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OSS

Experts: ‘Swedish govt. cloud should use open source’

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OSS

The key IT principles for Sweden’s government cloud services should be vendor-independence, open standards and open source, experts recommend. On Tuesday, the government shared service centre (Statens servicecenter, SSC) published an advisory report, containing the opinions of management at government data centres. Sweden’s public administrations would profit immensely from national, reliable and secure cloud services, these experts agree.

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‘Open Source’ Is Now a Word?

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“Open source” is now officially a word according to Merriam-Webster, according to my good friends at Ars Technica. Actually, I don’t know anybody at Ars Technica, but whenever you’re stealing news from another news source, you’re traditionally allowed to refer to everyone who works there as “my good friends.” The theory is that if they think you’re a friend of theirs, they won’t sue you.

I say “according to Ars” because I can’t find proof anywhere that “open source” was indeed just added to the dictionary, as it’s not included as an example in the article my good friends at Merriam-Webster posted announcing the introduction of 1,000 new words on Tuesday. Or, if it’s there, the “find” function on my browser couldn’t find it, which would be really strange since the browser is designed and built by my good friends at Google.

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How to Manage the Security Vulnerabilities of Your Open Source Product

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Interviews
OSS

The security vulnerabilities that you need to consider when developing open source software can be overwhelming. Common Vulnerability Enumeration (CVE) IDs, zero-day, and other vulnerabilities are seemingly announced every day. With this flood of information, how can you stay up to date?

“If you shipped a product that was built on top of Linux kernel 4.4.1, between the release of that kernel and now, there have been nine CVEs against that kernel version,” says Ryan Ware, Security Architect at Intel, in the Q&A below. “These all would affect your product despite the fact they were not known at the time you shipped.”

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Linux and FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS
  • DevConf.cz 2017

    Another edition of DevConf.cz took place last week. It was already the second edition I didn’t organize. This year, I was involved in the organization even less, just helping with the program and serving as a session chair for one day. So I could enjoy the conference more than ever before.

  • PyLadies Pune Meetup - February 2016

    The PyLadies Pune February Meetup was held on 6th Feb at reserved-bit. Kushal took a session on MicroPython on the MicroBit boards. Thanks to @ntoll for sending over the MicroBits for workshops.

  • PyCon India 2016

    Heya! First of all I’m really sorry for such a delay with PyCon India 2016 blog post.

  • Using Mesos to Drive Devops Adoption at Scale at GSShop
  • From Yawn-Driven Deployment to DevOps Tipping Point

    GS Shop is one of the largest TV shopping networks in Asia, and one of the largest e-commerce sites in Korea with more than 1000 employees and 1.5 million users daily. Vivek Juneja of GS Shop's Container Platform Team, at MesosCon Asia 2016, shares how he and his team moved this behemoth to the new agile way of running the datacenter.

    We know that change is not easy, and Juneja shares many valuable insights in how to successfully manage completely revamping your IT department. Progress is hard even when the old way is difficult. Juneja describes their old practice of "yawn-driven deployment": "We practice something called Yawn-Driven Deployment, deploying at 3:00 a.m. That's what we were doing for a long time. Everybody gets together at 3:00 a.m. It's a party. We deploy, and we have a lot of yawns, and that code goes to production." Nobody really like working this way, but it's what they are used to.

  • Redox OS, MINIX, Hurd & Genode Had Their Time At FOSDEM Too

    While Linux is the most prominent operating system each year at the Free Open-Source Developers' European Meeting (FOSDEM), it's not a conference limited to just Linux. Once again there was a developer room dedicated to other operating systems like the Rust-written Redox OS.

  • FOSDEM 2017 is finished...

    One big job that needs to happen after the conference is to review and release the video recordings that were made. With several hundreds of videos to be checked and only a handful of people with the ability to do so, review was a massive job that for the past three editions took several months; e.g., in 2016 the last video work was done in July, when the preparation of the 2017 edition had already started.

  • [diaspora] The state of diaspora* and the decentralized social world

    The decentralized social world is on. It's been four years since the project was transferred to its community. Discover with us what we accomplished and where we'd like to go.

  • My BSD sucks less than yours

    Instead of speaking about successful parts of the projects, this talk will focus on the weakness of both OpenBSD and FreeBSD, exploring conceptual differences between them and also exploring directions where motivated contributors can start working on to improve the projects. While being general purpose operating systems we will see that one size doesn't fit all and how one or the other may be a better solution to a particular problem. Trolls are to be left at the door.

Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS

OSS in the Back End

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Server
OSS

Kodi 17 Krypton Open-Source Media Center Officially Released, Here's What's New

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OSS

The Kodi team proudly announced today, February 5, 2017, the general availability of the final release of the Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center for Linux, Android, macOS, iOS, and Windows.

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Also: Kodi 17 Released With New Default Skin, Better Live TV Support

LibreELEC 8.0 Is Just Around the Corner, Now Based on Final Kodi 17 "Krypton"

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Opening up ECOMP: Our Network Operating System for SDN

    Harmonizing SDN and NFV technologies benefits all communications industry members. It takes unnecessary friction out of the system. It gives service providers more control of their network services. It also enables both developers and operators to create effective services at speeds never before possible.

  • TM Forum finds lack of ‘glue’ challenging telecom’s open source efforts

    Has the rash of new open source-focused organizations hindered the deployment of open source solutions or is it just a lack of cohesion?

    One issue facing the telecommunication industry’s move towards greater use of open source software platforms is the dizzying array of organizations that have sprung up over the past couple of years focused on trying to help that transition. While the help is appreciated, it would seem that too much help could be confusing the process.

  • LibreOffice 5.3.0 Released and Available via PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
  • LibreOffice 5.3 Released: The Biggest Release So Far

    Finally after a long waiting. The Document Foundation announced the release of LibreOffice 5.3. Which fairly can be considered a huge release full of updates and new features for the free office suite.

  • Freenas 10 Beta 2 released
  • [Older] [was paywalled] The trouble with FreeBSD

    Benno Rice, a member of the FreeBSD core team, might be expected to feel out of place at linux.conf.au, but it was not his first time there. While at the 2016 event in Geelong, he saw a presentation on Rust community automation [YouTube] by Emily Dunham and wondered: why can't FreeBSD have such nice things? The 2017 conference, held in Hobart, chose "the future of open source" as its theme but, Rice said, he was there to speak about the past; by looking at how FreeBSD ran into trouble, perhaps we can all learn something useful about how we run our projects.

    He got involved with open source in the 1990s; he actually started with Linux, but somebody told him that "Linux is rubbish" and he should use FreeBSD instead. So he bought an iMac computer and got FreeBSD running on it; the project then punished him by giving him commit access. It is a great project, but it does have some problems relating to three factors in particular: FreeBSD is big, it's old, and its leadership can be slow to act.

    How big is FreeBSD? The project's Subversion repository is currently about 3.1GB in size; a checked-out tree takes about 600MB. It consists of 71,100 files, about 32 million lines of code. It takes 20-30 minutes to build the whole thing, which is a big improvement from the old days, when it could take several hours.

  • [Video] Richard Stallman Explains Everything

    Richard Stallman, Founder and Leader of the free software movement, joins David to discuss his creation of the computer operating system "GNU"...

  • From free software to liberal software

    Robert M. "r0ml" Lefkowitz was the fourth and final keynote speaker at linux.conf.au 2017 in Hobart, Tasmania. He immediately served notice that his talk was going to differ from those of his predecessors; they offered "deep insightful questions", while he had answers. Also, the first three were nice people. What followed was an energetic event that left many in the audience wondering what they had just witnessed. The future of free and open-source software is grim, he said, but maybe we can make something better to replace it.

  • OGP unveils catalogue of open government tools

    The Open Government Partnership has published the OGP Toolbox, aggregating the digital tools developed and used by organisations across the globe to improve democracy and promote openness. So far, it lists 1,266 tools, 189 use cases and 515 organisations.

  • New Dataset: Five Years of Longitudinal Data from Scratch

    Scratch is a block-based programming language created by the Lifelong Kindergarten Group (LLK) at the MIT Media Lab. Scratch gives kids the power to use programming to create their own interactive animations and computer games. Since 2007, the online community that allows Scratch programmers to share, remix, and socialize around their projects has drawn more than 16 million users who have shared nearly 20 million projects and more than 100 million comments. It is one of the most popular ways for kids to learn programming and among the larger online communities for kids in general.

  • GitLab.com luckily found lost data on a staging server

    GitLab.com, the wannabe GitHub alternative that yesterday went down hard and reported data loss, has confirmed that some data is gone but that its services are now operational again.

    The incident did not result in Git repos disappearing. Which may be why the company's PR reps characterised the lost data as “peripheral metadata that was written during a 6-hour window”. But in a a prose account of the incident, GitLab says “issues, merge requests, users, comments, snippets, etc.” were lost. The Register imagines many developers may not be entirely happy with those data types being considered peripheral to their efforts.

