HackMIT

    One of the core missions of a Fedora Ambassador is to represent the Fedora Community at events. On the weekend on September 17 and 18, 2016 I attended HackMIT as a representative of Fedora with Justin Flory. I was also honored to serve as a mentor to several teams.

  • Tickets for systemd 2016 Workshop day still available!

    We still have a number of ticket for the workshop day of systemd.conf 2016 available. If you are a newcomer to systemd, and would like to learn about various systemd facilities, or if you already know your way around, but would like to know more: this is the best chance to do so. The workshop day is the 28th of September, one day before the main conference, at the betahaus in Berlin, Germany. The schedule for the day is available here. There are five interesting, extensive sessions, run by the systemd hackers themselves. Who better to learn systemd from, than the folks who wrote it?

  • [LPC] Preliminary Microconference Schedule Up

    Every year we get a number of constraints on Microconferences which we try hard to accommodate. Accounting for all of those, we’ve put the preliminary schedule up here. If you notice any problems, please email and we’ll try to fix it

    Also note, this is preliminary, the Microconferences may still move around as we get requests to change them. Also note that the times of talks within Microconferences is highly likely to change (please see the MC leaders if you want this to change).

  • World Port Hackathon 2016 concludes successfully

    Last month, the fourth edition of the World Port Hackathon took place in Rotterdam. Several teams worked on problems identified by representatives of the port community in workshops leading up to the hackathon. This year's event was organised in co-creation with the Maritime and Port Authority (MPA) of Singapore.

Leftovers: OSS

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  • Adept Releases Open-Source Energy Measurement Tools for Parallel Hardware

    Over its three-year lifespan, Adept has investigated energy consumption in parallel hardware and software. Energy efficiency is becoming a serious consideration for developers of high-performance and high-throughput computing systems. As computers become more powerful, they inevitably consume more energy – unless the technology is improved so they become more efficient.


    The Adept Tool Suite consists of three parts: a benchmark suite, power measurement infrastructure, and power and performance prediction tool.

  • Riot wants to be like Slack, but with the flexibility of an underlying open source platform

    In the ‘old days’ there were plenty of messaging apps and aggregators, but they survived in an open source world. Today, business models dictate that platforms like Slack must keep their messages to themselves.

    It would be nice if open-source alternatives could bring back the days of flexibility, combined with today’s world of excellent user experience. What if Slack were simply an excellent tool running on an underlying open-source platform? Could it create the same value?

    Riot (formerly known as Vector while it was running in Beta) is a new UK-borne app hoping to have a crack at that.

  • Orange to test AT&T's open source ECOMP platform

    Orange’s R&D division Orange Labs Network plans to test ECOMP, an open source platform designed by AT&T for creating and managing software-centric network services. ECOMP, which stands for Enhanced Control, Orchestration, Management and Policy, will be released to the wider telecom industry as an open source offering managed by the Linux Foundation.

  • MongoDB cofounder explains what to do when a project has gone off track

    It has happened to nearly every technology leader. A project that seemed like an excellent idea when you started it either drifted off course, proved too ambitious or not as useful as originally thought. What do you do when you're in the middle of a project that you realize is not going well?

    Eliot Horowitz, CTO and co-founder of open source database company MongoDB, knows this problem first-hand. In an interview with The Enterprisers Project, he explains what happened when he and his co-founder realized they had to pull the plug on the original version of their technology.

  • Open Source OpenPokeMap Project Will Enable Anybody To Run A Pokemon Go Tracker

    The 3rd party development community around Niantic's hyper successful Pokemon Go game is not slowing down. A new project will enable everybody interested to run his own Pokemon Go map service. OpenPokeMap is an open-source, open-infrastructure map for Pokemon Go. The developer behind FastPokeMap is supporting the project as a "consultant." He says that OpenPokeMap is similar to FastPokeMap.

  • NetBeans Going to Apache: Is Java Next?

    Most followers of open source probably weren't surprised by Wednesday's fuss over NetBeans' possible move from Oracle to the Apache Software Foundation. If you missed it, it started with an announcement on the NetBeans website that "Oracle has proposed contributing the NetBeans IDE as a new open-source project within the Apache Incubator."

