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4 notable open source projects at local maker faire

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OSS

The Rochester Mini Maker Faire is an annual event that takes place at the Joseph A. Floreano Riverside Convention Center in Rochester, NY. Each year, makers, creators, artists, and others from upstate New York and beyond show their crafts and creations to the community. Open source tools are popular at the Rochester Mini Maker Faire, where you'll find countless Raspberry Pis, Arduino boards, and open source-powered projects and creations.

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Best open source ecommerce software

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OSS

A solid ecommerce platform can help smooth out the whole shopping experience for your customers, from click, to cart to payment.

From massive corporations to sole traders, ecommerce platforms can meet the needs of most businesses, and those that don't are constantly improving operations to keep up with the fierce competition.

So, why go open source? If you want total control and absolute customisation, open source software lets you inspect, copy and alter that software to make the perfect package for you.

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Also: Pittsburgh Technology Council co-hosts xTuple Open Source ERP Roadshow

Open Source Software Is a 2017 Success Story

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OSS

As 2017 draws to a close, we look at some of the reasons why the use of open source software is growing and will continue to grow in the year ahead.

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Rising Thunder Source Code to be Released

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OSS
Gaming
  • Rising Thunder gets a second life as an open-source indie fighter

    When developer Radiant Entertainment announced that Riot Games had acquired it last year, the studio also revealed that it was shuttering its indie fighting game, Rising Thunder. But in a Reddit post today, Radiant unveiled Rising Thunder: Community Edition, a free, open-source version of the game that will be available in January 2018 for PC.

  • Canceled Fighting Game Rising Thunder Will Be Released With Online Play

    Rising Thunder was a big deal in the fighting game community when it was announced way back in 2015. It was in development at Radiant Entertainment, a studio led by fighting game legend Seth Killian and EVO Tournament co-founders Tom and Tony Cannon. After Radiant was bought by Riot Games in 2016, however, work on Rising Thunder shut down--but now, it looks like the game will live again.

  • Rising Thunder developers release source code for canceled indie fighting game

    Rising Thunder, the indie fighting game canceled in its alpha phase of development in 2016, will live on through one final build, with open-source server code, the game’s developers said today.

  • Cancelled fighter Rising Thunder and its server source code will be released for free

    Rising Thunder was a fighting game from Radiant Entertainment, built in part by FGC luminaries like Seth Killian and Evo founders Tom and Tony Cannon. It was to have all the depth of a traditional fighter, but with a simplified, infinitely more accessible control scheme, but was cancelled after Radiant were acquired by League of Legends developers Riot Games. Yet Rising Thunder is not gone, as the developers are releasing the final build of the game to the public.

  • Rising Thunder lives on with a free 'Community Edition' release next month

    Last year, Riot Games acquired Rising Thunder developer Radiant Entertainment. Following that move, the promising robot fighting game was never finished and the team shifted its resources toward another project. It was a bittersweet note to end on, but the story isn't over just yet.

The Open Source Funding Conundrum in 2018

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OSS

Over the years, I've watched first hand as enterprise-centric companies took open source technologies and found ways to make millions (and sometimes many millions) by providing trustworthy support. But what about those open source applications that lack enterprise level financial backing, how are the developers of these applications supposed to pay their bills?

In this article, I'm going to address one of the biggest issues facing those who want to see non-enterprise open source software - funding.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • How Open Source could Create 10x Better Circular Businesses

    Some people think it’s extremely complex and expensive to transition to a circular economy, especially at the scale and speed we need to solve the current problems related to food, energy, pollution, toxic chemicals, transportation, and climate change.

    Companies hold an important role, in moving from contributing to many of these environmental problems to solving them. But to devote resources to the circular economy, businesses need to justify to their boards that it will be financially beneficial over the long term to do so. And creating circular solutions sometimes feels like a barrier to profitability and convenience. If businesses can find new ways to work smarter, not harder, they can dramatically increase the chances of spreading a circular and profitable innovation. The key is sharing circular innovations in open source.

    [...]

    But simply putting an open source label isn’t a magic bullet. Creating and opening innovation documentation is an important start, but it’s only half the battle. An organisation can’t just hope others will follow. 

  • State and local government look for path to innovation with open source, cloud
  • Learn Guitar With This Clip-On Device and Open-Source App
  • Climate conditions affect solar cell performance more than expected
  • MIT’s Open Source Tool Predicts Solar Cell Performance per Location

    Ian Marius Peters, a co-author of the study and a research associate at the MIT Photovoltaics Research Laboratory, highlights the advantages of their tool – it’s free and accurate. “Tools used by developers to predict energy yields of solar panels and plan solar systems are often expensive and inaccurate. They’re inaccurate because they were developed for temperate climates like the United States, Europe, and Japan.”

