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OSS

Blockchain and FOSS

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • R3 Finally Open Sources Blockchain Project, Admits Budget Difficulty

    One major criticism on private Blockchain development initiatives led by banks and financial institutions has been the ambiguity in the coding language and structure of permissioned ledgers. The R3 Consortium is attempting to neutralize it by open sourcing its technology.

    R3 Corda, a private Blockchain platform specifically developed for financial establishments with massive transactional volumes by R3CEV, is officially rendered open source by the consortium after over 70 of its member financial institutions came to a consensus in setting a standard for the Blockchain technology.

  • Blockchain-Fueled Open-Source P2P Energy Trading System Wins Energy Hackathon

    Following a weekend of solution seeking, collaboration and competition, the highlight of the Hackenergy 2016 event was a blockchain-fueled peer-to-peer (P2P) energy trading system called EcoCoin, which grabbed top honors.

The basics of open source quality assurance

Filed under
OSS

Open source depends on a sustainable community to develop code rapidly, debug code effectively, and build out new features. Because community involvement is voluntary, people's skills, levels of involvement, and time commitments can vary. Given the variable nature of these factors, along with the fact that open source often relies on a philosophy of "release early, release often," quality assurance can be become challenging.

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Open Source CMS Pros and Cons - a Developer's Perspective

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OSS

The phrase "Open Source CMS" lingers in the minds and hearts of many developers. CMSes are today's talk of the Internet, and you won't miss the discussion in local schools and private offices either. I don't remember for how long I have used Open Source Content Management Systems (CMS) to manage local and international websites. However, I have implemented CMS-based solutions long enough, and I can tell you from experience these tools did become the big digital craze for many professional reasons.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • The Open Source Way

    "Open source", in the world of IT, is program code that is meant for collaboration and open contribution. Intended to be modified and shared, because by design and spirit, it is meant for the public at large.

    It’s been said that “"open source" intimates a broader set of values—what we call "the open source way." Open source projects, products, or initiatives embrace and celebrate principles of open exchange, collaborative participation, rapid prototyping, transparency, meritocracy, and community-oriented development.” So it is a natural conclusion that in this age of open and transparent government, that the government IT manager or technician would be one of the first to want to embrace this new role of collaborative team member within a larger community.

  • Another rift in the open source BPM market: @FlowableBPM forks from @Alfresco Activiti

    In early 2013, Camunda – at the time, a value-added Activiti consulting partner as well as a significant contributor to the open source project – created a fork from Activiti to form what is now the Camunda open source BPM platform as well as their commercial version based on the open source core.

  • Pydio, an Open Source File Sharing and Sync Solution, Out in New Version

    If you've followed us here at OStatic, you've probably seen our coverage of open source file sharing, cloud and synchronization tools. For example, we've covered ownCloud and Nextcloud extensively.

    Not so many people know about Pydio, though, which is out in a new version Pydio7. It's an open source file sharing & sync solution that now has a host of new features and performance upgrades. It's worth downloading and trying.

    Through a new partnership with Collabora Productivity (the LibreOffice Cloud provider), Pydio7 now combines file sharing, document editing and online collaboration. Users can now not only access documents online, but also co-author new content and work collaboratively.

  • Chrome 55 Beta: Input handling improvements and async/await functions

    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.

  • Chrome 55 Beta Brings Async/Await To JavaScript

    Google is ending this week by rolling out the Chrome/Chromium 55 web-browser beta.

    Chrome 55 Beta brings support for the async and await keywords to JavaScript for Promise-based JavaScript coding. Great to see them finally improving the asynchronous JS support.

  • Open-Source Innovations Driving Demand for Hadoop

    AtScale, provider of BI (Business Intelligence) on Hadoop, has released its study titled "The Business Intelligence Benchmark for SQL-on-Hadoop engines," which is a performance test of BI workloads on Hadoop. The report also studies the strengths and weaknesses of Hive, Presto, Impala and Spark SQL, which are the most popular analytical engines for Hadoop.