    The announcement goes on to indicate the move is being made out of the goodness of Oracle's heart. "Oracle is relinquishing its control of NetBeans and introducing it to Apache's widely accepted governance model, which will provide new opportunities to the NetBeans community and stimulate further code contributions."

  • Microsoft (MSFT) news recap: Microsoft loves open source, Garage gets a new look and more [Ed: Microsoft advocacy site repeats the Big Lie; Microsoft still lobbies against FOSS, e.g. in India this year]
  • Code Editor Wars Redux: Vim, Emacs Fire Salvoes
  • GNU Emacs 25.1 Text Editor Arrives with Enhanced Network Security Features
  • LA launches open source business portal

    The open source LA Business Portal was funded by the Small Business Administration's Start Up In A Day initiative and used the codebase of San Francisco’s Business Portal as a foundation for LA's code.

    As an open source project, the LA Business Portal can help cities without the resources or capacity to build a solution from the ground up improve their business climate, officials said. The startup guides and starter kits for popular business types will be made available to be adapted and used by other local government entities.

After Ten Years, Vim (Vi IMproved) 8.0 Open-Source Text Editor Is Here

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After ten long years, the popular Vim (Vi IMproved) open-source and cross-platform text editor used by many programmers worldwide has received a major update that brings lots of interesting new features and improvements.

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Top 10 Open Source CRM

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Clearly, finding the right open source CRM (customer relationship management) for your business isn't as simple as randomly selecting one. To be sure, there are plenty of good open source CRM apps, but still: you must carefully weigh features, function, licensing and support, for your own needs.

In this article, I'll share my top open source CRM picks. And with any luck, you'll find one that'll be a great match for your business!

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Commission makes a list of its open source solutions

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The European Commission is about to make a public inventory of the open source solutions used by the Commission and the European Parliament. A methodology for creating the inventory was just accepted by the EC’s Directorate-General for Informatics (DIGIT), as part of its ‘EU Free and Open Source Software Auditing’ (EU-Fossa) project.

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A beginner's bumpy journey to find a few good bugs

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I'd been trying to contribute to open source for about two years. Yes. Two years. And there's one thing I can tell you with a lot of certainty—it is intimidating. It's tough to get started. You have to learn how to work within a large code base. You have to learn and adhere to a project's coding style guides. Nothing makes sense: the control flow, how different modules interact, how and why the code is organized the way it is—it's all one big maze. You need to muster a lot of courage to ask questions, dive into the code base knowing next to nothing, and keep fighting with it. (This is a generalization about how some projects operate, but many have difficulty making their projects accessible to new contributors.)

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Overcoming language and distance barriers in open source projects

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Open source communities were among the first to use the Internet to make the physical distance between people irrelevant. The Internet is a great tool, since it helps us collaborate wherever we are. It doesn't matter if you're having lunch at the Eiffel Tower or waking up in sunny San Francisco, the Internet has helped us connect people on deeper levels.

I am from Peru, and have always lived in Peru. I study in Peru, and the Internet has helped me find valuable information for projects and life in general. However, when I joined the the Linux community, my life changed radically.

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#SoftwareFreedom: India’s Lukewarm Relationship with FOSS Needs to Change

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For a over decade, the third Saturday of every September has been celebrated as Software Freedom Day in dozens of countries around the world. The free and open source software (FOSS) movement, which grew in the 1980s out of frustrations with restrictions on use of copyrighted software, has changed considerably in the last decade. Barring a few exceptions, there has been a dilution in the focus on replacing Windows’ domination of mainstream computing. But FOSS, which some people may know as Linux, still forms the backbone of our technological lives. In developing countries like India, where scaling affordable access to technology is an admitted priority of the government, the promotion and adoption of FOSS seems to be a viable and pragmatic policy decision.

Whether one is aware of it or not, FOSS is behind the majority of all computing that makes modern, digital life possible. FOSS runs most of all smartphones, supercomputers, ATMs, servers and websites around the world. In India, two massive citizen-facing projects, our railway booking website IRCTC, and Aadhaar’s online infrastructure, use Linux servers too. But why should you care for FOSS?