  • Avast open sources reverse engineering decompiler RetDec

    Barely even featuring as an item on its press room pages, news has filtered out this week of Czech virus deerstalking firm Avast releasing its machine code decompiler RetDec to open source.

  • Open Source Software Has Unlimited Scenery, Testin Warning Three Major Challenges

    The 12th Open Source World Summit Forum opened in Beijing recently. Partner of Testin, Wang Jun participated and delivered a speech in the forum panel discussion. He talked about open source software and the great success it brings to the internet and mobile application.

Synopsys/Black Duck and Flexera Push FOSS FUD to Sell Their Products

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OSS

Containers and Kubernetes News

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Server
OSS
  • Containers lecture

    Whilst trying to introduce containers, the approach I've taken is to work up the history of Web site/server/app hosting from physical hosting and via Virtual Machines. This gives you the context for their popularity, but I find VMs are not the best way to explain container technology. I prefer to go the other way and look at a process on a multi-user system, the problems due to lack of isolation and steadily build up the isolation available with tools like chroot, etc.

  • As Kubernetes surged in popularity in 2017, it created a vibrant ecosystem

    Kubernetes is actually an open source project, originally developed at Google, which is managed by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Over the last year, we’ve seen some of the biggest names in tech flocking to the CNCF including AWS, Oracle, Microsoft and others, in large part because they want to have some influence over the development of Kubernetes.

  • Ops Checklist for Monitoring Kubernetes at Scale

    By design, the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is not self-monitoring, and a bare installation will typically only have a subset of the monitoring tooling that you will need. In a previous post, we covered the five tools for monitoring Kubernetes in production, at scale, as per recommendations from Kenzan.

  • Kubernetes 1.9 brings beta support for Windows apps

    Kubernetes, the cloud container orchestration program, expands even further and has grown more stable.

  • Kubernetes Linux Container Orchestration System Now Supports Windows Too

    Kubernetes, the open-source, production-grade container orchestration system for automating scaling, deployment, and management of containerized apps, has been updated to version 1.9.

    Coming two and a half months after version 1.8, Kubernetes 1.9 is here with a bunch of new features like the general availability of the Apps Workloads API (Application Programming Interface), which is enabled by default to provide long-running stateful and stateless workloads, as well as initial, beta support for Windows systems.

How to Market an Open Source Project

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Linux
OSS

The widely experienced and indefatigable Deirdré Straughan presented a talk at Open Source Summit NA on how to market an open source project. Deirdré currently works with open source at Amazon Web Services (AWS), although she was not representing the company at the time of her talk. Her experience also includes stints at Ericsson, Joyent, and Oracle, where she worked with cloud and open source over several years.

Through it all, Deirdré said, the main mission in her career has been to “help technologies grow and thrive through a variety of marketing and community activities.” This article provides highlights of Deirdré’s talk, in which she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects.

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Liberated Linux Drivers Help AMD 'Transparency'

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Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS
  • AMD Navi spotted in Linux drivers

    The architecture name is hidden under SUPER_SECRET codename. Normally we would be seeing the real name of the GPU, but AMD is likely trying to avoid generating hype for architecture which is still months away (I heard something about late 2018), hence the secret.

  • AMD’s next-gen GPU has been spotted in Linux drivers

    With AMD’s RX Vega now out and about, it is time to start looking towards the future. We’ve known for some time that Vega will be followed up by ‘Navi’ at some point between 2018 and 2020. Now, we know that progress is being made as AMD’s next-gen GPU has appeared in a new driver.

  • AMD's Next Gen Navi GPU Architecture Found Referenced In Linux Drivers

    This has been a big year for AMD, there is no doubt about that. Having launched a new CPU and GPU architectures (Zen and Vega, respectively), the company thrust itself back into relevancy in the high-end market, whereas previously the top shelf was the exclusive domain of rival Intel. So, what's next? On the GPU side, AMD is expected to roll out its Navi architecture sometime next year, with references to its next generation GPU already showing up in driver code.

  • AMD 7nm “Super Secret” Navi GPU Spotted In Driver, 2H 2018 Launch Expected

    AMD’s upcoming next generation 7nm based graphics architecture code named “Navi” has been spotted in Linux driver code. The all new GPU architecture is officially slated to debut next year, with all whispers indicating a debut in the latter half of the year.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more