Events: WikiToLearn India, FOSDEM 2017, MesosCon

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OSS
  • A look back at the WikiToLearn India conference, 2017

    The first ever WikiToLearn India conference was a 2 day single track event held on the 18th and 19th of January, 2017 in Jaipur, India. The event welcomed talks from all domains of technology, but admittedly, talks around KDE and MediaWiki were preferred.

  • Almost at FOSDEM. Video volunteers?

    The Desktops DevRoom will be a blast again this year. While I have been in charge of it for 6? years already, the last two (since my twins) were born I had organized remotely and local duties were carried on by the Desktops DevRoom team (thank you Christophe Fergeau, Philippe Caseiro and others!).

  • Kube at FOSDEM 2017

    I haven’t talked about it much, but the last few months we’ve been busy working on Kube and we’re slowly closing in on a first tech preview.

  • Share Apache Mesos Best Practices, Lessons Learned, and More at MesosCon Events in 2017

    MesosCon is an annual conference held in three locations around the globe and organized by the Apache Mesos community in partnership with The Linux Foundation. The events bring together users and developers of the open source orchestration framework to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem.

    The MesosCon program committee is now seeking proposals from speakers with fresh ideas, enlightening case studies, best practices, or deep technical knowledge to share with the Apache Mesos community at MesosCon North America, Asia, and Europe in 2017.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Is there need for Red Hat Certification training in Zimbabwe?
    A local institution is investigating the need to train Systems Administrators/Engineers who use Linux towards Red Hat certifications. The course is targeted at individuals with at least 2 years experience using Linux.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) By The Numbers: Valuation in Focus
  • Fedora @ Konteh 2017 - event report
    This year we managed to get a booth on a very popular student job fair called Konteh. (Thanks to Boban Poznanovic, one of the event managers)
  • Fedora 26 Alpha status is NO-GO
    The result of the second Fedora 26 Alpha Go/No-Go Meeting is NO-GO. Due to blockers found during the last days [1] we have decided to delay the Fedora 26 Alpha release for one more week. There is going to be one more Go/No-Go meeting on the next Thursday, March 30th, 2017 at 17:00 UTC to verify we are ready for the release.
  • Fedora 26 Alpha Faces Another Delay
    Fedora 26 was set back by a delay last week and today it's been delayed again for another week. Fedora 26 Alpha has been delayed for another week when at today's Go/No-Go meeting it was given a No-Go status due to outstanding blocker bugs.

GNOME News: Gtef, GNOME 3.24 Release Video, Epiphany 3.24

  • Gtef 2.0 – GTK+ Text Editor Framework
    Gtef is now hosted on gnome.org, and the 2.0 version has been released alongside GNOME 3.24. So it’s a good time for a new blog post on this new library.
  • GNOME's GTK Gets Gtef'ed
    Developer Sébastien Wilmet has provided an overview of Gtef with this text editing framework having been released in tandem with GNOME 3.24. Gtef provides a higher level API to make it easier for text editing or in developer-focused integrated development environments.
  • The Official GNOME 3.24 Release Video Is Here
    By now you’re probably well aware that a new update to the GNOME desktop has been released — and if you’re not, where’ve you been?! GNOME 3.24 features a number of neat new features, welcome improvements, and important advances, most of which we’ve documented in blog posts during the course of this week.
  • A Web Browser for Awesome People (Epiphany 3.24)
    Are you using a sad web browser that integrates poorly with GNOME or elementary OS? Was your sad browser’s GNOME integration theme broken for most of the past year? Does that make you feel sad? Do you wish you were using an awesome web browser that feels right at home in your chosen desktop instead? If so, Epiphany 3.24 might be right for you. It will make you awesome. (Ask your doctor before switching to a new web browser. Results not guaranteed. May cause severe Internet addiction. Some content unsuitable for minors.)

today's howtos

AMDGPU Vega Patches and AMD Open-Sources Code

  • More AMDGPU Vega Patches Published
    Less than one week after AMDGPU DRM Vega support was published along with the other Vega enablement patches for the Linux driver stack, more Direct Rendering Manager patches are being shot out today.
  • AMD have announced 'Anvil', an MIT-licensed wrapper library for Vulkan
    AMD are continuing their open source push with 'Anvil' a new MIT-licenses wrapper library for Vulkan. It's aim is to reduce the time developers spend to get a working Vulkan application.
  • AMD Open-Sources Vulkan "Anvil"
    While waiting for AMD to open-source their Vulkan Linux driver, we have a new AMD open-source Vulkan project to look at: Anvil. Anvil is a project out of AMD's GPUOpen division and aims to be a wrapper library for Vulkan to make it easier to bring-up new Vulkan applications/games. Anvil provides C++ Vulkan wrappers similar to other open-source Vulkan projects while also adding in some extra features.