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OSS

Quali Courts DevOps Community with Open Source Plugins and Libraries

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OSS

Quali hopes to forge stronger connections with the developer community by contributing plugins for its DevOps cloud sandbox platform as open source code, a move the company announced today.

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MIT Media Lab makes open source the default

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OSS

MIT Media Lab has declared open source to be the preferred software licensing model for its projects. According to Joichi Ito, Director of the renowned interdisciplinary research laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the academic institution can achieve greater impact by sharing its work.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Horizon wants to put all your games into one, open-source launcher

    I really hope non-profit developer LaunchHorizon can pull it off, because having all my games in one open-source application would be great.

  • Deeplearning4j founders on growing an AI community

    Deeplearning4j is an open source, distributed neural net library written for Java and Scala. It is also one of the most active communities on Gitter, the chat service I created. Interested in how they built a thriving open source community, I reached out to get their thoughts on the lessons they learned.

  • 5 open source home automation tools

    The Internet of Things isn't just a buzzword, it's a rapidly expanding reality.

    With an ever-expanding number of devices available to help you automate, protect, and monitor your home, it has never before been easier nor more tempting to try your hand at home automation. Whether you're looking to control your HVAC system remotely, integrate a home theater, protect your home from theft, fire, or other threats, reduce your energy usage, or just control a few lights, there are countless devices available at your disposal.

  • So Your Router Is Skynet – A Layman’s Guide

    By now, most of you are aware that TP-Link has decided to ban (custom) open-source firmware for their devices. So what was TP-Link thinking when they turned their backs on flashing routers with custom firmware? Some might suggest it’s the ambiguity in the new FCC rules that put a now much disliked router vendor over the edge. Unfortunately, the truth of the matter has nothing to do with TP-Link. No, the networking device company was merely a diversion for what I’m about to share with you.

  • Router Company Lazily Blocks Open Source Router Firmware, Still Pretends To Value 'Creativity'

    Last fall, you might recall that the hardware tinkering community (and people who just like to fully use the devices they pay for) was up in arms over an FCC plan to lock down third-party custom firmware. After tinkering enthusiasts claimed the FCC was intentionally planning to prevent them from installing third-party router options like DD-WRT and Open-WRT, we asked the FCC about the new rules and were told that because modified routers had been interfering with terrestrial doppler weather radar (TDWR) at airports, the FCC wanted to ensure that just the radio portion of the router couldn't be modified.

  • UCLA researchers develop sophisticated open-source program for analyzing thyroid health

    UCLA researchers have developed a software program that simulates the response of the human thyroid hormone regulation system to a variety of treatments and diseases. The open-source program, Thyrosim, can be used by clinicians, researchers and educators to accurately gauge the impacts of thyroid treatments and to develop more effective remedies for thyroid problems.

    The research appears on the cover of the peer-reviewed journal Thyroid.

    Principal investigator Joseph DiStefano III, a distinguished professor of computer science and medicine and chair of the UCLA Computational and Systems Biology Interdepartmental Program, developed the technology based on 50 years of research with his students.

  • Google's Lanai Backend Merged Into LLVM

    Last month Google engineers posted patches to LLVM for "Lanai", an in-house (apparently network/communications oriented) processor as they were looking to upstream the code.

  • Tech Tuesday: Students taking on industry giants in open source reservoir challenge
  • 10 places to get free 3d printing files

    Well like I said in my last post, 3d printing isn’t only to print Eiffel Towers, and Thigiverse isn’t the only website that you can find 3d models to print.

  • How one programmer broke the internet by deleting a tiny piece of code

    A man in Oakland, California, disrupted web development around the world last week by deleting 11 lines of code.

    The story of how 28-year-old Azer Koçulu briefly broke the internet shows how writing software for the web has become dependent on a patchwork of code that itself relies on the benevolence of fellow programmers. When that system breaks down, as it did last week, the consequences can be vast and unpredictable.

LibrePlanet and Software Livre 2016

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OSS
  • LibrePlanet begins with Snowden, ends with DRM protest

    LibrePlanet is a yearly gathering of free software activists, users, and contributors—and, it's my favorite conference of the year. Here's why.

    LibrePlanet is run by the Free Software Foundation, and has steadily evolved from a yearly members' meeting with presentations from staff and board members, to a full blown two-day conference with speakers and attendees from all over the world. The event brings people who care about free software together to talk about the future of the movement, address current challenges, and celebrate successes.

  • Workshop de Software Livre 2016 – call for papers and tools

    The call for papers and call for tools for the WSL – Workshop de Software Livre (Workshop on Free Software), the academic conference held together with FISL – Fórum Internacional de Software Livre (International Free Software Forum) is open!

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Top 11 project management tools for 2016

    For the last three years, I have rounded up the most popular open source project management tools for Opensource.com readers. As there continues to be major reader interest in this area, I decided to take a look back at the tools we covered in 2014 and 2015, and give you updates on all of these projects. I looked to see which projects had new releases, notable new and improved features, and more.

    Let's take a look at each of these projects and try to answer some of the questions readers have had in the comments of last year's edition, including which are still in active development, provide hosting options, offer a mobile solution, and more.

  • Google to remove Chrome app launcher for Windows, Linux and Mac
  • Google Chrome app launcher to retire from Mac, Windows and Linux
  • Google will retire Chrome app launcher: Here’s why

    Google has announced that it will retire its Chrome app launcher. The company said that since Windows, Mac and Linux users prefer to launch their apps from within Chrome, it is discontinuing the app launcher.