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Leftovers: OSS

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  • Closed Source Engines are a Big Risk

    The two of us have spent our whole careers writing C++ and making engines (in fact, we'd both worked at Unity building the engine), so we thought we'd take a nice vacation from memory management and C++ and pick that one first.


    It's the black box nature that's most troublesome to me. With source code, it's still a huge codebase that's hard to parse and has plenty of problems, but at least I can hunt down my bugs.

  • Can Carriers Open Source New Biz Processes?

    One of the more telling moments of our NFV & Carrier SDN event here this week actually happened before the conference itself had formally started, at an Oracle-sponsored breakfast session Tuesday morning.

    Appearing on a panel with my Heavy Reading colleague Jim Hodges were Bill Walker, director of network architecture at CenturyLink Inc. (NYSE: CTL), and Paul Boland, managing partner, solutions at Verizon Enterprise Solutions . Sitting in the front row of the session was Tom Anschutz, distinguished member of technical staff at AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T) Services Inc., who would later deliver a keynote.

  • Getting ready for IBM Edge 2016
  • LibreOffice Conference 2016 – Brno, Czech Republic
  • What's next for Apache OpenOffice

    Concerns about the viability of the Apache OpenOffice (AOO) project are not new; they had been in the air for a while by the time LWN looked at the project's development activity in early 2015. Since then, though, the worries have grown more pronounced, especially after AOO's recent failure to produce a release with an important security fix nearly one year after being notified of the vulnerability. The result is an internal discussion on whether the project should be "retired," or whether it will find a way to turn its fortunes around.

    The current chair of the AOO project management committee (PMC) is Dennis Hamilton, whose term is set to end shortly. He has been concerned about the sustainability of the project for some time (see this message from one year ago, for example), a concern sharpened by the routine requirement that he report to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) board on the project's status. The board, seemingly, had asked few questions about the status of AOO until recently, when the handling of CVE-2016-1513 (or the lack thereof) came to its attention. Now the board is apparently asking some sharp questions indeed and requiring monthly (rather than every three months as usual) reports from the project. "Retirement" of the project, it seems, has been explicitly mentioned as a possibility.

  • Microsoft And Linux — A Song Of Mice And Ire
  • GraphHopper Provides Open Source Routing Solutions and Routing as a Service
  • Two Small Fundraisings – on gspell and LaTeXila

    I have a half-time job, and I care about Free Software. So the natural thing to do for me is to find ways to be funded for the contributions I do.

Libreboot Screwup and FSF

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  • Libreboot Screwup - 18 Sept 2016

    As one of the main "contributors" to the Libreboot project, I was contracted to work on two chipsets by Minifree.

    Given the recent kerfuffle, and in spite of my vested interest in wanting to continue being paid to continue this important work, I find it necessary to spell out a couple of facts I find important about the libreboot project and the libreboot community:

    1) I have recently noticed that Leah Rowe is the only person who has git commit access to the website,, and also the only person who has git commit access to the codebase, which has only become a problem recently.

    2) The codebase is a deblobbed coreboot repository, with patches from libreboot contributors (but committed by Leah), and a bunch of install scripts for ease of use.

    3) We (the contributors) are not consulted about any of the views expressed on the website when they are hastily published by Leah.

  • Free Software Foundation statement on 2016-09-16

    This morning, an open email circulated in which the author said that the Free Software Foundation ended a relationship with one of our employees for discriminatory reasons.

    Although it is our usual policy not to comment publicly on internal personnel matters for privacy reasons, we felt it necessary to state unequivocally that the allegations made in that email are untrue.

    It is part of our job to celebrate and improve the diversity of the free software world. We have strong anti-discrimination and anti-harassment policies to help provide a safe and supportive working environment. We uphold a safe space policy at all FSF events, and we provide scholarships to help people of different identities, and from different regions, attend. The FSF's mission is to defend the freedom of all computer users.

  • GNU Autoconf Noteworthy changes in release 2016.09.16
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