  • Microsoft CEO Offers SQL Server for Linux Update [Ed: bad idea to use it [1, 2]]
  • New SafariSeat wheelchairs made from bicycle parts help East Africans roam rough terrain
  • SafariSeat, an Open Source Wheelchair for Rural Offroading

    If you’re disabled in a poorly developed part of the world, even a great modern wheelchair may be next to useless. What’s needed is a more off-road design that’s made to be easy to manufacture and repair than something built for a city with sidewalks.

    SafariSeat is a newly designed open-source wheelchair that hopes to make a big impact for disabled people the world over. It uses push bars for power and has large front wheels and small rear ones to easily roll over large objects.

    In a novel move, the designers included a moving seat that shifts bit every time you push the bars to help prevent pressure sores on the butt.

  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween

    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing techniques.

Renesas spins 3rd Gen automotive starter kits, adds new M3 SoC

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Renesas has launched two Linux-ready R-Car starter kits optimized for AGL and GENIVI: an R-Car H3 based “Premier” and a “Pro” with a lower-end M3 SoC.

Later this month, Renesas will begin selling two third-generation starter kits for its 64-bit ARM-based R-Car automotive SoCs. The kits are designed for ADAS, infotainment, reconfigurable digital clusters, and integrated digital cockpits.

The two kits are optimized for open source Linux standards like Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) and GENIVI, but they also support QNX. Earlier R-Car automotive starter kits include last year’s R-Car H2 ADAS Starter Kit, based on its earlier H2 automotive SoC.

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EU-Fossa project submits results of code audits

Filed under
GNU
OSS

The European Commission’s ‘EU Free and Open Source Software Auditing’ project (EU-Fossa) has sent its code review results to the developers of Apache HTTP server target and KeePass. The audit results are not yet made public, however, no critical vulnerabilities were found.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Google’s Open Source Report Card Highlights Game-Changing Contributions

    Ask people about Google’s relationship to open source, and many of them will point to Android and Chrome OS — both very successful operating systems and both based on Linux. Android, in particular, remains one of the biggest home runs in open source history. But, as Josh Simmons from Google’s Open Source Programs Office will tell you, Google also contributes a slew of useful open source tools and programs to the community each year. Now, Google has issued its very first “Open Source Report Card,” as announced by Simmons on the Google Open Source Blog.

    "We're sharing our first Open Source Report Card, highlighting our most popular projects, sharing a few statistics and detailing some of the projects we've released in 2016. We've open sourced over 20 million lines of code to date and you can find a listing of some of our best known project releases on our website," said Simmons.

  • Nino Vranešič: Open Source Advocate and Mozilla Rep in Slovenia

    “My name is Nino Vranešič and I am connecting IT and Society,” is what Nino says about himself on LinkedIn. The video is a little hard to understand in places due to language differences and (we think) a slow or low-bandwidth connection between the U.S.-based Zoom servers and Eastern Europe, a problem that crops up now and then in video conversation and VOIP phone calls with people in that part of the world, no matter what service you choose. But Vranešič is worth a little extra effort to hear, because it’s great to learn that open source is being used in lots of government agencies, not only in Slovenia but all over Europe. And aside from this, Vranešič himself is a tres cool dude who is an ardent open source volunteer (“Mozilla Rep” is an unpaid volunteer position), and I hope I have a chance to meet him F2F next time he comes to a conference in Florida — and maybe you’ll have a chance to meet him if he comes to a conference near you.

  • MySQL and database programming for beginners

    Dave Stokes has been using MySQL for more than 15 years and has served as its community manager since 2010. At All Things Open this year, he'll give a talk about database programming for newbies with MySQL.

    In this interview, he previews his talk and shares a few helpful resources, required skills, and common problems MySQL beginners run into.

  • Nadella's trust talk is just so much hot air

    Microsoft chief executive Satya Nadella appears to have an incredibly short memory. Else he would be the last person who talks about trust being the most pressing issue in tech in our times.

    Over the last year, we have been treated to a variety of cheap tricks by Microsoft, attempting to hoodwink Windows users left, right and centre in order to get them to upgrade to Windows 10. After that, talking about trust sounds odd. Very odd.