  • Vulkano: Pairing Rust With Vulkan
  • Citus 5.0 database goes open source with PostgreSQL push; offers scalable, real-time analytics
  • 8 challenges for improving the Indian-language Wikipedias

    After more than 10 years in existence, the Indian-language Wikipedias still are not known to many Indian language speakers. Wikipedia became the largest encyclopedia in history as a result of thousands of volunteer editors. Whereas native-language Wikipedias are becoming game changers in other corners of the world, the scenario in India is skewed.

  • Universities seek open-source solution to ‘absurd’ textbook prices

    Rajiv Jhangiani grew accustomed to the emails he would receive from his students at the start of each semester:

    “Is a previous edition OK?”

    “Do I really need the textbook?”

    The psychology instructor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University saw an increasing number of students attempting to go without the $150-$250 textbooks he was assigning for his courses, so he decided to stop assigning them.

    “I think it’s absurd, really,” Jhangiani said. “Every two-to-three years we get new editions which are basically cosmetic in terms of the changes that they have, and students are forced to spend a lot of money.”

  • The Onion Omega Carputer Can be Controlled via WiFi

    The Onion Omega, a curiously named ultra-tiny linux-based WiFi board, is a useful little device for everything Internet of Things related. [Daniel] decided to use it to connect his car to the internet.

    Most new cars these days have remote start built in, and slowly, manufacturers are catching up to modern technology and including apps to control various features of their vehicles. But for old cars, there’s not much you can do aside from after-market remote start kits and the likes.

  • Open source OBD-II Adapter

    Automotive diagnostics have come a long way since the “idiot lights” of the 1980s. The current version of the on-board diagnostics (ODB) protocol provides real time data as well as fault diagnostics, thanks to the numerous sensors connected to the data network in the modern vehicle. While the hardware interface is fairly standardized now, manufacturers use one of several different standards to encode the data. [Alex Sidorenko] has built an open source OBD-II Adapter which provides a serial interface using the ELM327 command set and supports all OBD-II standards.

  • Software spat raises open source questions

    If your company uses Node.js, you may have suffered a shock this past week. A critical software package in the open source code base that many Node.js applications rely on suddenly disappeared. The problem was quickly rectified, but it caused problems for many users – and belies a fundamental problem with open source software.

    The problem arose when Azer Koçulu, the developer of the Kik software module, was approached by lawyers working for a company of the same name. They wanted him to unpublish his module because the name infringed on theirs, they said. Koçulu refused, so they approached a company called NPM Inc.

  • Interoperability implementation and monitoring across Europe in 2015: main trends.

    As the majority of European countries have taken into account the European Interoperability Framework (EIF) in their National Interoperability Frameworks (NIFs), the NIFO Observatory focuses its 2015 update on the implementation and monitoring aspects.

  • Security advisories for Monday

Linux and FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Big Data

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OSS

Free Tech Refresher: OSS Isn’t Always FOSS

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GNU
Linux
OSS

Without a doubt, both Microsoft and Oracle are open source companies. What they are not, and probably can never become, are FOSS companies, because that requires a commitment to the concepts behind software freedom. There’s not a bone in either companies bodies — if corporations can be said to have bodies — that is in any way sympathetic to free tech. Even while obeying the open source precept to “share and share alike,” both companies are only concerned with expanding their bases of power and ownership of tech, and in Microsoft’s case at least, much of their open source software is designed solely for that purpose.

These are distinctions which need articulating, not only so we don’t seem like we’re never happy crybabies, but so that younger users of open source software can come to see the difference between FOSS, on the one hand, and OSS, on the other, and that while one is always the other, the other is not always the one.

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Red Hat’s Open-Source Success Points to Other Investing Options

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Red Hat
OSS

Common sense dictates that making open-source software, where the original code can be modified by anyone and freely distributed, doesn't seem like a sound business decision. After all, competitors could freely use code to create products. The success of Red Hat Software (RHT - Get Report) proves otherwise.

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Open Source in the enterprise: Perspectives for CIOs

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OSS

The proliferation of OSS technologies, libraries, and frameworks in recent years has greatly contributed to the advancement of software development, increased developer productivity, and to the flexibility and customisation of the tools landscape to support different use cases and developers’ preferences.

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Wine 1.9.9

Six free open source alternatives to Windows 10: Chrome, Ubuntu, Solus and more, what's the best alternative to Windows OS?

Windows 10 has generally be viewed as a welcome successor to Windows 8, both by businesses and individuals. However it has also come under scrutiny from users that are concerned about data privacy. So why not opt for a free Windows 10 alternative? Read more

Yet another GTK+ update

GTK+ 3.20 was released a while ago; we’re up to 3.20.3 now. As I tried to explain in earlier posts here and here, this was a pretty active development cycle for GTK+. We landed a lot of of new stuff, and many things have changed. I’m using the neutral term changed here for a reason. How you view changes depends a lot on your perspective. Us, who implemented the changes, are of course convinced that they are great improvements. Others who maintain GTK+ themes or applications may have a different take, since changes often imply that they have to do work to adapt. Read more

Linux Kernel 3.4.112 LTS Has Many PowerPC, x86, HFS, and HFS+ Improvements

A couple of days ago, kernel developer Zefan Li released the one hundred twelfth maintenance build of the long-term supported Linux 3.4 kernel series for stable GNU/Linux users. Read more