    Microsoft does not have the best reputation among tech companies. It is known for predatory practices, for being convicted as a monopolist, and in recent times has been trying to cultivate a softer image as a company that is not as rapacious as it once was.

    That has, in large measure, come about as its influence and rank in the world of computing have both slipped, with other companies like Apple, Facebook and Google coming to dominate.

  • If you wish, you may rebuild all dports to use non-base SSL library of your choice
  • DragonFlyBSD Continues LibreSSL Push, OpenSSL To Be Dropped

    DragonFlyBSD is now defaulting to LibreSSL throughout its operating system stack and is planning to completely remove OpenSSL in the near future.

    Last month DragonFlyBSD began using LibreSSL by default while that effort has continued. OpenSSL is no longer being built by default and in about one month's time the OpenSSL support will be completely stripped from the DragonFly tree.

  • Ranking the Web With Radical Transparency

    Ranking every URL on the web in a transparent and reproducible way is a core concept of the Common Search project, says Sylvain Zimmer, who will be speaking at the upcoming Apache: Big Data Europe conference in Seville, Spain.

    The web has become a critical resource for humanity, and search engines are its arbiters, Zimmer says. However, the only search engines currently available are for-profit entities, so the Common Search project is creating a nonprofit engine that is open, transparent, and independent.

    We spoke with Zimmer, who founded Jamendo, dotConferences, and Common Search, to learn more about why nonprofit search engines are important, why Apache Spark is such a great match for the job, and some of the challenges the project faces.

  • A look inside the 'blinky flashy' world of wearables and open hardware

    While looking at the this year's All Things Open event schedule, a talk on wearables and open hardware caught my eye: The world of the blinky flashy. Naturally, I dug deeper to learn what it was all about.

  • Why Perl is not use for new development , most of time use for maintenance and support projects ?

    There has been a tendency amongst some companies to play a “wait and see” attitude towards Perl, but the Perl market appears to have stabilized in the past couple of years and more companies appear to be returning to Perl. As one of our clients explained to me when I asked why they chose Perl “We’re tired of being bitten by hype.”

Blockchain and FOSS

Filed under
OSS

Linux/FOSS Events

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • FOSDEM Desktops DevRoom 2016 all for Participation

    FOSDEM is one of the largest (5,000+ hackers!) gatherings of Free Software contributors in the world and happens each February in Brussels (Belgium, Europe).

    Once again, one of the tracks will be the Desktops DevRoom (formerly known as “CrossDesktop DevRoom”), which will host Desktop-related talks.

    We are now inviting proposals for talks about Free/Libre/Open-source Software on the topics of Desktop development, Desktop applications and interoperability amongst Desktop Environments. This is a unique opportunity to show novel ideas and developments to a wide technical audience.

  • LatinoWare

    Yesterday, Wednesday 19 oct, was the first day of LatinoWare thirteen edition hosted in the city of Foz do Iguaçu in Parana state with presence of 5155 participants and temperature of 36ºC. Currently this is the biggest event of free software in Brazil.

  • Attending a FUDcon LATAM 2016

    From my experience I will share my days at FUDcon 2016 held on Puno last week. There were 3 core days, and 2 more days to visit around.

OpenStack in the Headlines

Filed under
Server
OSS
  • Mirantis and NTT Com Double Down on OpenStack

    Mirantis continues to drive forward with new partnerships focused on the OpenStack cloud computing platform. The company and NTT Communications Corporation (NTT Com) have announced that they will partner to offer fully managed Private OpenStack as a service in NTT Com Enterprise Cloud and its data center services across the globe. NTT Com, in becoming Mirantis’ first data center services partner, says it will offer Mirantis Managed OpenStack on NTT Com Enterprise Cloud’s Metal-as-a-Service.

  • Using metrics effectively in OpenStack development

    At the OpenStack summit taking place this month in Barcelona, Ildikó Váncsa will be speaking on metrics in her talk Metrics: Friends or Enemies? She will discuss OpenStack metrics and how they can be used in software development processes, both for the individual developer and manager.

    I caught up with Ildikó before her talk to learn more about how metrics in OpenStack help guide developers and companies, and how they also drive evolution of the OpenStack community itself.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.